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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Tuesday, November 01, 2005 - 09:37 pm:   

THE MAGAZINE OF
FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
January • 57th Year of Publication

NOVELLAS
Planet of Mystery -44- Terry Bisson

NOVELETS
Less Than Nothing -7- Robert Reed
The Boy in Zaquitos -138- Bruce McAllister

SHORT STORIES
Shadow Man -87- Matthew Hughes
Horse-Year Women -92- Michaela Roessner
A Daze in the Life -116- Tony Sarowitz
Journey to Gantica -126- Matthew Corradi

DEPARTMENTS
Books To Look For -34- Charles de Lint
Books -38- Elizabeth Hand
Coming Attractions -91-
Films: 101 More Uses of Enchantment -110- Kathi Maio
Index to Volumes 108 & 109 -159-
Curiosities -162- Bud Webster

COVER: BY MAX BERTOLINI FOR "PLANET OF MYSTERY"
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Sean
Posted on Friday, November 04, 2005 - 07:25 pm:   

Oh, fer the love of...

Halloween's barely passed, the malls are already playing freakin' Christmas music (it's seventy degrees outside), and you're already posting January's TOC?

Best get my bod into shape, then. Swimsuit season's just around the corner.


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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Saturday, November 05, 2005 - 07:48 am:   

Sean---

The December issue should be on the stands now. January issue should be on the stands before the end of November. We don't want anyone to pick up the October issue on the stands in November and think, "This issue's out of date," so the cover month for our issues is well in advance of actual publication.
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Dave Truesdale
Posted on Saturday, November 05, 2005 - 07:41 pm:   

Gordon--

I hope Terry Bisson's two-parter is well enough received that you will consider doing it again. A three or four-parter (an entire novel) might be a bit much for the obvious reasons (though Stan has done this successfully), but I think a two-parter fits the bill nicely.

Haven't had a chance to read any of this issue yet, but I'm looking eagerly forward to it.

Dave
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Sean
Posted on Sunday, November 06, 2005 - 10:24 am:   

Oh, I know. It's just one issue arrives about a day after I finish the previous, and then a week later the next TOC is published.
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Grayson Boyd
Posted on Friday, November 18, 2005 - 07:09 pm:   

A two-parter? With Mr Bisson? Whoo-hoo!

Was thinking about how much I love the mag, and decided to drop you a note, Mr Gelder. I love your mag! you get on the various message boards and tussle with the savages, but I want you to know that this little Philistine loves the fiction you choose and the look of your covers and the way you've carried on the tradition of F&SF.

Thank you very, very much.

Oh, and you bring on as much Terry Bisson as the man passes out. That's an order!
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Saturday, November 19, 2005 - 04:33 am:   

Thanks for your note, Grayson. Glad you like the direction the magazine's going in.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Tuesday, November 22, 2005 - 11:22 am:   

Our first subscription copies of the January issue arrived in Hoboken, NJ, in today's mail.
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Liz
Posted on Tuesday, November 22, 2005 - 08:59 pm:   

Yay! And in theory, I won't have to wait for this month's to linger at the post office to get the forward address applied to it.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Wednesday, November 23, 2005 - 08:54 am:   

Review:

http://www.tangentonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=624&Itemi d=259
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John Thiel
Posted on Thursday, November 24, 2005 - 12:46 pm:   

Issue just in my mailbox, and I liked some aspects of the cover art, however don't care for a half-man/half-horse in my art, though this one is more like the homo cameleopard, though zebra rather than leopard. Thought it would illustrate "Horse-Year Women" but instead it's "Planet of Mystery," which indeed had hosses in it, to prove that thing is one or is like one.

Surprised to see my very good friend Kent Clair Chamberlain in the Marketplace. Surprised? It blew my mind! I thought he was dead.

Not sure what you're getting at in "Coming Attractions"--what are "copy lines"? Oh, blurbs and plugs! Thanks for telling me!

Elizabeth Hand's column this time reminds me of Di Filippo's in the most recent Asimov's. It seems to me to be in the same mode, to have the same approach to science fiction and fantasy. Others may see it different.

The one figure on the cover holding the raygun reminds me of old-time cover art, especially the Better Publications Group, but in the style more often presented by Lowndes. But the rest of the cover is pretty much in present day fantasy art style.
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Robert Burke Richardson
Posted on Thursday, November 24, 2005 - 06:06 pm:   

This TOC makes me realize I'm still waiting for the December issue to arrive. On the bright side, though, it means I've got a lot of good fiction to look forward to!

Robert,
Elf-Help: comic*blog
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Friday, November 25, 2005 - 04:16 am:   

Foreign subscriber copies of the December issue are still in transit.
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Robert Burke Richardson
Posted on Friday, November 25, 2005 - 11:13 am:   

^Thanks for the update, Gordon -- I figured that was the case. Great line-ups for both December and January, btw!

Robert,
Elf-Help: comic*blog
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Saturday, November 26, 2005 - 12:58 pm:   

Review:

http://sfrevu.com/Review-id.php?id=3400
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Sean
Posted on Friday, December 02, 2005 - 06:38 pm:   

I'm a little disappointed in the cover art. In the story, Chang wishes for a weapon he doesn't have, but -- lo and behold -- he's got one on the cover.

The half a story, and I do subscribe for the stories and not the cover art, is excellent. Hope it doesn't go where I'm thinking, or, if it does, it does it well and surprisingly.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Monday, December 05, 2005 - 05:11 am:   

I just posted to my blog an interview with Matthew Corradi, author of "Journey to Gantica," which appears in this (the January 2006) issue. "Journey to Gantica" is Corradi's first publication.

http://www.tuginternet.com/jja/journal/
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Charlie Finlay
Posted on Sunday, December 18, 2005 - 10:16 am:   

I'm supposed to be reading other things right now, but I couldn't stay away from the Bisson any longer. It was a fast, fun read, very much in the style of the old planetary romances without feeling derivative or too nostalgic, a tough trick to pull off. Stylistically, it reminded me more of Brackett than anyone else, just for being clean, sharp, and economical. Now that I think I know where it's going, I'm waiting for Bisson to surprise me.

My favorite complete story in the issue was Michaela Roessner's "Horse-Year Women," for its honesty and depth. It shows that there's more than one way to weave fantasy tropes and sources with contemporary subject matter. I found the two narratives, of the narrator and Thera, both compelling, particularly the ways they intersected. I'm not sure why this one moved me so much, but it did. Nice work.
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Liz
Posted on Sunday, December 18, 2005 - 08:36 pm:   

I really enjoyed Bisson's story. Except for when they entered the atmosphere and expected it to be completely dark, instead of fairly dim and orange. Still, looking forward to part two. :-)
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Michael Samerdyke
Posted on Wednesday, December 21, 2005 - 06:52 am:   

The two stories I liked best this issue were "Shadow Man" by Matthew Hughes and "Journey to Gantica" by Matthew Corradi. The Hughes was a nice change of pace from his ususal type of story, and the Corradi was a very thoughtful use of a familiar fantasy idea.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Wednesday, January 04, 2006 - 08:16 am:   

Review (scroll down):

http://surprisingstories.dcwi.com/spaced.htm
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Sunday, January 08, 2006 - 03:12 pm:   

I forgot to post a favorite story poll for the past couple issues, so go vote now for your favorite story in the January (and December) issue:

http://www.tuginternet.com/jja/journal/archives/cat_polls.html
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Sue
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 07:23 pm:   

I just received my copy of the January 2006 Issue.
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StevenLP
Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 - 09:23 am:   

I received my copy of the January issue on Monday (I'm in the UK). I noticed a reference to Bruce McAllister's story "The Boy in Zaquitos" in the Personnel Ads section, which amused me: I'll have to look at some back issues to see if that's a regular gag.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Wednesday, February 01, 2006 - 10:21 am:   

Fantasy & Science Fiction
January 2006 Favorite Story Poll Results!

Planet of Mystery - Terry Bisson 31.6% 6

Shadow Man - Matthew Hughes 21.1% 4

I wasn't overly impressed with any of them. 15.8% 3

The Boy in Zaquitos - Bruce McAllister 10.5% 2

Horse-Year Women - Michaela Roessner 10.5% 2

Journey to Gantica - Matthew Corradi 10.5% 2

Less Than Nothing - Robert Reed 0% 0

A Daze in the Life - Tony Sarowitz 0% 0

total votes: 19

Come on, people! Only 19 votes?
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 02:21 pm:   

review: http://www.bestsf.net/reviews/fsf0601.html
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Ahmed A. Khan
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 07:30 am:   

For my money, "The Boy in Zaquitos" was the best story in the issue.

Ahmed
http://ahmedakhan.journalspace.com
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Ahmed A. Khan
Posted on Friday, March 03, 2006 - 11:17 am:   

A belated review of the January 2006 issue can be found at my blog: http://ahmedakhan.journalspace.com
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Dave Roy
Posted on Friday, March 03, 2006 - 09:17 pm:   

And my belated one as well.

http://www.epinions.com/content_4680294532

Dave
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, September 09, 2007 - 07:31 pm:   

Bruce McAllister's story from this issue is reprinted in BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES. The KIRKUS review singles it out:

KIRKUS 9/15/2007



THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 2007
Author: King, Stephen


Review Date: SEPTEMBER 01, 2007
Publisher:Houghton Mifflin
Pages: 448
Price (hardback): $28
Publication Date: 10/10/2007 0:00:00
ISBN: 978-0-618-71347-9
ISBN (hardback): 978-0-618-71347-9
Category: FICTION


A star is assigned to books of unusual merit, determined by the editors of Kirkus Reviews.


A rich, dense collection of 20 stories—King has harvested a bumper crop.


Auchincloss, Barth, Beattie, Boyle…the alphabetical order bunches together some big names at the start. The first three stories are entertaining and quirky, but T.C. Boyle's "Balto" really hits paydirt. In this marvelous cliffhanger, about the forging of character, a 12-year-old girl can protect her beloved father if she lies under oath. What will she decide? Other family dramas also have real bite. The renowned Canadian Alice Munro explores intrepidly the aftermath of murder ("Dimension"). A deranged father has killed his three small children; his stoic, baffled wife visits him in the insane asylum; later, through his letters, she enters his twilit world, still reluctantly bound to him. The late Beverly Jensen looks at a large, loving, quarrelsome family ("Wake"). The head of the family has died. His children drive him through an ice storm to his burial in a remote Canadian village, where festive mourners greet the hearse in an extraordinary tableau. That boisterous affection for the dead is offset by two moving but unsentimental accounts of tenderness toward the dying (Stellar Kim's "Findings and Impressions" and Eileen Pollack's "The Bris"). Surrealism is represented by Karen Russell's assimilation fable ("St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves") and Roy Kesey's airport nightmare ("Wait"), while Bruce McAllister's searing story about the crisis of conscience experienced by a CIA covert-ops guy who spreads plagues in left-wing Third World countries is a memorable example of speculative fiction ("The Boy in Zaquitos"). Also noteworthy are Richard Russo's "Horseman," an intriguing campus story that's a subtle illustration of the saying that good teachers teach themselves, and Joseph Epstein's "My Brother Eli," a juicy if superficial portrait of the artist (a thinly disguised Saul Bellow) as a bastard.


Just one criticism: The diversity on display does not extend to stories of minorities, which, considering all the talent out there, is troubling.

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