HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Collecting Books -- as expensive as a...

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » General » Collecting Books -- as expensive as any addiction « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mastadge
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2003 - 08:19 pm:   

Good Lord! The more good books I read, the more good books I find. Forget digging up copies of old good reads; it strains my wallet just to keep up with all the *new* books coming out by authors I follow. . .

I'm anal about my books. I have a ridiculous mentality that a book worth reading is worth owning, and I find it near impossible to read a battered, plastic-wrapped library copy of a book. Further, if an author is still alive, and especially still writing, I feel obligated to buy his or her books new, if possible, rather than used.

It's also time consuming, because so many of my favorite authors aren't carried, as a matter of course, by the local bookstores, so I do a lot of online ordering, and a lot of order-cancelling and re-ordering when different retailers offer bigger discounts on expensive books.

It's getting to the point where I almost long for the old days when I was happy with the readily available mass-market big fat fantasy junk than I now, for the most part, find unreadable. . .

My friends spend ludicrous amounts of money on alcohol and cigarettes and DVDs and various miscellaneous stuff. I spend more than most of them on books alone.

Another issue is that as I find more and more good books, I find that I have less and less time to read them, what with school and all, and so The List grows longer and longer. . .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 - 06:22 pm:   

Its all a matter of where you want to spend your disposable income. I work in a bookstore where people regularly spend $50+ on a book without blinking. The same bookstore has customers that complain about spending $6.99 on a new paperback, and hesitate to spend $1.50 on a used paperback, because the original price was only 80 cents.

Having said all that, I DO look down on people who don't value books, and the written word. People will blow $20 on a dvd that will last them 2 hours... maybe 6, if they watch it 3 times... but they "on principal" won't buy books in hardcover.

People with SUV's are the worst... "How much do you spend filling up the gas tank of your suv... simply for the privilege of "driving High"... and you won't buy a hardcover book!??!"

Savages!

Its one thing if you are unemployed, or have a really low paying job... I understand not being able to AFFORD hard covers... But people who choose to spend their money elsewhere when they got it are making a value judgments about what is worth spending their money on, and what is not. I know people who are unemployed, and they STILL come in, and blow their cash on books, because its important to them!

Obviously, I prefer it when people spend money on books because I have a vested interest, as a publisher, and as a book store employee... but also from an aesthetic and cultural standpoint... Its an issue I get angry about.

A young girl of about 10 came into my bookstore, dragging her dad in. she was really excited about getting a book, and twisted her pushover dad into buying it. He was embarrassed about her enthusiasm, and actually said "she gets so excited over a _book_?!" Like it was something unimaginable. argghhh. People like that bug me... but he DID buy her the book, so whatever.

Sorry. The thread is about collecting. I do that too. Its worse then Heroin, because when Heroin users move, they don’t have 4000lbs worth of dead trees to lug around.

I constantly make the Pusher/drug user comparison. Most drug dealers start out dealing as a way to support their habit. That’s How I got started.


-JL
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 - 07:15 pm:   

Heh. I've got a friend who'll buy four bargain books for a dollar each, knowing full well that he'll never read them, but buying them anyway because he figures a hardcover for a dollar is too good to pass up. I don't understand that. I buy books because I will read them, and learn from them, and likely read them again, and if they're really good, read them potentially many times. I don't see why he would spend a single cent on something he knows he's never going to read.

It's like my grandfather, who will buy food he won't eat simply because there's a 2-for-1 sale going on at the grocery store. It doesn't make sense.

My problem isn't with lugging stuff around with moving . . . it's simply storage in the first place. My bookcases, and I've got many, are overflowing, as are the shelves under my bed, and the boxes and drawers in my closet, and so forth. Every once in a while I round up some of the really bad ones that I know I'll never touch, or the extra copies of books that I've somehow acquired more than one of, and give them to a library or goodwill or something, but even so, I've got more books than I have space for. ..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jack Haringa
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 - 04:40 am:   

Mastadge, I appreciate your friend's position in a way, as there are books I'll buy in hardover from a remainder bin or thrift store that I probably wouldn't buy at all otherwise. Admittedly, I do intend to read them, and only buy those whose contents interest me (and not just their bindings). I think that's part of the addiction--not only do you buy $40 and $50 signed, limited editions in lieu of getting a haircut or new shoes, but you can also end up grasping at unneeded books that hold the potential to satisfy your reading/collecting habit simply because the opportunity presents itself. I've become more selective in my bargain/remainder selections in recent years, picking up only first editions or rarities, but I can't walk out of a bookstore without at least one purchase (mall stores excepted). I also tend to believe that a book worth reading is a book worth owning, and with the exception of research materials I almost never borrow from a library. Library sales, on the other hand, fill me with glee.

Re: Moving. When I moved into my current house three years ago, a friend who was helping me said, "I've never wished anyone was illiterate before." I've since added half again as many books to my collection. And space is becoming a major issue now. Why are bookcases so damned expensive?

I tend, like Jeremy, to turn my nose up at paperbacks if a hardcover version of the book is available, and I agree that there is a judgement value made in choosing to buy the paperback instead of the hardcover if you can afford both. I admit, I'm an anal-retentive book snob, but I'll also buy paperbacks if they're PBOs or hard to find in any other edition.

>>"A young girl of about 10 came into my bookstore, dragging her dad in. she was really excited about getting a book, and twisted her pushover dad into buying it. He was embarrassed about her enthusiasm, and actually said "she gets so excited over a _book_?!" Like it was something unimaginable. argghhh. People like that bug me... but he DID buy her the book, so whatever."<<

Not long ago I was in a bookstore and overheard a boy about that age asking his mother to buy him a book. Her answer: "You have enough books." I nearly bit the end of my tongue off. Had I been flush at the time, I would have bought the damn thing for him; what an awful thing to say to a child. Since I switched from teaching college students to 6th graders last year, I've become more attuned to what an important age this is in their development as readers. A lot of my students are avid readers, and I encourage that by frequently giving books away as incentives for effort in class. How can parents not encourage their kids to make reading a habit? And when I think of that mother and son in the bookstore, I imagine she's the same type of parent who would come in complaining that her kid isn't doing well or just wants to watch TV, as if that were the fault of his teachers rather than the lousy example set at home.

Sorry for the tangential rant. I need a fix.

~Jack~
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff Topham
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 - 09:40 am:   

I really sympathize with everything that's been said here: I love buying books, and I love books that are made with care--kudos to Nightshade for doing just that. I find, however, that I'm becoming more selective in what I actually buy. Most of what I do buy these days is coming from the small presses--people who actually love books and care about what they produce as more than just "product."

The reason I'm not spending much money on books these days is that there just isn't that much to spend--a great deal of my income is now going to diapers and formula, which doesn't leave a whole lot of discretionary money. This is why I love libraries.

It pisses me off, however, that so often when I request a book from my local library, they tell me it's missing from the shelves--in other words, it's been stolen, presumably from someone who felt they had to own the book rather than just reading it.

Grrr . . .

JT

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 - 02:24 pm:   

I've had to become more selective myself, but it's really out of space considerations. I have over 4,000 books and even though I own a house here in NYC I'm already running out of room. My wife didn't take too well to my idea of lining our newborn's nursery with bookshelves....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2003 - 11:42 am:   

I can't believe all the great books out there that I want: most everything from Prime that I don't have; everything from Night Shade except the Norm Partridge collection I already own; all the Ministry of Whimsy books; Witpunk; all of Lucius' 4Walls8Windows stuff; Caselberg's new book; there's two new Small Beer Press books coming out this year; new Golden Gryphon stuff; new Subterranean Press stuff....so the question becomes (I ask this the day after writing out a $4K check to the government) should I get all the books I want or save money to buy a house so I have room for the books I want?

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2003 - 11:43 am:   

I need to get a job at B&N again for the discount. Anyone hiring?

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2003 - 11:48 am:   

(One more from me and then I've done) For some reason, if I started getting an author in paperback, I won't change editions when new books come out. All of my Steven Brust is in paperback because I don't want to separate the books from each other. I will buy mass-markets from a hardcover author when that's the only edition available. Norman Partridge is a great example of this. (OK, not really, I buy every edition of his books that I can find, but you get the point) I like any type of book, even though I hate spending $7.99 on a new mass-market. Go to my blog [http://evzine.blogspot.com] and you can see my rant from Monday where I talk about a used bookstore in Frederick, MD that I was in recently.

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Luke Jackson
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 11:27 am:   

Why dish out so much $$ for books? I've found great books for less than $1 at the library used book sale...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 05:38 am:   

Because, man. Books are worth it!! And you should be buying the books of authors you like!

Personally I value books and music, over home entertainment systems and cars and stuff.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelius Kappabani
Posted on Tuesday, October 25, 2005 - 05:56 am:   

I do love books, too. Espezially books which don't turn into sheet collettions after the second time reading it.
Just got a 1908 edition of J.H.Pattersons - Man-Eaters of Tsavo from MacMillen. It might have been a lot of money but it's quiet a sadisfaction - so who cares the money afterwards?
Besides, books are a part of culture and art.
There's a difference between editions of 'The Kelmscott Press' and 'Tor' paperbacks.
But on the other hand I fully understand John Topham. But John, think about this: not everybody is handling a book they way it deserves it, particularily in libraries were people sometimes seem to belive: "Well, since this is not my own who cares if it gets dirty, broken or burned." A well cratfted book is a piece of art and deserves respect. So, maybe those who stole the books from the library might have saved them from being destroyed.
Well, as long as it goes for cheap mass market paperbacks, OK, what the hack if one or two get lost but for editions like the one I bought they should be keept properly and a library is not the right place.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

William Elliott
Posted on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 - 11:03 am:   

New edition of Adventures in Unhistory coming out.
http://www.avramdavidson.org/
Towards the bottom of Avram Davidson website it says,
“A new edition of Adventures in Unhistory from Tor Books is scheduled for December 2006.”
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Laura Davids Todd
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 07:28 pm:   

I adore books too. But I hate hardcovers because I like to carry the books around with me in my shoulder bag and hardcovers are too heavy. I can read a few paragraphs of a good book while waiting for a traffic light to change!

I confess my other vice (aside from Reading While Driving). I buy my books from Amazon.com . I can buy them used for like .01 cent plus $3.00 postage. I got the 2nd 2 books of the Mars trilogy that way. And the worst thing of all is that I went to Barnes & Noble, saw a great book called LONELY PLANETS...and went home & ordered it from Amazon for 1/2 the price. The science books are even more expensive than the SF. So I couldn't possibly read them unless I got a used copy from Amazon.

Plus, there is a big rush when getting a notice in the mailbox that I have a package waiting for me. It's just like sending a birthday present to myself!

I don't know how I lived before Amazon. Oh yeah, there was the Book Swap. Read the books that you bought at the last book swap and turn 'em in for new ones. That's kept me going for years.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Laura Davids Todd
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 07:29 pm:   

I adore books too. But I hate hardcovers because I like to carry the books around with me in my shoulder bag and hardcovers are too heavy. I can read a few paragraphs of a good book while waiting for a traffic light to change!

I confess my other vice (aside from Reading While Driving). I buy my books from Amazon.com . I can buy them used for like .01 cent plus $3.00 postage. I got the 2nd and 3rd books of the Mars trilogy that way. And the worst thing of all is that I went to Barnes & Noble, saw a great book called LONELY PLANETS...and went home & ordered it from Amazon for 1/2 the price. The science books are even more expensive than the SF. So I couldn't possibly read them unless I got a used copy from Amazon.

Plus, there is a big rush when getting a notice in the mailbox that I have a package waiting for me. It's just like sending a birthday present to myself!

I don't know how I lived before Amazon. Oh yeah, there was the Book Swap. Read the books that you bought at the last book swap and turn 'em in for new ones. That's kept me going for years.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nadine Rick
Posted on Monday, September 04, 2006 - 03:18 am:   

HI! I'm new here. (Lucky me, I finally came across another board in which people are still able to write complete sentences. :-) )

I usually buy my books from Amazon, too, or in Second Hand Book Stores. ( The German Post encourages "cultural exchange" by charging a lower price for the postage when you send books. :-))
I prefer Paperback to Hardcover. It's easier to read them in bed or when I'm under way.
AND they tend too look used after a few readings, which gives me a feeling of owening the story, rather than just reading it. :-)

The only thing I could complain about is the quality of the paper and the printing ink used for most paperbacks, though, this explains why they are so cheap. Fortunately, I'm now able to read (and understand) enough English to buy the Originals, and not the German translation, which costs easily twice as much.

I love to BUY books, as much as I love to read them. There are three kinds of books in my little private library (by now, only 40 or 50 books): classics (f.e. Moby Dick or a collection of the stories of Henry James, which I intend to read, yet), books I have to read because of my studies (Shakespeare, Dickens...) and books that I personally adore ("Ender's Game", "Owen Meany"...)...when I'm lucky, a book fits in all of my categories.

I can't remember ever not to have loved reading, and I can be glad, that my mom always encouraged me to do so, in contrast to the woman mentionend by Jack. Though my mother isn't much of a reader anymore, so I assigned myself to be my mom's and sister's personal librarian, for they never know, what to buy. I tried to read some of the books my mother bought because they were bestsellers, but I had to give up soon... they were so awefully written (flat types, clichées etc...) I would like to have a word with the people who allowed them to be printed this way! Maybe I can buy my mom some books that keep her awake.
My sister is nine years old. I can't tell whether she will turn out to be a reader, though I regularly buy her books that I loved when I was in her age. In two years, for example, I plan to buy her "The Neverending Story" by Michael Ende, though I read it for the first time when I was 8...she rather shies (shyes?) away from weighty tomes... *sigh*

By the way, I hope my English is not too bad and not too hard to read. If it is, or if it's hard to understand (maybe because I happened to choose the wrong word from the Thesaurus), just tell me, okay? I don't want you to be forced to put a lot of effort in understanding what I post. I won't be offended or discouraged, because I know my (active) skills are not perfect. (I haven't been in an English speaking country, yet.) But I would be glad if you let me know how to improve, if possible.
Thanks a lot! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

William Lexner
Posted on Sunday, October 22, 2006 - 09:38 am:   

I spend about 75% of my disposable income on books. Everything from the very occasional (I Loathe Them!) mass-market paperback to signed, numbered limited editions for hundreds of dollars. I have yet to buy a letterred edition of anything, and I try to view this as my 'behaving' and 'being reasonable.'

When I go to conventions, I see it as a time to splurge, and I will spend all that I have saved, if the right books appear.

At World Fantasy last year I purchased the initial three Dragonriders of Pern by McCaffrey firsts (I figured there wouldn't be too many more chances to meet Ms. McCaffrey, and she was scheduled for Worldcon LA), first editions of The Gormenghast Trilogy, and a slew of new books. (Including London Revenant, Snake Agent, Move Under Ground, The Fourth Circle, and the Hope Hodgson collections.)

At Worldcon this year, I splurged on firsts of The Forever War, Consider Phlebas, I am Legend, Jack Vance's Lyonesse trilogy from Underwood Miller, and Lord of Light. I also won the bids on some Picacio prints at the art show. (These splurges are the main reason I am fiscally unable to make it to World fantasy this year, alas.)

I have purchased firsts of Starship Troopers, Dune, and The Foundation Trilogy in the past, and I have every intention of getting my hands on signed firsts of The Lord of The Rings at some point.

I am sick. Incredibly so, and I understand that I am sick.

But I wouldn't have it any other way.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gerry Daumiller
Posted on Tuesday, October 24, 2006 - 07:32 pm:   

Nadine,

I just saw your post of September 4. Your English is outstanding. You should be proud of yourself.

The only awkward phrase in your message was "I can't remember ever not to have loved reading", which contains a double negative. "I have loved reading as long as I can remember" is what I probably would have said.

Also, you capitalized Paperback and Hardcover, which was not proper. I think in German it is common to capitalize many or most nouns, while in English the only capitalized nouns are proper names, such as the name of a person or a place.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register

| Moderators | Administrators |