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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 01:29 pm:   

Details imminent.
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 01:05 pm:   

I alluded to an imminent announcement earlier in the week.

So here's the wordcount.

Today, 1402 words of "Emissaries from the Dead."

The last of the two words typed were, THE END.


122,250 words.




Yes, it's a novel.

This is a major freakin' breakthrough for me. I've developed a bit of
a reputation, among friends, colleagues, and readers, as a guy who simply CANNOT
finish a non-media novel. Over the years, I have started and drifted away from
several, including one mammoth dark fantasy that some who've read in excerpt
consider my own equivalent to LAST DANGEROUS VISIONS: a much-praised, much-delayed,
much-excused, but ultimately stalled project that most believe will never see
the light of day. A novel I could be proud of, that was my own creation and
not an echo of someone else's, remained my Holy Grail.

I'm afraid I developed a bit of a complex about it. I began to believe
that I could never do it. This despite the fact that I wrote two (crappy) novels
prior to my first fiction sale. This despite the many short stories and the
novellas and the four Spider-things produced on time and at a length substantially
greater than the projects required. My writing career had become the story of
a guy who simply could not finish what he started, and I'll admit that there
have been many times when I simply despaired of ever managing it. I was so paralyzed
by past history that I just didn't think it was ever going to happen.

Now I've finished this book, an insanely complex science fiction murder
mystery starring my heroine Andrea Cort (protagonist of my ANALOG novella, "Unseen
Demons").

I don't know whether it'll sell.

I naturally hope it does.

But cripes, that isn't even the issue.

The issue is this.

I CAN DO THIS TRICK.

And what a relief that is!

Hee! Hee! Hee!


(Immediate plans. Will spend next month going through the book, chapter by chapter,
tinkering. Will then send it to the agent who never actually expected to ever
receive any complete MS by me. And start a new one. Again: THAT was the whole
freakin' point.)
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Mastadge
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 01:11 pm:   

Congratulations!

So for those of us unfamiliar with your fiction, with which of your collections do you recommend starting? Which do you consider strongest?
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 01:50 pm:   

Depends. Which rings your chimes the most? Horror? SF? Fantasy? Or Farce?
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mastadge
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 02:27 pm:   

Out of that list, I'm partial to fantasy, but the quality of the stories is truly more important to me than their genre.

Also, I notice that you have a book from Five Star. I own only one book from them, but they seem to have pretty decent production values.
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 07:55 pm:   

Okay, Mastadge. Here you go.

AN ALIEN DARKNESS is a mixture of my science fiction and my fantasy. It includes a bunch of stories that got some attention, including "The Funeral March of the Marionettes" and "The Last Robot."

A DESPERATE DECAYING DARKNESS presents some of my horror and dark fantasy. It includes one of my favorites, a novella available nowhere else called "The Juggler." Also a couple of zombie stories and a tale called "Locusts," which is one of the nastier cover stories F & SF published during the Kris Rusch era.

VOSSOFF AND NIMMITZ is a bunch of very silly, farcical stories about a pair of inept space criminals. It is hardcover and fairly expensive; it looks like the planned paperback is not gonna happen until those who currently have the rights run out of time to act on it.

WITH STARS IN THEIR EYES is a collaborative collection with Jerry Oltion. The centerpiece is a long novella, "The Astronaut From Wyoming," written by both of us and a Hugo/Neb nominee. The collection is rounded out by several minor stories by each of us individually.

All of the above are from Wildside Press.

The Five Star book, TANGLED STRINGS, contains five long stories, most of them sf, including "Sunday Night Yams at Minnie and Earl's" and the previous Andrea Cort story, "Unseen Demons". There is one horror piece, a western.

I hate choosing between them. I'll admit to more affection for the first two books on this list. But TANGLED STRINGS has some of the better known pieces, including (I must confess) another reprint of "The Funeral March of the Marionettes," there so its immediate sequel, "The Tangled Strings of the Marionettes," will make more sense.

Beyond that, your mileage may vary. A-TC
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Bruce
Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2005 - 08:02 pm:   

Congratulations, AT...must feel good.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Friday, July 29, 2005 - 07:07 am:   

I'm extremely happy for you, Adam-Troy. I've experienced a very disheartening last year and a half in publishing myself, and I'm having to pull from the deeps to find the cajones to start a fresh project and force myself not to think about two years of beloved work maybe swirling down the camode. But I know I'll get going on something new, because I can't imagine not doing it. As our mutual friend Barry says, the love should sustain you (love of the work), because you can't count on anything else.

I'll certainly be looking forward to this book. Let me know, when the time comes, if you want to do a book event or two in New Orleans, and I'll set you up.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Saturday, July 30, 2005 - 07:46 am:   

Thanks, Andrew.

Coinkadinkally (to use a Ned Flanders phrase), I am now midway through BRIDE OF..., just passed the disastrous resurrection scene, and remain in suspense over whether our hero will succeed in tracking down, um, Richard.
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 - 07:46 am:   

Have finished BRIDE OF, and discovered the solution to the whodunnit.

You are a sick man.

And I really like the identity of the person who adopted Richard. How...ummm.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 - 10:24 am:   

Glad you enjoyed BRIDE, Adam-Troy. Please feel free to recommend the book to all your "sick" friends and relations! I'm looking forward to picking up TANGLED STRINGS in the near future, probably right after I'm done with Crescent City Con this weekend.
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 - 02:19 pm:   

Lemme know what you think.

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