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Jeremy
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 02:35 pm:   

Hi everyone. My Name is Jeremy Lassen, and I’m one of the owners here at Night Shade. I'd like to take this opportunity to ask everyone to read our company statement at http://www.nightshadebooks.com/company.html, and to let us know what authors you would like to see us publish. “Me” is not a valid response, btw. :-) In particular, we are always looking for suggestions for our “classics” line.

The ideal material for our classics line is out of print, and used/reading copies are expensive. If used reading copies are relatively inexpensive, and easy to come by, or first additions hard covers are less than $50, its not quite right for our “classics” line.

Within those parameters, I’d love to hear suggestions. This thread would be an ideal place to make them. Of course we won’t be able to do everything. In fact, we probably won’t be able to do most of them. But feedback from our readers is invaluable. It was a customer that initially suggested we look into Lord Dunsany’s “Jorkens Stories”. This suggestion proved to be a very timely, as it came right around the time the Dunsany estate found a manuscript for an unpublished collection of Jorkens stories. So feel free to tell us what you want to see published. You never know.

– JML
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Andrew Breitenbach
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 10:42 pm:   

Well now that you and the Ministry o' Whimsy ("Minowhim" for short) are in bed together, perhaps a hardcover edition of Stepan Chapman's P. K. Dick award winning novel THE TROIKA could *finally* be in order...?

Just a thought. :-)


(Or -- as he has a message board here -- how about Calder's two Malignos novels?)


-Andrew Breitenbach
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Bob
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2003 - 10:45 pm:   

I'll just get it out of the way and say, "Me."
Aw, c'mon, you knew one of us was going to say it, it might as well be me.
That said, how about:
Originals
Rhys Hughes
D.F. Lewis
More M.J. Harrison
More Graham Joyce
Another collection from Kage Baker (Yes, I know you didn't do the first one, Black Projects, White Knights, but I'd love to see her continue to do anthologies. The lady has a flair for the short form, y'know?)

Classics
Mark Twain Family -- Perhaps the best, most comprehensive Twain collection I've ever seen.

The Gormenghast Trilogy -- C'mon, someone had to -- redux.

I've got a box full of old 30's, 40's and 50's pulps. I'd love to see someone do a collection. Some of those old digests -- Astounding, Other Worlds, Fantastic Universe -- have early stories from Clarke, Ellison, Sturgeon. That'd be something, if it can be done at all -- I'd buy it. Just a thought.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 12:12 am:   

Rhys Hughes - Ahead of you, we've got a novel with Rhys coming out sometime in the next year and a half.

M. John Harrison - Working on it

Graham Joyce - No plans for anything other than The Stormwatcher, but I'm always open to possibilities.

Gormenghast / Peake - I'd love to have an excuse to do Gormenghast, but it's been done in about 7.2 million editions at this point. Hell, I'd love to do anything with Peake. By the way, pick up the UK hardcover of Letters from a Lost Uncle. It rocks.

Jason
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Bill B.
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 03:48 am:   

Not classics (yet), but I suggest:

Ramsey Campbell - The Darkest Part of the Woods - a less expensive edition of the UK limited from PS Publishing) would be especially welcome (to me at least). There was also a flap some months ago about Arkham House's rejection of his latest story collection, Night Shade seems like a perfect home for it. Then there's his collected non-fiction, also from PS... In fact, I think a regular line of collected PS novellas, reasonably priced (e.g. the UK "Foursight" from Gollancz which collects the first four) would be SUPER.

John Crowley - Antiquities - this collection can't be touched for anywhere near $50. A Harrison treatment would be ideal, combining Antiquitiies, Novelty, and uncollected stories.

Chico Kidd mentions on her website that she's still shopping her Captain Luis da Silva trilogy, I'm a big fan of her ghost stories and the da Silva chapbooks and I'm dying to read the novels.

John Gordon's mid-70's ghost story collection Catch Your Death is another wishlist item, I can't seem to find a copy of it for ANY price. An expanded edition would be even sweeter.

Finally (for now), as for classics, a Dino Buzzati omnibus is a particular fantasy of mine.

Bill B.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 03:57 am:   

Bill,

I was under the impression that a big fat Crowley collection was forthcoming from someone, and that it would contain Novelty and Antiquities? Or maybe I'm on drugs.

As to Chico Kidd, I had a copy of Summoning Knells, but never actually got around to reading it. I have read the Ash-Tree Carnacki pastiches that she contributed to, and those were fun.

John Gordon? Never heard of him. Any antho recommendations for digging up some stories?

As to the Campbell collection that Arkham bounced, I believe that PS is doing that one as well. Pete's finger is quicker on the trigger (make that quicker on the telephone) than mine :-)

I don't know that we'll be doing any PS omnibuses, as it seems fairly easy to get ahold of the Gollancz editions (what are they up to now, four?), but there are several of the PS novellas that will be reproduced in various collections we'll be doing.

Jason
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Luís
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 05:55 am:   

Bill: Dino Buzzati seems like a wonderful suggestion, I've heard many great things about him!

As for books I'd like to see, please please please see FM's Shadow Cabinet list here:

http://www.fantasticmetropolis.com/show.html?ed,shadow,3
http://www.fantasticmetropolis.com/show.html?ed,shadow,4

The list needs updating (for example, the Whittemore books and A VOYAGE TO ARCTURUS are back in print), but there's still a lot of great stuff there.

Cheers, Luís
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Steve Miller
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 07:06 am:   

How about FLICKER?
How about SMILE ON THE VOID by Stuart Gordon?
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GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 10:33 am:   

Off the top of my head:

EH Visiak's MEDUSA (although John Pelan might be working on that one for his Midnight House imprint)

Richard Garnett's TWILIGHT OF THE GODS, a fabulous short story collection.

Henry Whitehead -- early Weird Tales ghost story author who's never been anthologized on his own outside of his two Arkham House collections, JUMBEE and WEST INDIA LIGHTS. Stories all set in the Virgin Islands, local folklore plays a big part.

Jack Mann -- His series of occult detective novels set in pre-WWII Britain are just great. They were reprinted by Bookfinger but are not that easy to find, and few people seem to know about him.

E. Hoffmann Price -- There are no collections of his outside of his Arkham House volume from many years ago and the collector's item Karl Edward Wagner did for his Carcosa imprint. He was a wonderful storyteller, deserves to be rediscovered.

Joseph Payne Brennan -- Another excellent Weird Tales writer, albeit from a later generation. Collecting all his stories as you did with Wellman would be quite a service. Like MWW he also dabbled in the occult detective genre, with his Lucius Leffing stories.

I'll come up with some more.

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Bill B.
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 11:29 am:   

John Gordon is the author of the well-regarded ghost novel THE HOUSE ON THE BRINK; two stories from CATCH YOUR DEATH were reprinted in THE YEAR'S BEST HORROR STORIES SERIES XIII (thus I see that the book is from 1984 and not the 70s, though HOUSE is of 70s vintage); there's a 1990s collection called THE BURNING BABY that's easy to find.

As long as *someone* is doing a Crowley collection, I'm happy.

Regarding Joseph Payne Brennan, I'm under the impression that John Pelan is working on a Complete Brennan for Midnight House, though I'm not sure.

Another thing I'm not sure about is a rumor I heard last year that Night Shade would be doing a Conrad Williams collection; if true, that's great news, and if not, well, I hope *someone* is doing it.

Lisa Tuttle's collection MY PATHOLOGY was orphaned when Pumpkin Books folded; it's available only as an ebook right now. I'd like to have it as an *actual* book, perhaps augmented by the out-of-print A NEST OF NIGHTMARES collection.

And as a final aside, Chico Kidd's pb novel from Baen, THE PRINTER'S DEVIL, is well worth tracking down a copy of, she does a great job of expanding her particular obsessions (ghosts, magic, and bell-ringing) to novel length.

Bill B.
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james
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2003 - 01:37 pm:   

How about "A Writer's Tale" by Richard Laymon? From what I understand Kelly Laymon has written that there is material that is new for an expanded version.
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Martin Andersson
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 02:53 am:   

I have said it before in an e-mail to you, but I might as well repeat here where everybody can see it: I would love to see a Collected Poems and Prose Poems of Clark Ashton Smith. You did a GREAT job on the poems of H. P. Lovecraft. :-)
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 02:55 am:   

Actually, I think someone is doing the collected poetry of CAS. Maybe it was Arkham or Hippocampus? I'm pretty sure Scott Connors was editing it, possibly with David Schultz.

Wow, aren't I helpful. I'll dig around, and see what I can find out.

My dream (well, one of them) would be to do a 5-volume collected fictions of CAS.

Jason
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 02:58 am:   

Oh by the way, I received a very nice package from Ireland today:

An unpublished Lord Dunsany novel, The Pleasures of a Futuroscope.

Jason
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 03:11 am:   

Just to respond to a couple of suggestions....

There is some truth to the Conrad Williams rumor. Nothing set in stone, but we're working with him on a possible collection.

The Brennan project was one I brough to John Pelan several years ago as a possible follow-up to the Wellman set. Once again, nothing set in stone, but it's still a possibility at some point.

Jason
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Jack Haringa
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 03:37 am:   

Jason's right, Hippocampus has just released a collection of the fantastic poetry of Clark Ashton Smith titled "The Last Oblivion" and edited by S. T. Joshi and David E. Schultz.

They've also done A. Merritt's "The Metal Monster", but I'd love to see some of Merritt's more obscure work back in print, like "Seven Footprints to Satan", "The Moon Pool", and his short story collection "The Fox Woman and other stories". This last would be great in combination with Sam Moskowitz's book on Merritt (a collection of fragments, a short biography, some poetry, and essays) "Reflections In the Moon Pool". I don't believe the short story collection has seen print since its original run in 1946 or so, and Moskowitz's book had only one short run from Oswald Train in the 70s.

~Jack~
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Rhys
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 03:37 am:   

Some of James Branch Cabell's lesser known titles such as HAMLET HAD AN UNCLE and that one about the pirate and his ghost... (and maybe also the excellent THE CREAM OF THE JEST). A woefully neglected writer, despite JURGEN.

A collected Felisberto Hernandez...

Frigyes Karinthy's CAPILLARIA, one of the strangest fantasy novels of all time!

Felipe Alfau's two novels in one volume.

A collected or selected Maurice Richardson (now that Savoy have republished Engelbrecht this probably is an invalid suggestion)...

Robert Nathan.

A collected Josef Nesvadba.

Pierre Louys's wonderful THE ADVENTURES OF KING PAUSOLE.
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Rhys
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 03:40 am:   

Whoops... Oh yes, Jack Williamson's GOLDEN BLOOD. (Gabriel Mesa's mention of E. Hoffmann Price reminded me of this lost Williamson novel, which is a Hoffmann Price tribute).
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 08:58 am:   

I like GOLDEN BLOOD a lot, yet another one first serialized in Weird Tales, the magazine that keeps on giving....

As far as Clark Ashton Smith, yes, my pal Derrick Hussey put out a selected fantastic poetry of CAS last year, and it's a very nice trade paperback. Scott Connors is working on a selected letters of CAS for Arkham House. But I don't think anyone is working on a collected poetry volume and I have to say it would be a pretty difficult task, there is an ENORMOUS amount of poetry that never saw publication and tracking it all down in archives and collections would be quite an undertaking. (Hell, I OWN one of those poems.) Derrick and I spent some time last year at the New York Public Library going through Smith's correspondence with George Sterling and in those letters alone there are dozens of unpublished poems. Of course, doing a collected published CAS would be easier....

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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 09:00 am:   

By the way, THE MOON POOL is back in print. A fine book, sort of like Haggard meets Clark Ashton Smith....
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 10:51 am:   

>>My dream (well, one of them) would be to do a 5-volume collected fictions of CAS.

Would it be worth it, do you think? The benefit of doing it for Wellmann and Brennan is that it hasn't been done before, but for CAS it was done through the six Arkham House collections and the Greenwood Press book. One thing about the AH collections is that although there's gems in all of them, the best stories are in OUT OF SPACE AND TIME and LOST WORLDS -- the overall quality starts to decrease after that, and really goes downhill in the last two. Getting through some of those SF stories in particular is really a chore. I personally think CAS would be better served a by a two volume "best of" collection with good illustrations. There's no satisfying everybody, but both RENDEZVOUS IN AVEROIGNE as well as the recent EMPEROR OF DREAMS collection leave out some very good stories.
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Andrew Breitenbach
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 11:25 am:   

[Robert Nathan's "A Portrait of Jennie" is still in print from Tachyon (Rhys mentioned him a bit earlier).]


Five possibilities I was thinking of:

1) CONFERENCE WITH THE DEAD by Terry Lamsley. This was his first collection through Ash-Tree and has been sold out for years. I've seen it go for over $200 on eBay. His two other collections (UNDER THE CRUST and DARK MATTERS) -- also through Ash-Tree (though of course CRUST is a reprint of his self-published first collection) -- are a bit easier to come by, but they're still limited editions and over $50 each. An omnibus edition including his more recent stories would possibly be the greatest collection of ghost stories of the decade, imho.

2) M. R. James's THE FIVE JARS. The second publication Ash-Tree put out, and is now even harder to find than copies of its original editions! True, Ash-Tree included it in their recent A PLEASING TERROR, but that is a $75 limited edition of all things James. I've always thought this book could have quite a following if it was ever released in an affordable (not to mention *findable*) format.

3) Harper Williams's THE THING IN THE WOODS. Who knew that the same woman (Margery Williams Biano) who wrote THE VELVETEEN RABBIT also wrote a werewolf novel under a different name? I've never been able to find this.

4) Charles G. Finney's THE UNHOLY CITY. His follow-up to the classic THE CIRCUS OF DR. LAO, and is supposedly overtly science fictional (I've seen one paperback copy of this only once in my entire life, and didn't have the cash at the time to pick it up, alas).

5) George R. R. Martin's collections are just about impossible to find these days. Babbage Press has A SONG FOR LYA in print currently, and Meisha Merlin is reprinting TUF VOYAGING later this year, but the rest of them (particularly the Dark Harvest volume SONGS THE DEAD MEN SING) are difficult to come by. For some reason, even though he is hugely popular in recent years because of his small mammal-crushing fantasy novels, no major publisher has stepped forward to rerelease his collections -- despite how quickly NESFA's QUARTET sold out.

6) And once you finish your Kane program, there's always Jakes's BRAK THE BARBARIAN.... ;-)


-Andrew
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Forrest
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 11:31 am:   

How about Gustave Meyrink's collected short works. Someone did a collection of his a ways back called "The Opal and Other Stories," but I believe it was incomplete.

Oh, and Raymond Roussel's LOCUS SOLUS.

As for Gormenghast, I know that NS would be most unlikely to do this, but has anyone ever attempted a graphic novel (which would comprise volumes and volumes)?

Forrest
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Martin Andersson
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 01:07 pm:   

Regarding poetry by CAS: Yes, I have a copy of THE LAST OBLIVION -- and it has rapidly become my most treasured poetry collection. I think that a Collected Poems of CAS *might* be in the works -- I noticed something to that effect in a "Note on the Authors" in the essay antholoy AN EPICURE IN THE TERRIBLE, where it said that David E. Schultz was working on it. But on the other hand, that book was published in 1991, and I don't have any fresher intel. And yes, a Collected Fiction by CAS would be very welcome indeed (I can seldom resist the words "collected" or "complete" when they appear in a book title).

Regarding the new Dunsany novel: Congratulations!! I'm looking forward to reading it. :-)
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 02:27 pm:   

I know that Subterranean Press is about to do a 1000+ page collection of George RR Martin.

Setting aside reprints for a moment, someone needs to do a big fat new Lucius Shepard collection. I know PS Publishing is going to do a particularly strong sounding 800 copy collection, but even then, there's more. I'd also suggest that there's a new Howard Waldrop collection waiting to be done (as well as a major reprinting of his OP stuff), a major Lafferty retrospective if well overdue (and if done well would probably onsell to the SFBC and a NY major), and some Leiber would be good (the Midnight House stuff is all in 400 copy editions). What else? I know it's not really a Night Shade kind of book, but it's a crime no-one has collected Pat McKillips' stuff and...there's a lot more. Always.

I should add, you guys do very good books.
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GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, February 06, 2003 - 03:00 pm:   

Meyrink's OPAL collection was put out by Dedalus. They've also reprinted some of his novels, such as WHITE DOMINICAN, GOLEM and ANGEL IN THE WEST WINDOW, all of which are well worth reading. Dedalus is a UK publisher so their editions are not always easily available in the US. A solid Meyrink short story collection would be nice to see.

I would like a copy of Lamsley's CONFERENCE WITH THE DEAD myself, his work is excellent. I believe the Rodens are planning to rerelease it in paperback.

I actually have a copy of that paperback of Finney's UNSEEN CITY but have never read it, despite CIRCUS OF DR LAO being one of my fantasy faves. Is it really supposed to be some kind of a sequel? I didn't realize that, I'll have to check.
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Andrew Breitenbach
Posted on Friday, February 07, 2003 - 01:52 pm:   

No, I don't think Finney's UNSEEN CITY is a sequel to CIRCUS OF DR. LAO. I meant "follow-up" as in it was the next sf/f novel he wrote. Sorry for the confusion!

And I second everything that Strahan recommended above. :-)

If Ash-Tree puts out a paperback edition of the Lamsley, I will be one happy mofo.


-Andrew
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, February 07, 2003 - 02:20 pm:   

If Ash-Tree doesn't do a Lamsley volume, I'd be more than happy to!

As to the concerns of the validity of a complete CAS set, I look at it like this: Not everything Sturgeon wrote was gold, but I'm still happy as hell to have the 8 volumes (and counting...) from North Atlantic. Ditto the Williamson volumes from Haffner, the Le Fanu volumes from Ash-Tree, etc. And while Arkham did release all of his stuff, some of those volumes are damn pricy these days.

I would have loved to reissue the Leiber volumes that Midnight House did, and I actually spoke to John about that a couple of times. But it looks like iBooks bought the rights out from under me, so they'll be coming out, but not from us.

We are kicking around the idea of doing the original version of The Moon Pool. Joshi brought it up to us that the Moon Pool was originally published as two novellas, The Moon Pool and The Conquest of the Moon Pool. Later these were re-written as the novel version, but in many ways the original novellas are superior to the final novel. It's an idea.

Jason
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Friday, February 07, 2003 - 04:30 pm:   

Hey Jason,
I'm interested in your thoughts on "complete" sets. I know you've published a few (and they are fine books), and god knows I've bought a handful over time, but what I've increasingly found, and I'm talking about for me as a reader, is that they're as much tombs where stories go to die as resources of wonderful work. When faced with The Collected Stories of Theodore Sturgeon Vol: VIII or a copy of A Touch of Strange, I always going to opt for the smaller book. It's for that reason that a while ago I abandoned my long-held dream to publish "The Collected Works of HW" for a new long-to-be-held dream of publishing a series of smaller reader-friendly volumes that comprised the collected works. Any thoughts? Do you see any drawbacks to the big fat archival volume?

Best
Jonathan

PS: Despite everything above being true for me, I do still buy 'em. Will buy the probably hideously unreadable GRRM retrospective, and if anyone did the collected Lieber or Lafferty I'd sign up in a second.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, February 07, 2003 - 05:03 pm:   

Jonathan,

My thoughts on complete set....

I don't have any one coherent thought on this, so excuse me while I ramble.

For one, I publish what I want to read, and I'm a sucker for the Collected Works of anyone. Give me that Complete Short Stories of J.G. Ballard, or the Collected Stories of Greg Bear, any of those. I love 'em. I've got everything, and I can decide what I like and don't like.

For another, the Complete sets that I publish aren't for your usual reader. If someone just wants to read Sturgeon, I don't hand them the Complete Works, I hand them the Best Of tpb that Vintage put out. I've you've never read Wellman, or have only read a story or two, I wouldn't recommend popping for our set.

As a corollary to that, the stuff we're doing complete sets of aren't really available. Jorkens will run you over $100 per book, assuming you can even find the original editions, and most of them are closer to $300. There are four core Wellman collections, and only one of them (the Baen paperback of John the Balladeer) is available, assuming you can find a copy used somewhere. Ditto Hodgson or CAS or Brennan... The stuff just isn't easy to find.

We could have just issued a series of volumes that eventually would comprise all of the Jorkens/Wellman/etc stories, but the collector in me loves sets.

Waldrop isn't really a comparable example. That I know of, his books aren't particularly hard to find, nor are they particularly expensive. Not to mention the fact that a Collected Stories of Howard Waldrop would be a bit premature, as he's still writing them :-)

That said, it has crossed our minds to issue companion volumes to our sets. For example, publish the 5 volume set of Wellman, but also issue a standalone single volume, with a Best Of selection. Something for people who want to read Wellman, not invest in him.

Well, I've rambled long enough, and not said anything very well, so I'll call it a stop.

Jason
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Saturday, February 08, 2003 - 12:05 am:   

Anyone got any opinions on Richard Bowes "Time Ranger" stories?

Jason
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Rhys
Posted on Saturday, February 08, 2003 - 08:28 am:   

Not yet, but I'd like to second that suggestion of Raymond Rousell's second novel, LOCUS SOLUS.

A complete Geza Csath?
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GabrielM
Posted on Saturday, February 08, 2003 - 09:56 am:   

I liked the Bowes stories I've read, as I mentioned. Ask Jeff Ford for his thoughts, I think he's a fan of the TR stories.
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Sunday, February 09, 2003 - 02:37 pm:   

Hey Jason,

I agree about being a sucker for "Complete" and "Collected" volumes and sets - I've bought them, and will continue do so. I guess the problem I've found is that those books become reference works rather than something to read. I regularly buy stuff like Ballard's Complete, Bear's Collected and look at them proudly on the bookshelves, but I READ Vermilion Sands or Wind from a Burning Woman, rather than browse through a thousand pages. And it's not really a dollars thing - it's more a convenient to read thing. A good example is the sampler the Vance Integral people did, which was wonderful to just carry around and read. I don't know if I'd have done that with, say, a 750pp Jack Vance 1960-65 volume.

Best
J
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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, February 09, 2003 - 04:00 pm:   

I definitely second GabeM's vote for a Bowe's Time Rangers collection. Bowes is an excellent writer (see Minions of the Moon, which is really something). The Time Ranger stories have won a great deal of critical praise and I think Bowes has been nominated for a Nebula and has won the World Fantasy Award and won the Lambda Award. His stuff is a keen mix of literary and pulp, often dark, often kind of trippy, but always put forth in really clear concise prose. Last I spoke to him about it, Time Ranger's isn't a collection of stories, it's kind of like a story cycle or a weaving of stories. He's really underrated, probably because he seeks no public persona, says exactly what he thinks at all time (I'm not just whistling dixie here) and has a truly wicked sense of humor. A Time Rangers book would be great. I think most all of the pieces have been published previously in F&SF or on Sci Fiction. Anyway, something to consider. If you want to get a clue about him, see Infinity Plus. There is an interview there I did with him a while ago. He's also got a lot of work at Sci fiction.

Best,


Jeff
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Stepan Chapman
Posted on Sunday, February 09, 2003 - 11:50 pm:   

Two people so far have brought up Charles G. Finney's The Unholy City. I've got a copy, and I've read it, and let me tell you, Folks, it's no City of Dr. Lao.

Charles G. was mostly a Tucson newspaperman. He wrote The Circus largely while he was in the army in China, thinking back on Tucson.

Then he wrote a humorous science fiction novel called The Unholy City. Then he wrote a collection of Arizona-based short stories called The Ghosts of Manacle. (That's Manacle, Arizona.)

Unholy City and Ghosts of Manacle are both tolerably amusing, but neither one comes anywhere close to the heights that Finney achieved in The Circus of Dr. Lao. Mr. Finney was pretty much a one-great-book type of an author. That's always puzzled and saddened me. He climbed so high so early in life.

Besides being a movie, The Circus was briefly a musical comedy, produced only in Chicago during the 1950s. That's Circus trivia from a letter that Mr. Finney wrote to me when I was investigating dramatic rights in the 70s.

He also wrote a short novel called The Magician Out of Manchuria which was reissued in HC in 1968 by Donald M. Grant, Publisher. The Magician has a real sense of poetry about it. It reads like a book by the same author as The Circus, at least.

Don't tell Disney that The Circus of Dr. Lao exists. They ruin everything. Shhhh!

I've rambled on rather lengthily. Sorry about that.
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jonathan briggs
Posted on Thursday, February 13, 2003 - 12:44 pm:   

I'll echo the calls for Brennan books.

Affordable Robert Aikman collections would be nice.

Charles Beaumont has been outta print for too damn long.

I'd buy a "best of" or "collected works" of Karl Edward Wagner's horror stuff.

Kim Newman, Mark Chadbourn, Paul Finch and Mark Morris seem to need a good home in the U.S.

And has Brian Hodge managed to place his most recent novel?
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Mike Simanoff
Posted on Thursday, February 13, 2003 - 01:27 pm:   

Stepan, you creature of Arizona, I agree! I don't think Unholy City is a great book. It's Finney's clumsy dystopian nightmare about 1930s politics, and it fails to work on many levels.

Magician Out of Manchuria is absolutely beautiful. I have a review of it going up on a Web site in the near future--in the hope of stirring some interest in seeing it come back into print. I sincerely believe it has been neglected because it was originally published with Unholy City.
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Mike Williams
Posted on Friday, February 14, 2003 - 07:57 pm:   

Two suggestions:

1. a complete Barrington J. Bayley
2. For something completely different: J.P.Martin's series of "Uncle" books: six in all, only the first two of which have been reprinted since the early 70s. Cult favourites of many writers, they are like a hilarious Gormenghast for kids (at heart) with terrific pix by Quentin Blake. The series is unlikely to get reprinted because they're considered very un-P.C. although they were favourably compared with Peake, Carroll et al.

There are several websites devoted to these books plus a Yahoo newsgroup. Used copies of the later titles typically sell for hundreds of dollars.
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Jerry Sawyer
Posted on Sunday, February 16, 2003 - 11:47 am:   

What about an omnibus edition of the five short "Silver John" novels by Manly Wade Wellman. The Doubleday and SF Book Club editions are equally poor in quality. Although some may argue that they are not among the best books Wellman wrote, I believe any stories about John should be preserved in an edition that will last throughout the years.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 05:07 am:   

Regarding some of the suggestions of late:

Jerry: We have considered reprinting the 5 Silver John novels, as well as the 2 Thunstone novels. Haven't quite decided yet, but it's not out of the question. The 5th volume in our Wellman series is due out in late March/early April, and will contain all of the John stories.

Charles Finney. Great minds think alike, as I had sorta been tossing a few Finney-related ideas around.

Brennan is still a possibility.

If you want affordable Aickman, look to Old Earth Books (www.oldearthbooks.com), as they're supposed to be releasing a Collected Stories sometime down the road.

As to Wagner's horror fiction, I've been told that a publisher has made an offer to publish all of Karl's horror fiction. As it's not official, I can't say who, but it's not us.

Charles Beaumont. Interesting idea. I'm a huge Beaumont fan myself, and the only thing that's commonly available is the Tor paperback of The Howling Man and the SubPress edition of Touch of the Creature.

Brian Hodge's next novel is sitting on my desk. It's called Mad Dogs, and if you liked Wild Horses, you'll love it. Whether or not we're publishing it is up in the air right now, but it's very tempting and very good.

I've been told that Bowes doesn't see his Time Ranger stories as stories per-se, but more along the lines of chapters to a future Time Ranger novel, and he's not terribly interested in doing a collection. Which is ok by me, as I'll gleefully pick up the novel when it comes out!

Jason
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Stephen Gallagher
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 09:05 am:   

>>Besides being a movie, The Circus was briefly a musical comedy, produced only in Chicago during the 1950s<<

I discovered last week that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was briefly a West End stage musical sometime around the 70s in London, starring Michael Crawford in "zany idiot" mode.

Ye Gods.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, February 17, 2003 - 09:10 am:   

Jason: You're right about Bowe's Time Ranger pieces. His planned novel will be sort of like a story cycle with an overarching plot (or that's how I understood it when we spoke). Glad you might be interested in it, as I would very much like to eventually read it.

Best,

Jeff
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Rhys
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 03:26 am:   

A suggestion, but not for books...

How about Night Shade setting up a board for Barrington Bayley, a woefully neglected writer of phenomenal ability? I'm sure we could contact him somehow and put the proposal to him?
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JT Lindroos
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 08:18 am:   

Rhys -- if you want to email Barry, drop me a note at juha [at] oivas [dot] com.
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JeffV
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 08:30 am:   

I second that nomination--Barrington Bayley!

Jeff V.
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Luís
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 07:54 am:   

Barrington Bayley is a god!
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Rhys
Posted on Saturday, February 22, 2003 - 04:08 am:   

Yes, he's one of the most amazing *concept* writers of all time. He's our Lem.
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 10:06 am:   

I was just thinking that Tanith Lee's massive short story collection DREAMS OF DARK AND LIGHT has to my knowledge never been reprinted (whether in paperback or in later hardcover) following its original publication by Arkham House during the Jim Turner years. This is something of a shame --Lee can be a spotty writer, but when she's good she's GREAT and I've always felt this collection showed her at her best.
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 02:42 pm:   

I'd second GabrielM's thoughts on Tanith Lee, with a caveat. I'm not sure there's much point in simply reprinting DREAMS..., but I do think a two volume expansion of her very best short fiction (and there's a lot of it) would be an amazing thing. The only problem - to do the job properly someone would have to read a LOT of stuff to winnow out the best of the best.

Jonathan
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Ellen
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 04:02 pm:   

Can you acquire rights to the Selected Stories of Beaumont that Dark Harvest put out a few years ago?

>>>Charles Beaumont. Interesting idea. I'm a huge Beaumont fan myself, and the only thing that's commonly available is the Tor paperback of
The Howling Man and the SubPress edition of Touch of the Creature.
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Andrew Breitenbach
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 04:23 pm:   

"THE SELECTED STORIES OF CHARLES BEAUMONT that Dark Harvest put out a few years ago" is in fact the same book as Tor's THE HOWLING MAN -- I think that evil clown is on the cover of both -- except that the former is a hardcover and the latter is a mass market paperback.


-Andrew J. Breitenbach
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Ellen
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2003 - 05:02 pm:   

Well, is there that much Beaumont not collected in that book? If so, then yes, I wish someone would do another collection of his. Otherwise do someone who isn't in print in paperback.
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Jerry Sawyer
Posted on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - 04:29 pm:   

I would like to suggest a collection of all of Davis Grubb's supernatural short stories. They've been out of print for a long time and some of the later ones can only be found in anthologies.
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jimrockhill
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 09:04 pm:   

I cannot say I disagree with any of the suggestions made here, but among those mentioned would most like to see omnibi of Clark Ashton Smith, Dino Buzzati, Lisa Tuttle, R.A. Lafferty, Charles Beaumont and John Gordon.

I believe David Schultz is working on the complete verse of CAS, but have no idea who his publisher is.

Tanith Lee has published a lot more great short fiction than has appeared in her few hardcover short story collections.

There is at least a book's worth of uncollected Henry S. Whitehead tales that should bring his collected works up to three full-sized books. I believe Douglas Anderson has all the details on this, which would be a nice project for some enterprising publisher.

After the collected Karmesin tales appear from Crippen & Landru and the supernatural tales from Ash-Tree, there should be plenty of first-rate tales by Gerald Kersh left over for at least one more collection.

A lot of vintage David Case tales have lain out of print for decades.

I still find it hard to believe that no one has yet collected Avram Davidson's Jack Limekiller tales set in British Hidalgo.

I am also pretty sure John Pelan has approached the Brennan estate, but do not know if any progress has been made with them. I have been hoping for decades that someone would issue a series of volumes collecting his work.

I suppose it is a good thing to have all of Theodore Sturgeon's tales back into print, but for me at least, his horror tales have remained evergreen while most of the S.F. has not aged well at all. A big volume devoted exclusively to the horror stories would be most welcome.

Having all of Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore in print would also be a boon. Not sure if Haffner Press will publish more than the one volume they have announced.

I would also love to see someone collect all of Richard Cowper's fiction. Little of his consistently superb work appeared outside magazines in the US and not even Gollancz in the UK collected all of it.

Jeff Vandermeer's expanded edition of CITY OF SAINTS AND MADMEN deserves a splendiferous binding and higher quality paper than it received in its present (still mighty impressive!) hardcover edition.

It is scandalous that, with the exception of MY WORK IS NOT YET DONE, Ligotti's work since NOCTUARY has appeared only in paperback or miniscule editions. Durtro said they were going to address this, but that was years ago.

There is more work by Michael Shea than appeared in POLYPHEMUS or the Nifft the Lean book: it is about time someone issued a fat retrospective collection of his work.

And if someone wants to publish A. F. Kidd's Captain da Silva novels, they can count on me to buy them.

And . . . too many books, too little time.

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Jim Rockhill
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 09:23 pm:   

P.S. concerning Clark Ashton Smith's tales and prose poems: I realize that I am going to sound like a broken record by bringing this up here too, but it has been a dream of mine to see the unexpurgated texts restored whenever available OR (even better) see both the "standard" and the original texts included. This has been done for the prose poems, but the unexpurgated versions of the tales are still scattered among a variety of books, pamphlets and magazines. What a treasure such a set would be!
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Jim Rockhill
Posted on Thursday, March 20, 2003 - 09:36 pm:   

I hope you decide to publish the magazine versions of "The Moon Pool" and "The Conquest of the Moon Pool". I read the first in an anthology many years ago, then eagerly read the novel cobbled together from both: I cannot vouch for "Conquest", but I thought the original version of "The Moon Pool" was much better than the novel. I even asked Donald Grant to consider publishing this 15 year ago or so. He sounded interested at the time, but the book never appeared.
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GabrielM
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 09:04 am:   

Hi there, Jim. Good to get your learned opinion, as always.
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PeterW
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 09:58 am:   

Harlan Ellison once said his favorite writer was Gerald Kersh, and since that time, I've been half-assedly looking for either "Nightshade and Damnations" or "Men Without Bones", his short fiction collections. I've only read "Prelude to a Certain Midnight", however.

Would it be a worthy suggestion to republish Kersh's short work, anyone?
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PeterW
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 10:04 am:   

Oliver Onions' collected stories? This is another one I've had trouble finding, and most editions seem rather outrageously priced.
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Des
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 01:22 pm:   

Hey, yes! That Onions suggestion is a *must*. I have an old edition of the collected stories and they are absolutely unbelievably great. Haunted me for the last 25 years since I first read them. Des
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 03:34 pm:   

The ghost stories of Oliver Onions were reprinted in a big fat volume a year or two ago by Tartarus Press.

Jonathan
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Jim Rockhill
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 04:10 pm:   

"Hello!" to you, Gabriel, and thanks.

Peter asks, "Would it be a worthy suggestion to republish Kersh's short work, anyone?" (Jumping up and down and waving my arms vigorously--) Yes! He is a wonderful writer. Try to find a copy of ON AN ODD NOTE too, if you can,

I received my copy of PS Publishing's edition of Ramsey Campbell's THE DARKEST PART OF THE WOOD today after receiving RAMSEY CAMPBELL, PROBABLY a few weeks ago, and second Bill's request for American editions of all the Campbell titles produced by this publisher.

The only problem with the Onions collection by Tartarus Press was the exclusion of "The Master of the House", "The Ether Hogs", "The Mortals" and the recently rediscovered "Tragic Casements". None of these is a major work, but with a writer of Onions' caliber, even minor work is worth preserving. Otherwise this is a superb book up to the publisher's usual high standards. Tartarus will be reprinting it.
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ScottW
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 05:40 pm:   

Hi I would like to suggest the Zimiamvia trilogy by E.R. Eddison. I don't believe anyone else has mentioned him yet. This is very difficult to get a hold of, especially in the states. Most copies running around are old Ballantine Adult Fantasy copies that are from the 60's-70's. I have a set that have been read through about 20 times and are in bad condition.

The Worm Ouroboros would be nice also, although it is a bit easier to get a hold of since someone put out a hardcover edition in the early nineties. Thanks, Scott
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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Saturday, March 22, 2003 - 03:45 am:   

I believe Millenium's already published The Worm Ourorboros under its Fantasy Masterworks line, Scott.
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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Saturday, March 22, 2003 - 03:55 am:   

Pardon the misspelling.
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Bill B.
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 - 10:11 am:   

Tartarus Press is doing a second printing of its Oliver Onions collection this year.
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Bill B.
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 - 10:13 am:   

Please ignore my previous post, as now I see it merely repeats what Jim has already said.
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Dru Pagliassotti
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2003 - 09:05 am:   

I'd like to add another voice in support of reprinting Wellman's novels! Have been waiting for somebody to reprint his stories for years and was delighted to find this site; I'd love to add his novels to my shelves, too.
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Mike Williams
Posted on Saturday, May 24, 2003 - 02:54 pm:   

Russell Greenan? Is all his output available or even published?
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M. Bishop
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2003 - 04:57 pm:   

I'd have to put in a good word for A. E. Coppard, whose story "Arabesque: The Mouse" is a small masterpiece. "Dusky Ruth" is almost as good, and he wrote dozens more, in several collections. Perhaps something of his is still in print, but I sure I haven't *seen* any of it of late.
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Mike Williams
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2003 - 12:55 am:   

So for much for me recommending Russell Greenan. I've just learnt that his first book "It Happened in Boston?" is about to be revived by the Modern Library with a Jonathan lethem intro.
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Mark Pontin
Posted on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 - 03:58 pm:   

Mark Geston has never received the readership he deserves for his novels MIRROR TO THE SKY(1992) and THE SIEGE OF WONDER (1976). The former book, particularly, was one of the best science-fiction novels of the 1990s -- though so strikingly different in its handling of SF tropes as to be resistant to the genre's average reader.

As it happens, Geston isn't unknown and his conceptual originality showed in the first couple of books he wrote for Terry Carr at Ace way back in the late 1960s and early 70s. However, it's those books -- with their happy associations with the rest of Carr's Ace specials of that time -- which Geston still gets primarily remembered for. And that's too bad, because the later books are far more achieved and ground-breaking.

Critics like Gerald Jonas, D. Hartwell and A. Budrys have praised them, but that hasn't got them a bigger readership. Nor, of course, has it helped that Geston is apparently a successful attorney in Idaho and produces his novels after decades-long breaks. So, what's so different about Geston's fiction? Well, I'll be facile in order to be brief, but the recent attempt -- led by China Mieville and M. John Harrison -- to proclaim a 'New Weird' or 'Interstitial' literary movement sounds like nothing so much as what Geston has quietly been doing on his own since he started. And he's been doing his genre-jumping thing in a much deeper way than the likes of Mieville.

In Geston's stories, a milieu is established with all its own everyday routineness -- whether the routines are those of Washington's diplomats and bureaucrats in MIRROR TO THE SKY or of the wizards' Holy City in THE SEIGE OF WONDER -- and readers expect the usual tropes of, say, Washington fiction or fantasy. But Geston jams up his fictional milieu against another world. Thus, for instance, in MIRROR TO THE SKY we get characters (and their families)somewhat like a cross between those of the Washington novels of Louis Auchincloss and Ross Thomas, maintaining their careers at the State Department, the NSA and the CIA as those organizations interact with the gods' diplomatic missions on earth.

That's gods with a lower-case 'g'. They're humanoid aliens of, apparently, more-than-human perfection who have arrived in mile-long starships and who refuse, as they indicate in a memorandum to the State Department, to be worshipped. Indeed, as Earthly diplomatic departments interact with their bureaucratic counterparts among the gods, the aliens increasingly appear as just the stodgy, unimaginatively well-meaning types that Washington bureaucrats would get on with. But then one diplomat god is particularly unimaginative and arranges a cultural exchange effort: a show of the aliens' art at Washington's National Gallery. Hell breaks loose, the Vietnamization of Earth begins, and a series of appalling miracles accumulate -- this is a Geston trademark -- which would be transgressive of scientific rationales in the hands of just about any other writer, but which Geston paints as scientifically explainable and the more appalling for that.

Obviously, I've liked these two novels of Geston's a lot ever since they came out. I've also understood the reasons why they've had a general impact that's been almost inversely proportional to their originality. It may be, nevertheless, that their time has at last come around, given the current success of Mieville and others.


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Mastadge
Posted on Friday, July 11, 2003 - 10:39 am:   

Well, they're hardly "classics," but I'd sure like to see Matt Stover's first two books back in print. . .
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DesertJo
Posted on Tuesday, July 15, 2003 - 01:58 pm:   

Nate, I've seen Iron Dawn on the shelves of a couple local Borders (Phoenix AZ area) within the past 2-3 months.

and I'd personally love to find a copy of Asimov's "Tomorrow's Children" that's reasonably priced. Everything I've seen was in the $400-500 range, and even though my interest and curiosity at reading this is great, that's way out of my budget these days.
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crazylittleelf
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 09:05 am:   

I'd love to see a collection of C.L. Moore.
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RC
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 05:37 pm:   

Haffner Press ( www.haffnerpress.com ) is coming out with a massive C.L. Moore collection...should be out soon.
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Forrest
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 11:16 am:   

OK, here's a crazy idea: A collection of all fictions written by members of the Golden Dawn c. 1887-1903 (when the cult effectively broke up). I know Crowley did a lot of poetry, some shorts, and a novel, but am not sure what others of the Order had done. Yeats was a member, so there's that. Of course, Crowley's writing is not the best, but as a historical piece, it might help contextualize the fictional writings of contemporaries such as Lovecraft, etc. You would only want pieces that relate to the Order, but I would hate to be the editor in charge of determining which poems/stories/novels are "related". I'm guessing that the potential to market this to University libraries would be huge.

Forrest
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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 11:39 am:   

What a WONDERFUL idea!

The proposition is terribly movie-like, though. Twenty bucks says half the people involved in the book's production end up devoured by demons by the end by the time it's done. ;)
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Martinus
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 12:19 pm:   

Weren't both Machen and Stoker members of the Order at one time or another? Could be a fun anthology. :-)

Martin Andersson
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GabrielM
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 01:14 pm:   

Machen certainly was. And Algernon Blackwood. And AE Waite. Dion Fortune was a member and she wrote some (not particularly good) fantasy in addition to her occult activities, although she might have joined after 1903.
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Mike S.
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 09:28 pm:   

Forrest, it *is* a great idea. You know, I've actually been leafing through some of the "non-fiction" (there's a thin line!) from group members and associates over the past week or so and thinking about its relationship to fiction. All this came originally from a discussion I had with GabrielM, in fact. It's an important link and very frequently, as far as I can tell, overlooked. And this is coming from someone who sometimes buys academic-level books on the occult for a library -- the overlap is almost always with psychology, religion, philosophy, and mythology, not with literature. It has left me wanting...
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Neal Stanifer
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 10:16 pm:   

You realise, of course, that you're condemning this anthology to a small readership. Those who have an intense and rather narrow interest in Hermetic Order stuff. I mean, who else is going to read Crowley, really? And the Yeats stuff is already out there, several times over. You may as well fling out a Madame Blavatsky Extravaganza. Great for fifteen, a snore for a million.
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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 01:28 am:   

There are also those who would buy it for the coolness of the concept (and the guaranteed quality of some of the writing). I would.
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GabrielM
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 09:02 am:   

It depends. Just throwing together random writings by these people wouldn't work but if you have a skillful editor they could use specific writings to trace the development of particular "occult" themes. More of a thematic anthology if you will.
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Mike
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 09:53 am:   

A book like this would appeal to enough people. The problem is assessing fiction that's worth republishing, specifically, fiction that is *good* as well as significant. The other concern is that a book like this should have an informative aspect, but not in a way that turns people off. It should have a good introduction that serves as an overview of the Order and probably a few notes to add some value where appropriate.
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Jonathan
Posted on Friday, September 26, 2003 - 11:31 pm:   

Hey Jeremy & Jason

To revisit John Crowley as a suggestion, there was a big-ass collection done in French in 1998, but I've never heard of him selling a new collection in English. I would have thought that with the stuff from ANTIQUITIES and NOVELTY, and the uncollected stuff, you would have one heck of a book.

Best
J
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Martinus
Posted on Sunday, October 12, 2003 - 11:14 am:   

OK, this may not be technically right for your "classics" line, since I have no idea what the price of used copies is (probably not much), but I would like to suggest Peter Morwood's "Book of Years" series, consisting of THE HORSE LORD, THE DEMON LORD, THE DRAGON LORD and THE WARLORD's DOMAIN, with at least one more volume, THE STAR LORD, being planned. I loved these books when I read them in Swedish in the early 90s, and I still loved them when I got hold of some battered British paperbacks a couple of years ago. They would make lovely omnibus volumes, especially with the author's own illustrations (which, IIRC, weren't included in the US editions).

I don't know how to describe them -- "Celtic fantasy with a Samurai flavour" is probably the closest.

I would also like to suggest the prequels, "The Clan Wars" series, set 500 years earlier in the same world. Two books were published, GREYLADY and WIDOWMAKER, with at least one more, FIREDRAKE, planned.

I can't speak for anyone else, but if they were to appear in hardcover *I* would definitely get them, and as I said I already have them in both Swedish and British paperback.

Yrs
Martin
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Jonathan
Posted on Sunday, October 12, 2003 - 05:11 pm:   

Hi guys

A thought - am I the only person to note that no-one has ever done a Le Guin retrospective? And some of her collections are falling out of print...

J
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Dave Olson
Posted on Monday, October 13, 2003 - 07:08 pm:   

Hmm, you've done 2 Karl Edward Wagner Kane collections, which I've bought. So purely from my own desires, how about any of these:

1) A omnibus collection of Andrew Offutt and Richard Lyons "War of the Wizards" Trilogy. The 3 books were Demon in the Mirror, The Eyes of Sarsis, and Web of the Spider. I haven't been able to get book 3 at all and my paperbacks are in terrible condition.

2) An omnibus collection of Dennis Schmidt's "Twilight of the Gods" Trilogy. My paperbacks are falling apart as well, and this was a great trilogy that is impossible to find. Published in 1985 they may not qualify for "classics", but The First Name, Groa's Other Eye, and Three Trumps Sounding were great books worthy of a collected hardback edition.

3) Last but not least. Probably the most difficult request. A complete printing of the Ken Bulmer's "Dray Prescott" series (written variously under the names Dray Prescott and Alan Burke Akers), especially the 15 or so books of the series that were only published in German. Last I heard there were about 50 books in the series published in 5 book "cycles". Savanti Press was trying to republish them in various forms, but as far as I can tell they have gone out of business.

Anyway, those are my dearly desired suggestions...
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Lou Anders
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 05:10 pm:   

How about an Omnibus of Michael Moorcock's "Blood: A Southern Fantasy" trilogy?
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ellen
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 08:03 pm:   

Lou, there are a lot of used copies available cheap--check amazon.
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Brendan
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 12:05 am:   

How about a book of the Contes cruel of Octave Mirbeau.
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Jamie Rosen
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:51 am:   

I wouldn't mind seeing a collection of fiction in translation -- Kobo Abe, Italo Calvino, Zoran Zivkovic, and the like -- to expose we English-speakers to what's been going on elsewhere in the world in the literature of the bizarre and eclectic.

Of course, this raises the cost by requiring translators.
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ellen
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 09:16 am:   

Kobo Abe and Calvino are both readily available in translation.
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GabrielM
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 09:29 am:   

The occult detective stories of the Belgian writer Jean Ray (of MALPERTUIS fame), featuring Harry Dickson.

Or a definitive best of RA Lafferty anthology, along the same lines as the AVRAM DAVIDSON TREASURY antho TOR put a few years ago.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 04:26 pm:   

We've kicked around the idea of a Lafferty collection, but I'm a little less enthused now that Wildside has reprinted so much of his work.

Jason
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Jamie
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 09:15 am:   

True, Ellen. But there's something to be said about the context an anthology gives stories, with the possibility of accompanying nonfiction about the authors and about the literature of their countrymen, as well as the chance to expose people who like one particular author to another one. One could make the same argument ("readily available") about anything from mass market reprints to "Year's BesT" anthologies, after all.

In any event, those authors mentioned as examples were just that, examples.
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Jamie
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 09:16 am:   

How about Malzberg? AFAIK, most of his latter-day fiction remains uncollected.
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ellen
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 09:33 am:   

Jamie, I thought you meant individual work by each of the authors you mentioned. Not an anthology. Sorry--I was confused. However, how would such an anthology be themed? "Fiction in translation" is a bit broad. It would need more focus. Also, acquiring rights to mainstream writers is a lot more difficult and expensive than to genre writers.

Malzberg's latter-day fiction has just been collected by Golden Gryphon. However, I have been trying to get someone to reissue some of his novels.


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Brendan
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 10:35 am:   

There are many writers who I think are much more interesting anyhow than Calvino . . . Authors who have really not been translated, or translated hardly at all, or whose translations are for the most part out of print: Luigi Capuana, the Goncourts, Nodier etc. . . . Truth be told, I think most of the really cool writing in Italian is untranslated, and probably about 30 percent of the cool writing in French . . . Maybe more.
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Jamie
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 01:42 pm:   

Thanks for pointing out the new Malzberg collection... I think three of his novels came out in omnibus form in the last year or so, but yes, mostly I've acquired them through haunting used book stores.

As for a theme, the closest I had come up with to a theme was "Weird fiction from around the world" or some such. Not unlike the various international (chiefly Russian, I think) sf anthologies of the 60s and 70s.

It doesn't surprise me that it would be more expensive to procure reprint rights for mainstream writers. Still, no harm in tossing the idea out there. :-)
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GabrielM
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 02:32 pm:   

There's also a relatively recent Malzberg collection from Arkham House entitled THE STONE HOUSE.
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ellen
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 04:17 pm:   

Gabe, I think that's the one I was thinking of. Not from Golden Gryphon but Arkham House.
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Jamie
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2004 - 05:52 pm:   

Ah, all right then. That one I knew about -- it's all alternate history, isn't it?
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Will
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 02:22 pm:   

I've been trying to find Nigel Kneale's collection TOMATO CAIN for some time. Maybe it could be a combined volume with his Quatermass screenplays?

...The collected short fiction of Walter Miller...

...and maybe (I haven't read him yet so I have no clue if he is worth reprinting) The selected novels of Dennis Wheatley? I've been keeping my eyes peeled for UNCHARTED SEAS and THE DEVIL RIDES OUT in particular.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 05:47 pm:   

I was actually thinking about a Miller collection, but got wind another publisher was working on it. Haven't heard anything about it since.

Jason
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 05:48 pm:   

Tomato Cain has been mentioned to me a few times, and I do have a copy of the US hardcover, but I'm just not sure it's got an audience large enough to make worth doing. I'm a big Kneale fan, but I don't know how many others there are.

Jason
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ellen
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 07:58 pm:   

Jason, any idea who controls the Miller estate?
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WS
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2004 - 07:20 pm:   

If you did a Kneale collection I think you would definitely need to tie it in to the Quatermass films somehow. They're his best known work and most of them are available on DVD.
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John Klima
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 09:03 am:   

Well, taking from another post on this discussion board, Mr. Ford has pointed out the John Gardner's work is out of print in the US. I don't know who holds the rights to them, but they sound like they're good. Plus, with a bio coming out, that's a nice thing to tie into. Could be someone is looking into this already, but I thought I would mention it here.

JK
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 02:45 pm:   

John Gardner? Didn't he write a bunch of James Bond novels? :-)
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Travis Fahling
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 08:20 pm:   

I would like a reprint of your "The Ancient Track" by Lovecraft. That would be nice.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2004 - 12:41 am:   

We're planning on reprinting Ancient Track, we just haven't had the chance yet.

Jason
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Lowell Foster
Posted on Monday, February 02, 2004 - 03:01 am:   

Here's a few books I'd like to see come back into print and haven't been mentioned above:

The Unfortunate Fursey and The Return of Fursey - Mervyn Wall (I've read the first and found it very funny and have not been able to find the second book anywhere.)

Hanns Heinz Ewer's books (Karl Wagner seemed to like Alraune and The Sorcerer's Apprentice enough to list them in his Best Of lists twenty years ago.)

For contemporary stories - David Drake's horror and his Vettius fiction (if Fedogan and friends doesn't produce a copy) really needs to be housed in a permanent form.

Or if you really want a line of people at your door - Reprint Everett Bleiler's The Guide to Supernatural Fiction. I was lucky enough to find a copy of this for $25 a few years ago. (yeah - $25 - don't ask me how. I bought Wheatley's Uncharted Seas {HB - autographed} for $12 and David Case's The Cell for $20 the same day in the same store. Falling star, four leaf clover, lincoln in my shoe - my luck came from somewhere that day!)

Oh yeah, someone else mentioned David Case. I would second that opinion...

I don't believe there has been a definitive Ray Russell collection put together yet.

Oh, last one...I have just read about Mr. Cady's passing and it saddens me greatly. Behind me, on a shelf, sits a copy of each of his books, even the two written under the Pat Franklin name. I have greatly enjoyed every item his pen has produced, from his collection The Burning to The Haunting of Hood Canal. They have provided a great many hours of enjoyment, but also, more than many other titles in this field, they spoke with a voice that had something substantial to say.
I ask this:Please put together a collection of his uncollected/unpublished work, even if the pieces are incomplete or unpolished. I would be very interested in reading whatever he may not have had a chance to share with us yet.

Thank you for listening.

Lowell
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Monday, February 02, 2004 - 12:25 pm:   

Ghosts of Yesterday pretty much was Jack's uncollected/unpublished work.

I emailed with Bleiler about reprinting The Guide to Supernatural Fiction, but he wants to do some more work on it first.

As you mentioned, F&B is doing the Drake collection.

I've pondered the Ewer's trilogy, but I'm not sure about the quantities. They are pretty cult items.
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, February 02, 2004 - 01:07 pm:   

I was looking at an advance copy of the new STRANGE TALES and noticed there was a story by Gary Myers, a writer I've always liked but who'd slipped my mind. This is someone who hasn't had a collection out since HOUSE OF THE WORM, back in the mid-seventies. He has a Dunsanian take on the Mythos that's different and refreshing, presumably inspired more by the Randolph Carter stories than by the later Lovecraft. Some of his stories also have a Klarkashtonian feel. I don't know how much material he's had since HOTW, but might be worth considering.
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Mastadge
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 12:34 pm:   

How about the first two AEGYPT books by John Crowley. I, for one, can't find them anywhere.
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AntonyS
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2004 - 11:28 pm:   

hi,

I recently bought a copy of Midnight Sun by Karl Edward Wagner and was very suprised to see that Gods in Darkness by the same author is out of print.
Are there any plans to do second printing in the future?



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dave butler
Posted on Saturday, April 03, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   

i would LOVE to see you publish kage baker - complete company set - including short stories - are you aware how impossible it is to get a copy of the graveyard game?
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Saturday, April 03, 2004 - 07:58 pm:   

Thanks dave... we actually tried to do this, but were outbid by TOR. Graveyard games will, if I am not mistaken, be coming out in paperback before too long, as will the next company Novel.

Likewise, a Baker collection is forthcoming from us in June. It features an original company Novella, among other things...

-JL
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Saturday, April 03, 2004 - 08:00 pm:   

Antony...
don't know if you are still out there or not... but Gods in Darkness is currently in print in a Science fiction book club edition...

-JL
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Jamie
Posted on Thursday, April 29, 2004 - 09:29 am:   

Does anyone currently hold the rights to Istvan Orkeny's material? I just finished his One Minute Stories (English edition from Hungary) and he might be someone worth a look too.
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Bob K.
Posted on Thursday, April 29, 2004 - 11:53 am:   

>How about the first two AEGYPT books by John Crowley. I, for one, can't find them anywhere.

We've published them both in eBook format, re-edited with John's input. They're available for reading on any device. I'm sure John wouldn't be averse to seeing the re-edited text in print.
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, April 29, 2004 - 05:46 pm:   

hey, you guys ever considered doing a collection of geoff ryman's stuff? i've went hunting around for one a while back, and outside UNCONQUERED COUNTRIES, couldn't find one, which seemed a shame to me. he's got some excellent short fiction.
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Stephen G
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 08:09 am:   

How about the collected short stories of Ray Russell?
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Andrew Hook
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 11:39 pm:   

I'd also recommend Istvan Orkeny's stories. My copy of his One Minute Stories is published in English by the Hungarian publisher, Corvina. Presumably they'd be the first port of call where the issue of rights is concerned.
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Michael Hemmingson
Posted on Sunday, June 06, 2004 - 01:16 am:   

Don Webb or Lucy Taylor. Ed Lee.

Ocean View Books was gonna do a collection of Jasmine Sailing's stories, but whimped out. (she says emails have not been returned in over a year)

Maybe a Night Shade Books book?
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AntonyS
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 07:10 am:   

hi,

A couple of suggestions

Avram Davidson - Vergil in Averno (currently selling for around $115.00 second hand)

Avram Davidson - Adventures in Unhistory (not available anywhere even second hand and the last copy that surfaced supposedly went for a prohibitive sum)

Sir Charles Morell - Tales of the Genii (again good copies above $100 and Lin Carter did a small excerpt of this book in one of his anthologies "Golden Cities Far")




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Mike
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 11:10 am:   

Tor is supposedly reprinting Adventures in Unhistory, though they've been saying this for a while. Personally, I don't think the book has a broad appeal and it's not the type of thing we're used to seeing from Tor, but as long as it doesn't end up costing $350, I don't care who publishes the damned thing.
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GabrielM
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 01:38 pm:   

$350? You wish. Barry Levin's selling one right now for $850.
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Yes It's Mike
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 05:50 pm:   

I think Levin's coming in at the high end. A signed copy went for $400 on eBay last year. Then again, Levin might have the only copies for sale in the world right now.
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Tom Mannon
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 04:39 pm:   

i would like to see Something Rich & Strange by Patricia A. McKillip reprinted. Hard to find unless you want to pay $100+ Only one printing, and not many at that.
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Kage Baker
Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2004 - 06:48 pm:   

There is a marvelous book by Francine Prose that's been out of print for years-- title's MARIE LAVEAU and it's a biographical novel set in old New Orleans. Magic, murder, glorious historical evocation, and not a stinkin' vampire anywhere. My one copy made the rounds of my mother and sisters until it fell to pieces, loved to death. Again, you can find it once in a blue moon on Ebay or at abebooks, usually for over $100.

It would be soooo cool if you were able to do a reprint...
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DesertJo
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 10:36 pm:   

just a little wishful thinking here.

nonfiction: "Psychological Warfare" by Paul M. Linebarger (aka Cordwainer Smith).

it's a crime that this book runs between $400-$1800 everywhere you go (but for some reason, German editions are under $50).
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Martinus
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 05:21 am:   

Umm... How about a collection of Richard L. Tierney's stories? His Simon of Gitta collection from Chaosium went out of print WAY too fast, and there are bound to be lots of other goodies I haven't even heard of. His novels are great too.
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Jeremy
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 07:11 am:   

I'd love to own a nice, crisp hardback of Dunsany's non-Jorkens stories. The best one can do right now is paperback.

Bonus: public domain material!

Rgds.,

Jeremy
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Martinus
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 10:21 am:   

*A* nice hardback of Dunsany's non-Jorkens stories would be impossible -- he wrote 400+ stories, according to some stories.

Besides, I seriously doubt that they are public domain, since Dunsany died as late as 1957. That's only 47 years ago.

But a series of nice, carefully proofread Dunsany collections (where "paynims" has not been rendered as "pyjamas", as it was in a collection that appeared a couple of years ago), sure would be nice. I'd buy every volume even though I already have the paperbacks (or maybe BECAUSE I have the paperbacks).
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 10:44 am:   

I myself would buy a nice set of Dunsany's fantasy works, the Pegana stuff for example. However, there's just too many readily available editions out there for us to be doing a set of hardcovers. Perhaps selected works, as I know Jeremy's reading a rather uncommon novel now from Dunsany.
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Martinus
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 05:42 am:   

Yes, there are many readily available editions, but many of them are atrociously proofread -- as I mentioned earlier, in the story "Blagdaross", "paynims" have become "pyjamas"!! "Saladin and his pyjamas were in the desert..."

But according to www.stjoshi.com , the esteemed Mr. Joshi is contemplating a *complete* Dunsany edition on CD-ROM. Now taht would be something -- but I much prefer dead-tree editions.

A nicely proofread selection (not like many of the current paperbacks) would be a must-have for me. Perhaps something along the line of "Gods, Men and Ghosts" edited by Bleiler in the 1970s, with illustrations by the one and only Sidney Sime?
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Holger
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 03:01 pm:   

I'd certainly buy ANY Dunsany or Clark Ashton Smith hardcover edition, especially if the title contains either the word "collected" or "complete". As for CAS, even a collection of the available or published poetry would be a treat AND the same goes for Dunsany's (imho underrated) lyrical work (consider "Ulysses, bound to the mast", "The Fairy Cild" or "The Watchers".

As for out of print prose, the following come to mind:

- Andrew J Offutt: The complete ACE "Cormac Mac Art" series (no mere REH pastiches but marvellous sword & sorcery)

- how about a decent hardcover edition of E.R. Eddison's incommensurable Zimiamvia trilogy (or, even better, a 3 volume edition of his collected fantastic literature)?

- anything by Harold Lamb?

- wishful thinking: "The Wind And The Lion" by John Milius AND "The Lion In Winter" by James Goldman


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Mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 04:56 pm:   

Isn't THE WIND AND THE LION a movie? Is John Milius the director any good at writing?

I second the wish for Eddison; I've only got the Fantasy Masterworks edition of Ouroboros and Mistress of Mistresses and would like nicer editions of anything of his.
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Martinus
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 03:53 am:   

Holger:

According to S. T. Joshi's "Upcoming Works" page at www.stjoshi.com , Hippocampus Press will publish Smith's collected poetry (which includes unpublished poems! YAY!) in a 3-volume edition; the first volume appearing in 2006 and the other two in 2007.
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Kathy S.
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 07:37 am:   

I would love to see a nice hardcover edition of Ernest Bramah's Kai Lung stories.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 01:54 pm:   

We've certainly discussed doing the Kai Lung stories.
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gary gibson
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 02:23 pm:   

... might i suggest an incredibly obscure novel called 'the krugg syndrome' by a Scottish author called Gus McAllister, published in the '80's? It's a comic coming-of-age novel about a kid who gets a knock on the head and wakes up absolutely convinced he's really a scout for an impending invasion of evil alien trees. I swear, I love this book, and the world needs to know about it.
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Kathy S.
Posted on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 05:27 pm:   

>We've certainly discussed doing the Kai Lung stories.

That's great! I hope the discussion will result in publication.
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Holger
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 08:07 am:   

@Mastadge:

aye, The Wind & the Lion was both written and directed by John Milius. IMHO the book is as good as most pulp stories that Harold Lamb or Talbot Mundy ever wrote and Milius' admiration for Robert E. Howard / Conan shines clearly through.

Actually I like the motion picture starring a.o. Sean Connery, John Huston and Candice Bergen quite good, although the film does not really convey the mood of the book.

The book was published as a mass market paperback by Award Books N.Y. in 1975 and it should be easily available for a buck or two (thus it does probably not qualify for a reprint).

By the way, "The Lion in Winter" was also a motion picture in the early 70s (starring Peter O'Toole) - highly recommended!! The original play was reprinted in a hardcover edition of 100 copies by Amereon House some years ago. Does anybody remember this great play?

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Mastadge
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 10:18 am:   

I haven't seen The Wind and the Lion; the only Milius film I've seen is Conan the Barbarian. Interestingly enough, those two films have two of the greatest scores of the history of cinema. The first by Jerry Goldsmith isn't as well known as Williams' Raiders of the Lost Ark music, but IMO it's better. The ultimate action/adventure score. And Basil Poledouris' Conan the Barbarian is a landmark in the world of film scores.

The Lion in Winter is indeed a terrific movie. One of my favorites. Also has a great score, this time by John Barry, before his music started getting terribly boring.
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matthew rossi
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 12:30 pm:   

I just wanted to second the Tierney and Avram Davidson suggestions. In addition, is there any chance of E.R. Eddison seeing a new edition? My copy of The Worm Ouroborous is pretty damn warn, but I don't know the status of the Eddison stuff, if it's public domain or not.

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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 09:49 pm:   

I'm not sure if it qualifies, but I'd love to see a Night Shade edition of the seriously out-of-print 'I, Libertine' by Theodore Sturgeon (under the pseudonym 'Frederick R. Ewing'). It's about "18th century Lance Courtenay—moral adventurer, first of his breed," but it also has an interesting story behind it's publication.

From the Wikipedia:

"I, Libertine was the result of a practical joke by author and late-night radio host Jean Shepherd. Shepherd, having discussed the imaginary novel and its author on his radio show, urged his listeners to go into bookstores and ask for it; soon not only was there a huge demand for the novel, but it had reportedly been banned in Boston! Ian Ballantine engaged Theodore Sturgeon to write a novel to match the rumor, from Shepherd's outline. Betty Ballantine is supposed to have written the final chapter after an exhausted Sturgeon fell asleep on the Ballantines's couch, having written most of the novel under deadline in one marathon typing session."
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Antony
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 06:01 am:   

A Suggestion:

A single hardcover like "GRRM: A Retrospective" comprising the four Clark Ashton Smith collections edited by Lin Carter along with the fifth one that he could not make (Averoigne).

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Ed Sinkovits
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 09:39 pm:   

Great suggestion from Antony! I also would like to see the CAS collections as grouped/edited by Lin Carter for the Ballantine Adult Fantasy Series.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 09:54 pm:   

We've got plans in the pipe for CAS, plans that you'll all enjoy, I'm sure.

However... Bill Schafer at SubPress is a good friend of mine (the bastard) and I know what he went through producing GRRM. I can assure you that I'll be long gone from this world before we ever do a 1300 page book.

As to "I, Libertine". I'm a huge Sturgeon fan, and a Sturgeon collector. And I've read the book. Unfortunately, it's a piece of shit. While I'm all about rescuing books from obscurity (look for us to publish K.W. Jeter's Dr. Adder and Terry Lamsley's Conference with the Dead next year), I far prefer that the book be worthwhile on it's own merits. I, Libertine is an item for collectors, but not really worth a damn otherwise.

Adventures in Unhistory sounds interesting, and I do like Davidson, but I'd have to read it first, and that seems somewhat problematic.

We have been offered a few Hugh Lamb projects, but haven't made any decisions either way. So many cool projects being offered, and we can only do a few of them each year.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 09:56 pm:   

I sorta had the idea that The Worm Ouroborous was a relatively oft-reprinted book, and was pretty readily available? I'll admit to only having read that Eddison title, and I really should track down the rest of his stuff.
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Mahesh
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 10:26 pm:   

"As to "I, Libertine". I'm a huge Sturgeon fan, and a Sturgeon collector. And I've read the book. Unfortunately, it's a piece of shit."

That's too bad. I'm also a huge Sturgeon fan, but I haven't read it; I'd read about it in a Harlan Ellison essay. Oh well, I look forward to what you have planned with CAS.
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billc
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 05:18 am:   

"As to "I, Libertine". I'm a huge Sturgeon fan, and a Sturgeon collector. And I've read the book. Unfortunately, it's a piece of shit."

Okay, how about the two westerns, both pbo's, bound in a single volume. As far as I know they're both op and have never been done in hardcover. Or a nice edition of "Some of Your Blood".
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Antony
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 07:05 am:   

"I sorta had the idea that The Worm Ouroborous was a relatively oft-reprinted book, and was pretty readily available? I'll admit to only having read that Eddison title, and I really should track down the rest of his stuff."

The rest of E.R.Eddison's fantasy ouvre comprises of the Zimiamvia Trilogy and the defnitive edition of that work is
"Zimiamvia: A Trilogy" (A Dell Trade Paperback)
ISBN: 0440503000
However copies of the individual books of the trilogy (Mistress of Mistresses, A Fish Dinner in Memison, The Mezentian Gate) were also published seperately; but they do not contain the explanatory notes that the omnibus version contains.
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StephenB
Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2004 - 06:59 pm:   

I'd like to get ahold of Harlen Ellison's 50 year retrospective but it seems to be out of print or at least out of stock. Does anyone know if it will be back in print soon? If not, it would be a great book for nightshades to publish, although it is long.
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Gavin Smith
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 12:04 am:   

Poet-performer Donald Sidney-Fryer has produced an audio cd of the fantastic poetry of Clark Ashton Smith, The Hashish Eater and other poems, $14.00 (+2.00 domestic postage). This is a very small-scale item, we're talking less than 50 copies available and no plans yet to create more. I know that some people don't "do" audiobooks, but this is a very special item, beautifully packaged by Philippe Gindre in France. As this is a place where people fond of CASmith gather, I trust this notice might be welcome. Order from me, Gavin Smith, 3408 Pleasant Run Road, Irving TX 75062-3266
http://donaldsidneyfryer.free.fr/biblio_en.php3
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Dorwin Black
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 11:33 am:   

Classic Author Recommendation: Ernest Bramah.
I recently picked up volumes one of both the collected Hodgeson and collected Jorkens books. They both look beautiful, and I'm looking forward to reading them. I know I've been looking for an economical way to obtain all of the Jorkens tales for many years now. In a similar vein, I have long been waiting for a collection of Earnest Bramah's Kai Lung books. Two of the Kai Lung books were released in paperback in the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series many years ago, but even 5th and 6th edition hardcovers of the original books in very good condition will set you back $50 these days. If not Kai Lung, the perhaps the Max Carrados detective stories.
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Dorwin Black
Posted on Friday, August 27, 2004 - 12:08 pm:   

I see several folks have mentioned E.R.Eddison as a classic author. One fairly obscure work of his that I highly recommend is Styrbiorne the Strong, which is prohibitively expensive to buy used. Another work of his which I would like to read, but could never find at an affordable price is his translation of Egil's Saga with Introduction, Notes, and Essay on some principles of translation.

-DCB
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Holger
Posted on Friday, September 03, 2004 - 04:18 pm:   

@ Dorwin:

I was suprised that "Styrbiorn The Strong" is still available as a nice but somehow affordable (about US $ 40.00) hardcover reprint from 1978 (a facsimile from the 1926(?) edition bound in attractive brown leatherette) from ARNO Press. I think the remaining stock of the ARNO Press is now distributed by AYER Books and it should be easily available, as I could order my copy through a mainstream book store here in Germany. That was maybe 6 months ago.

By the way: obviously many other scarce titles are still available in the ARNO Press collection (mainly Lost Race & Adult Fantasy fiction), e.g. works by Chambers, Atkins...

@ Nightshade Books:

I second the wish for another collection by Gary Myers and would like to suggest the prose and poetry of Emil Petaja for a reprint. Something like "the collected short prose and poetical works of...". Petaja wrote about 150 short stories (also under his alter ego Theodore Pine); many of his sonnets were dedications to H.P. Lovecraft and R.E. Howard, when both were still alive. There was a limited run of 1000 copies of the poetry collection "As Dream And Shadow", published by SISU in 1972.

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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, September 07, 2004 - 05:26 pm:   

With your love for Manly Wade Wellman, have you considered reprinting THE BEYONDERS in some form? It's a very good alien invasion novel, set among a nicely realized cast of Wellman's mountain characters.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, September 07, 2004 - 05:41 pm:   

Strangely, I met Emil Petaja and Gary Myers at the same convention...I think it was the Third World Fantasy Con...and although I never got to know Petaja, Gary Myers roomed with me so that he wouldn't have to drive back to South Gate in the wee hours. We had been corresponding for a little while, and had written a Dreamland story together ("The Summons of Nuguth-Yug"). Actually, I wrote a bloated novella of about 10,000 words and Gary honed it down to something closer to 1,000. Maybe less. I loved his stories and wish he'd kept at them, but the small press market for Dunsanian & Lovecraftian tales was fairly tiny...and I guess once you've made it to Arkham House, there wasn't anywhere much to go after that. Lin Carter praised Myers to high heaven in A LOOK BEHIND THE CTHULHU MYTHOS, and then promptly went and started swiping his stories and putting them in his fantasy anthologies without permission. I think Arkham House eventually sorted Carter out, but that didn't stop LC from printing our collaboration (without a contract or payment) in one of his Zebra Books WEIRD TALES volumes. I haven't heard from Gary since that time (late 70's/early 80's). One of the funny things he did was make anagrams out of names, and he came up with an address for me which I still use:

Ira L. Madclaw
Madclaw Lair
Dim Crawl, Ala.

If it's any hope, in my last communication with Gary he mentioned that he had tried to interest Arkham House in another collection, but that James Turner wasn't interested.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, September 07, 2004 - 05:50 pm:   

Well, I was going to plead with you to reprint S.T. Joshi's unbelievably good biography, H.P. LOVECRAFT: A LIFE, but I see that Necronomicon Press is supposedly going to reprint it soon.

They had better. This book deserves to be kept in print.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, September 07, 2004 - 05:59 pm:   

Marc,

We'll be reprinting The Beyonders at some point, along with the two Wellman projects this year, the Flint Folks stories next year, a three-volume set of the 30th Century stories, etc... Much Wellman coming in the future.

And I'd have loved to reprint A LIFE, but Marc Michaud and I haven't gotten along since we did The Ancient Track.

Jason
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Martinus
Posted on Tuesday, September 07, 2004 - 11:02 pm:   

MarcL: Mythos Books are supposed to have plans for a new Myers collection, but so far nothing is firm -- I haven't even heard of a tentative title.

H. P. LOVECRAFT: A LIFE deserved a hardcover printing. Oh well, at least I'll get a new cover and an afterword now.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, September 08, 2004 - 09:22 am:   

Martinus: That indicates Gary Myers is still going at it, which is good news.

I am happy that HPL:AL is going to be available again, because I have been so uptight about losing/damaging my copy that I've been unwilling to lend it to any of the people who would most enjoy it, and it's hard to recommend a book that is completely unavailable at anything like an affordable price.
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zaybu
Posted on Friday, September 10, 2004 - 09:16 am:   

How about Zohra: the Planet of Truth and Knowledge by Joseph Palazzo?

It is a self-published book, but nevertheless a terrific read.

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Lampriere
Posted on Friday, September 10, 2004 - 11:15 am:   

And here is a sample page which should help you make your editorial decision:

http://www.authorhouse.com/BookStore/ItemDetail.aspx?q3=iAYIEZaMf%252fI%253d
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Tom Alaerts
Posted on Friday, September 10, 2004 - 02:57 pm:   

My two small suggestions:

1. There are a few Thomas Ligotti stories from the last 5 years or so that haven't been properly collected.
Out of the top of my head, these stories are:
- My case for retributive action
- Our temporary supervisor
- Purity
- The town manager
- Sideshow
- In a foreign town, in a foreign land
- the lyrics of This degenerate little town
- the lyrics of The unholy city
+ probably a few that I missed

And maybe he has other stories ready as well (I believe he has been working on a script called "Michigan Basement", for example). Also the "Theatro Grottesco" stories were only in the Nightmare Factory paperback. And finally, only a handful of people have his "Victor Frankenstein" collection (but I heard that it's rather weak, so...)

I would prefer to see such a book published by Nightshade since you don't limit yourself to luxurious limited editions, I prefer this writer to be more easily accessible for a wider group of readers.

Come to think about it, a "best of" collection of his older work would be welcome as well. I often notice that I recommend him to others but his books are difficult/expensive to find nowadays.

2. In the same vain, it is true that Tartarus publishes the ultimate Aickman collection, but it comes at a price that's outside the reach of many. So, a kind of "best of" paperback might be interesting as well.

best regards,

Tom
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Tom Alaerts
Posted on Friday, September 10, 2004 - 03:01 pm:   

as an addition to my previous post, since Durtro's edition of Ligotti's Crampton script is out of print, it would be a good idea to add it in the collection as well. This script is actually quite a clever scary story.

best regards, Tom
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B Boston
Posted on Saturday, September 11, 2004 - 12:54 pm:   

My suggestion:
Hake Talbot's "Rim of the Pit"
He also wrote another horror/mystery/magic novel, but I have been unable to obtain a copy of it, so I can't recommend it as yet.
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Craig Shaeffer
Posted on Monday, September 27, 2004 - 07:29 am:   

Nighttown, by T.E.D. Klein (in paperback)

I don't know if anyone has mentioned this one, but this gentleman is one of my favorite writers. He's also the least prolific. I wasn't even aware of this book's existence when I stumbled upon it on the Fantastic Fiction website.

His novel The Ceremonies is on my Top 10 Novels List, and his novella "Petey" is on my Top 10 Novellas List.


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Luis
Posted on Tuesday, September 28, 2004 - 12:47 pm:   

I'd like to see an affordable collection of W. C. Morrow stories, please.

Best,
Luís
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Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, October 12, 2004 - 01:40 pm:   

Good day,

An omnibus collection of Tom Reamy's 13 short stories and 1 novel would be cool...it's been 25 years since Earthlight published 'San Diego Lightfoot Sue and other stories'. That collection contained 11 stories, New Voices 4 [ed. by George R.R. Martin] has the 12th story and Harlan Ellison has the never-before-seen 13th piece.

Cheers, Bruce
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Andrew Breitenbach
Posted on Tuesday, October 19, 2004 - 08:50 am:   

How about Scott Baker? He's never had a collection in English (I believe he had one in French). "The Lurking Duck", "Still Life with Scorpion", "Varicose Worms", and "Nesting Instinct" were all World Fantasy Award nominees (with "Still Life..." winning, tying with Ryan's "The Bones Wizard"), and all wonderful horror / dark fantasy stories. (I have a soft spot for "The Lurking Duck" in particular -- and not just because of the demented title!) Anyway, just an idea. Thanks!

--Andrew J. Breitenbach
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Stratovar
Posted on Tuesday, October 19, 2004 - 10:17 am:   

A couple of recent books that really knocked me out were small press limited editions from the UK. Mark Samuels The White Hands from Tartarus is a collection of stories up there with Ligotti's stuff. And I bought a very limited edition hardback (100 copies) called The Haunted Ocean by John B. Ford from Rainfall Books. I'd never even heard of this author before but he writes like the reincarnation of Hodgson. Don't know if you have anything on the cards by these guys?
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, October 19, 2004 - 01:50 pm:   

Scott Baker's a terrific idea."The Lurking Duck" is a weird masterpiece.
Also, "The Jamesburg Incubus" and "Virus Dreams," the latter a novella.
There would definitely be enough for a collection.
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Jason Williams
Posted on Tuesday, October 19, 2004 - 11:54 pm:   

Scott Baker sounds interesting. And I have considering approaching Mark Samuels about reprinting The White Hands, but no decisions made as of yet.
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mark samuels
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 07:32 am:   

That's very flattering to hear. Tartarus have recently issued my WH book in a paperback reprint so rights in that are tied up. I do, however, now have a third collection of weird tales written (eight in all). I think it'll be as well-received as WH when published. If you're interested then do let me know Jason.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 08:00 am:   

If you need contact info for Scott, let me know.
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Ahmed A. Khan
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 12:08 pm:   

I would like to see reprints of some of Thorne Smith's books, particularly "The Stray Lamb" and "Rain in the Doorway".

Ahmed
http://www.angelfire.com/zine2/fictiononline/myworks.html
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Kage Baker
Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2004 - 12:46 pm:   

Thorne Smith, YEAH!!! I second the motion.
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Ahmed A. Khan
Posted on Thursday, October 21, 2004 - 09:46 am:   

Another Thorne Smith enthusiast! Glad to meet you, Kage. I have read some of your stories and liked them. I particularly remember "The Literary Agent" with affection. I have yet to read any of your novels but I think the time to do that is approaching.

Best.

Ahmed
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Kage Baker
Posted on Thursday, October 21, 2004 - 06:32 pm:   

Nice meeting you, too. I grew up on Thorne Smith-- my aunt and uncle were in a TV adaptation of TOPPER that ran as a series in the early '50s. So George and Marian Kirby were family members, in a sense. I always loved THE NIGHT LIFE OF THE GODS, too.

Our little regional library has a lot of books dating to the '30s and '40s-- people have donated their personal libraries-- and there is actually a first edition of DID SHE FALL? It's not one of Smith's better ones, but still worth reading, and I'm fairly sure it's been out of print for at least my lifetime.
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Ahmed A. Khan
Posted on Friday, October 22, 2004 - 07:13 am:   

Almost all Thorne Smith books are out of print. I actually have a copy of DID SHE FALL? (the Pocketbooks edition) and another Thorne Smith book (and in my opinion one of his best): THE GLORIOUS POOL.

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Glen
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 11:01 am:   

Jermey:

Take a look at the Carcosa imprint, three of the four I believe are either unavailable or available with large price tags. All were quality collections.

Also, I would like to see someone look at re issuing the Terry Lamsley material that Ash Tree put out years ago.

The "Collected Stories" events (what else can you call them) are wonderful. The PKD, Sturgeon, etc, all are treasures to hold for a lifetime and than some.

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Jason Williams
Posted on Monday, November 01, 2004 - 04:18 pm:   

Regarding the Carcosa titles, the Cave has been reprinted by Wildside Press, and the contents of the two Wellman collections have been reprinted by us as part of our five volume set of Wellman's supernatural fiction. I'm not a big Price fan, so we probably won't be doing that.

As to Lamsley, we'll be reprinting Conference with the Dead next year.
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StevenRowe
Posted on Friday, November 26, 2004 - 05:28 am:   

Thorne Smith would be good - but -- since many of his books were bestsellers; it is not that hard to find them really cheap -- thus eliminating the need for a good reprint....

I'd like to see Wellman's unpublished biography of Obray Ramsey --- although i suspect that would be a slow seller........

any stories ever not reprinted from Weird Tales?
maybe a volume called "The Worst of Weird Tales: the stories you wondered why they printed"?




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Kage Baker
Posted on Friday, November 26, 2004 - 09:41 am:   

Thorne Smith books really cheap?

Define Cheap.

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Jason Williams
Posted on Friday, November 26, 2004 - 01:41 pm:   

That I'm aware of, the Ramsey book isn't a biography, it's a novel loosely based on Ramsay's life. That said, I'd still love to get my hands on it.
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Matt Hughes
Posted on Tuesday, November 30, 2004 - 04:40 pm:   

Let me weigh in on Ahmed's and Kage's Thorne Smith suggestion: YES!
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StevenRowe
Posted on Saturday, December 04, 2004 - 03:33 am:   

as for cheap on Thorne Smith , I built my collection - which has most of his novels, for around $5 a piece or less. Of course, these are not first editions.

looking at prices on the internet,
you can still find a fair number of hardbacks for under $10 - condition wouldnt be that great though.
frankly, I too would like an uniformed set of Smith and would buy them/ but just remarking on their easily availablity

as for Wellman and Ramsey - I hope yall get the rights and print it. then a soundtrack would be next :-)
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Martinus
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 02:01 am:   

I was thinking of a collection of R. A. MacAvoy's three Damiano books. Though I don't know what a first edition costs, I do know that they deserve to be reprinted.
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - 05:10 pm:   

Well, following on from my post in JeffV's messafe board, either The Collected Stories of James Tiptree Jr, or The Collected Stories of Howard Waldrop. The Waldrop, of course, would come in two matching volumes covering 1976-1990 and 1991-2004. It would be very cool.
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Jim Rockhill
Posted on Sunday, December 12, 2004 - 11:39 am:   

Another fat volume of Brian Hodge's short stories and novellas would be most welcome. There is a lot of excellent material written before and since LIES & UGLINESS appeared, which deserves better exposure.

Jim
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Mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 07:11 am:   

I'd like to see a collection of Walter Jon Williams' uncollected short fiction. NESFA printed Frankensteins and Foreign Devils several years ago, but Williams still has a lot of good stories uncollected. Not sure what kind of demand there is for his stuff right now -- his new space opera trilogy is, alas, not all that good.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 02:22 pm:   

Yeah, we're pondering WJW ourselves. Jer and I are big fans. Wouldn't mind reprinting some things in tpb, such as Hardwired, Angel Station, etc, if we ever get in a position to start doing tpb reprints.
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 03:29 pm:   

On Walter Jon: his first collection, FACETS, is out of print. His second, FOREIGN DEVILS, is available from the publisher. It would be possible to do a strong new collection - he's certainly published enough good novellas to fill a collection by themselves of late. If it were up to me, and it isn't, I'd do a best-of. Hardly anyone has published 'best-of' collections since the '70s and they're way cool books for all sorts of reasons. A 150k best of WJW would be damnfine.
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Jonathan K Stephens
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 04:19 pm:   

Sign me up. I'll buy a copy of a 'WJW Best Of'.

I had the enjoyment of getting Fred Pohl to sign his 'Best of' from 1975! We both marveled, and since I was the only person who had a copy of 'The Space Merchants' in the room, he did me the honour of borrowing my copy for the afternoon reading at Torcon III. Fred subsequently autographed the book, thanking me for the loan of 'my' book. Damn fine gentleman!

How about a nice anniversary edition of 'The Space Merchants'. In scanning 'bookfinder', I don't see any available.

regards,

Jonathan K. Stephens
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mastadge
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 05:16 pm:   

I own both of his collections, and some specific stories of his I'd love to see collected but remain stubbornly uncollected include:

"The Green Leopard Plague," "The Tang Dynasty Underwater Pyramid," and "The Last Ride of German Freddie" (from the WORLDS THAT WEREN'T antho, which I don't yet own for reasons incomprehensible to me).

Walter Jon himself is very interested in doing another collection as well, or at least that was the case six months ago when I spoke to him about it six months ago.
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 05:53 pm:   

Hey Mastadge - All of the stories you mention post-date the Nesfa book. I think a best of would almost certainly cover those stories plus a bunch of others. It would be a way cool book. Someone should do it. - J
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Ed S.
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 01:52 pm:   

Jonathan said:
"How about a nice anniversary edition of 'The Space Merchants'. In scanning 'bookfinder', I don't see any available."

According to their web page the following is "under consideration" at NESFA:

"A collection or collections of Frederik Pohl/C. M. Kornbluth collaborations."

That pretty much takes The Space Merchants off the table.
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Andrew
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 03:20 pm:   

What about a comprehensive collections of the following authors (not the puny 240 pages collections brought by by Golden Gryphon)?

Robert Reed
Ian R. MacLeod
William Barton
Rober Aickman
Terry Dowling
retrospective collection of short stories by Clifford D. Simak
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Jonathan
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 03:39 pm:   

Hi Andrew - In fairness to the various publishers who bring out collections in the 240pp range, there are compelling practical financial reasons to go for shorter books. That aside, there wouldn't be enough uncollected Ian Macleod for such a book (he has two collections, with a third in process), Robert Reed has a new collection due, as does Dowling (who actually has a 400+pp retrospective).

That said, I think the Barton idea is a terrific one, I'd love to see the Dowling retro expanded and published in the US and Simak would be great. My understanding on Simak, though, is that there are problems with the managers of the estate.
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Ed S.
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 04:33 pm:   

John Pelan's Darkside Press has announced a 12 volume collection of all the short fiction of Clifford Simak. The first volume "Eternity Lost and Other Stories" should be out soon.
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Andrew
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 06:12 pm:   

Thanks Jonathan and Ed S.

It's a great news about Simak.

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Michael Walsh
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 08:12 pm:   

WAY STATION and CITY are also back in print. And CITY is the complete edition - Simak's 1976 foreword and the final CITY story from "Astounding: The JWC Memorial Anthology."

And if I do say so, the art for the WAY STATION jacket is perhaps the book has ever had. Period.

Check it out at www.oldearthbooks.com

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Michael Walsh
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 08:23 pm:   

As for Aickman, I've been trying to work out a deal with the estate to do a US edition of the Tartarus edition, but adding The Model, and some selected non-fiction such as all of the intros to the Fontana collections he edited. (Gad, that was a long sentence...)
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Keith Knight
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2005 - 05:23 am:   

Hippocampus Press is putting out some excellent Lovecraft/H.P.L.related stuff, but all in glued paperbacks.How about joining with them and you do the hardcover line of their titles? I think there are a lot of H.P.L. collectors who would put up the extra amount for the quality.
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Jonathan
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2005 - 06:17 am:   

Hey Ed.S - I'd heard whispers about the Simak books from Darkside. While it's fine that the books will be published, my concern with Simak is that he's looking slap bang down the barrell of being completely forgotten. A project like the Darkside one, however well-intended and well-executed, will do little to redress the situation by find Simak a broader audience. A selected stories volume - like The Avram Davidson Treasury or the rumoured R.A. Lafferty Treasury - is what's needed. I wish Darkside well with their project, but I hope someone will do the selected. - Jonathan
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2005 - 07:00 am:   

The problem with the type of Lovecraft material that Hippocampus is doing is that it's pretty niche. They're doing POD and that works ok for them. But in order for us to do something, we need to be able to move some sort of quantity on it, and the tertiary material doesn't generally sell all that well. I got a warehouse full of Mysteries of Time and Spirit that can testify to that. We'll see if the second volume, Letters from New York, does any better when it's released this month (presuming B&T decides to play nicely. We just got a new Accounts Payable rep at B&T, our 5th in the past year).
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Ed S.
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2005 - 10:22 am:   

Jonathan, admittedly the Darkside editions will presumably be limited to 500 copies and have very limited distribution (no Amazon or BN). I understand what you are saying and it would be nice to see someone like NESFA or Night Shade do a Simak omnibus collection of his best shorts since it would be widely distributed and stay in print for years to come. I think the likelihood of another publisher touching Simak for a hardcover collection of his short stories is unlikely because of the imminent Darkside publication. Paperback though might be a different matter.

And thanks to Michael Walsh for pointing out the Old Earth Simak titles. I wasn't aware of them. I am looking forward to rereading City.
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Chris D
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 04:21 am:   

Hello everyone,

New fan of Nightshade books here. Loving the Wellman collection, guys.

What I'd most like to see are reprints of Lafcadio Hearn's Japanese supernatural tales. The most famous one is, of course, Kwaidan, which is maddeningly hard to find in an affordable hardback edition. Used editions are extremely expensive too, well over the $50 mark. The tales are strange, haunting, and eloquent, and Kwaidan is certainly a well-recognized classic.
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JKS
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 06:54 am:   

Here's a novel suggestion for you:

Start a new Suggestions thread! :-)

best,

Jonathan
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jlassen
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 04:27 pm:   

Since this thread is getting rather long in tooth, Please continue to post your suggestions on the new thread:

http://www.nightshadebooks.com/discus/messages/52/3870.html?1107995154
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William Elliott
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 10:00 pm:   

I'd like to see Sterling Lanier's The Peculiar Exploits of Brigadier Ffellowes. It would probably interest fans of Jorkens.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2005 - 10:55 am:   

How about a book collecting all the short fiction of John Christopher? His collection, The Twenty-Second Century, collects most, but not all of it. But perhaps this would be a better book for NEFSA's line, as they did those great editions of Cordwainer Smith's and C. M. Kornbluth's short fiction.
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Chris Johnson
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 03:58 pm:   

I may be late responding to some of these wish lists, but Centepede Press has put out a collection of Kuttner/Moore; Medusa Press has put out a collection of John Gordon's supernatural tales; and the Whitehead is coming out by Ash Tree.

I wonder when John Pelan will have "Medusa" out? Time will tell...

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