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des
Posted on Saturday, November 08, 2003 - 12:38 am:   

Kazuo Ishiguro was born 8 November 1954 and wrote one of my favourite novels, The Unconsoled. Elsewhere he said: "our fate is to face the world as orphans, chasing through long years the shadows of vanished parents".
Des
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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Saturday, November 08, 2003 - 01:15 am:   

"It is perhaps a sign of my advancing years that I have taken to wandering into rooms for no purpose."—An Artist of the Floating World
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des
Posted on Sunday, November 09, 2003 - 12:43 am:   

Found this:
"The numinosity (Jung, 1964) of artifacts among preliterate peoples reflects an investment of what Carl Sagan calls extra-somatic knowledge, that is, knowledge carried outside of the body (Sagan, 1977)."
Carl Sagan was born on 9 November 1934.
des
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des
Posted on Monday, November 10, 2003 - 09:07 am:   

A few years ago, the Coca Cola Corporation announced that its product was noumenon--the real thing--thereby solving that problem of philosophy.
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des
Posted on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - 08:55 am:   

Kurt Vonnegut was born on 11th November 1922.
Kant and Noumenon are buddies.

Web: "In Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five, the author tells us that "Billy Pilgrim came unstuck in time." He sometimes was living in the 1950s or 60s, and other times was in the midst of World War II in Germany. And we've all experienced time as seeming to slow down or speed up, but none of us, says Kant, has ever had an experience that is not conditioned by time. This fact alone, viz., that every single actual experience we have ever had, without exception, has occurred in time, ought to make us suspicious that time is a human construct, something our minds must add to experience in order for the experience even to register with us. (As the bumper sticker says: Time is the mind's way of arranging things so that everything doesn't happen all at once.) "

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des
Posted on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 - 08:30 am:   

Auguste Rodin was born on 12 November 1840.

Web: "Photography all but sums up Modernism's ambivalence to progress. Critics sometimes argue that modern art turned on the invention, but how? On the one hand, some have claimed, it made old-fashioned realism superfluous. It also, the story goes, accelerated a centuries-old trend toward unique styles and individual points of view. Painters had to pursue their own vision once anyone could churn out photographs. On the other hand, it helped artists play with the anonymity of reproductions—-from Auguste Rodin's multiple casts and Kurt Schwitters's torn headlines to Robert Rauschenberg's appropriations."

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des
Posted on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 05:22 am:   

From: "Kant's Noumenal Self and Doppelganger in P.K. Dick's 'A Scanner Darkly'"
by Frank C Bertrand:-

"Arctor/Fred is a psychological rather than physical double; he is a split-personality, a second-self reminiscent of Robert Louis Stevenson's famous novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)"

Robert Louis Stevenson was born on 13 November 1850.
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des
Posted on Friday, November 21, 2003 - 08:23 am:   

My favourite painter was born on 21 November 1898: Rene Magritte.

"Magritte’s numerous paintings of men with bowler hats also suggest the impersonal anonymity of contemporary urban life. The men are portrayed with either their backs facing the viewer or their faces obscured."
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des
Posted on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 02:31 am:   

Benjamin Britten was born 22 November 1913 (St Cecilia's Day). Britten wrote an opera based on Henry James' Turn Of The Screw and if you want your gooses bumped about it go here:
http://www.service.com/paw/morgue/listings/1998_May_29.REVIEW29.html
Noumenymity rampant.
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des
Posted on Sunday, November 23, 2003 - 02:30 am:   

Harpo Marx was born 23 November 1888.

From web:
"...the bird turns its head slowly. (The shadow of a sundial would turn faster.) The black hook that forms its beak splits in half and rejoins itself, leaving a trio of syllables to haunt the air. It is the utterance "Harpo Marx.” This beast has taken the silent comedian’s name and it’s doubtful he will ever give it back."


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des
Posted on Friday, November 28, 2003 - 08:00 am:   

William Blake was born on 28 November 1757.

By Blake: "Poets develop a sharp eye to observe, a sharp ear to hear--the sights and sounds of everyday reality, the texture of the quotidian, to find infinity in a grain of sand, eternity in an hour."
The noumenon?

About Blake (by Hazlitt): "He has no sense of the ludicrous, and, as to God, a worm crawling in a privy is as worthy an object as any other ... he attempts impossibles."
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des
Posted on Wednesday, December 03, 2003 - 01:15 pm:   

Joseph Conrad was born 3 December 1857.

Aren't shadows on the wall sometimes more revelatory than seeing the people that cast them? CHANCE is a novel by Joseph Conrad. Here, the characters and particularly the heroine are drained of any motive or sympathy because of the layering of narrative: we hear a spoken voice telling an inscrutable narrator of someone else’s view of someone else’s view of certain events, mix and match between. But it does not seem to lessen one’s interest in the book: it is character-driven and sympathy is allowed to take a backseat in preference to exploring one’s own motives for assigning certain motives to certain types of people just on the basis of hearsay and chance. Conrad writes in introduction to CHANCE: “And it is only for their intentions that men can be held responsible” and this novel seeks to show, I think, that any intentions are essentially unknowable. I propose that even one's own intentions are unknowable: being shadows, too. The heart of darkness.
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des
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 08:39 am:   

Brenda Lee was born on 11 December 1944.
Seasonal greetings from the DF Lewis threads to the sound of her "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree". Des
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des
Posted on Thursday, December 18, 2003 - 07:47 am:   

H H Munro was born on 18 december 1970. For the sake of anonymity, he took the name Saki ... from a poem in the "Rubaiyat" by the 11th century Persian Omar Khayyam.

"A little inaccuracy sometimes saves tons of explanation." Saki


His 'Mowsle Barton' is mentioned in Weirdmonger Nemonicon.
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des
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 12:27 pm:   

A fascinating new article here by Oliver Sacks (who wrote The Man Who Mistook His Wife for Hat) :
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/16882
Still reading it. Borges, Proust, filmic stills of reality, discrete selves etc... can't be bad!
des
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des
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 - 10:03 am:   

My Three Discrete Equations:

(1) Fiction/Poem = Text placed in the audience arena, and nothing but that text. (Incontravertible)

(2) What can be *taken from* or *given to* the text = reader's 'opinion' or 'reaction' or 'knowledge' (i.e. manifold opinions and reactions etc., all different and unknowable, even unknowable subsequently in hindsight to the reader him- or herself dependant on the degree to which their memory fades or mutates).


(3) The nearer one is able to reach towards the noumenon of the text, the more one can shuffle off the variably misleading and unknowable historical, biographical, critical, academic extrapolations from the text = my opinion.

Notes:
The Poet/Author of the text -- the text that is already placed in audience arena -- is no more than just another reader inasfar as explaining, judging, interpreting that text.
Each time the text mutates (e.g. in translation or rewrite or exegesis or reprinted in a new edition etc.), then that event triggers a new set of the first two equations above.





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Neil A
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 09:22 am:   

http://books.guardian.co.uk/reviews/politicsphilosophyandsociety/0,6121,1143193, 00.html
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des
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 11:05 am:   

Thanks, Neil, for that interesting article. A world language being lost once every two weeks is a staggering thought. And I agree that:
"perhaps most poignant is the story of a parrot speaking a language that had died out among humans and that its keepers could not comprehend."

des

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