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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 07:43 am:   

A friend sent me this URL: http://www.legis.state.ia.us/GA/76GA/House/Members/Jerry-Cornelius.html
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Rhys
Posted on Monday, May 19, 2003 - 08:19 am:   

I wonder if the Japanese (one man) band Cornelius are named after Jerry Cornelius?

Wasn't there a Dutch sailor named Jeremiah Cornelius who became a tyrannical ruler of a group of castaways?
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iotar
Posted on Monday, May 19, 2003 - 08:23 am:   

I think the Japanese Cornelius is in reference to Cornelius in Planet of the Apes. But I could be wrong.

Actually, I think I shd make that my sig-file "http://iotar.8m.net ++ i could be wrong ++"

I saw Ezra Pound on the tube the other night. He's starting to look pretty old for a dead man.
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - 03:31 am:   

English speaking people always screw up the proper way of writing and pronouncing Cornelius, which is Cornelis, without the U. (In Dutch that is.) During my studies in the US, I just stopped asking people to pronounce it correctly and just assumed a nickname: Cornrows.

By the way, never heard of Jeremiah.
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Rhys
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - 10:29 am:   

Yeah, well Dutch (and English) people always screw up the proper way of pronouncing LLANFAIRPWLLGWYNGYLLGOGERYCHWYRNDROBWLLLLANTYSILIOGOGOGOCH. So I just stopped going there.
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, May 22, 2003 - 01:12 am:   

Good for you Rhys. :-)
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mjm
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 11:19 am:   

Cornelius -- Roman soldier who helped Christ.
Cornelius of London -- Notting Hill greengrocer whose name I pinched for a character with a
common European name...
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mjm
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 11:20 am:   

Oh, I forgot -- Cornucopia comes from the same
root...
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 11:45 am:   

The actual meaning of Cornelius is "Man with the Horn" which is a reference to "WARRIOR".
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Lou Anders
Posted on Tuesday, June 03, 2003 - 07:01 am:   

This is a little late in responding
but Cornelius the japanese pop artist
takes his name from Planet of the Apes
he's confirmed it in interviews
and samples some dialogue from the movie on one of his CDs.
However, if you watch the Wes Anderson film Bottlerocket, when the young crook-wannabes are using "code names"
Owen Wilson says, "I'm Jerry and this is my friend Cornelius."
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mjm
Posted on Wednesday, June 04, 2003 - 07:13 am:   

I understood the meaning wasn't horn (warrior)
but horn (farmer) as in Cornucopia...
Still, the two were the same when the Roman army
was only made up of landowners.
Could it also mean bad music hall comic (Corny ?)
It's the centurion mentioned in Acts x.I. Some martyred pope. Cornelia's the femininine.
It came into England from the Low Countries and was also used to anglicise Irish names like Conchubhar.
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Friday, June 06, 2003 - 07:13 am:   

Could be Mr. Moorcock. Still, quite an interesting name, if I may say so. Without bragging of course!

But what about the name Moorcock?
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mjm
Posted on Friday, June 06, 2003 - 08:44 am:   

Another name for a grouse...
Comes from Yorkshire, where my paternal ancestors came from in the late 18th century, to settle, with other Methodists, around Wamering in the
South. Moorcock is a tiny village in W. Yorks. Its only other fame is probably Prince Charles's painting. Nowadays it's no more than a farm and a few buildings. Moorcocks moved gradually into what became the South London suburbs. My great great Aunt Rachel Moorcock wrote some stirring poems in her day in support of Garibaldi and various radical causes. She wrote a poem on the Apocalypse which was pretty nifty and spoiled only by its anti-Semiticism, inspired sadly by her Lutheran leanings.
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Sunday, June 08, 2003 - 09:55 am:   

Thanks for the info! I wish I could find out what my last name means, but I couldn't find anything on the Net. Ow, well...

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mjm
Posted on Sunday, June 08, 2003 - 01:50 pm:   

First bit could well be from Alder tree. Alder's a common English surname from Old English. Is Alder the same in Dutch ? Or maybe 'Alte' (Old). Alderman is still used in local politics in England, though, to mean 'elder'originally.
Ald- means old in OE.
Lister's also OE for 'dyer'... But we're moving
off into speculation here...

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Luís Rodrigues
Posted on Sunday, June 08, 2003 - 04:43 pm:   

It's amazing how you people can trace your ancestry centuries down the line. All I know is that one of my great-grandfathers was mayor of Lagos in Algarve, while another fought in the Great War and came home with his pockets full of looted silverware.

That aside, I have no idea where my parents' families come from, or what they did before the 20th century. Doesn't help that Rodrigues is about the fourth or fifth most common surname in Portugal. If anyone asks, I'm a mutt. :-)

Cheers,
Luís
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Rhys
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2003 - 03:50 am:   

What I heard, Luís, was that your ancestors were sailors or pirates or something who all played the cavaquinho.

Must have been a big cavaquinho...
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mjm
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2003 - 09:22 am:   

Well, that is the advantage of having a name like Moorcock... Those with the guts to retain it (and some didn't) are inclined to stand up and
be counted, as it were.
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2003 - 10:05 am:   

Thanks for the effort Mr. Moorcock. But I guess the meaning of my family name will remain veiled with speculation.
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2003 - 10:08 am:   

Ow yeah, alder tree = elzenboom in Dutch.
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2003 - 10:46 am:   

OK! After some intensive searching on the Net I finally found the meaning of my last name.

Alderlieste is derived from Allerliefste, which means Dearest or Darling in English. Its origin lies in the province of Zuid-Holland of the 17th century.

Well, I'm glad that's finally clear to me.
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mjm
Posted on Tuesday, June 10, 2003 - 08:12 am:   

Congratulations. Cornelius Darling. You might well be related to that lady who married Peter
Pan...
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Tuesday, June 10, 2003 - 11:53 pm:   

O crap! Of course! That runaway shade of mine should have been a dead giveaway.
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mjm
Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2003 - 12:46 pm:   

Or Grace Darling, the shipwreck heroine, who steered the lifeboat and saved the survivors!
You're in fine company!
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, June 12, 2003 - 05:13 am:   

Thanks Mr. Moorcock, it's always nice to hear kind words from a man whose last name is KORHOEN in Dutch. :-)
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mjm
Posted on Thursday, June 12, 2003 - 09:56 am:   

Korhoen, eh ? Useful... Is it a real name or did you just translate ?
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, June 12, 2003 - 10:48 am:   

Korhoen is the translation of grouse/moorcock (the animal). I checked the online phone directory and there are no last names Korhoen, although there is a last name Korhone which is of no genuine actual resemblance. Korhoen is widely used though as a name for certain restaurants and community houses. Just as a proper name with no special meaning to it, for instance the Korhoen snackbar, which could also be, for instance, the Seagull snackbar.

When I looked it up I was kind of surprised that the Dutch version of your name started with Kor. :-)
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mjm
Posted on Friday, June 13, 2003 - 06:59 am:   

The Spanish word is Gallibasta. That's why you'll see a Migual Juan Gallibasta turning up here and there in my stuff...
Watch for Mr Korhoen. He could be slipping in
somewhere fairly soon.
Much obliged, pard!
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Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Friday, June 13, 2003 - 08:48 am:   

Glad I could help! :-)

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