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John Hawkes: nobody likes him except me!

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Rhys
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 04:30 am:   

For the past two or three years I have being trying to share my enthusiasm for the novels of John Hawkes -- with absolutely no success!

I have nearly lost count of the number of times I have persuaded friends and strangers to read such books as THE LIME TWIG, TRAVESTY, THE BLOOD ORANGES, SECOND SKIN, etc, etc, only for those people to come back and say, "Why did you force me to read those? What the f--k were they all about???"

Am I alone? Am I the only person who likes John Hawkes?
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GabrielM
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 08:58 am:   

No, Patrick MacGrath likes him a lot. And I like MacGrath.

Actually I remember reading (many years ago) LIME TWIG and BEETLE LEG. One is something of a surrealistic mystery the other a surrealistic western. Unfortunately I can't remember which is which. I liked them well enough, although I suppose not enough to read more. But given your endorsement perhaps I should....
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 09:42 am:   

I like The Lime Twig quite a bit. Read it a long time ago, but thought it was excellent.
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Mike S
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 12:11 pm:   

Rhys, which book would you recommend for a first-time reader of Hawkes?
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ellen
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 08:17 pm:   

I loved Blood Oranges when I read it. I also read and like Travesty.
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Stepan Chapman
Posted on Thursday, September 30, 2004 - 05:24 am:   

I discovered John Hawkes this year and immediately plowed through four of his incredibly depressing but brilliantly poetic novels. If you've ever wondered how an American-born Samuel Beckett might write, check out John Hawkes.
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Rhys
Posted on Friday, October 01, 2004 - 02:25 am:   

Yes they are depressing but poetic. SECOND SKIN is especially depressing but poetic. What I haven't yet worked out is: does the lyricism lessen the bleakness in any way? Does it actually add to it? Or does it leave it alone?
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literature
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 06:46 am:   

One who can't tell what literature really is, can never enjoy reading J. Hawkes. His exceptionally innovative writing style, which, I admit, is very implicit and complex, made most readers think that he wrote nonsense. However, to appreciate reading J.Hawkes, one should first be very demanding towards literary works. I, personnally, not only find an enomous pleasure in reading his great novels, but I also feel such an admiration for his writring that I'm preparing a Ph.D on his fiction through a psychoanalytical approach.
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literature
Posted on Friday, October 08, 2004 - 06:48 am:   

One who can't tell what literature really is, can never enjoy reading J. Hawkes. His exceptionally innovative writing style, which, I admit, is very implicit and complex, made most readers think that he wrote nonsense. However, to appreciate reading J.Hawkes, one should first be very demanding towards literary works. I, personnally, not only find an enormous pleasure in reading his great novels, but I also feel such an admiration for his writring that I'm preparing a Ph.D on his fiction through a psychoanalytical approach.

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