HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Strange Music

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » General » Strange Music « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff Topham
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2003 - 11:01 am:   

Thought we could use this thread to swap recommendations on strange music. No restrictions really, just let us know about music you've heard that is, in some way or another, odd. For best results, tell us a little about the record/artist in question. Let me start with a couple:

The Residents: Probably one of the strangest musical phenomena of the last 25 years. Not quite pop, not quite avant-garde, just sort of . . . well, weird. They perform incognito, until a few years ago appearing in tuxedos with giant eyeball heads. My favorite record is NOT AVAILABLE, which I find more or less indescribable. Someone else, of course, is welcome to try.

Bongwater: Actor Ann Magnuson and gonzo producer/ex-Shockabilly guitarist Kramer made some of the funniest music of the early 90s. Magnuson's vocals often sound like readings of her dreams, and Kramer's music is a kind of fractured psychedelia that incorporates found sounds, tape loops, odd samples. My favorite tends to be TOO MUCH SLEEP, although the hilariously offensive POWER OF PUSSY is right up there.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2003 - 01:55 pm:   

Danielson Familie: The only cool christian rock band in the world! High pitched voices, nurses outfits and a frontman who dresses as a tree with a guitar stuck to the front.

Juan-Garcia Esquivel: Lounge band leader and composer of space-age bachelor pad music. Weird cartoon soundtrack arrangements, big brass hits, whistling and his trademark "Zu zu zu!"

Kling Klang: Liverpool electric cosmic frazz punk. Imagine Slayer played on cheap Casio keyboards with odd prog-jazz stylings a la Magma...

Magma: French faux-Wagnerian Jazz Rock mammoths. Fronted by the awesome Christian Vander who leads the band from his drumkit and invented an alien language and culture, Kobaia, to write the bands pseudo-operatic lyrics in.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Simanoff
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2003 - 03:36 pm:   

Syd Barrett, anyone?

"In the sad town
cold iron hands
clap the party of clowns outside
rain falls in gray far away
please, please, Baby Lemonade"

Some of Marc Ribot's stuff is way out there: http://www.marcribot.com

A great radio show that is exclusively devoted to the strange (and bad): http://www.incorrectmusic.com

Irwin Chusid wrote a great book about "outsider music" called SONGS IN THE KEY OF Z: http://www.keyofz.com
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Williams
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2003 - 04:29 pm:   

Antony & the Johnsons: Extraordinary gothic um lieder - hauntingly beautiful. Lou Reed & Laurie Anderson are huge fans: try Cripple & the Starfish http://www.antonyandthejohnsons.com/samples/samples.html

Joe Veitch: We Like the Moon http://www.rathergood.com/moon_song/

Hayseed Dixie: Hillbilly renditions of AC/DC, Kiss etc http://www.hayseed-dixie.com/mercantile.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Williams
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2003 - 04:32 pm:   

Oops almost forgot the indefatigible Margarita Pracatan: http://www.margaritapracatan.com/newcd.htm

All the songs she sings are in fractured English, accompanied by Casiotone and always at the same tempo punctuated by her crying out her own name.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Williams
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2003 - 04:35 pm:   

Oops almost forgot the indefatigible Margarita Pracatan: http://www.margaritapracatan.com/newcd.htm

All the songs she sings are in fractured English, accompanied by Casiotone and always at the same tempo punctuated by her crying out her own name.

Peter Wyngarde: WHhen Sez Leers Its Inquisitive Head, recently re-released after 30 years in limbo when the record label realzied it didn't have a nice tax loss on its hands:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000024C1V
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 02:06 am:   

Ah yes, Incorrect Music - great show! The excerpts from the Princess Di musical were nothing short of revelatory.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rhys
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 07:04 am:   

Os Mutantes -- Brazilian tropicalismo and bossa nova meets avant-garde cabaret.

Slapp Happy -- *Casablanca Moon* is one of the greatest and strangest albums of the 1970s. Dagmar Krause's weird and wonderful voice... and the songs! "Cabbalistic inneundoes in everything he says..." *Desperate Straights* is an even odder album. 'Some Questions about Hats' is like a cross between Schoenberg, Kurt Weill and a song for the Wicked Witch of the West.

Henry Cow -- They worked with Slapp Happy and at one point the two bands combined into a single unit. They did themselves no favours, writing completely new material for every gig they ever played and having a variation of the same cover for all their albums: a mediaeval sock!

Gentle Giant -- Prog Rock, but not as we know it. Ultra complex arrangements mixing sackbutts and serpents with electric guitars and synthesizers. Every song contained about 15 other songs inside it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Simanoff
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 07:06 am:   

Not to forget, of course, Disability Bill & the Cussmothers. His solo stuff, though, was less . . . revolutionary.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 08:18 pm:   

John Zorn? Anyone?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Simanoff
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 08:51 pm:   

Zorn's awesome. I bump into him at a Thai place here in Queens every once in a while and one of my best friends from high school records on his label.

So, to stay on topic, I'd recommend pretty much most of the stuff on Tzadik, including Marc Ribot, whom I mentioned above.

I also like Guided by Voices and the song "Life Without Windows" by The Leanover--anyone know more about this group? Are they worth checking out? The song is awesome.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Simanoff
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 08:55 pm:   

Three more great artists who totter onthe edge of "strange": Pedro the Lion, Low, and Ida. All very mellow American bands with interesting links who make great--but not radio friendly--songs. Ida's not very big outside of New York, but Pedro the Lion's from Seattle and Low's from the Midwest.

Iotar, I think you might like some of these, if you were in the right mood.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike Simanoff
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2003 - 09:03 pm:   

Oh, duh. My absolute favorite band of all time--and they are very strange--is Quasi. They're out of Portland, Oregon.

One word: Roxichord.

Best. Stuff. Ever. The Kinks meet Elliott Smith. Opus magnum: the album entitled Featuring "Birds"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 03:10 am:   

Mike: I'm already a big Low fan. Their Christmas EP is particularly good, although of course it can only be played during the festive season. I'll have to look into Pedro the Lion and Ida - I've got a feeling I might have heard some Ida.

Also, references to Portland, Oregon remind me of John Fahey (Portland Cement Factory at Monolith California) and from here we reach Cul De Sac - the China Gate album is an all time favourite. Modal surf guitar with mad stomp box wrangling and free-jazzisms exploding across a post-krautrock firmament of analogs, shortwaves and general headfuck.

They got a new album out too! My copy should be turning up any day now!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 03:13 am:   

Rhys: Slapp Happy are really quite excellent. A friend from Oz sent me a good quality live bootleg of them playing in Japan a couple of years back. Also: have you heard the version of Casablanca Moon with Faust acting as backing band?

Have I asked you this before?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 03:50 am:   

No you haven't! But it doesn't make an *iotar* of difference! :-)

A friend from Oz??? You have a friend in a violent prison drama?

Slapp Happy's 'A Little Something' is an absolutely perfect song, in my view!

Another rather strange band: Azucar Letal. Three Cuban girls who put together 'hot' salsa tracks and then pass them over to a German producer (I can't remember his name) who 'krautrocks' them up. Weird combination. Spicy Latin dance music given the cold, precise, "we can manufacture oil from coal", pulsation treatment!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 04:05 am:   

Have to look up Azucar Letal, sounds fun! Are they contemporary or antique? I had a thing about South American garage psychedelia for a while last year. There was one band called Traffic Sound who were pretty amazing. Did a cover of Sky Pilot but with this wonderful plaintiff Peruvian accent and razor-sharp fuzz tremolo twang. Only ever heard mp3s of them, haven't been able to find albums anywhere - I guess you have to go to Peru for that sort of thing.

Another more recent but certainly very strange psychedelic band are the awesome Angel'in Heavy Syrup - three Japanese girls who produce a huge teutonic guitar velodrome with feather soft wistful vocals something like a collision between Amon Duul II and the Cocteau Twins. Oh, and the apostrophe *is* supposed to be in the name - the band were asked why it was there and replied "No reason, no reason!"

Actually Japan are particularly noteworthy for brain-eating space music: Ghost, especially their album Lama Rabi Rabi and Acid Mothers Temple (might be "Tempel" as in Ash Ra Tempel?) - all hair and fuzzwah and excessive patchouli!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 05:19 am:   

Ah, it's Holger Hiller producing Azucar Letal! *strokes beard*
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 06:41 am:   

Whose beard? That's what I'd like to know!

One very strange album (which happens to be awful and wasn't meant to be avant-garde) is *Canterbury* by Diamond Head. Ill-fitting hard prog rock meets badly done pseudo-monkish chanting... I didn't like it much.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JT Lindroos
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 06:52 am:   

Sounds like y'all should get a subscription to Ptolemaic Terrascope....oh, wait, you all DO!

I always loved Magic Hour who sorta sound like Indian raga music done as west coast psychedelic drone. And just listen to http://www.wfmu.org for a further bunch of weird-ass wonders... I think they archive most of their stuff so you can probably listen to old eps of Incorrect Music there too.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

DF Lewis
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 07:58 am:   

Sorry, I don't know much about some of the music you're talking about. But, for me, a lot of great strange music (the strangest imaginable) is often labelled within the 'classical music' arena, where I feel more at home. The truly spiritual and/or creatively 'insane' world of non-vocal orchestral/chamber music is an adventure playground that some people often miss visiting. I would like to visit other adventure playgrounds, too, because my greatest passion is music.
Des
Appendix:
My definitions of (1) classical music' and (2) 'pop music' below. Where does your 'strange music' fit into this spectrum?

(1)An inchoate area (defaulting towards an aspirationally cultural & predominantly exact art form) within the universal, uncompartmentalised, wholly accessible language of sound commonly known as music: encouraging spirituality and/or various permutations of all human emotions -- centring on and radiating from the serious deployment of an ostensibly organised pattern of acoustic sounds as produced by orchestral instruments and voices (performed normally by established or qualified interpreters/musicians, from one to very many). The question of taste and the unknowable relativities of disharmony and harmony are no part of this description, because such affective considerations differ from individual to individual.

(2) An inchoate area (defaulting towards a popular art form) within the universal, uncompartmentalised, wholly accessible language of sound commonly known as music: encouraging dance, hummability, 'musak', soundbites of perceived 'aspirational cultures' and/or (when taking itself seriously) various permutations of all human emotions -- centring on and radiating from the deployment of an ostensibly organised pattern of acoustic and non-acoustic sounds as produced by computers, instruments and voices (performed normally by qualified and unqualified musicians, from one to very many). The question of taste and the unknowable relativities of disharmony and harmony are no part of this description, because such affective considerations differ from individual to individual.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 08:11 am:   

What is "inchoate"? It sounds like (a) something fruity which has been dipped, (b) an industrial process just behind armed guards and watchtowers.

In the realm of *modern classical music* I heartily recommend the works of Conlon Nancarrow, Harry Partch and George Crumb. They are strange and often delightful, sometimes bluesy or creepy.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 08:13 am:   

Damn, Rhys, I had a friend in college who turned me on to those Henry Cow and Slapp Happy records. He even taped them for me and I loved them, but I lost the tapes on a move a few years ago and thought that was it, I'd never hear them again. Hadn't thought about them in AGES, but prodded by your post I checked on Amazon, where they actually had them available, and I've gone ahead and bought a set.

I only had tapes of two of the Henry Cow records, but I can't really remember which two they were...saying they had socks on the cover isn't too helpful....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Des
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 08:24 am:   

Rhys, 'inchoate' means you're in with the in crowd and silver-tongued. The opposite is 'getyourchoate'.
Des
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 08:40 am:   

Hola Gabriel!

The first three Henry Cow albums (the ones generally regarded as the best) were *Leg End* *Unrest* and *In Praise of Learning* (which was recorded in collaboration with Slapp Happy)...

The most structured of the three is the first, with Fred Frith's enigmatic, cool but technical guitar playing. The song 'Nine Funerals of the Citizen King' reminds me of the fiction of Michael Moorcock, I can't say exactly why! The second album is mostly improvised because they ran out of money and studio time and had to rush it, but it's still a remarkable set of (surprisingly funky) tracks! Something similar happen to Neu when they were trying to make their second album.

Peter Blegvad of Slapp Happy still lives in New York City, I believe.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 11:40 am:   

Des: If you want weird out of the classical tradition you could do worse than invoke the name and spirit of Karlheinz Stockhausen. His Helicopter String Quartet does exactly what it says on the tin: four string players each in their own helicopters are miked up and transmitted to Karlheinz at a mixing desk on the ground. Levels of instruments and helicopters are mixed tastefully and the whole thing is surprisingly listenable.

Satie and Poulenc are pretty strange too! I've got the Poulenc interpretation of Babar somewhere around here.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Des
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 12:10 pm:   

Yes, I know the Stockhausen.
One of my favourite symphonists is Sir Malcolm Arnold (nine in all) who also wrote film music and this ---

Grand, Grand Overture:
"Arnold employs three vacuum cleaners, a floor polisher, rifle shots and assorted percussion instruments. The piece culminates in final mayhem, and Arnold quotes the "1812 Overture" after which the rifles 'silence' the vacuum cleaners one by one! A triumph indeed for music. And yes, I must mention that memorable melody which must rank among Arnold's best, perhaps a cheekily used one-off musical joke. Watch out for the four fffff rifle shots in the opening section! While the almost inaudible vacuum cleaners tempt you to turn up the volume, do not! The rifle shots are deafening!"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff Topham
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 12:29 pm:   

That description of Arnold's music reminds me of the first time I saw KMFDM in Chicago, where they performed primarily on amplified vacuum cleaners.

It also brings to mind the early days of Einsturzende Neubaten (sp?), when they primarily used as instrumentation power tools, pieces of scrap metal, and other home-made items. I believe that one of their early percussive tracks consists of band members banging on the inside of a metal drain pipe.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 12:35 pm:   

Jeff: Only *one* Neubauten track does that?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff Topham
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 02:18 pm:   

iotar: Ha! Guess that could apply to quite a few! I was never lucky enough to see them perform, but I've heard stories that they would often dismantle parts of the stage during performances, which made club owners (understandably) rather reluctant to book them.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff Topham
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 02:28 pm:   

Mike: I love Low and GBV. Will have to check out Roxichord--sounds very cool. I also love Syd Barrett, although I have to admit that what I primarily feel when I listen to his records is regret for a wasted talent. Piper at the Gates of Dawn is a great (and very weird) record. The only interesting thing Pink Floyd ever did, IMO.

Rhys: Slapp Happy and Henry Cow are new to me--will have to check them out.

Any Butthole Surfers fans out there? That aren't embarrassed to admit it, that is . . .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 03:02 pm:   

Jeff: I've seen them a couple of times. Most of the time the floor of the stage or the scaffold that they build their equipment around gets tapped expertly at some point. There's always been an avant-tap-dancing element to their music!

Once when I saw Faust live the smoke they released into the audience got out of hand and the building had to be evacuated. Another time they had a hay threshing machine in the middle of the audience blasting shredded leaves at the stage.

And yes, I'm a Buttholes fan! Anything up to Piougd (sp?) is either pretty good if not brilliant. Locust Abortion Technician and Hairway to Steven are classics.

Also agree about Piper at the Gates of Dawn. The rest of the Floyd ruined Pink Floyd - in fact I'm convinced that Syd was driven to hallucinogenic oblivion through having to work with such boring fuckers!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jonathan briggs
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 05:37 pm:   

I had a girlfriend who ran off with a Butthole Surfer. True story. In love one minute, dumped for a Butthole Surfer bassist the next. I ran into the culprit a few years later when he was touring with Daddy Longhead. No hard feelings. I bought him and his bandmates a few pitchers of beer, and they took me out to their van and offered me bonghits, signed my CD, etc. Good buncha guys. My brush with strange music "fame."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff Topham
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 06:47 am:   

"I had a girlfriend who ran off with a Butthole Surfer." Jonathan: my sympathies. At least you came out of it with a great ice-breaker line for parties.

iotar: Locust Abortion Technician has one of my favorite Butthole tunes: Human Cannonball. I think, though, that Cream Corn and Rembrandt Pussyhorse are my favorite records.

It was at a Butthole Surfers show that I learned that a human being could be knocked down by a strobe light. Not just any strobe light: huge-ass racks of strobe lights that left blobby after-images on your vision for several minutes after they fired. The first time they went off, they guy next to me (whose pupils were dilated to the size of dinner plates) went down like an axed tree. Boom. The same show also featured two drummers, a topless dancer, much incautious use of lighter fluid, and a series of horrifying images projected onto a screen behind the stage--including the infamous sex-change footage (played in reverse). I pity anyone who'd dropped acid. From what I understand, this was actually a pretty tame show.

I'm sobered by the fact that one day I will have to explain all this to my daughters.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 07:53 am:   

I've been a huge fan of PRAXIS for many years now. It's gone through several incarnations, but the first album [Transmutation (Mutatis Mutandis)] combined people like Bernie Worrell and Bootsy Collins with Buckethead (the most frightening guitarist I've EVER heard, and unfortunately has the bad luck to be in Guns 'n' Roses) and Brain (drummer from the Limbomaniacs and later Primus). The result was a funky heavy metal melange that sits right at the back of your tongue.

Their second album [Sarcifist] either draws people like flies or drives them away like lemmings: it featured John Zorn, Mick Harris, Yamasutka Eye, and a bunch more noise artists in addition to Buckethead and Brain. It's wildly chaotic, but I have to be in the right mood; like Mr. Bungle's Disco Violante.

PRAXIS' third album [Metatron] was Buckethead, Brain, and Bill Laswell crunching out really heavy instrumental tracks. This album has some of the most amazing guiter work I've ever heard. And it's not just shredding; the album starts with a hypnotic acoustic ballad, and moves through heavy tracks and Marc Ribot type sound tracks. There are two live albums, which I have not heard. Good stuff.

The coolest thing was that they changed musical formats with each album, but kept the core musicians. Quite a show of technical prowess.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michael Cisco
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 11:38 am:   

Speaking of Zorn and Eye, let me put in a plug for their band, NAKED CITY. "Grand Guignol" is a magnficent spazzcore album of 30 second to 1 minute songs, which follow one of the best orchestrations of Debussey's "Sunken Cathedral" I've ever heard. But their best album, without a doubt, is "Absinthe".
Zorn, Mick Harris, and Laswell also play together under the name PAINKILLER. I like their double album "Execution Ground" the most - especially the ambient disk.
Zorn and Eye put together a record, just the two of them, called "Nani Nani" - the best cut is definitely "Bad Hawkwind."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Des
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 11:42 am:   

"the best orchestrations of Debussey's "Sunken Cathedral"
******

Better than Leopold Stokowski's? Hard to believe!
Des
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 11:43 am:   

I was into PAINKILLER for a while, but then I felt like I needed more structure in my music. I took all my Zorn discs, ripped the songs I liked, and sold them. Except for the first Naked City disc (with the Weegee cover) since I like that one start to finish. I had the same experience with Mr. Bungle. The first album I thought was filled with quirky fun, and then the second album, was, different. I still love it, but I can't listen to it all that often.

Never heard any of the stuff from "Absinthe" (or drank it either, for that matter), but I loved the stuff on "Grand Guignol."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michael Cisco
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 08:27 pm:   

I stand by my wild generalizations!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 09:01 am:   

>>Speaking of Zorn and Eye, let me put in a plug for their band, NAKED CITY.


I caught them many years ago (late 80's) at a New Year's concert at the Puck Building here in NY. Quite a performance. Quite a night too, later that evening I got locked into a bathroom while a Christmas tree caught fire in the other room. Oh, those crazy Upper West Side parties....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jack Haringa
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 09:59 am:   

I'm pretty sure the music itself doesn't qualify as strange, but the lyrics and composer do: Robyn Hitchcock (with or without the Egyptians). I had lunch with Hitchcock at an Earth Day concert back in '92, and he is one seriously warped individual. I particularly enjoy his album "Eye".

One of the current darlings of the Goth scene is Rasputina, who have grown on me like a particularly intrepid lichen after many listens.

And for admirers of Mark Z. Danielewski's House of Leaves, I encourage you to check out Poe's Haunted, which gives a list of specific references to the book for each song. Poe and Mark are siblings, and he went on tour with her a couple of years ago since he performs a spoken word piece on the album. It's strange to go to a concert and see people holding up copies of a novel....

~Jack~
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michael Cisco
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2003 - 01:12 pm:   

Far be it from me to neglect to mention SUN RA.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 01:01 pm:   

Some of the more bizarre ones I can think of:

Glenn Branca - Devil Choirs at the Gates of Heaven: a "symphony" composed for 13 guitars. Each guitar is detuned and they are all played in a way to blend them all together. At times, you swear you almost hear strings, woodwinds or choirs in the dissonant mess of the music. Utterly brilliant, but not easy to listen to at all (I've only made it through the whole thing once).

Cynic - Focus: An odd hybrid of heavy metal, jazz and new age, with vocals that range from spoken word female, death metal growls and computerized vocals. Unlike other bands that blended death metal and jazz, Cynic doesn't alternate between the two, but mixed them into an odd combination that is neither (or both at the same time).

Spastic Ink - Ink Complete: Taking a kind of Oulipo approach to instrumental metal. The guitar player picks some constraint and then writes a song following it. One uses only Suspended chords in alternating measures on 7/8 and 9/8. One syncs everything to Bambi. One only uses 2 notes: C and C#.

Thought Industry: Another metal band, starting quite spastic on Songs for Insects (switching from thrash to Nordic folk to punk all in the span of a few minutes). Later albums toned this down into a more lush alternative sound, but the lyrics still stayed completely bizarre:

I'll carve out my grandfather's spine
and turn it into a boat
Shore up the holes with my hands
and see if the vessel will float

Others deal with Satan buying a postcard or song titles like "I'm Lonely (and Grooving like Cancer)."

David Torn: Guitar's resident mad scientist, he's the king of guitar looping, and on "What Means Solid, Traveler?" he comes up with some downright strange instrumental guitar.

Tribes of Neurot - Adaptation and Survival: 2 CDs of music composed entirely out of samples insect noises. It's some of the creepiest stuff I've heard.

Ulver: Each album individually is not very weird, but taken as a whole, this band is quite odd. One album is black metal, one is acoustic folk (and one blends the two). One is techno, one is urban soundscapes. The most odd is Themes from William Blake's The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. It slips from industrial to folk to progressive rock, and occupies a lot of territory between them. All the lyrics are from Blake's poetry, and sung with a lot of different vocal styles. The most odd thing is that all the different sytles come from the same musicians.

Yat-Kha: Mixing traditional Tuvan/Mongolian folk music with rock, the vocals are certainly odd (if you're not familiar with Tuvan throat singing, one singer manages to sing multiple notes at the same time for a quite odd effect).

Frank Zappa: I'm surprised he hasn't been entioned yet. He's not just silly lyrics, but came up with some of the most bizarre and complex rock music written.

-Robert
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 01:38 pm:   

Ah! Mr. Devereux (not to be confused with Robert Devereaux) checks in and doesn't mention his own music? Check out:

http://strangetravelers.com/audio.shtml

to hear his audio version of Ambergris (yes, Jeff VanderMeer's Ambergris) and other cool original music.

Glenn Branca always makes me think of Band of Susans, but aren't they connected in some way? I have to second Cynic and Thought Industry; I completely forgot about both bands, but I still pull out my tape of Songs For Insects every now and then and groove to it. My favorite track is "Blistered Text and Bleeding Pens."

Soul Coughing is another weird group who unfortunately broke up. They created some great word poems in their music. The words didn't necessarily work together in a classic sentence structure, but the flavor and texture of the sounds meshed together to make cool sounds.

And then I'll mention Telepopmusik and Massive Attack because I'm getting into that type of music these days.

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rhys
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 07:02 am:   

Massive Attack are great. I've only started getting into them recently too...

Brainticket anyone? Really weird and obscure band from the early 1970s. I'd love it if even one other person here has heard of them!

(I nearly accidentially posted this message on the 'stories to be read aloud' thread! Has anyone else posted a message in the wrong thread?)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 07:09 am:   

That's because you use 'Last Day'

'Last Day' for all your armageddon needs!
Brought to you by Rhyscorp.

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 09:51 am:   

Thanks for the plug John, I'm just too familiar with my own stuff to think of it as odd.

There is a Branca / Band of Susans connection. Page Hamilton has worked with both of them, as a member of Branca's "orchestra" and as a member of Band of Susans.

-Robert
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 10:12 am:   

Yeah, that's what it was! I saw Band of Susans in college at the UW-Madison's Ratheskeller and sat about three feet away from Page Hamilton. Not much later I was rocking out to Helmet, not even comprehending that I could have touched the guy if I wanted to. Another weird college connection. I saw a group, The Blake Babies, which I thought were horrendous. Then their lead singer, Julianna Hatfield, went on to a solo career. It took me months to figure out why she was so familiar.

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 11:44 am:   

Brainticket are fab. What have you heard? Cottonwoodhill is quite brilliant. There's an album that came out in the last few years that isn't so good though, as is often the the problem when bands "return".
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nicholas Liu
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 11:54 pm:   

Yay for Massive Attack. Great stuff.

I suppose Portishead could be considered "strange", too?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 02:36 am:   

If Portishead are strange, then so are Goldfrapp.

I'm willing to say that both these bands are "strange", but I guess this begins a debate on what exactly is strange. Does it necessarily have anything to do with obscurity?

I mean, can weird acts that are popular ever really be considered strange? Captain Beefheart is incredibly strange but is he obscure enough to be STRANGE?

Is strange a weird form of elitism???
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nicholas Liu
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 03:00 am:   

And can something be considered strange by virtue of the fact that one has no idea why it's popular?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 05:47 am:   

Beefheart *is* strange. Doesn't matter how popular or famous he is he's weird, odd, funny and just a teensy bit gaga! Anyone who considers the album Trout Mask Replica anything but strange has spent too long in specialist record shops.

Either that or they're the good Cap'n himself!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 02:33 pm:   

Captain Beefheart is unquestionably strange. But not Massive Attack or Portishead or Goldfrapp. I like all three, mind you. But I don't particularly care for Captain Beefheart. Even if Henry Cow opened for them....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

paul witcover
Posted on Saturday, May 10, 2003 - 03:59 am:   

The Residents, I see, have been mentioned, but let us never forget, and forever honor, their late and much-lamented collaborator, the guitarist, Snakefinger.

I don't know if Spiritualized counts as strange or not, but I like them and I'm strange, so that's good enough for me.

Definitely Robyn Hitchcock! Although, like Magnetic Fields, his music begs the question of what constitutes strangeness: is it musical oddity, a la Residents, or general weirdness of lyrics or attitude?

And what about Hasel Adkins? There's the tribute album I want to see! U2 doing "No More Hot Dog."



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LLP
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - 12:52 pm:   

Anyone ever hear of a band called ojo? They were beyond description in both areas of talent & oddity. They were never signed & mysteriously dissapeared shortly after releasing their demo. I'm sure if you hunt around you can still find some of their stuff floating around.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lester Luallin
Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 - 01:21 pm:   

Some of y'all got some funny ideas when it comes to strange music. Quasi? Guided by Voices?

Try out some Hellebore, Officer, Masonna, Eddie Detroit, Little Fyodor. For those of you into the Improv wierdness, how about Paper Bag, Last Exit. I use to love wierd music in the 80's, but now I'm all about straight-up rocknroll. One slightly wierd hippy rock record I still enjoy is Peter Peter Ivers "Terminal Love." I used to think Lydia Lunch was pretty wierd. It's even tough for me to listen to that nowadays. That Masonna is pure torture. Oh, how could I forget Blurt from Glasgow Scotland. Their earlier releases were a little odd; hits include "Fish Needs a Bike" and "Dog Save My Sole"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nicholas Liu
Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 - 08:50 pm:   

Luis just introduced me to the music of a band called Blasted Mechanism, and they sound pretty strange to me.

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Tom Waits yet.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Tuesday, May 25, 2004 - 03:31 am:   

I know this thread is rather long dead but... Radio KRMB is back - the original Krautrock Message Board. Krautrock is the emphasis but we'll be covering all areas of experimental and psychedelic music and general weirdness in music and the arts.

We're here: http://www.iotacism.com/discus/
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 05:58 pm:   

animal collective 'sung tongs': does for the sun what comus' 'first utterance' did for the moon.

peter grudzien 'the unicorn': way strange country by a man with a thing for johnny cash.

kenneth higney 'attic demonstration': he can't really sing, not sure if he can play guitar, but it's a charming disjointed record just the same.

fiery furnaces 'blueberry boat': an antique made in the future. a time capsule for aliens to tell about the human race.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2005 - 10:33 am:   

I'm trying to find review sites or blogs that deal with strange music. Can anyone recommend some?

Two I can think of are:

http://www.musiquemachine.com/
http://www.monotremata.com/dead/

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Atwell
Posted on Saturday, July 23, 2005 - 05:51 pm:   

Beefheart is unquestionably strange music, at first. But there is musical method to his madness. His music can be so dense that you have to give it a while to sink in. I love Sheriff of Hong Kong -- it is SO wierd, but it's so strong, it simply has to be that way.

Mauricio Kagel is strange, especially his early works. List to Der Schall or Acustica (if you can find 'em anywhere). Kagel was a major influence on the young John Zorn. Zorn's The Parachute Years (his early "game pieces") are a direct result of his interest in Kagel.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Luke Jackson
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 11:24 am:   

I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Aphex Twin or the Flaming Lips. Old Butthole Surfers for the new era.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 12:15 pm:   

Flaming Lips are pretty strange. Don't know about Aphex Twin, the little bits I heard didn't strike me as strange. But my view itself is strange. Many so called strange things sound normal to me.

Maudlin of the Well, who later became Kayo Dot, throw everything into songs. Death metal, jazz, folk, alternative. It's a weird experience.

I can also think of 2 labels that are almost exclusively strange music
Mimicry: http://www.webofmimicry.com/label.php
Jester Records: http://www.jester-records.com/
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StephenB
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 01:15 pm:   

Yeah, Aphex Twin trys to have strange videos. But I don't like them much. Too techno and gimmicky for me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 01:17 pm:   

The band itself, as well as the videos.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Luke Jackson
Posted on Thursday, September 01, 2005 - 02:49 pm:   

How about Mr. Bungle-- there's a band that throws everything in the mix. Or how about O Yuki Conjugate??
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 04:31 am:   

Mr. Bungle and many of Patton's projects would qualify, probably.

Also Steven Malkmus' (from Pavement) solo stuff.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 05:52 am:   

I'm not familiar with O Yuki Conjugate.

Bungle never did much for me. I'm more fond of Secret Chiefs 3, who are mostly Bungle without Patton.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 09:57 am:   

I love the Grandaddy offshoot, Arm of Roger, especially their song, "Robot Escort." Looks as if Grandaddy has let the domain lapse on their Sweat of the Alps label, so the mp3 ain't available anymore. Shame.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Pratt
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 10:46 am:   

Z-Rock Hawaii. It's Ween, with the vocal assistance of that screaming guy from The Boredoms. Some of the weirdest stuff I ever heard.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

R.Wilder
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 11:07 am:   

Three & Four Pullovers (1975-78) on the Emanem label. Steve Beresford, Nigel Coombes, Roger Smith and Terry Day playing toys, electronics, guitars, cellos, mandolins, euphonium, violins and percussion. European free improvisation ---insect music at its abstract best.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steve aylett
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2005 - 08:55 am:   

i've just brought out this vortical monstrosity (The Wesley Kern Gun) -

http://www.ikuisuus.net/products.php?id=2286&kategoriaLevy=11&artisti=WESLEY%20K ERN%20GUN,%20THE&nimi=Rocket%20to%20the%20Room%20-%20CDR&hinta=5.00&PHPSESSID=c0 2155f5d5477740462d3d9e11f33307
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 10:08 am:   

The Neverhood and Skull Monkeys were both really weird video games with some very bizarre music. I'm happy the soundtrack was re-released and is available here http://www.danielamos.com/store/

There are some MP3s here http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/thumbs.aloft/wos/skull.htm
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 10:38 am:   

I loved the Neverhood soundtrack while I was playing the game. I tried to listen to it straight through once and my head almost exploded.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 11:09 am:   

My head may well explode when I get it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 11:26 pm:   

Someone at work has this and I listened to a bunch of it nostalgically today, and yes, there was only so much I could take. Still, good stuff. You're only the third person I know who actually played any part of Skull Monkeys (apart from (presumably) its creators). I played a bit of it. The Neverhood, on the other hand, I played pretty much straight through. Great great game.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 09:34 am:   

There were a large number of us at college who loved Skull Monkeys. We got it without even knowing what it was about, the name itself sold us. I've been trying to find the soundtrack for about a year now. Until I found the site yesterday, I only saw it for $40+.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

iotar
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 06:48 am:   

"Raagnagrok are a synthesizer and electric sitar duo who produce an ecstatic cosmic raga-drone - psychedelic, hypnotic and transcendental. Easy journey to other planets, from 45 minutes to eternity."

Just in case anyone here is attending: Raagnagrok, my electric sitar and synth duo will be performing will be playing at Concussion, the 2006 Eastercon - 57th British National Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow. Sometime between April 14th and 17th. (More details when programmes are finalised.)

If you can't wait that long we are playing twice before Eastercon:

24/03/06: Dalston Klinker on a fun filled bill including Draper's Fowl, John Waterhouse and a new Hugh film. As ever the Klinker is at the Sussex pub, 107a Culford Rd, N1, starts 9pm - 5/3 concessions.

04/04/06: supporting cosmic jam veterans The Green Ray at The Plough Inn, E17. (Wood Street Station, Bus 230 (from Wood Green) and W16 (from Leytonstone underground) stop outside the venue. Bus 56, 257, 357, W12, W15.) An evening of new and classic psychedelic music for discerning psychonauts. And if that's not enough, The Plough serves a very palatable selection of European beers. Starts 8pm - 5 on the door.

But if you are going to miss all of these events you can always download our 23 minute long 0707 EP here: http://www.iotacism.com/rgk, or our Resonance FM live session here: http://podcasts.resonancefm.com/archives/61

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register

| Moderators | Administrators |