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des lewis
Posted on Friday, July 27, 2007 - 01:49 pm:   

This book free - sent to you by surface mail: ONLY CONNECT by DF Lewis & Gordon Lewis
Cover: http://vaultofevil.suddenlaunch3.com/index.cgi?board=faves&action=display&num=11 80122920

All you need do is tell me on this thread which of these Elizabeth Bowen quotations you like the best and why - as shown here:
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320

There are currently over 50 separate postings on that blog each containing about 4 or 5 different quotes. Good searching and choosing.

Claim book here: bfitzworth@yahoo.co.uk
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Byron Bailey
Posted on Friday, July 27, 2007 - 08:37 pm:   

I'm on the case. This one may take a while. Most of the quotes are wonderful that I've read so far but they're a bit much to take in all at once. It might be easier if I do a batch at a time (4-5) and pick the best one from the batch. From the batch winners, I pick the overall "best."

des, my condolences on your father.
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, July 28, 2007 - 12:07 am:   

Thanks, Byron. I am also glad you're taking this project so conscientiously!
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Byron Bailey
Posted on Saturday, July 28, 2007 - 11:12 am:   

My favorite from batch 45 is:

"The most stubbornly or darkly drawn-in man has moments when he likes to impose himself, to emerge and be a bully. The diversion of a raindrop from its course down the pane, the frustration of a pet animal's will in some small way all at once become imperative, if the nature is to fulfil itself."

From Part I (7) of _'The Death of the Heart'_ 1938.

It's beautifully written and it makes me think on the nature of man on a profound level. A big part of me agrees that "he likes to impose himself, to emerge and be a bully." Yet a part of me says, "Hey, I'm not sure it's that way at all. Even if it is that way, does it really have to be that way?"

To bring my soul in conflict with itself, that's a wicked little paragraph.
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, July 28, 2007 - 03:32 pm:   

Hey, Byron, let me know when you have chosen your favouritest favourite, then you can claim ONLY CONNECT. In theory, you can claim it already, I guess.
Good luck to all other people about to do this, too, on this thread.

BTW, EB is so far only about halfway through, I guess, in quoting from her own fiction on this blog.
des
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Byron Bailey
Posted on Sunday, July 29, 2007 - 05:43 pm:   

Not done yet. I'm on batch 19 now working my way backwards. I have two favorites currently and unless something in the remaining ones beats them, it's going to be tough. The winner may depend entirely on whether I'm in horror mode or sense of wonder mode when I choose.
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Byron Bailey
Posted on Tuesday, July 31, 2007 - 03:26 pm:   

Finished.

First, I'll mention the quote that made me the saddest because if only one phrase had been changed, it would have been my favorite, at least for this week:

"Also, there is something very heroic about dangling one's legs at a height."

From 'Charity' 1926

Change "at a height" to "in the water" and it would have been perfect for Shark Week. As is, it didn't even make my list of favorites. Sad.

The quote I like the least is:

"Other people have that sinister advantage over one of being able to see the back of one's head. For the first time in her life she had the uncomfortable sense that somebody had done so, that somebody had not only glanced but was continuously staring."

From 'The Evil That Men Do ' 1923

When I was into chess when I was younger, there was a player who when it was the other person's turn, he would get up and stand right behind his opponnent, boring into the back of our skulls with his eyes, staring, always staring. I hated him.

Now for my favorite. It's a very tough call, but I think I'm going to have to go with:

The skeleton clock, in daylight, was threatening to a degree its oddness could not explain. Looking through the glass at its wheels, cogs, springs and tensions, and at its upraised striker, awaiting with a sensible quiver the finish of the hour that was in force, Clara tried to tell herself that it was, only, shocking to see the anatomy of time. The clock was without a face, its twelve numerals being welded on to a just visible wire ring. As she watched, the minute hand against its background of nothing made one, then another, spectral advance. [...]

'I'll tell you something, Clara. Have you ever SEEN a minute? Have you actually had one wriggling inside your hand? Did you know if you keep your finger inside a clock for a minute, you can pick out that very minute and take it home for your own?' So it is Paul who stealthily lifts the dome off. It is Paul who selects the finger of Clara's that is to be guided, shrinking, then forced wincing into the works, to be wedged in them, bruised in them, bitten into and eaten up by the cogs. 'No you have got to keep it there, or you will lose the minute. I am doing the counting the counting up to sixty.' . . . But there is to be no sixty. The ticking stops.

From 'The Inherited Clock' 1944

It's one of the more creeper, terrifyfying images and I like how it slowly builds up, each notch a little more disturbing than the other. I couldn't help but think of Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum" when I read it.

Also, another factor that went into my decision is that from the Elizath Bowen that you quoted, I couldn't help but see clocks as a reocccuring theme. I'm not sure if that is really the case, but clocks are something I identify with Elizabeth Bowen now. As perhaps the best of the clock quotes in my mind, it has raised itself a little above the other quotes by giving me the feel of being Elizabeth Bowen at the top of her game when she is most herself. I'm not at all sure that my assessment is true, but if feels like it may be which is enough to nudge it ahead of a few other quotes in my mind.
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des lewis
Posted on Wednesday, August 01, 2007 - 12:38 am:   

Hi, Byron, I am fascinated by your choice and by your process of choosing it. I think I know it gave you some pleasure to do this, judging by your comments.
Please claim your prize from: bfitzworth@yahoo.co.uk

Anyone else who wants to try out this pleasure of choosing a favourite quote from;
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320
please do so as there are many ONLY CONNECTS to win by posting on this thread.
des
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des lewis
Posted on Friday, August 03, 2007 - 01:50 pm:   

Bump.
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des lewis
Posted on Sunday, August 05, 2007 - 08:04 am:   

The last time I shall artificially bump this thread.
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Byron Bailey
Posted on Sunday, August 05, 2007 - 07:28 pm:   

What's wrong? Elizabeth Bowen doesn't bite.
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des lewis
Posted on Monday, August 06, 2007 - 08:20 am:   

She has just finished quoting from her stories, but not yet from all her novels:
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320
Please let her know if she has forgotten any of her stories in this long and onerous task.
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des lewis
Posted on Sunday, August 12, 2007 - 03:56 am:   

Bump from above. See first post on thread.

More Bumps for Books:
http://weirdmonger.mindsay.com/bumps_for_books.mws
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Blue Tyson
Posted on Tuesday, August 14, 2007 - 11:22 pm:   

I like this one :-

Striking, to any eye, was the hyper-congestion of antique gravestones. These, so closely set edge to edge that you could not have slipped the blade of a knife between them, flocked up in serrated ranks, each rank being not more than inches behind another.


Hyper-congested antique gravestones, a great image, and words I would have never thought of putting together.
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des lewis
Posted on Wednesday, August 15, 2007 - 12:48 am:   

Thanks, Blue, for above and your claim - book on its way.
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Carole Hall
Posted on Wednesday, August 15, 2007 - 01:49 am:   

Ok I've got some:

"Having been seen at the window, having been waved to, made Anna step back instinctively. She knew how foolish a person looking out of a window appears from the outside of a house as though waiting for something that does not happen, as though wanting something from the outside world. A face at a window for no reason is a face that should have a thumb in its mouth: there is something only-childish about it. Or, if the face is not foolish it is threatening blotted white by the darkness inside the room it suggests a malignant indoor power."

From Part III (2) 'The Death of the Heart' 1938

I like that one because she goes through all the things that standing at a window might mean - not what it might mean in actuality, but the kind of unspoken impressions that everybody gets from seeing someone at a window.

I liked this one as well:

"Eric was now at the War Office, and Joanna, who had not seen him in uniform before, looked at him naively, twice. He reminded her of one of the pictures arrived at in that paper game when, by drawing on folded-over paper, you add to one kind of body an intriguingly wrong kind of head."

From 'Careless Talk' 1941

I liked that one because it is funny, and also surreal, and also has a deeper meaning by implying that somehow the character of Eric might not be suited to the uniform or the activities associated with it.

Of those two my favourite is the window quote, because she so neatly sums up the impressions you might have from the simple act of seeing someone at a window.
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des lewis
Posted on Wednesday, August 15, 2007 - 07:42 am:   

Thanks, Carole. Are you claiming?
EB just posted some more today:
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320
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Carole Hall
Posted on Thursday, August 16, 2007 - 01:41 am:   

Yes, definitely claiming - will send an email!
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des lewis
Posted on Friday, August 17, 2007 - 12:07 pm:   

Well, for the record, here is my own favourite:

'I swear that each of us keeps, battened down inside himself, a sort of lunatic giant impossible socially, but full-scale and that it's the knockings and batterings we sometimes hear in each other that keeps our intercourse from utter banality.'
From Part III (6) 'The Death of the Heart' 1938

I think it goes without saying why - the strongest reason of all.
des
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Phillip Stecco
Posted on Friday, August 17, 2007 - 05:51 pm:   

It is queer to be in place where someone has gone. It is not two other places, the place that they were there in, and the place that was there before they came. I can't get used to this third place or to staying behind.

From Part II (8) 'The Death of the Heart' 1938


This Elizabeth Bowen quotation strikes close to home. Her words introduce a temporal dread into the insoluble equation of existence. Both space and time deserve equal fear and respect.
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, August 18, 2007 - 12:05 am:   

Thanks, Phillip.
Are you claiming?
EB started quoting from 'The Heat of the Day' yesterday:
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320
I think they once made a film of that novel?
I think they also made a film of her story: 'The Demon Lover'.

Yesterday, I started reading the very long and complex: ELIZABETH BOWEN: THE SHADOW ACROSS THE PAGE by Maud Ellmann. An early theory in the intro is that EB wrote mainly about nothingness! And that things have a stronger living character than the humans ... I think.
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Phillip Stecco
Posted on Wednesday, August 22, 2007 - 03:45 pm:   

I received ONLY CONNECT in today's mail. des' own photography graces the cover - and an odd picture it is, too. This lovely item must have actually been shipped via matter transmitter considering the speed of its arrival in the United States. (Meanwhile, Nemo 5 and Nemo 4 are afloat somewhere in the Atlantic. I hope the currents are favorable...) Thank you, des!

Best wishes,
Phil
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Ron Breznay
Posted on Wednesday, August 22, 2007 - 07:10 pm:   

I like the following quote:

"The most stubbornly or darkly drawn-in man has moments when he likes to impose himself, to emerge and be a bully. The diversion of a raindrop from its course down the pane, the frustration of a pet animal's will in some small way all at once become imperative, if the nature is to fulfil itself."

I like this quote because I know someone like that. In fact, I know two people like that. It helps to know they are not the only ones. But I would like to understand why they are that way. Alas, this quote, though spot-on, doesn't help me understand them.

Ron
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des lewis
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2007 - 12:20 am:   

Meanwhile, Nemo 5 and Nemo 4 are afloat somewhere in the Atlantic.

Phil, Surface mail is an erratic force. Can take up to 12 weeks, or on average 6-8 weeks, or sometimes mistakenly sent as air mail by the authorities!
I'll send them again if they eventually don't turn up.

Ron, an interesting choice of Bowen quote. Thanks.
des
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, August 25, 2007 - 01:24 pm:   

More Bowen quotes are ever on stream here:
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, September 01, 2007 - 09:14 am:   

This is a recent one;
"She stared first at a row of backviews of eaters perched, packed elbow-to-elbow, along a counter. A zip fastener all the way down one back made one woman seem to have a tin spine. A dye-green lettuce leaf had fallen on to the mottled rubber floor..."
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Phillip Stecco
Posted on Sunday, September 02, 2007 - 11:33 pm:   

What a wonderfully strange quotation! Phildickian in spirit, but not style. A description of the world falling apart at the seems...
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Phillip Stecco
Posted on Tuesday, September 11, 2007 - 05:31 pm:   

It seems that a lamented "r" has somehow made its way out of our universe. "R" we less for it? "I" think not. "Y" question what has gone "B4"? This could go on and on. I'll just "letter B." "C" what I mean?
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Dflewis
Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 - 01:04 am:   

Is this text talk? Text talk is a good word for 'The Day I Did' project... Hmmmm...
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Phillip Stecco
Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 - 02:12 am:   

I don't know the nuances of "text talk" at all. I do not have a cell phone or other portable doodads. All I have is the traditional QWERTYUIOP.
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Dflewis
Posted on Thursday, September 13, 2007 - 01:21 am:   

Latest Bowen quote has Maud communing with her own wound:
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320

true texture of text is self-inflicted
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Dflewis
Posted on Saturday, September 15, 2007 - 01:06 am:   

Spoiler. A pic of me in link.


Striking, to any eye, was the hyper-congestion of antique gravestones. These, so closely set edge to edge that you could not have slipped the blade of a knife between them, flocked up in serrated ranks, each rank being not more than inches behind another.
From 'Gone Away' a short story by Elizabeth Bowen 1946


This is me visiting part of the site of this story: HERE
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des lewis
Posted on Sunday, September 16, 2007 - 06:23 am:   

Free book, free shipping. See above
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des lewis
Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007 - 09:22 am:   

http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320
Just specify here your favourite Elizabeh Bowen fiction quote from 70 blog posts to receive a free 'Only Connect' paperback.
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des lewis
Posted on Tuesday, October 30, 2007 - 01:08 pm:   

Today's choice Elizabeth Bowen quote:

The eternal shingle skeined with eternal sand was strung and clotted with dunglike seaweed; bedrabbled seaweed slimed some exposed rocks proceeding outward like stepping-stones to nowhere. A last-summer's child's bottomless bucket, upturned, could have been jettisoned by expeditionaries from some other planet. A colourless haze was gathering out at sea.

From Part I (7) of 'Eva Trout' 1968
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Dflewis
Posted on Wednesday, November 14, 2007 - 08:28 am:   

Last quote from EB's fiction:
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=147731320

I have been meticulously working on these for nearly a year, burning the midnight oil. There are 77 sets of these quotes.

It represents a systematic sampling from all Elizabeth Bowen's novel chapters and stories.

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Phillip Stecco
Posted on Friday, December 07, 2007 - 05:45 pm:   

Thank you, des. Ms. Bowen's fiction and poetry is extraordinary. Although my own archiving of excerpts from Thomas Ligotti's work at Thomas Ligotti Online may not be systematic or ordered by any plan (except in certain, conscious seasonal instances), one hopes that the effort will result in new readers. Both Bowen and Ligotti deserve wider recognition. Please know that what you are doing is fully appreciated here!

Best wishes,
Phil
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, December 08, 2007 - 11:01 am:   

Thanks, Phil. I am indeed getting a lot of feedback on the EB quotes.
des
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Byron Bailey
Posted on Saturday, December 08, 2007 - 01:36 pm:   

Elizabeth Bowen is definitely on my radar screen thanks to these quotes. However, I think I've reached the point where I've read enough quotes for now. Yeah, I now know that Elizabeth Bowen can write some quite intriguing bits of prose, but can she string them all together to make an intriguing story? Novel? That's what I want to find out.
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, December 15, 2007 - 02:33 pm:   

Bump.
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des lewis
Posted on Saturday, December 22, 2007 - 08:45 am:   

An item of Elizabeth Bowen's posthumous fiction: HERE

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