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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 05:02 am:   

Here's where I rant about stuff I've picked up. Feel free to join in!

Jason
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 05:03 am:   

Stopped by Powells on Friday, and picked up:

Christopher Priest - The Prestige (tpb)
Cory Doctorow - Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom (hc 1st)
Mervyn Peake - Letters from a Lost Uncle (Methuen hc 1st)
Scott Nicholson - The Red Church (mmpb)
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 05:07 am:   

Stopped by Powells on my way home from the grocery store yesterday, and snagged:

Edward Carey - Observatory Mansions (tpb)

Philip K. Dick - Our Friends from Frolix 8, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch and The Penultimate Truth. I realized today that I've never seen a used PKD paperback. At least, not unless it was in a plastic bag with a collector's price on it. I've never actually seen a used PKD paperback on the shelf. So I bought these three just for the novelty, although I haven't read The Penultimate Truth.

William Gibson - Pattern Recognition (hc 1st) I'm hoping this is good. I hated Virtual Light, and because of that never got around to reading Idoru and All Tomorrow's Parties. Am I missing anything?
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 05:13 am:   

Timescapes!

For those that don't know, I'm trying to put a Timescape bibliography together, and in the process trying to put a full set of Timescapes together. I've found most of the mmpbs so far, but a few have eluded me. Friday I got lucky and scored a bunch of the ones I was missing:

Robert Anton Wilson - The Masks of the Illuminati
Cherry Wilder - Second Nature
Chelsea Quinn-Yarbro - The Saint-Germain Chronicles
A.E. Van Vogt - The Wizard of Linn
Marta Randall - Journey
Gene Wolfe - The Shadow of the Torturer (3rd series, already had a first series)
Terry Carr - Fantasy Annual IV
PKD - The Transmigration of Timothy Archer
Norman Spinrad - The Iron Dream
Marion Zimmer Bradley - The Ruins of Isis
Nancy Kress - The Prince of Morning Bells
Randall Garrett - The Best of Randall Garrett
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GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 11:25 am:   

Do you have the Clark Ashton Smith Timescapes?
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 11:51 am:   

Nope, missing:

All three Clark Ashton Smith's, both Jack Vance books, and two of the three PKD books (Confessions of a Crap Artist and The Divine Invasion).

There's some other stuff I think I might be missing, but I don't know for sure. I think there's an Octavia Butler Timescape pb, as well as a couple of George R.R. Martin pbs, but I haven't confirmed it yet. I'll post a list of what I do have so far.

I've only got four of the trade paperbacks, and only a couple of the hardcovers. Been mostly focussing on the mmpb stuff so far.
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Jay Caselberg
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 12:40 pm:   

Idoru and Parties were okay, but to my mind, just okay. The latest has been reviewed very positively in a couple of places. I'm waiting for my galley to arrive...
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GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 01:01 pm:   

What was the third PKD -- Transmigration of Timothy Archer?

I picked up PATTERN RECOGNITION today, together with the Doctorow and THE DANTE CLUB, a historical mystery that looked intriguing. In the mail I received the first three volumes from the Ash-Tree paperback line, including the very cool VAMPIRES OVERHEAD, from the infamous Wagner list.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 01:12 pm:   

Right, Transmigration was the third PKD Timescape title.

I've got all three of the Ash-Tree tpbs on order. I'm especially looking forward to the Cardin collection, as I've liked what I've read.

Jason
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Minh Nguyen
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 01:00 am:   

William Gibson lost me after MONA LISA OVERDRIVE, but this new novel is supposed to be very good. I guess I'll have to pick it up tomorrow.
Does anyone on this board read Andrew Vachss? His new novel THE GETAWAY MAN just came out and I thought it kicked ass! It was a short fast read a truly a homage to the old pulp crime novels.
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 09:05 am:   

Vachss' first few Burke novels, like FLOOD and STREGA, were superb high-impact noir, but I thought he really started to go downhill FAST, and I stopped reading them a few years ago. I might pick up this new one, since it's not part of the series....
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 09:06 am:   

I read the first Cardin story, it was quite good, and I also liked the intro. It's a short volume, only three or four stories. Somewhat Ligottiesque, but less surreal.
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 02:31 pm:   

I read the Priest, Doctorow and Gibson novels - all of which are worth the trouble. On Pattern Recognition - it's the best novel he's done since NEUROMANCER. It's a bit like Stan Robinson's ANTARCTICA, in the sense that it takes a lot of the themes and ideas of an earlier major work and compresses it down into one single concise statement. I don't think it's actually SF, but I don't think Gibson is really an SF writer, so that's cool.
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Forrest
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 02:42 pm:   

I've said it before, I'll say it again: Edward Carey's OBSERVATORY MANSIONS may be one of the best books I've read.
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Ben Wooller
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 07:02 pm:   

[quote]I hated Virtual Light, and because of that never got around to reading Idoru and All Tomorrow's Parties. Am I missing anything? [/quote]

All Tomorrow's Parties, for me, is Gibson's best work. It's best to read Idoru first.
I think I like it because it has a very un-Gibson ending...
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Stepan Chapman
Posted on Sunday, February 09, 2003 - 11:59 pm:   

I'm reading two books on the history of medicine: Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Shewin B. Nuland and The Greatest Benefit To Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity by Roy Porter.

This research relates to some work I'm involved in for an upcoming Jeff VanderMeer/Mark Roberts project called... deep breath... The Thackery T. Lambshead Pocket Guide To Eccentric & Discredited Diseases.

I read fiction too, now and then. Silly stuff, fiction.
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GabrielM
Posted on Saturday, February 15, 2003 - 06:11 pm:   

Read PATTERN RECOGNITION straight on a five hour plane ride from Mexico City, enjoyed it a great deal, certainly more than any book of his since NEUROMANCER.
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jonathan briggs
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 05:59 pm:   

Just got a box of stuff from Shocklines, including the new Lebbon collection. Great job on the book, Night Shade guys, as always.

Sitting here at work, missing the William Gibson reading at Borders. But the recent snow has pretty much shut the DC area down, so I doubt the event went on anyway.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 07:52 am:   

I finally finished Pattern Recognition. The ending is a little waffly, but other than that I think it's Gibson's best book in a long time.

I also finished Chris Priest's The Prestige. Good book, although the ending was a bit abrupt.

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Night Shade Books
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 08:01 am:   

Another run to Powells yesterday:

Lawrence Block, Hope to Die : The most recent Matt Scudder mystery. I started it last night, finished it this morning. Entertaining if you're a Scudder fan.

Patrick O'Leary, The Impossible Bird : Heard a lot of good stuff about this guy. Seems to be another of the literate fantasy posse.

Robert Crais, The Last Detective : Crais is one of the only mystery writers that I still buy in hardcover. This one is a new Elvis Cole novel, and that fills me with joy :-)

Patrick Suskind, Perfume : I'm slowly putting together a collection of first editions of World Fantasy Award winners. I had a German hardcover first, which is the true first, but my German is a bit rusty. So I was happy to score a US first for $25. Perfect copy.

Bruce Sterling, Tomorrow Now : Seems like just about every SF author takes a crack at writing a nonfiction book on the future, and I'm pretty ambivalent about most of them. But I'm a Sterling junkie, and I loved The Hacker Crackdown. Of course, I was around when the events in that book took place, and I knew more than a few folks who were ducking for cover during it.

Other recent acquistions:

First editions of Zelazny's Lord of Light and Doors of His Face. Ex-lib, but Lord of Light is a $2800 book, so I'm more than happy with the $50 I paid for it. I'll spend another $50 replacing the endsheets, and then I'll just sit back being happy.

I think that's it for now.

Jason
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Rhys
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 08:25 am:   

Tell me Jason: is Lord of Light so expensive because the first edition was pulped by mistake? It was Creatures of Light & Darkness that should have been pulped.

I seem to recall reading that somewhere but maybe I dreamed it!
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 09:13 am:   

I agree about the ending of PATTERN RECOGNITION. The book becomes a conventional thriller when it could've been more of a Pynchonesque metaphysical thriller. Oh well, still a very good read.
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 11:32 pm:   

Rhys... Lord of Light was indeed one of the famous Zelazny "accidentally pulped" books. A small number (Less then 100?) went out as review copies, and to library pre-orders...

I'm VERY jealous of Jason's recent ex-lib acquisition...
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 06:17 pm:   

Jeremy was in town this weekend, and we went on a booking binge.

John Myers Myers - I picked up Silverlock, The Hard and the Blade, and The Moon's Fire-Eating Daughter.

Walter Mosley - Little Yellow Dog, White Butterfly and Black Betty, all Easy Rawlins detective novels. Because you need series mysteries.

James Blish - Dr. Mirabilis, A Case of Conscience, Black Easter and Day After Judgement.

Matthew Woodring Stover - Heroes Die. I'd just assumed he was more craptastic fantasy, but I've been assured by many that I'm missing out on a great thing, so it's time to find out for myself.

R.A. Lafferty - Nine Hundred Grandmothers and The Reefs of Earth. Never read Lafferty, so I figured a collection and a novel would be a good start.

Charles Finney - Circus of Dr. Lao and The Magician out of Manchuria.

Randall Garrett - Lord Darcy Investigatess, Murder and Magic, and Too Many Magicians. I think this is all of the Lord Darcy stuff. I'm a couple of stories into Murder and Magic, and mostly I'm having a hard time keeping all of the nobles straight.

Geoffrey Landis - Mars Crossing. I like his GG collection, so I figured I should read his novel as well.

Andrew Offutt, ed - Swords Against Darkness II. Because it's got Ramsey and Wellman and all kinds of rippling manflesh.

Poul Anderson - The Broken Sword. Heard good things about it.

Chico Kidd - The Printers Devil. Been hearing good things, and I liked the Carnacki pastiches.

Jack Williamson - The Legion of Space. A Timescape paperback I didn't have.

PKD - The Clans of the Alphane Moon. Because it just seems wrong not to buy used PKD paperbacks when I see them.

Greg Costikyan - First Contract. Entertaining, but not as good as I'd heard. The ending is pretty wonky.

And three Timescape hardcovers I didn't have:

Charles Whitmore - Winter's Daughter
Tim Lukeman - Witchwood
Fred Pohl - Years of the City
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 07:34 pm:   

Hi Jason
Re: your purchase of Lafferty's 900 Grandmothers - the folk over at NESFA have mumbled on and off about doing a best of Lafferty but have taken no substantive steps to do it. It's a book that MUST be done, and NS could be the perfect press for the job. There's 400 or so pages of mindbogglingly good short stuff to collect. Should you ever be interested, I'd be happy to help in any way I could, as I'm sure would folk like Dan Knight and Chris Drumm.

Best
Jonathan
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 01:03 pm:   

I also picked up a copy of Chico Kids's The Printer's Devil, and am enjoying the heck out of it. The contrasts between the archaic "found" manuscripts, and the contemporary text is wonderfull. The oddest thing is the latin footnotes scattered throughout the text -- the seem to have been added after the fact by an editor at baen... In fact, I am shocked that Bean published this book at all, as it seems to be far outside their editorial norm. A great book so far. The contemporary parts remind me of Jonathan Aycliff.

Over the weekend, I finished my arc of Christopher Moore's forthcoming book "Fluke, or I Know Why the Winged Wale Sings". It is brilliant, and should be sought out by anybody who likes comedy and satire. Though it would not seem like it from the outset, this one probably qualifies as his most "science fictional" novel yet, though he has always zig zaged willy nilly over genre boundaries. It certinaly is a novel that could not have been published as a mainstream book, had not science fiction already conqured the world.

-JL
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2003 - 12:57 am:   

Jonathan,

I'm tempted by the Lafferty idea, but it seems the Wildside factory has beat me to it.

Jason
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2003 - 03:40 pm:   

Argh. Really? I knew they have been/were reprinting the existing books, but was unaware of any "best of" plans. Sigh.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2003 - 05:56 pm:   

They're not doing an omnibus, but we would be hard pressed to sell a "Best of" when they've got all the original collections in print.

Jason
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2003 - 09:06 pm:   

Hi Jason

I take your point about Wildside. I guess my thought had been that, given the high price and low quality of most of the Wildside eds, that their books wouldn't a great issue - from what I understand, they haven't had much impact on Tor's Davidson Treasury with their Davidson books. I also have this belief (unsupported by fact) that a well-edited, well-designed trade paperback of Lafferty fiction in the same format as the university presses "Readers" (The John McPhee Reader, The Ray Bradbury Reader etc), would do really well and would be a fine book. Still, I'd be lying if I didn't understand a real element of commercial caution where Lafferty's concerned.

Jonathan

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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 02:19 am:   

Gotta brag about this one.

William Hope Hodgson - The Luck of the Strong, Eveleigh Nash, 1916. First edition in really nice shape.

Price? $160

I am a happy fellow.

Jason
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Gregory Feeley
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2003 - 12:47 pm:   

The Zelazny hardcover that saw most of its first edition pulped was NINE PRINCES IN AMBER. Very few surviving copies save those sold by advance order to libraries.

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