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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 06:16 pm:   

NOVELLAS
THE IMAGO SEQUENCE -61- Laird Barron

NOVELETS
I.D.I.D. -131- Robert Thurston

SHORT STORIES
THE GREAT CARUSO -6- Steven Popkes
THE GOLEMS OF DETROIT -37- Alex Irvine
BORN-AGAIN -48- K. D. Wentworth
THE NEW DEITY -119- Robert Reed

DEPARTMENTS
BOOKS TO LOOK FOR -24- Charles de Lint
BOOKS - 29- Elizabeth Hand
PLUMAGE FROM PEGASUS: MOODY'S ANGELS -115- Paul Di Filippo
FILMS: KOREAN FUTURES -125- Lucius Shepard
COMING ATTRACTIONS -160-
CURIOSITIES -162- Steven Utley

CARTOONS: Arthur Masear (36), S. Harris (47), J.P. Rini (130).
COVER BY CORY AND CATSKA ENCH FOR "THE IMAGO SEQUENCE"
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Patrick M.
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 06:19 pm:   

No Finlay or Hughes???? Rickert???


*sigh*
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Jonathan
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 07:04 pm:   

A yes, but it has Alex's infinitely cool "The Golems of Detroit", which has left me salivating for his next novel THE NARROWS. It's a terrific story, and a way cool idea.
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MarcL
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 09:11 pm:   

Wow...Robert Thurston of "The Mars Ship"? Cool.
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MarcL
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 09:12 pm:   

I'm also extremely excited to see a Laird Barron novella on the way. More is better.
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JJA
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 10:06 pm:   

If you think you're excited about the Barron now, wait til you read it. If it's not a lock for a year's best horror volume next year, there ain't no justice. And have you seen the brilliant cover for it by Cory and Catska Ench? I think the only place it's online so far is at the Tangent review. It's small, but you can get some idea of its granduer: http://tinyurl.com/6ggzj
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JJA
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 10:07 pm:   

THE IMAGO SEQUENCE
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Vylar Kaftan
Posted on Sunday, March 06, 2005 - 10:24 pm:   

That's especially good cover art. Wow.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, March 07, 2005 - 12:42 am:   

Nice. Barron reminds me a bit of early Michael Shea when he first sprang on the scene with "Angel of Darkness" and "The Autopsy."
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E Thomas
Posted on Monday, March 07, 2005 - 10:55 am:   

Wow, that cover art is gorgeous.
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E Thomas
Posted on Monday, March 07, 2005 - 10:59 am:   

Here is their gallery, if anyone is interested:
http://www.enchgallery.com/
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Patrick Samphire
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 08:55 am:   

No one has spoken up for K.D. Wentworth's Born-Again yet, so I will. It's a great piece of social science fiction and very well observed, particularly in the characters of the teenagers.

Patrick
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 11:56 am:   

I haven't seen the issue yet, so it's hard to comment on the stories. Hopefully that cover will sell some copies though.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 02:13 pm:   

I don't think the contributors have even seen copies yet. The first copies only came in a few days ago.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 02:37 pm:   

Some people still have the old MK-ULTRA subscription service.
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JJA
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 10:18 pm:   

For a while back in the old days, the publishers thought about using "F&SF--better than being locked inside a sensory deprivation chamber" as the tag line for the magazine, but after a little trip to a secret government facility, where they were subjected to the aforementioned sensory deprivation followed by repeated viewings of Stanley Kubrick films, they decided to go with the more upbeat "General Ripper says: Reading F&SF may help replenish your precious bodily fluids!" and "F&SF will sharpen you up and make you ready for a bit of the old ultra-violence." Ultimately, they went with none of the above. Just think what might have been!
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 10:41 pm:   

Aw bitter the old OOBE never herd enny1.
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Patrick Samphire
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 01:39 am:   

Whoops. I assumed the copies were in the shops already. :-)
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Dave
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 05:59 am:   

Patrick,

So how do know the K.D. Wentworth story if no one has the issue yet?
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JJA
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 06:15 am:   

Dave,

Patrick reviewed the issue for Tangent, so he got an advance copy. You can read his review here:
http://www.tangentonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=354&Itemi d=53
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Chris Clark
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 07:38 am:   

How is it that F&SF consistently manages to get higher quality cover art than Analog and Asimov's?

Is this an issue of budget allocation or is this a question of editorial preference?

Whatever the difference, the covers on F&SF always catch my eye at the bookstore where I have to hunt for the others to not overlook them.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 12:08 pm:   

Thank you for your comments about our covers. A lot of it has to do with a deal I cut with the devil---that chump thought I have a soul! The laugh's on him.

For what it's worth, I thought the cover of the March Asimov's was outstanding.
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R
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 03:42 pm:   

But the March Asimov's cover wasn't commisioned.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 06:11 pm:   

Not for Asimov's, anyway. But it doesn't make the cover any less good.
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Catska Ench
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 02:50 am:   

Hmmm.... Interesting.... Gordon, you never told us about the devil....:-)
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 03:45 am:   

My contract has a non-disclosure clause. It has probably been voided because of my comments on this board.
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John Thiel
Posted on Saturday, March 26, 2005 - 11:29 am:   

Well, I didn't like this issue's cover so well. It may be "gorgeous" in terms of the two colors it uses, but the subject-matter is rather macabre--it's one of those things that's of a deceptively attractive appearance, like some things that are found in nature. Look closer and there's a parrot-like BEM about to eat some reader who got fouled up in his rubber cement while he was trying to affix a peeled-off stamp to the SASE accompanying his LoC. I suppose that creature is an imago, though, and the mortal-like being has defied it to enter its cocoon, a naturalist in search of hidden facts. I first saw the word "imago" in a poem by Phillip Lamantia, and looked it up in a dictionary, not expecting to find it there, but found it was an unborn stage usually involving insects, though Lamantia had said "imago-magpie." I see Wallace Stevens, among poets, used the word before Lamantia. Looking at the tale, it does indeed concern a BEM, and this reference to art lessons in the introduction corroborates my impression of the first few paragraphs that it refers to one of Finlay's poorer drawings of insects that is being circulated in art folders. I don't like that cover art as well as I have many cover pieces on previous issues, though it may be more into art.

Advertisement on the back cover, a mighty saga of a man who takes on everything--a mere sidekick of Ender, he yet has enemies all over the entirety of the planet Earth. No doubt those enemies are reacting to news that he has a spaceship carrying a weapon that can destroy a planet at one use.

Thurston's story gives me the impression that he is Thurston the Magician (or Great)...a very magical tale, as is the introduction to it as well. That's GOOD---more magic in F&SF.

"The Great Caruso." In reality, Caruso couldn't carry a single note--they were always distorted out of the proper key. But this gave his singing a "blues" effect that enhanced and promoted his reputation as a Voice. Reverence to this has been paid in SF before--in one of the Galloway Gallegher stories someone was offered the chance to "sing like Caruso." This story here, though, is one I'd recommend to the attention of your readers. The thought content in it is high. Unlike the thought content of the Padgett story.

"The Golems of Detroit." Well, that could describe anybody there, from the police to the Motown holdovers---but I'd guess the factory workers in the auto industries. Look to the story, sure enough! Mass production employees. Well, mass production does turn people into golems, as ee cummings once suggested--"How can it turn mere men into monsters?" There's been a whine coming out of Detroit for some time about how tough auto production is. This story puts up their case.

It is a satisfying issue, anyway, and I'll break into it more a little later.
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Human from Earth
Posted on Saturday, March 26, 2005 - 12:59 pm:   

I don't understand anything you say, Thiel.
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John Thiel
Posted on Saturday, March 26, 2005 - 03:26 pm:   

Well, if you were more literate, you would.
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Michael Samerdyke
Posted on Monday, March 28, 2005 - 12:41 pm:   

I thought the best story this issue was "Born-Again" by K. D. Wentworth. It was funny, the characters were well-drawn, and the plot moved quickly. A good job all around.

At a step down, I liked "The Golems of Detroit." This was a very interesting idea, but the ending seemed to come up short for me. Then I re-read the intro and saw that this was taken from an upcoming novel, THE NARROWS. So I'm interested in looking for that now.
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:-)
Posted on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 - 07:50 pm:   

Wow, just in time for Easter the mailman delivers the May issue with two stories that reference the Shroud of Turin, another about headhunting for a replacement deity, and one that answers the burning question: WWTJCD--what would teenage Jesus clones do?

I'm guessing maybe this is all part of the "deal with the devil" that Gordon mentioned above?
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Kelly Shaw
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 09:17 am:   

I was blown away by Laird Barron's "The Imago Sequence." Not since Clive Barker's Books of Blood have I been this excited by a modern horror writer.

Can we expect more from Mr. Barron in future F&SF issues? Does anyone out there know if he has any collections or novels in the works?

Thanks a lot.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 12:18 pm:   

I just saw Laird at Norwescon and he's hard at work on more short stories. No books in the works, but I must point out that his "Bulldozer" is still online at SciFiction and we have back issues available with some of his other stories ("Shiva, Open Your Eye" was in the Sept. 01 issue, I think "Old Virginia" was in the Feb 03 issue. Unfortunately, we're out of copies of the Feb 05 issue with "Proboscis" in it.)
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JJA
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 12:34 pm:   

> Unfortunately, we're out of copies of the Feb 05
> issue with "Proboscis" in it.

But you should still be able to buy it online at Fictionwise (http://tinyurl.com/3m2za) or Palm Digital Media.(http://tinyurl.com/6yg9n).
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Kelly Shaw
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 01:06 pm:   

Thanks a lot for directing me to some more Laird Barron stories. I just read "Old Virginia" in the Datlow/Lint/Grant year's-best collection loved it! and will definitely track down those old copies of F&SF.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 01:58 pm:   

"Link" not "Lint" --I think Kelly L might object to being referred to as "lint" :-)
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JJA
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 02:58 pm:   

I'm sure Kelly was subconsciously thinking of Lint as in Charles De Lint, rather than the belly-button variety. :-)
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Patrick M.
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 03:35 pm:   

I thought she was Linked to Grant not De Lint.
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Liz
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 07:30 pm:   

But is she linked to Kevin Bacon?
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Thomas R
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 07:54 pm:   

1:Kelly Link was in an issue of Asimov's with Michael Cassutt(Oct/Nov 1996)

2:Michael Cassutt wrote for Eerie, Indiana which had Stephen Root as a guest star.

3:Stephen Root played a detective in Ghost.

4:Demi Moore was in Ghost.

5:She was also in A Few Good Men with Kevin Bacon.

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Thomas R
Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2005 - 07:59 pm:   

Except Jose Rivera wrote the episode of Eerie, Indiana Stephen Root was in. Hmm, well it looked good.
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Patrick M.
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 05:13 am:   

I am thoroughly impressed.
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Kelly Shaw
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 10:49 am:   

It's amazing what great comments accidentally misplacing a "k" with a "t" can generate!
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Charlie Finlay
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 12:25 pm:   

Thomas R.:

Matt Frewer was in the episode written by Cassutt. He was also in "The Stand" with Gary Sinise. Gary Sinise was in "Apollo 13" with Kevin Bacon.

I'm sure someone else can come up with a shorter route.
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JJA
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 01:18 pm:   

I was thinking there must be a more direct link via the film Stir of Echoes, which was based on a book written by Richard Matheson. I checked, but no Matheson reprints up at SCI FICTION (where Kelly is the slush reader).
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Thomas R
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 03:07 pm:   

Good jobs Finlay and JJA. I kind of figured mine was an amateur effort.

I believe I can link myself to Kevin Bacon in five steps, but I'm not sure.

I was in a brief CNN news clip with Bob Dole.
Bob Dole at that point had been in an episode of Murphy Brown.
Grant Shaud(who played Miles) had a role in Antz with Sharon Stone.
Sharon Stone did He Said, She Said with Kevin Bacon.

Granted it's faster to say Dole was on Late Night with Conan O'Brien a few times and so was Kevin Bacon, but using talk shows like that seems like cheating.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 11:12 pm:   

Just finished "The Imago Sequence," after having had the pleasure of meeting Laird Barron at Norwescon. Like all of the Barron stories I've read so far, I feel I must read it again--but this will hardly be a chore. There's just more to his tales than you can possibly gather the first time through. Awesome story. I'm happy to learn there are more of his I haven't read yet, both previously published and still on the way.

Now, on to the rest of the issue!
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Sean T. M. Stiennon
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 04:27 pm:   

If you enjoyed K.D. Wentworth's story in this issue, why not check out her story which won first place in the 2004 SFReader.com Short Story Contest? It's posted online at http://www.sfreader.com/fiction_main.asp .

Also, while you're there, be sure to have a look at the second place winner...

Sean T. M. Stiennon
www.sfreader.com/authors/seanstiennon
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Jill Elaine Hughes
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 04:59 pm:   

For what it's worth, I enjoyed THE GOLEMS OF DETROIT, BORN-AGAIN, and THE IMAGO SEQUENCE the most in this issue.

However, I've just gotta say this----I thought the novelet story I.D.I.D totally SUCKED. It started out OK, then went off on a bunch of weird pseudo-philosophical tangents that read, in my opinion, like a bad college-student paper. I couldn't even finish reading that one. I'd be interested to hear what other folks think about that novelet. Am I totally off-base in thinking I.D.I.D. SUCKED?
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S. Hamm
Posted on Sunday, April 10, 2005 - 09:36 pm:   

Any reason why the May issue never went on sale at Fictionwise and EReader? I was hoping to read it in bed, in the dark, under the covers, on my Treo.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Monday, April 11, 2005 - 05:24 am:   

No reason I know of, Sam. I'm looking into it now.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Tuesday, April 12, 2005 - 02:40 pm:   

Sam---

The issues should be up on both sites now. Thanks for letting me know they were late in posting them.
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S. Hamm
Posted on Wednesday, April 13, 2005 - 01:08 am:   

Thank YOU, Gordon. EReader.com has posted the June issue as well.
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Sean Melican
Posted on Wednesday, April 13, 2005 - 09:25 am:   

Kelly Link will be in _The Best American Short Stories_ edited by Michael Chabon; Michael Chabon has a screenwriting credit for _Spiderman 2_ starring Alfred Molina; Alfred Molina got shot full of darts with Harrison Ford in _Raiders of the Lost Ark_; Harrison Ford is dating Calista Flockhart, and rumored to be starring in Indy 4 with her; Flockhart and Bacon starred in _Telling Lies in America_.

Not the shortest route, but perhaps one of the more obscure.
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Patrick Samphire
Posted on Thursday, April 14, 2005 - 02:05 am:   

Jill, I didn't think much of I.D.I.D either, but I have seen some people say they thought it was great. I always figure if I get a 50% hit rate with a magazine, I'm onto a winner.
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Paige
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 12:11 pm:   

I thought "The Imago Sequence" was probably the most terrifying thing I've read in F&SF since I was a little girl and read "The Cobbler" one night when no one was home. It was one of those stories that made me check the locks on my door and startle at every sound... Awesomely creepy.
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RVS
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 10:11 am:   

Hi, I didn't know how to contextualize Paul Di Filippo's essay in this issue - specifically, I didn't know how to contextualize his comment about Mary Doria Russell.

Is he implying that she is a writer of the same quality as his narrator? Or that she is an example of a good science fiction writer whose coat-tails the narrator might want to ride?
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StephenB
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 01:27 pm:   

I also think it's a nice looking cover. But I usually like F&SF covers in general.

I liked all four of the short stories this issue. Robert Reed offers us some American satire. Alex Irvine introduces us to the Detroit of his upcoming novel with his "Golems of Detroit" story, which I thought worked alright as a stand alone story. But my favourite is definitely "Born Again" by K.D. Wentworth (followed by Steve Pokes' "The Great Caruso"). "Born Again" is both funny and entertaining, with an unexpected, and even a little creepy, ending.

I've noticed that the recent issues feature quite a few religiously -- mostly Christian bent -- and politically themed stories. Both which are very much on the forfront of the American conciousness. Not to say that they are solely an American obsession. Would it be safe to say that F&SF publishes at least 60% American writers?

I did like Robert Thurston's "I.D.I.D". Although, it started slow and I didn't really get into it untill a little ways into chapter three. Jill, maybe if you'd stuck with it, you'd like it a little better?

I didn't like Paul Di Filippo's Plumage From Pegasus nearly as much as the one from the february issue.

Now all that's left to read is the main feature....
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StephenB
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 06:23 pm:   

Actually I don't think I was accurate about the recent issues featuring a lot of American politics and religious stories. Feb didn't have any of either really. March, the Disch story was political, but that's the only one. And then the april issue had the "Harrowing" and "The Gospel of Nate", one which was Christian mythos based, the other with a religious theme. I guess those two stories were read pretty recently...
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StephenB
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 06:30 pm:   

by me, that's why.:-)
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 05:57 am:   

So, I finished "The Imago Sequence", and like MarkL, I thought it was awesome. I think it's by far the best story of the issue -- in an issue with some strong stories -- and the best story I've read by Laird so far. Laird Barron seems to have a fascination with insects, or at least likes to use them in his fiction. Don't know whether this comes from an admiration or fear, but it's likely both. I know spiders and insects generally creep me out.

JJA, I agree that this story's sure to appear in a year's best, but I'll take that further. I wouldn't be surprised if it shows up on an award ballot as well. Maybe even a Stoker? When the first photograph, the alpha parallax, was introduced, it totally had a chilling effect. Although the story didn't end up going in quite as frightening of a direction as I thought, it still was full of creepy imagery and speculations on reality, which stimulates the imagination. Stuff you'd expect from a good dark fantasy/horror story.
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S. Parker
Posted on Sunday, July 03, 2005 - 04:50 am:   

A little late with this one, and my other commitments mean that "The Imago Sequence" will have to wait until I have more time to give it. It sounds great though.

As for the rest...
On a scale of 1-10 (one being an active hatred of a story and ten being deep love, with five being total indifference), I personally rated the stories as follows:

I.D.I.D.: 7/10
The Great Caruso: 5/10
The Golems of Detroit: 5/10
Born Again: 9/10
The New Deity: 3/10

Born Again was excellent. I enjoyed it more than any other F&SF story so far this year.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 06:44 am:   

Review:

http://www.bestsf.net/reviews/fsf0505.html
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 03:05 pm:   

Here's another review:

http://www.sfsite.com/07b/fs5204.htm

Why didn't he review the best story of the issue?!

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