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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 12:06 pm:   

NOVELETS
Thwarting Jabbi Gloond -5- Matthew Hughes
Maze of Trees -38- Claudia O'Keefe


SHORT STORIES
Gypsy Tail Wind -71- Mary Rosenblum
Refried Clichés: A Five-Course Meal -89- Mike Shultz
A Very Little Madness Goes a Long Way -100- M. Rickert
Spell -118- Bruce McAllister
Pure Vision -130- Robert Reed
The Woman in Schrödinger's Wave Equations -143- Eugene Mirabelli


DEPARTMENTS
Books to Look For -25- Charles de Lint
Books -29- Elizabeth Hand
Films: Curse of the Deadly Sequel -94- Lucius Shepard
Coming Attractions -99-
Curiosities -162- F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre

CARTOONS: S. Harris (70), J.P. Rini (88), Danny Shanahan (160).

COVER: "FAIRY FALLS" BY MAX BERTOLINI
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kellys
Posted on Thursday, June 02, 2005 - 01:11 pm:   

Glad to see M. Rickert's got a new piece.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Wednesday, June 22, 2005 - 11:11 am:   

FYI, our first subscription copies arrived in the mail today (6/22). So subscribers should start receiving their issues this week.
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John Thiel
Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2005 - 10:49 am:   

The August issue has arrived, bringing with it butterflies, a better look at the world of nature as regards insects than your last issue's cover, I think. I'd scarce taken that cover in when along came this change of pace.

The featured story doesn't look too promising, seeming to celebrate a tail-wind for a gypsy caravan. It reminds me too much of the story of Bobby Ree as told by Janis Joplin. But the story reminds me more of DREAMSNAKE. One looks for prior references as to its milieu. The story developed some excellent alternate-worldly atmosphere up toward its end, though, which I think justifies it among those of us who find gypsies rather dull.

Jabbi Gloond? What kind of a name is that, Matt?

Stanley Schmidt having just written an editorial about cliches, after reading some forum discussion of the same, Mike Schultz' story is timely, and it is always good to have some humor on the menu (except in a real restaurant).

I doubt if Schroedinger would have been as well known as he is today without his cat.
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Matt Hughes
Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2005 - 04:23 pm:   

Jabbi Gloond? What kind of a name is that, Matt?

To steal from Joseph Heller, and I always steal from the best, it's Jabbi's name, John.

I made it up. Then I found out that there is a Spanish name, Xabi, that is pronounced much the same way.

Matt Hughes
http://www.archonate.com/black-brillion
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2005 - 05:36 pm:   

Isn't Gloond a Bainese name?
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John Thiel
Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2005 - 07:17 pm:   

Mining has been a very popular setting for science fiction stories over the years since 1970, apparently starting with the concept that asteroids would be a valuable source of ore and being augmented by the "hard science" demand--what could be harder than mining, unless it's engineering, also a popular setting? Well, in spite of the familiar setting, I couldn't get over the notion that the characters in the story I mentioned above were in the middle of nowhere somehow, no criticism of the story intended, smiley, the nowhere I speak of is the milieu described. But of course where there is mining there is substantiality. I am glad that something was accomplished in dealing with the title character and it justified the title and the reading of the story to see this accomplished in the way it was. An interesting experience to read it.
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Matt Hughes
Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2005 - 09:10 pm:   

Glad you found it interesting, JT. As for describing milieu, I confess that I tend toward minimalism. I figure any story is a collaboration between author and reader, and why should I have to do all the work?

JJA, Gloond is Pseudocaledonian.

Matt Hughes
http://www.archonate.com/black-brillion
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John Thiel
Posted on Friday, July 01, 2005 - 07:20 am:   

Lol, reader involvement--the reader can well imagine himself in the situations described.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Saturday, July 02, 2005 - 04:58 pm:   

Review:

http://www.tangentonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=493&Itemi d=259

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Tom Kraemer
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 09:44 am:   

John Thiel, I love your posts, but your comments about "Jabbi Gloond" confused me a wee. It's the stuff in italics. Please elucidate.

I've read half the offerings this month.

O'Keefe made WV seem romantic and appealing: no small feat. Brava!

I also enjoyed the denouement of "Jabbi Gloond". Stupid, stupid boy!

McAllister's "Spell" mesmerised.

Shultz' "Cliches" was harmless fun.
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John Thiel
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 05:08 pm:   

The title character had to be dealt with and was, and the thwart seemed effective.
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Tom Kraemer
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 07:18 pm:   

Oh. For some reason I thought...
anyways, I agree with you.
And I do love your posts, both here and on 'mov's.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 02:33 pm:   

Review:

http://www.irosf.com/q/zine/article/10164
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Michael Samerdyke
Posted on Sunday, July 10, 2005 - 12:53 pm:   

I thought the best story this issue was Eugene Mirabelli's "The Woman in Schroedinger's Wave Equations." It continually surprised me, was informative, and proved romantic.

Also good were "Thwarting Jabbi Gloond," by Hughes, "Refried Cliches" by Shultz, and "Pure Vision" by Reed. (The last seemed like an ironic variant of Robert Bloch's "The Cheaters," since a few of us were going on about Bloch in regards to "Twilight States" in the previous issue.)
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Sarah Louis
Posted on Saturday, July 16, 2005 - 09:48 pm:   

Just wanted to comment that I don't think I would have convinced myself to buy this issue were it not for the gorgeous cover. Of course, some of the stuff between the covers looked interesting, too <g>, but it was the cover that sealed the deal.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 - 09:40 am:   

Review:

http://trashotron.com/agony/news/2005/08-01-05.htm
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2005 - 12:44 pm:   

Review:

http://www.bestsf.net/reviews/fsf0508.html
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Friday, September 30, 2005 - 04:57 pm:   

The somewhat final tally of the August 2005 F&SF Favorite Story Poll can be found here:

http://www.blogpoll.com/poll/view_Results.php?poll_id=19891

The Woman in Schrödinger's Wave Equations by Eugene Mirabelli came in first with eight votes, and was followed by Maze of Trees by Claudia O'Keefe, which garnered six.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, October 03, 2005 - 02:53 pm:   

Claudia's Maze of Trees is my favorite of the issue. My only problem was the ending, which seemed too sappy; otherwise, really good story. I guess their love affair didn't seem developed enough, to end on such a sappy note. But I was convinced right up untill the very end; both Landry and Carly are strong characters.

I liked "Schrodingers Wave Equation". It also seems to have characterization and prose as strengths, but I enjoyed the style in "Maze of Trees" more, and found the characterization better overall, in the O'Keefe story.

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