June 2005 F&SF -- contents Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction » F&SF Issues - Tables of Contents, Discussion » June 2005 F&SF -- contents « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 07:45 pm:   

Novelets
OF SILENCE AND THE MAN AT ARMS -6- Charles Coleman Finlay
CHESTER -55- David Gerrold
THE GIST HUNTER -121- Matthew Hughes

Short Stories
POET SNOW -38- Robert Reed
EATING HEARTS -50- Yoon Ha Lee
BEDFELLOWS -77- Harry Turtledove
SWEETMEATS -83- Marc Laidlaw
THE LEGEND OF THE WHINEY MAN -106- John Morressy

Departments
BOOKS TO LOOK FOR -28- Charles de Lint
MUSING ON BOOKS -33- Michelle West
COMING ATTRACTIONS -82-
FILMS: GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE -101- Kathi Maio
CURIOSITIES -162- David Langford

CARTOONS: S. Harris (27), Joseph Farris (49), Arthur Masear (76).
COVER BY MATT HUGHES FOR "THE GIST HUNTER"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

DeltaR
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 06:29 pm:   

Matt does his own artwork? That's pretty cool.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Joseph Adams
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 06:43 pm:   

That would be pretty cool, but Matt Hughes is a different person than Matthew Hughes, though to add to the confusion, Matthew Hughes also writes as Matt Hughes (when publishing non-SF stuff, like mysteries). For more info about Matt Hughes the artist, see his website at http://www.matthughesart.com/. For more on Matthew Hughes the writer, see his website at http://www.archonate.com/.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Charlie Finlay
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 06:57 pm:   

There's a reason why I decided to be Charles Coleman Finlay when I published instead of just Charlie Finlay: although I didn't know of any other writers with the same name I was already tired of a lifetime of owning the Oakland As jokes.

Although apparently there's a surgery professor who's Charles Coleman Finley with an "e". So what're you going to do?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Patrick M.
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 07:08 pm:   

Well, according to the Jet Li movie, you become more powerful when the other you's are gone. I'm not making recommendations, just pointing out options... :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jaye Lawrence
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 07:21 pm:   

I thought my name was unusual enough (at least for a woman) to avoid mistaken identity. But it turns out there's another Jaye Lawrence, an artist, and she's already taken jayelawrence.com. <sigh>
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Joseph Adams
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 08:08 pm:   

I use the Joseph in my name for obvious reasons, but if you google my full name, there are still others out there, such as some famous politicians on the rather morbidly titled "Political Graveyard" website, and there's a professor somewhere with my name too (http://students.vcccd.net/scheds/summer_05/sched_v_m.htm) who teaches a class on multimedia.

I had a run in in the slush pile with another John Adams (though he wasn't a John Joseph). But the strange thing was we went to the same university, and we had some other things in common too.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 06:54 am:   

There's a turn-of-the-century Alexander C. Irvine--an evangelist who wrote books, including the immortal My Lady of the Chimney Corner.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Akers
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 08:32 am:   

I'm apparently a stock car driver, as well as a studio musician in Nashville. Google will tell you more about yourself than you ever wanted to know.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Diana Rowland
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 09:12 am:   

My alter ego writes books on Japanese Business Etiquette. I actually got an email from the BBC once asking me to come to London for an interview. Trust me, I thought long and hard before finally writing them back to inform them that they had the wrong Diana Rowland. I wasn't quite sure I could fake my way through an interview on Japanese Business Etiquette for the purpose of a free trip to London. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Pratt
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 09:26 am:   

There's a music critic named Tim Pratt, but I've never gotten any messages meant for him. Wish I did -- I could use some free music.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christopher
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 10:02 am:   

My main doppelgoogle is a big deal writer and teacher on philosophy and the history of philosophy, particularly your standard Greeks. There's also an engineering prof at Vandy and a bunch of others, it's not that uncommon a name. I'm trying to slowly drive them off the first two or three search engine pages by posting on newsgroups. It's what I do instead of working on my novel.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Matt Hughes
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 10:18 am:   

+ I wasn't quite sure I could fake my way through an interview on Japanese Business Etiquette for the purpose of a free trip to London. +

Diana, you could have got away with murder. Who would there be to contradict whatever you said? You coud have had export-minded British businessmen exhibiting peculiar motions with chopsticks all over Tokyo, to the polite consternation of their Japanese hosts. Ah, conscience doth make cowards of us all.

My nomative doppelganger writes scholarly books on the German army of World War II which are conflated with mine on Amazon. I think he's managed to get to the people who run the UK version, however, because Black Brillion is listed there as written by "M Hughes." I wonder if I might become as mysterious as the author of Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

Matt Hughes
http://www.archonate.com/black-brillion
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 10:56 am:   

I just want to point out that credit for this thread should go to the header notes for Robert Thurston's "I.D.I.D."

Phil Klass who writes as William Tenn told me that occasionally he'd receive royalty checks meant for Philip J. Klass the UFOlogist, and vice-versa. We should all have such problems with our namesakes. (I am not the Gordon Van Gelder who founded the zine 8-TRACK MIND, by the way.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 01:06 pm:   

Are you related to the Van Gelder who did some production work on a couple of Coltrane's records?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 01:10 pm:   

I recently learned that jazz producer Rudy Van Gelder is a distant relative, possibly fifth or sixth cousin. I was always told we weren't related, but I recently heard from a first cousin of his who explained that his family and mine are related somehow.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rob Darnell
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 01:40 pm:   

There's another writer named Rob Darnell, as I discovered when I stumbled over his book on Amazon.com a couple years ago. Sheesh, that peed me off. I'm Rob Darnell, goddamnit. Mind you, that was a couple years, and I just hiked over to Amazon and punched that suckers name in. Apparently he ain't there no more. I'm safe... I hope.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

S. Hamm
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 02:05 pm:   

There are at least four Sam Hamms, which leads me to wonder what the hell is wrong with people.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rob Darnell
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 02:19 pm:   

Well, Sam, maybe they all just want to be you. Heh heh.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Matt Hughes
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 03:24 pm:   

Rob, I scent a story idea. Someone is knocking off all the Rob Darnells... No, wait a minute, isn't that how Terminator starts?

Matt Hughes
http://www.archonate.com/black-brillion
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rob Darnell
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 03:35 pm:   

See what I get for punching in my own name?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mark Siegal
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 06:51 am:   

Except for one letter, my name is the same as Mark Siegel. He wrote the novel Echo and Narcissus, and he was in a Writers of the Future anthology. Sadly, he died in 2003.

It does make me wonder if I should write as Mark Andrew Siegal or use a pen name. But I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 08:34 am:   

So I got curious and started looking into the history of the name Irvine. Turns out I'm related to the actual Duncan killed by the actual Macbeth. At least it's extremely likely that I am, which is good enough for me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Klima
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 09:06 am:   

There's a John Klima who lives in Brooklyn who's an artist that gets written up in the NY Times every now and then. So, when you search on my name, you get tons of info on him. I'm creeping up the ranking though!

Damn! Related to Duncan! That's pretty frickin' cool. I'm not related to anyone cool. (although I almost bought a Klima Red Wings jersey when Petr was playing for them...)

JK
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, April 12, 2005 - 04:30 pm:   

My contributor's copies arrived today. Nice cover, and "Sweetmeats" looks...sweet... Thanks, Gordon (and JJA)!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Charlie Finlay
Posted on Wednesday, April 13, 2005 - 07:57 am:   

I got mine a couple days ago, so I haven't had time to read all the longer stories yet. "Sweetmeats" was a very good story and didn't go the way I expected at all. It was also good to see something from Yoon Ha Lee again. She writes very dense stories; a lot happens in them, and she's not afraid to imply things. I also enjoyed watching Turtledove push buttons.

Can't wait to get to the rest of them.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MaryRobinette
Posted on Wednesday, April 13, 2005 - 03:27 pm:   

My dad is George Harrison, but he goes by his middle name which is Ken. It's a handy way of sorting out the solicitors from the real phone calls. Occasionally I would give into temptation when asked if George Harrison was in. I would put on my best British accent and say, "No, I'm sorry he's in the recording studio now... May I ask how you got this number?"

They never got it. Telemarketers are no fun.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Thiel
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 12:51 pm:   

Y'know, this is good; the latest issue of The Mag of Fantasy & science Fiction. It's so much what one wants to see in a magazine that I expected to see a picture of Redd Boggs on the cover, but I don't see any signs of him there--still, the issue does meet his critic's criterion.

Finding first a story called "The Gist Hunter," which would seem from its title to be a writer discussing how his story was put together, and in fact upon reading it one almost thinks it must have been written by a Forum Wannabe made good, but it's too on top of it to see that genesis for it. I'll recommend it to one and all--it is very timely and very interpretive of topics that are of great interest in the forums. Sure, a BEM turns up after a couple of pages, but anything is going to turn up after a couple of pages.

After seeing this in the story, I went right to another that seems to end with a rejection slip, that being "Poet Snow," which closes, "You are very strange and probably mentally ill, and you aren't much of a poet, either. But really, even together, those still aren't good enough reasons to kill anybody." No, a budding fair flower might bloom from deadly nightshade; I take it that a further looksee will be given what the poet has to say.

Chester Song at Twilight, here's another of those tales where we learn right off about the accident the main character has been in, and what he's managed by way of a companion. That seems to be one of David Gerrold's interests, judging from THE MAN WHO FOLDED HIMSELF--how people are, how they make out.

Morrissey's in good form with "The Legend of the Whiney Man," right in with a fairy-tale and tall-tale quality which seems stressed in this issue, and with what made "A Day in the Life of Eb and Flo" a top story and classic lines like "set out to whine his way through the world." First-rate writer here; don't know if he'll be further recognized as such. Yoon Ha Lee's has a similar quality, but starts out saying there will be a lot of fairy and tall tales more than telling one. Yes, I've seen her at Strange Horizons and on The Internet Review.

Finlay's lead story had to be the best. I've ranked it with "The Little Goddess" in Ms. Williams' mag. (I mean Gardner too.) Here's writing that holds the interest and subject-matter to the reader's liking. Very provocative to the imagination, not always true in today's reading. I think this man is taking an old tradition and working with it. Keep 'em going, Charles Coleman!

Marketplace? Still don't want something that's spiffy, but the Lee Brown Coye volume looks interesting. I'd send for the SF rock opera but don't have any net buying account; too bad it isn't available ground mail.

Good issue--you can tell by how I am about it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 01:15 pm:   

A few years ago, someone on ebay had a piece of ceramic pottery handpainted by Lee Brown Coye. It sat there for a few days, no one bid, then I got sniped.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Charlie Finlay
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 03:55 am:   

Thankee, Mr. Thiel. Glad you liked it!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Matt Hughes
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 09:01 am:   

But I'm not sure whether you liked mine or not.

Matt Hughes
http://www.archonate.com/black-brillion
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Taylor
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 12:36 pm:   

At the risk of re-openning the political rant about "Bedfellows", I read the story a couple of nights ago and have to admit to being a little confused how it got published. For me, the politics was not the issue (alas, I am definitely NOT a George W supporter) rather it lacked quality. I don't mean any offense to Mr. Turtledove, but the entire thing felt like the literary equivalent of a knock-knock joke. It didn't have any of the elements I am used to finding in F&SF, the characterization relied entirely on the readers stereotyped image of both GWB and OBL, the conflict and suspense were completely absent, and the ending ... well, was there an ending?

Personally, while I have not always 'liked' the stories Mr. Van Gelder publishes, I have never been able to fault them or the writers for quality or skill. "Bedfellows", however, I felt, only got published because it made fun of America's favorite boob, and, for me, that just didn't seem worthy of F&SF magazine.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Thiel
Posted on Saturday, April 30, 2005 - 06:44 am:   

I liked some things about Mr. Hughes' story, and other aspects I didn't like so well. A story doesn't have to be a hundred percenter.

"Bedfellows" is pretty clearly not something the government would like, as the description of the story states. I can only wonder along with the editor whether there will be a reaction.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michael Samerdyke
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 07:54 am:   

I thought the best story this issue was "Legend of the Whiney Man" by John Morressy. It captured the feel of those Andrew Lang "Blue/Orange/Crimson Fairy Books" but was very funny. Just when I've sworn never to read a revisionist fairy tale again, Morressy proves me wrong.

At a step below the Morressy, I enjoyed "Poet Snow" by Reed and "Chester" by Gerrold. "Poet Snow" surprised me. It never developed how I would expect, but I liked being surprised. "Chester" was interesting, but it just stopped instead of reaching a resolution. If it had a stronger ending, I would have rated it higher.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Thiel
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 05:44 pm:   

F&SF used to print folk tales about a wandering balladeer; I thought JM's tale evoked these rather pleasantly.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 05:53 pm:   

Phyllis Eisenstein's "Born to Exile" stories or Manly Wade Wellman's Silver John? I assume you mean the latter because they had a gritty fantasy setting rather than a Smoky Mountain feel.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Thiel
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 06:39 am:   

Wellman's, yes. I kept thinking "Manly Bannister" when I tried to remember the author's name.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 11:04 am:   

"That's a heck of a manly bannister you've got there."

"Well, we tried installing a womanly stair-rail but the boys wouldn't stop sliding down from morning till night. This seems to have done the trick."

"Except for Eustace there. He seems rather fond of this one."

"Well, he's always been prone to such things. Last summer on our architectural tour, we had to peel him away from every flying buttress we encountered."

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Charlie Finlay
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 11:28 am:   

Marc, you've gone a step too far this time. Don't you realize you're encouraging the homosexual bannister agenda?

And everyone knows a manly bannister is a mannister.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michael Samerdyke
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 07:41 am:   

Actually, there was an author named Manly (Manley?) Bannister back in the days of Weird Tales. His most reprinted story is "Eena," about a hunter who falls in love with a female werewolf.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

James M. Pfundstein
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 12:15 pm:   

Not to be fussy, but isn't it Manly Banister (with one n)?

Fussy Banister was Manly Banister's spinster cousin, who wrote an etiquette column for the Didn't Really Exist Bugle-Picayune.

JMP("Picayunier Than Thou...")
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Thiel
Posted on Sunday, May 22, 2005 - 05:43 pm:   

I got a couple of issues of Manly Banister's fanzine Nekromanticon. I think he'd made a couple of pro sales prior to that. He was true to his form of writing, and got some good ideas into the mainstream of fantasy. His fanzine was a starting place for some really good writers.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Thiel
Posted on Sunday, May 22, 2005 - 05:54 pm:   

Again, there was a Sam Hamm topic, but Mr. Hamm comes out of nowhere here; but I'd like to know if the writer for Batman is really around this forum.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, May 22, 2005 - 06:14 pm:   

Yes, that's the same Sam Hamm.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Joseph Adams
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 08:57 am:   

Review: http://www.bestsf.net/reviews/fsf0506.html
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2005 - 04:30 pm:   

review/mention: http://new.sky.net.pl/modules/news/print.php?storyid=674&PHPSESSID=f354b957250c9 24b51547e8b0a9c2d5b

What, don't you read Polish?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Joseph Adams
Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2005 - 05:37 pm:   

Sadly, the Poltran Polish-English translator doesn't clear things up much: http://www.poltran.com/pl.php4

And in american theme else very shortly F&SF 6’05, which (who) will dirty on knees nothing. But probably,, that mediocrity. Unfortunately,. Do something be worth noticing (remarking) here? None too, although several are zadatków. For example, here such john tires MAN in (to) more ( LEGEND ) only Morressy THE OF THE WHINEY and it pisses of repeatability of plot. It can not convene in (to) small amount Morresey. This time ironic fairy tale is is defended its (his) about young three – legend ksi&#261;&#380;&#261;tkach, it must leave to world which (who) in turn, but certainly <obvious> youngest was mocked by all, but it has advised best . Banalik, What not? But it leaves we good impressions and it is struck on background work remaining <survivor>. What on plus else? ( MAN ) – neatly Charles Coleman Finlay OF SILENCE AND THE AT ARMS, not necessarily exploratory, however, it remember next for illusion ( second (other) ) chapter novel, some adventures Kuikina and in (to) not necessarily way to house rouge (rose) Vertira us&#322;anej. Thing in climates very fantasy, it is played in countries of smallest asia as if, but perhaps, near - egyptian. Farthest pull, then and book certainty (for sure), it is possible to be certain stuprocentowo, that it will follow (will step) soon. David also ( ) Gerrold CHESTER here it is is defended just a little -. History of small boy, sound nightmares oppress which (who) very. And everything there was as it belongs, it is carried on nicely, it grows tense <tension>, although it was served something many times such , but reader has hope, that it leads it for something concrete, when suddenly <snap> author in one here opinion (sentence) work urywa as it passs it (him) surely puentuj&#261;cym. Damage, damage. The rest for remission as it sees me. That for deployment to curious history truth idea nice ( ) completely Roberta Reeda POET SNOW - artist future, however, which (who) builds (create) manner to enough indefinite (vague) that truth poems petals of snow completion merciless commonplace – and nieprzystaj&#261;co - as at least it passs me - kicked. Short far eastern history has left me completely indifferent ha ( ) Yoon Lee EATING HEARTS. Here, next will disclose as such result idea ( ) me Marc Laidaw SWEETMEATS it stands up - author early <morning> and night nightmare decide describe – which (who) nowhere not lead szybciutko, image (offense) bears only. However, perhaps, it very american work ( ) ( Harry Turtledove BEDFELLOWS and prze&#347;miewczo in theme of dependence between american empire - political pronunciation ) but iraqi ( and not only ) terrorist; one could not exist without it second (other). Number closes long tale enough ( HUNTER ) Matthew Hughesa THE GIST, which (who) is complete loss of paper for I already and I have managed it (him) barely to the end ( as I could not be placed as reader here ) anyway, it next scene of adventure of local main hero - too, it is called which (who) Henghis Hapthorn and there is strange detective this described by author of land such a bit. So many (so much) <rear>. For see after vacations already as it seems me. Several links for former else this year's recapitulation only part.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2005 - 07:53 pm:   

"it pisses of repeatability of plot." Now there's a blurb!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

andres
Posted on Saturday, February 11, 2006 - 03:14 am:   

Gordon:do you know if "Chester" is the first chapter of a work in progress or a stand-alone story?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Saturday, February 11, 2006 - 05:36 am:   

Andres---

As far as I know, it's a stand-alone story. I understand why you might think it's part of a longer story---it's hard to leave those chararacters at this point---but last time I spoke with Dave G., he didn't give any hint of working on a follow-up.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register