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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7146
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - 07:36 pm:   

Not With A Bang, But With The Sex Pistols
By Lucius Shepard

According to a consensus of the world’s filmmakers, our future is a =fait accomplis=. We will be ravaged by a deadly virus; billions will die or become the living dead; cities will be quarantined and the survivors will revert to barbarism; a powerful clique within the government will seize power; a man or woman with great martial skill and a highly individual moral code will be sent into the quarantined zone to recover some vital information or object, and during the course of this mission he or she will discover something that will prove that the government was responsible for the plague or has some otherwise significant culpability. There are variations on the theme, but that’s the essential end-of-the-world scenario, one that far outstrips the second place entry, i.e, death by killer asteroid or meteorite, which endured a brief millennial vogue.
It’s a reasonable scenario, actually—the elements for a pandemic are all in place—but the prescience of these contemporary John Carpenters and George Millers is somewhat muted for me by the furnishings of their films. Why is it, I find myself wondering, that 80s punk fashions should so abound in the post-apocalyptic futures conjured by these visionaries? =Escape From New York= and =The Road Warrior= were both released in 1981, during the flourishing of the punk aesthetic, so a reliance on the imagery of the day is understandable; but it would seem the many re-imaginings of their seminal vision filmed since that time might mine some other depth for barbarian accessories. Perhaps the directors of these films are merely committing the sin of =homage=, or it may be that the fund of imagination responsible for such pictures has gone bankrupt. I think it more likely that when they cast their minds ahead, these great men have foreseen that vast secret stores of hair products and make-up will be unearthed from beneath our dead cities, not to mention loads of 80s synth, music much beloved by the punkiest generation.
The latest incarnation of this pop culture staple comes to us courtesy of Neil Marshall, who has previously given us two entertaining little horror films, =Dog Soldiers= and =The Descent=. Despite the chops Marshall displayed in those films, it’s hard to believe that he can return to form after a showing as abysmal as his latest, =Doomsday=, a mash-up of the sort one commonly sees on Youtube--such sudden downturns in quality usually reflect a drastic lowering of aspiration, a surrender to the realities of modern filmmaking. The movie opens promisingly enough, introducing us to spandex-clad commando, Major Eden Sinclair (Rhona Mitra), who is engaged in holding together the last vestiges of a decaying Britain. Thirty years earlier, an outbreak of the “deadly Reaper virus (as opposed to the cuddly Reaper virus),” in Glasgow of all places, caused Scotland to be quarantined behind a steel wall stretching eighty miles from the North Sea to the Irish Sea, protected by automated batteries that blow away anything (as Marshall gorily demonstrates) from the size of a bunny rabbit on up. I suspect Marshall’s choice of a virulent Glasgow betrays some sub-text—at least I know quite a few Scots who would welcome such a wall, though with the guns facing in the opposite direction. Be that as it may, in terms of the movie all signs of human life disappeared from Scotland until 2032, when satellite imaging picked up activity on the streets of Glasgow. Now the virus, too, has resurfaced, this time in London, and the evil Canaris (a thuggish David O’Hara), the power behind the British Prime Minister, orders Bill Miller (Bob Hoskins in Thankless Role 538 of his career) to assemble a team to go into Glasgow and find Martin Kane (Malcolm MacDowell in Thankless Genre Role 327 of =his= career), a scientist who was working on a cure. Miller knows just where to go for a team leader: Eden Sinclair. As a child, she was thrust by her mum onto the last chopper out of Scotland and thus has a burning, churning urge to learn what happened. So off they go, the team, into the ghostly ruins of Glasgow, packed into a pair of =Damnation Alley= style armored vehicles (there is scarcely a post-apocalyptic movie that Marshall doesn’t “pay homage” to). Things are moving along rather nicely at this stage, a suitably dark atmosphere having been established, and I was settling in for what looked to be a decent B-picture (nothing original yet done with a certain panache), when a force of Mohawk-sporting, S&M gear-wearing, cannibal gutter punks attack the team, overwhelm vehicles designed to resist rocket assaults with Molotov cocktails, capture Eden, and the movie veers into low comedy.
Derisive audience reaction (sniggers, guffaws, and the odd profane catcall) began in earnest when Sol (Craig Conway), the leader of the punks and, as it turns out, Kane’s son, fronts his tribe in what appears to be a send-up of the stadium scene in =Escape From New York= (currently being remade for 2009, oh joy!), prancing about on a stage with dancers and leading a group singalong to “Good Thing” by Fine Young Cannibals, distributing paper plates to the mob in preparation for a feast, while one of Eden’s team is flash-roasted and then served piping hot by Viper, Sol’s consort, a tattooed young lady who seems to think that waggling her tongue Gene Simmons-style conveys her evil essence—whatever her intent, she waggles away whenever the opportunity arises. Sol, who specializes in yelling during moments of anger, frustration, and pretty much any old time, doing his best impression of Lord Humungus from =The Road Warrior=, yells aplenty when Eden breaks out of punk jail along with Cally (MyAnna Buring), Kane’s daughter, whom Sol has imprisoned because…well, just because. They make their escape by means of a train that’s conveniently waiting at the station, ready to chug off into the countryside in search of Kane, here portrayed as the mad Steward of Gondor-Lite by MacDowell. He’s hanging out in a medieval castle, the head dingbat of a bunch of armor-wearing, bow-and-arrow toting, sword-swingers who eschew technology and resemble your local chapter of the SCA, participating in jousts, throwing roast beef up into the air and like that. This feudal schtick puts the punk ethos of Sol’s rebellion into somewhat comprehensible perspective, but basically it serves to amp up the comedy, some of which may even be intentional.
By the time the survivors of Eden’s team reach Kane’s castle, there have been so many logical gaffes and plot holes that to list them would be overkill; however, two in particular deserve mention. First, we learn early on that the Scottish survivors have become cannibals because they have run out of food; yet the team has just entered Scotland when they run smack into an enormous herd of cattle. Secondly, before imprisoning the team, Kane, a blood scientist, tells them that their quest has been in vain, the virus is incurable, this despite the fact that he and his subjects are immune, and that his daughter is ultimately handed over to the evil Canaris government with the instruction that a cure can be distilled from her blood. The general slovenliness exemplified by these irrationalities makes it impossible to enjoy the film, even as an exercise in camp. There follows a pitfight before a howling audience between Eden and Telamon, a massive armored chap who caves like a sissy after a few karate kicks, thereby allowing Eden and her pals to flee into a mineshaft where she happens upon a brand new Bentley in a box, with a full tank of gas and an activated cell phone.
No, seriously.
Pretty lucky, huh?
Off Eden and her team go again, only to be pursued by Sol and his band of neo-barbarians who appear out of nowhere in jalopies tarted up with skeletal remains and so forth—they may not look fast, but they’re capable of outrunning Eden’s ride, a fact that must distress executives of the Volkswagon Group, manufacturers of the Bentley. The ensuing chase scene is an almost note-perfect reprise of the climactic chase in =The Road Warrior=, with punks and punkettes alike suffering grisly, comic deaths…at least they were comic the first few times I saw them. In short, =Doomsday= should be avoided like the deadly Reaper virus.
Sticking with the end of the world as a theme, a better result (not for the world, but for the moviegoer) can be had by a viewing of =The Signal=, a low-budget filmic tryptich by a trio of Atlanta-based directors, David Bruckner, Jacob Gentry, and Dan Bush, each of whom tell part of a larger story. The first and most traditionally horrific, Bruckner’s =Transmission 1: Crazy For Love=, follows an adulterous wife, Mya (Annessa Ramsey), home after a nooner with Ben (Justin Wellborn), where she finds her suspicious husband Lewis (AJ Bowen) watching a game on TV with some pals. Zzzzt. The picture goes haywire, resolving into a many-colored Rorschach blob. A minute later, someone is bludgeoned by a baseball bat and Mya flees her blood-splattered house only to discover that the world has been driven insane by a signal that comes through every TV, cell phones, and radio. People armed with guns and hedge clippers and whatever falls to hand are committing mayhem on one another…albeit not mindlessly. The signal amplifies bloodlust and leaves its victims with sufficient mental capacity to deny or rationalize their guilt, a symptom that strikes me as very 21st century.
It’s in Jacob Gentry’s more comedic =Transmission 2: The Jealousy Monster= that the film really comes together. The episode opens with a wife sitting at the dinner table talking to her murdered husband. Several other people join her over the next half hour, including Lewis, who’s searching for Maya, and the situation grows increasingly surreal—at one point the group has a deadpan discussion about whether or not to kill someone knocking at the door; at another, a woman believes she is dancing with her husband, whose body lies a few feet away. The last episode, =Escape From Terminus= by Dan Bush, takes place after most of the citizens of Atlanta have been slaughtered and covers events that occur after Ben and Lewis arrive at a bus station, both men hunting for Mya. It’s hampered by having to tie all the narrative strands together, yet it maintains the movie’s surreal edge and is highlighted by a conversation between one of the characters and a decapitated head. Though it’s a bit uneven, =The Signal= employs its interlocking narrative with considerable deftness and the recurrence of characters in one another’s stories seems entirely natural.
Sometime this summer or this fall, a little movie called =Paranormal Activity= will sneak into your town, play for a few days or a week, and then be gone without much fanfare. After =Cloverfield=, I thought I was done with the Blair Witch mode of home video “documentary” filmmaking. I was wrong. First time director Oren Peli has taken the form and, working with basically a two character cast and from a completely improvised script, has fashioned a terrifying ghost story that left me exhausted and unsettled for a couple of days after watching it. Much credit must be given to the actors, Micah Stoat and Katie Featherston. They play a young couple who have just moved in together--Katie has felt haunted by an indefinite presence her entire life and, half playfully, Micah decides to record their nights when they are asleep. Katie begs him not to disturb the entity, but Micah's ego won't let him hear her, and so it begins. I'm not going to tell you any more about the movie, except to say it makes =The Blair Witch= seem about as scary as a day-old sandwich and, though it's always hard to guess what will scare people, I'd wager you won't make it through this one without experiencing major anxiety. The picture's paced so well, the actors are so persuasive…Put simply, =Paranormal Activity= revitalizes a worn-out scenario, gives it a canny new edge, and succeeds in adding to the canon of horror cinema.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 286
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - 09:43 pm:   

Too bad about Marshall's new movie. I liked his previous ones too. When I saw the trailer and they state "by the director of The Descent" I couldn't believe it.
Paranormal Activity sounds pretty cool. I imagine they could come up with some creepy stuff with the whole "videotape themselves sleeping" premise.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7147
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - 10:00 pm:   

Paranormal Activity is totally cool.

I read my own review and as much as I liked Marshall's other films, I still do Doomsday's badness justice. I mean it's even worse than I said... :-)
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1430
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - 06:02 am:   

Paranormal has its own myspace page. I'm going to check out the trailer...
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7148
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - 07:26 am:   

I don't do myspace. Too noisy. You can find the trailer on youtube, I think...
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1431
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - 09:12 am:   

Yeah, I just watched it. Some of it looks a lot like the "house" segment at the end of Blair Witch that I found so mesmerizing. One other horror flick using the hand-held aesthetic to great effect is MY LITTLE EYE. Neat film.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7149
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - 11:04 am:   

Yeah, saw Eye. PA is another level.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1432
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - 02:00 pm:   

Bad news: the blogosphere says Miramax plans to release PA on DVD, while hiring Peli to helm a theatrical "remake"...
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7150
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - 04:07 pm:   

Oh, shit.

There are some other examples of this type of filmmaking that look interesting. Jamie Balugueros (Rec), which I haven't seen, and Street Thief, which I have seen and is very good. Unfortunately it's no longer available on Netflix, but it can be bought cheaply enough.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1433
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2008 - 06:02 am:   

Sat down to check out Larry Clark's WASSUP ROCKERS last night and had to scupper the project after :25. I've always been a fan of Clark's work, but WR was just shaping up to be completely awful. Skinny ghetto teenagers talking dirty and living "on the edge." We get it. In this case, the Latino kids were stiff, uninteresting, not in the least bit natural in front of the camera. They were either bad actors, or "real" kids coming across like bad actors. The clashes with the black teens seemed scripted and phony. It just seemed like Clark let his chops slip completely overnight. Maybe it got really good later, but there was nothing in the first half hour to hint that this was possible.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7151
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2008 - 07:01 am:   

Clark lost his appeal for me a few films back.

Watched a Thai horror film about a poor schmuk who gets trapped in a weird reality show--gory and sort of interesting. 13: Game of Death is the title.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1010
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2008 - 06:42 pm:   

Since there's a new Indiana Jones movie coming out, I wanted to revisit the older movies. Raiders has not held up well at all. The more I think about it, the less I like the movie.

The whole opening sequence seemed to randomly mix Central and South America, and that doesn't even get into the impossibilities of the traps (light triggers, boulder traps, and the pressure plate that sinks when weight is removed).

The snakes make no sense. How did thousands of snakes from all over the world end up in a cave in Egypt? What did they eat, and why didn't they leave the cave?

What damns the movie most is the climax. Indy knew to close his eyes when the Ark was opened, yet they never explained how he knew. Apparently there was a deleted scene explaining it, but why would you cut a scene that explains the critical element of the climax? That is incompetent storytelling.

I don't think I want to revisit Temple of Doom.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7160
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2008 - 08:48 pm:   

I agree. I was underwhelmed when they came out. And I'm not going to bother with this one. I've got to review Iron Man and then something in May; then off to Switzerland where hopefully there'll be better movies to see....
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1012
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 07:21 am:   

I was 5 when I saw Raiders, it's easy to overlook flaws when you're that young.

I'll still probably watch Iron Man and Indy, but I don't expect anything good out of them.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1438
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 07:49 am:   

Hollywood claims another vic...Simon Pegg from HOT FUZZ to play Scotty in new Star Trek flick.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1013
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 08:27 am:   

I don't blame him for taking the role, it will help pay the bills so that he can make more good movies. I'll only be disappointed if he doesn't follow it up with something good.
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Lukedjlaw
New member
Username: Lukedjlaw

Post Number: 85
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 11:43 am:   

Punk portrays itself as apocalyptic, so it makes sense that the post-apocalypse will be punk. What interesting has happened since then.. Emo Mad Maxes? Ick.

I tried not to let my aged mind stand in the way of my appreciation of WASSUP ROCKERS. It started off slow and pointless, but the best parts were later in the film, when the skaters are all jumping through random Beverly Hills backyards, fucking and fighting en route. Sure, all the characters were caricatures, but he captures the fuck-it-all mood of teenagers so well. I'm a thirtysomething but I don't want to forget.

Luke Jackson
http://solipcyst.blogspot.com
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7162
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 12:00 pm:   

Ditto Robert on Pegg. But I have fears... :-)

What interesting has happened since the early 80s isn't the point, though the point could be made since Doomsday is set in 2035, there might be something interesting in the next 25 years. The point I was making is that I find it wildly improbable that these new barbarians would fix on 6O year old, difficult to maintain hairstyles at a time when they are reduced to canabalism.

Haven't seen WASSUP ROCKERS.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1439
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 01:00 pm:   

Luke, one of the side effects of age is the consciousness of time running out, which makes me less likely to slog through a lame beginning to see the tail end of a film. I will take your word for it that WR gets better; I sure hope it did. Yeah, Larry is good at capturing the fuck-it-all mood of teenagers, but isn't it time for him to widen his sights a bit? He's been capturing that mood for 15 years now...

Sorry, I'm in a bitchy mood....
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7163
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 02:22 pm:   

Bitch! :-)

I'm going to see the new Simon Pegg film tomorrow. Watched the great Brian Cox in LIE again....stilll very effective.
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Huw
Junior Member
Username: Huw

Post Number: 161
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 02:28 pm:   

I was at the DVD rental store today and saw three new Seagal flicks all in a row: URBAN JUSTICE, PISTOL WHIPPED, and another I can't remember the title of. Despite a sense of morbid curiosity, I resisted the temptation to rent any of them...

Who comes up with these titles?! It's like there's a rule that they have to have only two or three words - I wouldn't be surprised if the people who make his movies carry around a list of words to choose from, like "urban", "justice", "force", "deadly", "die", "kill", etc...

"Bored to death",
Huw
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7164
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 05:44 pm:   

I think I saw 15 minutes of Urban Justice on the tube and couldn't stay focused.

My fave Seagals lately are the funny ones. The one in Alaska with Michael Caine, and The Patriot.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 291
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 09:06 pm:   

Are there any Seagal movies that aren't funny?
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 292
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - 09:16 pm:   

I was flipping by Sci-fi channel the other day, and there was one of their lame creature movies, and one of the stars was Ron Asheton from Iggy and the Stooges! WTF! That must be a sign of the apocalypse.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1440
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 07:28 am:   

Yeah, LIE was terrific. I need to see that again.

URBAN JUSTICE with Eddie Griffin has its belly-busting moments. I didn't know about PISTOL WHIPPED until I saw part of it on USA last weekend. (Why buy or rent it when it's on free TV?) Didn't watch too much of it, but I did note that SS has added Lance Henricksen to his list of top-drawer second bananas.

Yeah, ON DEADLY GROUND and THE PATRIOT are pretty funny, but they are nothing compared to the one where he whips the ass of the genetically-engineered Russkie superwoman in the bustier. The name escapes me...

Watched COUNT YORGA, VAMPIRE last night. A real kitschy cheapie, but Robert Quarry is a great leading man-vampire!
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7165
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 08:30 am:   

OK, now you got me. You are gonna remember the name of that movie! I guess I have to get the Lance movie as well. God, the waste... :-)
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1441
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 11:40 am:   

JWK must be referring to Mosquito. It's the only Asheton film on IMDB I can recall seeing on Sci Fi. Isn't Clint Howard in it, too?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7166
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 12:22 pm:   

Christ! How did I miss that. I used to know the Ashetons and Iggy in theirA Square days. That's amazing.


Did you remember the name, Dave?
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1442
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 12:33 pm:   

No, I looked it up. But I did see part of it on Sci Fi one Saturday. It's pretty awful...
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1014
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 01:54 pm:   

Sci-Fi Channel and awful go hand in hand. I was taken in by some pre-airing hype that Rock Monster didn't completely suck. The hype was wrong.

During my masochistic moments watching Sci-Fi channel movies, I noticed that Lance Henrikson is in every bigfoot related movie they've done. Sasquatch Mountain, Abominable, Untold. Sasquatch Mountain was hilarious - it was Rear Window with bigfoot.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7167
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 03:01 pm:   

I was going to mention the Hendrickson-Sasquatch connection, I saw part of Abominable, but not SM...
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 293
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 09:07 pm:   

Yeah, Mosquito was the one with Ron Asheton. Yikes. Maybe Sci-fi can dig up GG Allin or Sid Vicious to star in their next movie.
Speaking of rockers in movies, the Bauhaus album discussion in the music thread reminded me that Peter Murphy tried out for the part of Tarzan in that Greystoke movie with Christopher Lambert. Too bad he didn't get the part, that would have been endlessly amusing. haha.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7168
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 09:34 pm:   

With Nick Cave as Cheetah...
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 294
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 10:09 pm:   

Did you ever see Nick Cave in that movie with Brad Pitt? Johnny Suede or something? Not very good. He was going to play the serial killer in that crummy horror movie with Lou Diamond Phillips from awhile back too. I guess he passed or was passed on. Can't remember the name of it.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7169
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 04:49 am:   

Nope. To my knowledge the only thing I've ever seen Cave in was Ghosts of the Civil Dead...
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7170
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 04:50 am:   

...and that Wim Wenders thing.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1443
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 05:59 am:   

Does Wings of Desire count???

Peter Murphy as Greystoke...you know, I can't even think of a one-liner for that. It's stupefying.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7171
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 06:37 am:   

That's the one i meant,

Yeah, that would have been,...something. I don't know what exactly. But something...
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1444
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 08:36 am:   

He could have stopped an elephant stampede by vogueing.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 295
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 10:14 am:   

Yeah, Niok Cave was in a movie with Brad Pitt called Johnny Suede. It came out before Pitt became a big star. It's a "black comedy" about a guy who wants to be a rock star, and he has a huge pompadour. Cave is in it and plays a sort of twisted mentor for him, and wears a huge pompadour too.
Well, Murphy was in The Hunger. Sort of. I read somewhere that somebody went to the premier of The Hunger with Peter Murphy, a friend of his at the time, and he said Murphy got so excited when he was on screen, he thought he was going to jump up and down on his seat and shout "That's me! That's me!"
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1446
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 10:57 am:   

Murphy is in it for about two minutes, essentially playing himself, with no dialogue. It was an inauspicious film career.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 296
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 09:11 pm:   

Lucius, did you ever see a movie called To Have and To Hold? I think it was directed by the guy who did Ghosts of the Civil Dead. Tony Hillcoat?
Cave did the soundtrack, with Blixa Bargeld from Einsterzende Neubauten. Pretty cool soundtrack, but I could never find the movie anywhere.
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Jwk
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Post Number: 297
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 09:18 pm:   

John Hillcoat directed it. Tcheky Karyo and Rachel Griffiths are in it. An Australian film.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7173
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 09:41 pm:   

I've read about it, but never seen it. His first, right?
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 298
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 09:46 pm:   

No, I don't think it was his first. It came out around 1996. Ghosts of the Civil Dead was done in the eighties, wasn't it?
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7174
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2008 - 07:19 am:   

Right.

I'm looking forward to Death of a Ladies Man with Winstone, Roth, Hurt, McShane....
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 299
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2008 - 11:01 am:   

A comedy co-written by Nick Cave huh? Looks like it might be cool, especially with that cast.
Guess they got the name from the Leonard Cohen album.
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1017
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 08:40 am:   

Anyone watch "Run Fatboy Run?" I'm a bit interested in it. It stars Simon Pegg, he co-wrote it with Michael Ian Black (hit or miss for me). But it's directed by David Schwimmer. That sounds like a kiss of death.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1447
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 08:53 am:   

At least the Schwim has gotten out from in front of the camera.
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Redrichie
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Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 7
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 10:26 am:   

Ugh...Run Fatboy Run was pretty horrible, actually. The only thing really to redeem it was that Simon Pegg and Dylan Moran are both funny.

It's not even that it was predictable Hey, they were hardly going to have him wuss out and fail *completely* were they?

And you sure as hell knew he had no chance of winning...the "marathon". It was just...meh.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7182
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 10:35 am:   

Yeah, I agree...i liked it more than was due, I was so eager to see Pegg in something, but it was indeed...meh.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7183
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 10:45 am:   

Still, Run Fatboy Run is way better than what I've been watching, a bunch of Albert Pyun's movies for a magazine piece.
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Redrichie
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Post Number: 8
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 10:49 am:   

It is a shame...He has a lot of good will from me (and I suspect many others) because of his earlier TV comedy (I still absolutely love Spaced) but his films are starting to worry me.

Shaun of the Dead (especially) and Hot Fuzz: good.

But ...Fatboy... and more so Big Nothing were big letdowns. If you've not seen Big Nothing, really do avoid that. It attempted to be clever at the end by having wee twisty surprises, but it just became stupid and, *le sigh*, tedious.
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Redrichie
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Post Number: 9
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 10:50 am:   

"No other film director has been so much vituperated against as Albert Pyun." (IMDb)

Ahahaha...so; not recommended then?
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1448
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 12:07 pm:   

I saw one of his over the weekend...the much and justifiably-maligned TICKER, the great "lost" Seagal film that most experts exclude from the canon. I have to say that it was pretty awful, made no real sense plot-wise (why does Seagal need to disarm the big bomb if Sizemore disarms the detonator?) and managed to waste the talents of both The Master and Dennis Hopper. And Jaime Pressly keeps her clothes on!

Did see one excellent movie this weekend, Stephen Wooley's STONED, a dramatization of the last days of Brian Jones, with excellent performances by Leo Gregory, Paddy Considine and a pair of very sexy ladies playing Jones' girlfriend Anna Wohlen and Anita Pallenberg, a force of nature he shared with Keef. Recommended.
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 162
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 01:05 pm:   

I agree that BIG NOTHING was a big disappointment.

I'm not really that fond of Dylan Moran - I find him a bit irritating, to be honest. Bill Bailey (also of BLACK BOOKS, and the excellent SPACED) is much funnier.

I think the best British comic team at the moment, though, is the gang (they often turn up in each other's shows) who brought us GARTH MARENGHI'S DARKPLACE, THE IT CROWD, THE MIGHTY BOOSH, and others: Richard Ayoade, Matt Berry, Matthew Holness, Noel Fielding, and Julian Barrett.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7184
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 01:49 pm:   

I loved Spaced...wish there was more.

Have Black Book, but haven't watched it.

Yeah, Pyun is to be avoided...unless you dig ed wood.
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Redrichie
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Post Number: 11
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 01:49 pm:   

Ah, yes. Bill Bailey is super-funny. If you haven't already, try and see him live. I wish I were related to him.

Have to admit, at first, I wasn't over keen on the IT Crowd, it seemed like it might be a load of tired "have you tried turning it on and off" jokes, but an On Demand assisted reappraisal tells me that it did improve.

Never saw Darkplace though. Good?
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 163
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 04:17 am:   

Darkplace is great! I think it's up on youtube, but the DVD is well worth getting for the in-character commentaries and interviews, which are hilarious.

The IT Crowd took a few episodes to get into, but I was soon hooked. Ayoade's character Maurice Moss is really funny.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1449
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 08:25 am:   

I realize this is not a big hub of Peter Greenaway fandom, but I am intrigued by the fact that his new film is a Rembrandt bio. Has anybody seen it?
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7185
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 09:24 am:   

Nope. Read about it. Chose not to.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 301
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 10:17 am:   

I'd kind of like to see it. Hope it gets a Region 1 release. Not all his films are great, but they're usually visually interesting. I wish they'd release that Lars Tulper Suitcase or whatever it was called, on Region 1 too. And the Baby of Macon.
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Redrichie
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Post Number: 12
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 10:34 am:   

I've only ever seen The Draughtsman's Contract, very recently too, so I'm not sure if my opinion has been coloured slightly by the tendency of a lot of recent films to look as though they've been shot by a hyperactive chimp on speed, but...I liked it...It was deeply pretentious, yes, and the dialogue did tend towards the self-consciously "witty" but I quite enjoyed the near static camera. At least somebody was trying..?

He really does seem to get a lot of opprobrium though... Not familiar with the rest of his oeuvre, I'd be interested to know from people who have seen (endured?) more of his films than me.
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Redrichie
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Post Number: 13
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 10:40 am:   

"...to know why he is so reviled...", that should read of course.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1450
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 01:39 pm:   

Liked THE BABY OF MACON with Ralph Fiennes and Julia Ormond. Seem to remember liking THE COOK, THE THIEF, HIS WIFE, HER LOVER. Despite his excesses, I'd love to see what he does with the decline of Rembrandt's career.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7186
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 05:50 pm:   

the baby of macon was cool, but generally the sort of games he plays with the audience bore the piss out of me....
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 302
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 09:30 pm:   

Yeah, Greenaway loves playing games, like in his early film The Falls, a faux documentary about 92 people and the nonsense they get up to. And there's about 3 hours of it. Talk about excruciating!
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7187
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 06:21 am:   

Haven't seen that one, but yeah....excruciating's the word.
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Redrichie
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Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 14
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 09:58 am:   

Funnily enough, I was thinking, perhaps, so that their films don't look shit on low-bandwidth Internet connections.

Cloverfield was pretty terrible, though, non? I remember reading Abrams saying that it was going to be like nothing you've seen before. OK, so I didn't believe him. It was just another one of these occasions when you're watching the film thinking "Oh for goodness sake, hurry up and kill the hideous yuppie sprats so we can all go home". Plus. THEY SHOWED THE MONSTER. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

I always think that the shaky-cam and also that bizarre editing technique where every film looks like a 3 hour long trailer, are just lazy ways of film making though. You've no way of telling that the composition of each scene is actually any good. Very few of them get it right (for my money The Bourne films are enjoyable hokum).
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7189
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 11:01 am:   

Cloverfield reeked.

Some interesting films have been made with that twchnique. Paranormal Activity is excellent. rec. is supposed to be very good.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7190
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 11:06 am:   

The films of albert pyun Part One

Over the course of his twenty-five-year career, the native Hawaiian director Albert Pyun has made forty-three movies (more if you give credence to rumors that he has worked under a variety of pseudonyms), the majority straight-to-video efforts—all have been either reviled or ignored by the critics. His work has been compared to that of Ed Wood and a number of his pictures have received ratings lower than 2 on IMDB, ratings even lower than Wood’s. His collaborators include Jim Wynorski, the exploitation director, who has made pictures like Busty Cops 1 and 2, the Bare Wench Project, The Breastford Wives, and Alabama Jones and the Busty Crusade (with Wynorski, you know what you’re getting). His films are populated by a who’s-who of B-list has-beens, actors on the way up or in the midst of a career slump or looking for a quick payday: Charlie Sheen, Rutger Hauer, Snoop Dogg, Ice T, Christopher Lambert, Teri Hatcher, Angelina Jolie, Courteney Cox, Thomas Jane, Dennis Hopper, George Kennedy, Michael Dudikoff, Tom Sizemore, Mario Van Peebles, Jean Claude Van Damme, Steven Seagal, Jack Palance, Elias Koteas, Billy Drago (one of the great B-movie villains), Burt Reynolds, Rob Lowe, Natasha Henstridge, Kris Kristofferson, etc.
Pyun rarely has a guaranteed budget (never one that could be called substantial), and he often shoots two films at once, using the same actors in both, stealing a few hours here and there, making the second picture in less than a week. Occasionally things tend to get hinkey with the money. For instance, in 2004 Pyun and his producer John Laing traveled to Guam, where they convinced the government to finance their movie Max Havoc: Curse of the Dragon. In 2006 Laing defaulted on the loan, blamed Pyun for the debacle, and left the Guamians holding the bag for seven figures. The matter is currently being litigated in Guam and in the US.
Every now and then in many of Pyun’s movies there’s a flash of original thought, a snatch of excellent cinematography, some minutes of film that persuade you to keep watching—this may be attributed to the fact that Pyun was trained by Kurosawa (yes, that Kurosawa), mentored by Takao Saito, one of Kurosawa’s cinematographers, and by Toshiro Mifune, the star of Kurosawa’s most famous films (The Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, Rashomon, Throne of Blood). You wouldn’t expect a person with this history to achieve such ignominy, but as a child Pyun compulsively attended theaters frequented by marines from the Kaneohe military base—the standard fare consisted of low-budget horror and action pictures, movies that funded his creative vision more, it would seem, than did his time with Kurosawa. He started making his own movies on a borrowed 8mm camera while in his teens and, following high school, he traveled to Japan to study under the master. Upon his return to the States, he became a director of commercials and finally made his first feature, The Sword and the Sorcerer, in 1982 at the age of twenty-eight.
The Sword and the Sorcerer attempted to catch the wave of fantasy films initiated by John Milius’ Conan the Barbarian and to an extent it succeeded, becoming a minor hit. It’s at best a mediocre flick, but has a certain verve, abundant nudity, and enough ultra-violence for three films, much of it dispensed by Prince Talon (Lee Horsely) who, armed with a ridiculous three-bladed sword, cleaves heads, torsos, limbs, and alternatively finds more creative means of slaughter, including roasting alive, as he battles brutal tyrant (another great B-movie villain, Richard Lynch) and his sorcerer Xusia (Richard Moll, who played Bull on “Night Court”). If you’re in the mood (read “toasted”), the movie can be hugely entertaining despite the primitive acting and inept almost everything else.
Pyun followed his debut with, notably, two pictures of even less merit, Vicious Lips (aka Pleasure Planet), a movie about an interplanetary rock band, and Radioactive Dreams, a post-apocalyptic flick concerning two boys, Phillip (John Stockwell) and Marlowe Michael Dudikoff), who are locked into a bomb shelter along with a supply of 40s style detective fiction by Dash Hammer (Don Murray) and Spade Chandler (George Kennedy) and emerge after a massive nuclear exchange as hardboiled detectives into a world of mutants and cannibal hippies and punk rockers and two weird kids who wear leisure suits and drop the F-bomb constantly and are eaten by a giant rodent. Dudikoff is especially bad, here supplying none of the gravitas that he brought to his American Ninja movies, but his performance is saved by an amusing dance scene. There is a plot about the sole remaining MX missile. The post-apocalypse has never seemed so dull.
In 1988 Pyun hooked up with Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus and their Cannon distribution chain, and made Alien from LA with swimsuit model Kathy Ireland in the title role—this was an attempt to cash in on Night of the Comet, a film in which the end of the world is rendered as a Valley Girl comedy. It achieved some notoriety when it was chosen as one of the films lampooned by MST3K, but is much funnier, I think, with the cuts made by that program restored. Ireland adopts a little-girl helium voice for most of the film (she slips out of character now and again) as she plays Wanda Saknussemm, a descendant of Arne Saknussemm (the original explorer of the sub-surface world in Jules Verne’s novel) who stumbles into an ancient underground world. Pyun gives his underground civilization unexpected texture and depth, its own slang, and bizarre characters that suggest a fascinating world beyond the camera’s view; but he fails to exploit this and focuses on a dreary chase scenario. A year later, Globus and Golan were plagued by trouble on the set of their remake of Journey to the Center of the Earth—they fired director Rusty Lemorande (one of the producers of Yentl) and brought in Pyun, who turned the film into a sequel to Alien from LA. The product of this union is unwatchable. An odd note for Pyunologists: one of the minor characters is named Brick Bardo, after an actor in films directed by Richard Dennis Steckler, a character name that constantly re-occurs in Pyun’s films, most prominently in Dollman and Bloodmatch.
That same year, 1989, saw the surfacing of Pyun’s great theme, if one can call a hybridization of martial arts and science fiction a theme, in the form of Cyborg, which was initially intended to be a sequel to He-Man, but somehow morphed into a vehicle for Jean Claude Van Damme. Like many of Pyun’s “better” pictures, it rips off half-a-dozen other flicks, but grossed forty million worldwide, a hefty sum at the time, and was a smash hit as a video rental. It also features an uncredited nude appearance by the young Angelina Jolie, who went on to appear in Cyborg 2 (not a Pyun film, but made by one of his protégées, a second unit director on Pyun’s Ravenhawk), a movie whose best assets are an over-the-top performance by Jack Palance as the bull-cyborg Mercy and more gratuitous breast shots (a Pyun specialty) than any film in recent memory.
One noteworthy disaster of the Golan-Globus-Pyun triumvirate was Captain America, a film that was slated to be the first of a franchise; however, the financing fell out. Pyun brought the picture in, but it was a shadow of what it might have been… yet one wonders how far the quality actually dropped, considering its director. Captain America featured Matt Salinger, the writer JD Salinger’s son, as the shield-throwing hero. When the movie tanked, so did his career--lately he has shown up in small parts in a couple of Steven Seagal pictures.
1991’s Dollman, starring the glib Tim Thomerson (loved his performance in 2006’s Evil Bong) as a two-foot-tall cop from Arcturus chasing an equally diminutive criminal through the Bronx was one of Full Moon Productions' (a studio noted for their trashy films) worst pictures and, according to many, one of Pyun’s best, though I would argue with that rating. Pyun’s best film is, to my mind, Nemesis, made in 1993, featuring another kickboxer, Oliver Grunier, as ex-LA cop Alex Rain, whose body has been eighty-five percent replaced by cybernetic parts. Rebecca Charles’ screenplay, despite having to throw in the big guns and explosions that the picture’s video niche demands, captures the gritty nihilism of cyberpunk better than any studio film. It has its weak spots, but some of the images, particularly that of Deborah Shelton crawling across the floor until Tim Thomerson wipes her memory by jamming his fingers into her eyeballs, are going to stick with me. Nemesis spawned three sequels, each worse than the last.
There once was a film called Gymkata starring American gymnast Kurt Thomas. It’s a classic bad movie, the idea being to make gymnast Jonathon Cabot (Thomas) into a superspy and send him to the tiny country of Parmistan (whose national war cry is the bloodcurdling, YAK’MALLAH!) to participate in the Game, a kind of decathlon/obstacle course that takes advantage of the fact that much of the architecture of the country doubles as gymnastics equipment, all this so the winner (hopefully Cabot) can beg a favor of the king, in this instance, asking for permission to build a radar installation in Parmistan that will help with SDI. It’s insanely funny. My favorite moment is when Cabot finds a pommel horse gussied up to look like… something else, in the middle of a medieval loony bin, and uses it to kick people; but there are many, many more just as funny. As a female complement to this, Pyun gives us Spitfire, starring US National Champion gymnast Kristie Phillips as the gymnast/secret agent. The pre-title sequence offers the longest and most gratuitous breast-revealing scene in B-movie history, and follows that with one of the most improbable gymnastic scenes ever put on film. Following that, the movie lapses into a viewing experience best described as torture. But as the first half of a double feature with Gymkata, it makes some sense.
Next week, I'll follow Pyun’s career from the mid-Nineties to the present.
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Robdev
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Post Number: 1018
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 11:29 am:   

Gymkata may have been the first movie that I enjoyed as a "so-bad-it's-good" movie.

Captain America was just painful. That and Cyborg were the only two Pyun movies that I've seen. Maybe I should keep it that way.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7191
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 12:09 pm:   

Nemesis is worth a look if you have nothing else to do, and Mean Guns, which is basically Battle Royale three years earlier. Many of the movies are interesting in some way...but many of the others are just awful. Deceit, for instance. Corrupt...awful. Next week i'll do another part of the article, and there may be something there in the second half of Pyun's career.
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Gordon_van_gelder
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Username: Gordon_van_gelder

Post Number: 605
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 06:37 am:   

IMDB.com lists about fifteen pseudonyms for Steckler, including "Cash Flagg" and "Otto." Still, I always think of him as Ray, probably because that's how he's named in the INCREDIBLY STRANGE FILMS issue of Re/Search.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7194
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 07:44 am:   

well, that may have been his high water mark...

Here's the memoir of a guy who worked on a Pyun film....

http://www.geocities.com/minagahet/maxhavoc1
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1019
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 10:45 am:   

Reading that memoir makes me wonder how Pyun can still make movies. I'd think that after a while, he'd burn enough bridges that nobody would work for him anymore. But I guess there are always desperate actors and crews who aren't getting work in other places.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7195
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 02:29 pm:   

Obviously not all his movies are filmed that way--otherwise he couldn't get "name" actorsand he's had ongoing relationships with technical people, cinematographers, lighting people, and the like, I think of this a one-off and lay most of the blame on Laing, But Pyun was obviously a complcitor...
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 311
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 10:20 pm:   

Watched Southland Tales. Wonder how fast Kelly will get the bum's rush from the studios after that mess? What was he thinking? Well, good to see that Booger from Revenge of the Nerds is still getting film roles.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7208
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 07:58 pm:   

IMDB says this monstrosity is now filming: The Day The Earth Stood Still, starring Keanu Reeves as Klaatu. Others in the cast are Kathy Bates, John Cleese,, Jennifer Connolly. The film will have a December release and be directed by Scott Derrickson, who gave us the Exorcism of Emily Rose and the immortal Urban Legends: Final Cut. This guy's next two movies are a remake of Hitchcock's the Birds (can't wait for that--I hear they have supersonic pigeons) and Paradise Lost...yes, the draggy Milton version. Wow. Fucking Hollywood has lost it's min
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7209
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 08:00 pm:   

it's mind.
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Alan_frackelton
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Username: Alan_frackelton

Post Number: 258
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 03:17 am:   

The Day the Earth Stood Still, The Birds...will they never stop? There must be a parallel universe out there somewhere, where instead of remaking classic movies they just reissue them, and Hollywood spends its time making decent, original movies instead. In this paradise of cinema, Keanu Reeves doesn't even exist, let alone 'act'.

Which circle of Hell does Hollywood occupy these days, or has it pretty much taken over all of them?
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7210
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 06:03 am:   

They;ll have to stop sometime...or maybe the industry is evolving to the point where each subsequent year they remake the last year's movies...or they simply remake the same movie over and over...I guess we're almost there.

Paradise Lost is an autobiography of Michael Bay. I think that answers your question.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1453
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 06:40 am:   

The worst thing about these remakes, other than their iffy quality, is that they invariably chase worthy originals out of circulation. With the plethora of movie channels on cable, just try to find the Robert Wise version of The Haunting or the Stanley Donen Bedazzled. Impossible. So we can look for the Michael Rennie/Patricia Neal Earth to go the way of the dinosaur as well.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7211
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 07:32 am:   

Yeah, that's rotten.
Some remakes, whether they turn out good or not, are justifiable. But what that dickweeds don't understand is that many films are about a moment in time, that;s why they;re effective, and remaking them you basically have to hollow them out and put in a new philosophical core and then refit the skin, and that rarely can be done because the filmmakers just don;t have the skill or it simply isn't appropriate. Take The Say the Earth Stood Still. What we recall about films are certain images. They resonate with the times. The scene of Gort and Klaatu standing at at the port of their ship, that can't be replicated in the oughts (certainly not with Keanu Reeves)--it doesn't mean the same thing, and they can't retrofit another meaning that will have the same impact on today's audiences that it had on audiences of the Fifties and Sixties. I've heard they plan to put the emphasis on global warming. Well, that's a serious issue but it's not the same as the cold war apocalypse...it just doesn't have the necessary oomph to fit the image, to reconjure the chill that image cast over the theater.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1023
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 11:42 am:   

There's a petition to get Uwe Boll to retire from cinema
http://www.petitiononline.com/RRH53888/petition.html

According to one article, Boll might retire if 1,000,000 people sign the petition.
http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment/2008/04/uwe_boll_will_quit_making_movies.ht ml

Right now, the count is 165418, so there's still work to be done.

There's also a pro Boll petition
http://www.petitiononline.com/uwelive/petition.html
It's not getting nearly as many signatures.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1454
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 02:01 pm:   

What really stinks about remaking TDTESS is that you know it's going to played for camp. Just what we need.
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Huw
Junior Member
Username: Huw

Post Number: 164
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2008 - 02:59 am:   

The Kalevala, directed by Uwe Boll...
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1024
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2008 - 05:27 am:   

I've seen both Dune adaptations (Lynch and Sci-Fi). I wouldn't call Lynch's version faithful because he invented stuff for the movie. He didn't understand the political reasons why the Emperor feared Leto, so he came up with the idea of sonic weapons to explain the fear.

Besides that, it was faithful, but it failed as an adaptation. Lynch created a companion piece to the book, but it only makes sense if you have read the book. Films adaptations should stand on their own, and Dune didn't. When I first saw it, I hadn't read it, and it was incomprehensible. It was only later, after I read the book, that the movie made sense. But even making sense, some parts seemed too rushed while others dragged out too much.

The Sci-Fi Channel version was better. I talked to friends who hadn't read the book, and they could follow what was going on. The pacing was better. It was mostly faithful, but played up the role of the Emperor's daughter. The set designs and costuming weren't great, and the acting was what you would expect from Sci-Fi channel (i.e. not good). The only decent acting in the mini-series was Ian McNeice as Baron Harkonen.

Children of Dune was unwatchable.

I could see a new version improving on these flaws, but I don't have much hope that it will, and it may introduce new flaws.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7213
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2008 - 06:38 am:   

The director, Peter Berg, hjas mostly done comedy...though he's also attached to Robert Howard's Bran Mak Morn. I'm nnot encouraged. I think it'll have better FX, anyway, but for the rest,,,,un-uh. I agree with most of Robert's points, but you can't do a faithful Dune. You'd need 4 or 5 hours, and you have to get rid of some of that stuff, like the mindspeak stuff--it got really riidiculous in the Lynch.
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Dave
New member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 94
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 12:20 pm:   

Hello all. Been a while. I've had my head down working. Hope you're all doing well.

Can’t help but add my two cents on Dune. It’s had an interesting production history if nothing else.

At one time Salvador Dali was meant to do it. Jodorowsky as well. It was going to be over 10 hours. Pink Floyd was to do the soundtrack. Can you imagine?

Things changed. HR Giger, Ridley Scott, and Dan O'Bannon were attached, then went on to do Alien after production delays.

Eventually Lynch turned down Return of the Jedi to direct Dune. He'd go on to have his name removed from the final version of Dune. And we got lots of cute Ewoks in Jedi to boot. Oops.

With every iteration, the adaptations and re-makes get worse.

Doesn't really matter much to me though. I went back to re-read the book not too long ago and was shocked to find that it's really a crap read. Just terrible and pretentious and politically irrelevant. It gave me a Kwisatz Headache. My teenage self had such poor judgement: anything with sandworms and space ship was deemed worthy.

Now, here I am years later with reams of useless info about a crap book that inspired two crap adaptations with one more crap adaptation in the pipeline.
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Lukedjlaw
New member
Username: Lukedjlaw

Post Number: 92
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 04:33 pm:   

I loved Lynch's Dune. I saw it before reading the book, but caught the gist of what was going on. How would a truly alien civilization be easily comprehensible to our narrow perspectives??

This guy loves Lynch too. Maybe almost too much:
http://www.thepervertsguide.com/clips.html

All of these kid comics are being made into movies. I want more Vertigo flicks: Preacher, The Invisibles, Transmetropolitan, DMZ...

Re: Wassup Rockers-- a punk film crafted too well would probably be something like John Hughes (SLC Punk).

Luke
http://solipcyst.blogspot.com
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7217
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 05:32 pm:   

Exaactly, Dave. Dune is a clumsy book and totally irrelevant. Nevertheless, a good movie would fun to see, though what are the odds.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7218
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 05:36 pm:   

Huw, I'd like to see less comic books.. The Preacher? Do we really need ANOTHER gorefest? I'd rather see more original scripts get made.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 312
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 09:12 pm:   

Jodorowsky's version of Dune would have been interesting, to say the least. In the doc that's on Fando Y Lis he talks about the movie, and how he chose one of the costume designs. He opened one of his picture books at random and that was the design.
Regarding Dune books, I'm puzzled that the sequels written by Herbert's son or whoever are continual best sellers.
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Brendan
New member
Username: Brendan

Post Number: 538
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 06:32 am:   

A couple films I have seen recently:

13 Assassins: a great Japanese flick

Walk Hard: stupid but funny

American Gangster: Ok, but nothing really special
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Huw
Junior Member
Username: Huw

Post Number: 165
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 06:56 am:   

I quite liked American Gangster but thought it could've been better. It felt lacking, somehow.

I haven't seen [Rec] yet, but am eager to - it seems to be garnering quite a lot of praise. Has anyone seen Balaguero's other earlier film Fragile? I've only seen Los Sin Nombre and Darkness (both okay, but flawed, I felt).

I picked up a Chinese film called The Blood of Yingzhou County (seems to be a documentary about orphans of AIDS victims in rural China) today. Looks pretty good...
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7222
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 07:57 am:   

I couldn't appreciate American Gangster at all, because it was a total fiction,. As I mentioned, I know the guy who wrote the original story and there's no saving grace to Frank Lucas--he's just a bad dude. RIchie, the cop, never had any sort of relationship with Lucas apart from arresting him--I doubt they ever had any exchanges that could be called a conversation. That said, the real story is far more interesting that the fictional.

I saw Fragile--not much there, I felt.

Brendan, if you can find a copy of The Great Killing by the same director, I think you might enjoy it.
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Brendan
Junior Member
Username: Brendan

Post Number: 539
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 08:42 am:   

Lucius---

The Great Killing? The same director as what? As the 13 Assassins?

By the way, have you ever seen a film called Older Brother, Younger Sister? It is an old Japanese film I caught last week. Really fantastic. Directed by Naruse.
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Brendan
Member
Username: Brendan

Post Number: 540
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 08:45 am:   

Maybe you mean The Great Duel? By Eiichi Kudo? I have that film, but if you mean something else I am interested.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1026
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 11:13 am:   

I watched Sharkwater, a documentary about how shark fishing for sharkfin soup is decimating shark populations and could have dramatic effects on the environment globally. It was interesting, but could have been more effective if the filmmaker didn't gush endlessly about how incredible sharks are. It did raise one statistic - more people die from vending machine accidents than die from shark attacks. It was most interesting when it tried to debunk the view of sharks as killing machines.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7223
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 01:27 pm:   

The great Killing is the Great Duel. I saw it a long while ago in the theater...

I preferred that to 13 assasins....

I'll look for the Naruse
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Brendan
Member
Username: Brendan

Post Number: 541
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 01:55 pm:   

The problem is that a lot of these are not really available in English...that I know of. The Great Duel, 13 Assassins, etc etc. I guess the American DVD houses are lazy or prefer to spend their time on more low-brow films.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7224
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 03:38 pm:   

Well, yeah I expect that.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1027
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 07:10 pm:   

Finally saw 28 Weeks Later. Shitty camera work, but a very compelling movie. I like the blending of zombie and plague movie. I did find it a bit ridiculous how many times Robert Carlyle came back, but there was similar ridiculousness in 28 Days Later with Cillian Murphy taking on all the military guys.
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Redrichie
New member
Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 20
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 01:14 pm:   

I have to admit - but hey, perhaps I'm giving the military far too much credit in this - I was a bit annoyed at how the rage spread at first.

If I remember it was because THE JANITOR (Carlyle) had the equivalent of an access all areas pass, so was able to visit his wife who was in an uncertain status infection-wise. Whereas surely teh powerz that be would've had some kind of guard on her all day?

Still - the bit where the zombies/plague victims got chopped up by the helicopter blades was cool.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1456
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2008 - 08:44 am:   

Over the wknd, finally saw THERE WILL BE BLOOD, which I liked an awful lot. DDL does a great job with an eerily pathological character. And I love that final scene. CRASH left a really rotten taste in my mouth. I thought it as contrived as an EEO training video.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1457
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, April 18, 2008 - 06:03 am:   

Lucius, which is scarier: [Rec] or Paranormal Activity? Not that I'm not going to see them both!!
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7226
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, April 18, 2008 - 09:02 am:   

Paranormal Activity
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1028
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 19, 2008 - 10:14 am:   

I saw Forbidden Kingdom last night. It was basically "Last Starfighter" as a kung-fu movie...modern US teen travels back in time to China and has to return a magic staff to the Monkey King. It was fun to watch, but it seemed more like an homage to classic kung fu movies rather than trying to tell a good story. I didn't regret watching it,.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7231
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, April 19, 2008 - 11:03 am:   

I haven't gone to see that because I developed an antipathy for Jackie chan, but I may...

only movie I've seen in the past week apart from Rec wwas a screening for Forgetting Sarah Marshall which was suprisingly okay...
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Jts
New member
Username: Jts

Post Number: 22
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 19, 2008 - 09:49 pm:   

Has anybody seen the spanish flick called The Orphanage. It looks pretty good, and at a loss to find anything decent at the cinema or dvd I was thinking about shelling out the cash for the US import. Is it worth it or should I save the cash.

Jay Steneker
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7233
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, April 19, 2008 - 09:57 pm:   

It's completely derivative of Del Toro and a whole bunch of other spanish flicks, often annoyingly so, but it's scary as hell and the lead actress is cool.
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Huw
Junior Member
Username: Huw

Post Number: 166
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 20, 2008 - 12:09 am:   

I agree about The Orphanage - it's unoriginal, but definitely effective, as far as scares and creepiness go.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7234
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 20, 2008 - 07:46 am:   

Yeah, a pretty good kid-with-a-sack-on-head...
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Jts
New member
Username: Jts

Post Number: 23
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 20, 2008 - 08:57 am:   

Thanks Lucius, Huw. Sounds as if it's at least worth a watch.

Watched Fatih Akin's (Head On) new film last night called The Edge Of Heaven. While not quite as good as Head On - It's still a very effective if slightly overlong movie. I was a little cocerned early on about the multiple storylines which were obviously going to come together at the end which is happening a lot lately, I think Akin managed to pull it all off pretty well giving it his own voice. I hope someone puts this out on dvd soon, I'd love to see it again.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7236
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 20, 2008 - 09:48 am:   

Sounds good. I'd like to see it on DVD too. I'll keep a eye peeled.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1458
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 01:05 pm:   

While I wouldn't necessarily consider it a great film, I just rewatched David Lynch's LOST HIGHWAY and it reminded me that, though Patricia Arquette is ensconced on the idiot box as a chunky/funky soccer mom nowadays, it was not too long ago that she could do a smokin' Bettie Page impression.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7237
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 04:48 pm:   

Yup.

But she can't act...
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 313
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 09:02 pm:   

I think she said Lynch was Satan, after making that movie with him.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7238
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 09:30 pm:   

Lynch....can't direct anymore.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1029
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 24, 2008 - 07:47 am:   

Could he direct at one point?

Nothing interesting for my movie viewing. Watched The Painted Veil and wasn't very interested in it. I kept thinking of Ed Norton in Fight Club. I also watched Seraphim Falls which didn't interest me that much either. I might get to watch Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle tonight.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1459
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 24, 2008 - 09:06 am:   

Well, I liked MULHOLLAND DRIVE and INLAND EMPIRE. Guess I'm in the minority here...
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7239
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 24, 2008 - 10:06 am:   

Harold and Kumar...Yes! I'm going tomorrow.

I can't help you, Dave! :-)

Saw Battle for Hadditha, a documentary style film by Nick Broomfield.. Probably one of the two best films I've seen about Iraq....
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Lukedjlaw
New member
Username: Lukedjlaw

Post Number: 95
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Thursday, April 24, 2008 - 10:22 am:   

What do you think of this movie?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbGkxcY7YFU
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7240
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 24, 2008 - 11:14 am:   

Fucking Genius...
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1460
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2008 - 06:31 am:   

Saw LEOLO on IFC the other night. Definitely a unique, thought-provoking, funny, disturbing movie. A totally original take on the hoary, coming-of-age flick we've seen a zillion times. Such off flourishes! I now understand those shit references. I was particularly struck by the dark, left-hand turn it took in the last :15 with the catfucking scene. (Catfucking?) Reminded me of the last three pages of Kerouac's Maggie Cassidy where the beautiful tone of the book unravels all too hell at the last minute. While LEOLO was certainly more creative and serious-minded than any of these, I detected echoes of John Waters, Monty Python's "Most Awful Family In Britain," the dystopian comedy THE DARK BACKWARDS and, most notably, Bob Balaban's brilliant but ignored 1989 black comedy PARENTS.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7243
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2008 - 08:17 am:   

Yeah, I loved Leolo. Too bad the director died shortly after making it--he might have been something else.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1461
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2008 - 10:47 am:   

Scary Frog's CD should be called "Catfucking."
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7244
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, April 25, 2008 - 11:14 pm:   

Yeah, that would be okay....

I saw Harold and Kumar--it wasn't as good as the first. Major letdown. saw Keane again tonight, Man, that;s a great movie, a great acting job by Damian Lewis...
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Redrichie
New member
Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 23
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, April 26, 2008 - 05:18 am:   

Oh god, yes! Keane! I loved that, we saw it as a "surprise movie" at a film festival a good while ago.

Superb. It wasn't in the least sentimental; but I also think that it managed to avoid be didactic.

H&K..? I have to admit when I first heard the concept I was a bit, wtf? You ARE shitting me? The first was actually not bad though. This bad enough to avoid, y'reckon?
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Pmx
New member
Username: Pmx

Post Number: 1565
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 27, 2008 - 09:07 pm:   

"Well, I liked MULHOLLAND DRIVE and INLAND EMPIRE. Guess I'm in the minority here..."

I'll join you there...:-)
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1462
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 06:29 am:   

Yes, THE ORPHANAGE started out promisingly, but ended up being a rather pedestrian story that we've seen many times before. LETTERS FROM IWO JIMA was pretty good, though. Not what you would expect from Clint Eastwood, certainly.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1463
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 08:59 am:   

http://www.amazon.com/Seagalogy-Study-Ass-Kicking-Steven-Seagal/dp/1845769279/re f=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209398265&sr=8-1
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 317
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 10:32 am:   

Yeah, I didn't think the end of The Orphanage was so great either. Yeah, if you have a dead child just kill yourself and you'll be together again?
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 318
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 10:36 am:   

And if the dead kids were the ones who killed
Simon, you'd think the mom would be kind of ticked off at them when she went to ghost-land.
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Redrichie
New member
Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 25
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 11:13 am:   

Lucius - Clean, Shaven - no, I haven't...but I will check it out.

*checks*

Hmm...seems to be out of print in the UK. Fortunately my DVD player is capable of NTSC/region 1 milarky. Sounds interesting though. I'll follow that up, thanks!

I just saw My Beautiful Laundrette for the first time, it was pretty decent...nice to see DDL has a bit of range with all that emoting (that's not intended as an insult, btw).

Oh, and dunno if it's out in the US yet, but for anybody who likes "that kind of thing" check out Son of Rambow. A lot of it was very "British" (and that's emphatically not to make any condescending remarks about American humour, just the reference points are different, maybe) and 80s... a lot of stuff I remembered for childhood...but a good, not in the least bit creepy and completely unsentimental film about childhood. Not just for the chaps either (it's about two boys) my girlfriend loved it too (we nearly cried...ahaha).
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7247
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 11:53 am:   

I saw the previews this weekend--looked pretty damned funny. I love british comedy. Spaced was fucking great.

Clean, Shaven is pretty harrowing. Good movie.
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Redrichie
New member
Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 26
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 12:16 pm:   

Yeah..it's not a kick in the nuts away from that kind of thing. Well, for starters Jessica Stephenson is in it. It was very funny...it has those wee touches like the "one child at a time" sign bit in Hot Fuzz that really make something (for me anyway). I s'pose in the same way the Simpsons did attention to detail so well.

You see much Chris Morris stuff?

Blue Jam (as it was on the radio) and Jam (telly) were pretty ace.
Also Brass Eye and The Day Today (spoof current affairs and spoof news, respectively) also great. Although Brass Eye could suffer more if you're not familiar with British C-Listers making tits of themselves...although the rest of it is fairly universal. I imagine that bad investigative journalism is awful wherever you are.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7248
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 01:24 pm:   

I saw the Day Today. Great stuff. How about Hyperdrive--was that any good?
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Redrichie
New member
Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 27
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 01:32 pm:   

A particular favourite was the woman getting skewered by a spear of frozen piss jettisoned from a plane.

I never really got that far into Hyperdrive. It was a little ho-hum, sadly. Had it's moments, and Nick Frost is usually pretty entertaining, but now't to get over excited about.

Although...like I said earlier, I think, I have reappraised my view of the IT Crowd...
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1464
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 02:43 pm:   

Lucius, no comments on the book?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7249
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 04:06 pm:   

Oh, yeah, I forgot. That's really necessary. Really important. I got caught up in a lost imnportant papers situation and whiffed on it. I'm going to put it on my blog....
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7250
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 04:23 pm:   

Redritchie, that's too bad about Hyperdrive, Anything you'd care to recommend along the lines of Spaced, Alan Partricdge, et al?
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Huw
Junior Member
Username: Huw

Post Number: 167
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 05:19 pm:   

I'm not Redritchie, but: Garth Marenghi's Darkplace!

Also, Man to Man with Dean Lerner, and The IT Crowd. Oh, and The Mighty Boosh and Peep Show, both of which are sometimes very funny.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7251
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 08:19 pm:   

Thanks, HUW...
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 319
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 10:17 pm:   

Lucius, have you seen the new Harmony Korine movie Mister Lonely? Sun City Girls and J. Spaceman did the soundtrack. I heard a few tracks on the radio today, SCG parts sound pretty good.
Not sure I can make it through another Korine movie after Gummo.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1465
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 05:55 am:   

Yeah, but Julien Donkey-Boy was pretty good...
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7252
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 07:10 am:   

I kinda liked Gummo, actually...yet I kniow what you mean. No, I haven't seen it yet and probably won;t have time until the fall, as I'm leaving for Europe June 1 and won't be back until Sept....
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1466
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 10:01 am:   

Listening to a guy talk about rapacious coal mining techniques on Amy Goodman's news show reminded me that I recently saw and was moved by Barbara Kopple's HARLAN COUNTY, USA. Amazing that someone who could make that film could also make something as fake and flimsy as HAVOC.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7253
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 12:05 pm:   

Havoc sucked. Saw an interesting faux-documentary called Battle for Haditha. It's the most authentic feeling film I've seen as far as giving one a sense of what the war may be like...
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1467
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 04:37 pm:   

Yes, it did. And it's interesting how the failure of this "adult" film forced Anne Hathaway's career to take a right turn into frothy comedy. Yeah, somebody mentioned Haditha to me before. It's the same guy who did Curt and Courtney, right? Broomfield?
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7254
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 05:43 pm:   

yeah, that's him. He also did a great non-doc called Ghosts about a Chinese girl smuggled into the UK so she can support her family.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 35
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 08:45 am:   

I thought "There Will Be Blood" was overrated. Ciaran Hines was excellent (for the whole 10 minutes he was in the film), the Eli kid was creepy (and well-played), but Daniel-Day Lewis chewed up the set. What's with his oddball accents anyhow?

Saw Juno... "Juno" should be called "Mary Sue."
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Redrichie
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Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 28
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 09:55 am:   

Clint - I take it you didn't like Juno much, either? Or am I completely wrong, there?

I found that it all got a bit wearing after about 15 minutes, and the script really wasn't as witty as everybody made out (hey, well that's why it got tiresome).
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1032
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 10:28 am:   

Still haven't seen Juno. I read the "abridged script" ad the Editing Room
http://www.the-editing-room.com/juno.html

I've found the previous scripts ther to be both funny and accurate assessments of the movies. It doesn't give me much hope for Juno.
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Redrichie
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Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 29
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 10:42 am:   

Ahahaha....that's a pretty goddamn accurate assessment of the script...I remember make several similar jokes about it after seeing it myself.

It also seemed to be another one of those films based around the director/writers/set-designers oh-so-cool teenage years...16 year old kid these days with a vinyl copy of Horses? Puh-leeze!
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 36
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 10:43 am:   

Robdev, that link was frickin' cool, and summed up what just about anyone with half a brain would have been thinking during the movie. Thank you.

In my best estimate it was the movie you want to hate, but can't seem to find a good reason to do so. That didn't give me enough of a reason to like it either.

My biggest question with Juno is: what's with the goddamned hamburger phone!?!?!
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7256
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 04:41 pm:   

I saw Ironman Wed night--I didn't like it No surprise there. But I was in a rotten mood, so I'm going back to see it again just to make sure.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 37
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 10:13 pm:   

I don't think "Juno" was even provocative enough to hate. It was a trite, fluff movie that wouldn't have even become half as popular as it has if it hadn't been nominated for an Academy Award. Maybe I hate that more than anything. It was simply this years attempt for the Academy to create another "Little Miss Sunshine."

Juno had just as many obscure pop culture references than "Southland Tales". But the difference is I actually hated Southland Tales. Probably for incorrect, gratuitous Philip K. Dick references and use of Jane's Addiction lyrics as dialog.

"Superbad" had more cinematic significance than Juno. Certainly "Knocked Up" was a better movie and in a similar vein.

As for "There will be Blood," it was a movie handcrafted to win awards. There are movies that people make to tell an interesting story, and there are movies people make to be pretentious. Day-Lewis did much better in "My Left Foot", "The Ballad of Jack and Rose" and "A Room with a View." When you make a movie just to win awards, you forget about your audience.

This is still the guy who played John Proctor in that shitty Winona Ryder version of "The Crucible." And though Gangs of New York got him nominated, all that movie, combined with There will be Blood has done is to prove that Day-Lewis can play both greasy and sweaty. And weird.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 320
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 10:17 pm:   

Didn't you love the line in Southland Tales where Jon Lovitz playing a cop says "flow my tears"? Oh how clever!
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 321
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 10:20 pm:   

The director of London Voodoo has a new movie completed called Mindflesh, which is supposed to be much more gory than London Voodoo. It's playing some festivals in the U.K. Hopefully it will get a dvd release soon.
Here's the description from imdb:
MindFlesh is a psycho-sexual horror/thriller about obsession. Chris Jackson is a taxi driver with a childhood trauma. The trauma has made him a portal for obsessions to pass from the mind to the physical world and hence disrupt the world's multiple planes of reality. Extraterrestrials that police the universe threaten to kill Chris' friends unless he conquers his past
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7257
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 06:01 am:   

Cinematic significance is sort of a meaningless term in context. I thought Knocked Up was lame, flat, dreary, and Superbad was funny-stupid, but neither had any quality that I would express as being cinematically significant. Juno has everything I loathe about Hollywood. It's this years Little Miss Sunshine, a movie designed to win awards, a R-rated sitcom like Sideways and LMS. Juno follows that model and is essentially a paen to teen pregnancy, rife with cute (make that precious) characters and stale jokes.

So according to you, the recipe for a picture designed to win awards is you start with an unsympathetic character who sinks deeper into his pathology, gradually revealing himself; has no significant women's role; tosses in an entirely unfamiliar (for American movies) structure, and makes unrelentingly harsh judgment on the human condition? Yeah, right. Films like that are always huge,. Seriously, dude. Designed to win awards is way more a movie about the nobility of the human spirit as in My Left Foot or Rain Man or any other film that takes the Little Lame Prince for its model. As for DDL, name me an actor that hasn't made a bad movie and I'll show you an actor who doesn't work much. The Age of innocence was a bad movie, but that was mostly Scorsese's fault. As for being weird, people are weird once you look beneath their surface. Check it out. Most American films don't have any interest in showing this--they;re satisfied with the farcical and/or stereotypes.

All art pretends, is a pretense, and thus pretentious. But bad pretentious...to me, that is typified by the obnoxious American Beauty, The kid's rap about the magic paper bag made me embarassed to be human. I wanted to rip holes in the screen. Of course Anderson was being pretentious. He wanted to make a great film and you can't without pretension. I disliked most of his other films, all except Hard Eight. They were bad pretentious, and so I was totally surprised by Blood. Juno pandered to its audience and look how it turned out. Art is personal, and to make it one has to forget about one's audience as much as possible. That's a fact. You can't write a great book, make a great anything, by pandering. However well Anderson succeeded in Blood is a matter of personal judgment, and history will determine the truth of it. Personally I think it'll be watched a hundred years from now and I'm glad Anderson was pretentious. It's a rare thing when pretension and narrative drive and acting craft come together as they did in Blood. If they hadn't, you'd have had a Spielberg film or Magnolia or American Beauty. To go against popular taste as Blood did and be a mild success at the box office is a fucking miracle. You didn't like it? FIne. But trying to prove it by saying it was designed to win awards and it forgot about its audience...those are statements in complete opposition to one another and you can't have it both ways.

JK, I'll look forward to mindflesh. Sounds like a hoot.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 38
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 07:51 am:   

I'm with you on American Beauty, Lucius. The driving force behind the whole movie was an off-hand chance at seeing some jailbait boobies. The bag scene was pretentious. But it gives me a good reason to say "That's the most beautiful thing I've ever seen" anytime I see a grocery bag blowing in the wind. It makes me grin.

Boogie Nights wasn't too bad. I think it lampooned the porn industry of the 1970's and 80's and possibly that entire generation as well. It really shouldn't be watched with any serious intent. It's a black comedy at best. Punch Drunk Love was good, but because of Sandler's rage mixed with his stark moments of intense calm. Unfortunately for that movie, I don't think there are many moments that stand out. It was sort of flat in retrospect. Magnolia was a steaming pile of shit.

As far as crafting movies to win awards, yes, Juno is such a movie, and I did also mention it was this year's Little Miss Sunshine. Only Little Miss Sunshine was entertaining because of Steve Carrell and Alan Arkin. The pushing the bus scenes were gimmicky, and really detracted from the great parts of the rest of the movie. They had a story without that.

But movies do have a formula to follow to garner awards. Take "The English Patient" it's a prime example. Take a literary novel, usually a period piece, put in some intense actors that think very highly of themselves and are next to impossible to work with, and give it long stretches of chewy, stilted dialog followed by strange poignant silences.

It also helps to give someone in the movie a physical disability. My Left Foot, Shine, Forrest Gump, The English Patient (burn victim), Rudy, etc. It's built-in conflict, and if an actor can act believably retarded, crippled, etc. then it just makes people think all the better of them. Also, if we can slow down the action and fill it up with sweeping landscapes, then it also adds points. Out of Africa, There Will Be Blood, etc. Get a big-deal composer out there and you have tentpole Oscar gold. Use Philip Glass or John Williams inspired OSTs for best results.

Sure, it's arguable that most movies would love to have such combinations, if budgets allowed, but my point is that many of these movies aren't worth the hype. The Godfather II, in my opinion, was worth the hype. The Deer Hunter was not. Maybe that's just down to personal taste, but the difference is that GFII was interesting, and Deer Hunter was just one deliberately painful/shocking anecdote after the next with only the expectation of the next horrible scene to carry you through. Same goes with There Will Be Blood.

Hell, the title sets us up for that all by itself. But really, there wasn't that much blood, but they told us there would be, eventually. All I got out of it is not to hang out with Plainview in his bowling alley. It didn't quite live up to its promise.

Now, don't get me wrong. I didn't hate the movie. I just thought it was slow, the soundtrack tedious, and NOT DDL's best movie to date. As far as people studying it hundreds of years from now, I seriously doubt it. People probably don't watch Citizen Kane or Lawrence of Arabia to that degree, and they were ten times the movies this was.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 40
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 10:35 am:   

I haven't seen NCFOM, but Bardem's character is reported to be an unrelenting sociopath. Like he didn't already play that in Goyas Ghosts. No thanks. The Coen bros. have some great movies, and some real pieces of shit. I'm guessing this one is of the latter. I'm starting to think they are beginning to play one note these days. O! Brother was a lot of fun, as was Lebowski, and Miller's Crossing was cool, but Fargo didnt' do it for me. Reliance on more quirky character types and silly accents than palpable story.

Out of curiosity, Lucius, how does Ironman compare to other superhero movies? It's not like many of them set the bar very high, so even if it sucks in its own right, is it still better than X-Men? It's got to be better than The Punisher! Right?!

I'm looking forward to Watchmen, especially with Crudup and others involved, but I also worry it's gonna suck in the worst way.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7259
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 04:25 pm:   

The first forty-five minutes of Ironman isn't awful. Just Downey being Downey, whcih can be entertaining. but after that it settles down into a by the numbers hero-villain deal. I wasn't excited. ANother lame-ass movie. They made some huge mistakes in plotting, errors in judgement. C, C-.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 322
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 09:06 pm:   

I saw that the Coen Brothers are going to write and direct a version of Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policeman's Union. Haven't read the book, but isn't it fantasy? Seems like a strange choice for them.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7261
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 09:51 pm:   

It's alt universe stuff. I'm pretty much disinterested in what the coens do and have been for several years.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7262
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 10:01 pm:   

Oh yeah, as for Watchmen, the director is Zach Snyder, the director of 300. Enough said.
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1035
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, May 03, 2008 - 04:51 am:   

Iron Man was fairly good for the genre, on par with X-Men and X2 (take that however you want to).

The movie featured an instrumental version of the Black Sabbath song "Iron Man." Annoyingly, that's not on the soundtrack. Hearing classic Sabbath songs without Ozzy is always more appealing for me.
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Redrichie
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Username: Redrichie

Post Number: 30
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, May 03, 2008 - 05:33 am:   

Is the Yiddish Policeman's Union any good? I always thought it looked like one of these things where SF themes were getting mainstream recognition 'cos it's so called "literary" fiction...? Unfair?
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Redrichie
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Post Number: 31
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, May 03, 2008 - 07:15 am:   

Oh, and btw, Lucius, you were asking about British TV Comedy. Another one I particularly liked was The Thick of It. If you're not familiar, it is a New Labour take on Yes Minister. Very, very funny and has some excellent swearing in it too. Another Armando Iannucci scripted show.

How well it translates, given the Westminster setting, I dunno...although the West Wing did OK on these shores... Having said that, in terms of global, um influence, the US is a little less, um "rubbish" than the UK. So maybe that might explain that.

There is the other issue that one of the main actors, Chris Langham, got done for the contents of his hard drive. But they got around it in two specials by having him on holiday...so that kinda worked.

But yes: ace.
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Pmx
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Username: Pmx

Post Number: 1566
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2008 - 04:26 am:   

Iron Man's stomping around sound effects and the battle with that other man in armor reminded me of Robocop.

"Chabon is a big advocate of genre fiction"

As far as I'm concerned Chabon writes genre fiction. He wrote an interesting read in a recent New Yorker issue about his early life as a superhero.

I agree with Lucius that Zodiac was tedious...
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1468
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2008 - 03:04 pm:   

At the risk of depressing the tone of this thread, I was not appalled at my recent viewing of ROCKY BALBOA. It could have been lots worse...
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7266
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 - 06:44 pm:   

How? :-)
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1469
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 06:11 am:   

Uh, Rocky could have beaten Mason Dixon? Rocky could have nailed Little Marie?
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Gordon_van_gelder
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Username: Gordon_van_gelder

Post Number: 635
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 06:23 am:   

It could have been a musical.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7267
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 08:22 am:   

GVG may have a point. Rocky nailing Little Marie...There's a song in there somewhere! I guess we should be grateful he didn't nail Mason Dixon.

Still, it was more honest than Mamet's Redbelt. To anyone who's ever been in a MMA gym, thay was a fucking cartoon.
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1036
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 08:54 am:   

So Redbelt isn't very good? I was interested in it because of Chiwetel Ejiofor. Mamet isn't a draw for me.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7268
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 11:27 am:   

Eijofor is the most bullshit part of the movie. It's not his fault. It;s just the pat the way it's written. Maybe if I wasn't familair with MMA, it would be an okay movie, but my judgement was clouded by knowing that's not the way trainers are, not the way people train. BUt at best it's no more than an okay movie. Mamet wrote this bullshit article about MMA, all this tripe about the warrior spirit and that's how he sees MMA. It's ridiculous. jMMA trainers just aren't like the guy Ejiofor plays and the world they inhabit isn't anything like the place Mamet writes about. That movie hasn;t been made.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1470
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 01:52 pm:   

Maybe RB would have been better as a musical...
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7269
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 02:22 pm:   

I think so. Balboa on side of a darkened stage singing of his longing for Marie, in a spotlight, amd in another spot, Marie singing about her disgust in even even being near such a steroid freak! :-)
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Lukedjlaw
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Username: Lukedjlaw

Post Number: 96
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 03:56 pm:   

Thanks for mentioning 13: Game of Death, Lucius. I got it off Netflix and enjoyed the film very much. Do you have an online list of interesting foreign films like that one somewhere?

I have to say, I think There Will be Blood was overrated. Not bad, just overrated. The film revolved completely around the Daniel Day Lewis character, who was simply a completely sickening self-aggrandizing sociopath. I spent the entire film just hoping and waiting for him to die. The on-edge horror-music movie score seemed almost completely detached from the dull oil-drilling on the screen. Maybe I'm just a plebian, but I expect some audience gratification dammit.

In many ways it was like Zodiac: well-acted and well-done, but overlong and tedious.

Luke Jackson
http://solipcyst.blogspot.com
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7270
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 - 07:04 pm:   

Well, I loved it. So we'll have to disagree. I didn't notice the score, which meant it did it;s job as far as I'm concerned. I see no similarity between it and Zodiac. Structuarlly one is dynamic and one is plodding, one is a character study in revers and the other a police procedural...but I've said enough about that film. To my mind, Memories of Murder, by the guy who made the Host, is far superior a police procedural.

Glad you liked 13. I don't know of any particular list other than these many movie threads. If I have time before I leave I'll post one.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1471
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 08, 2008 - 08:03 am:   

Saw a good film last night -- THE DEAD GIRL, by Karen Moncrieff, whose debut feature BLUE CAR was lost in all the hype surrounding THIRTEEN. Five vignettes surrounding the murder of a young prostitute. Great performances all around, and some genuinely eerie and touching scenarios.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7272
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 08, 2008 - 09:12 pm:   

I didn't think much of the dead girl. It was all right, but nothing special. I sort of liked Toni Collete's but, I can't even remember the rest. But compared to what I saw today, 45 min of speed racer, it was probably a masterpiece...
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 323
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 08, 2008 - 09:21 pm:   

Did you run out of the screening room after 45 minutes? :-)
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7274
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 09:45 am:   

HUW, if you're out there, call home! I'd like to ask you some questions if you don't mind.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 324
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 10:20 am:   

It sure looks pretty awful from the bits of previews I've seen. Looks like the Wusupski brothers have gone off the rails. lol
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7275
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 12:08 pm:   

Yeah, and this was supposed to be their comeback movie. I'm not too sure.....
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Lukedjlaw
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Username: Lukedjlaw

Post Number: 99
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 01:36 pm:   

Unfortunately, I have a 5 year old and will therefore probably watch it this weekend.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 41
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 03:37 pm:   

Yeah, Zodiac left me feeling emotionally and physically exhausted. Like I'd had to do taxes while fighting with my wife for 3 hours, and having to pay the government afterwards instead of getting a refund.

I did like the scene with the squirrels though. Very creepy.
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 168
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 04:35 pm:   

Hi Lucius! I'm on my way to the hospital right now (I have cellulitis), but I'll check back here again when I get home.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7276
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 06:11 pm:   

I hope you're on the mend soon.

Do you speak Welsh? That may be a dumb question, but I'm looking for someone with a knowledge of the language.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7277
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 09, 2008 - 06:19 pm:   

luked, here's hoping your kid doesn't have an adverse reaction.

clint, I actually liked it all right, but when I hear it's masterwork, that nothing is its equal, I tend to overreact... :-)
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 169
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, May 10, 2008 - 04:53 pm:   

Sorry, Lucius, I don't speak Welsh. I know some phrases and can understand bits and pieces whenever I go back, but I don't have any real knowledge of the language (I left when I was very young). I keep meaning to learn, but after moving to Taiwan I put all my efforts into learning Chinese.
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 170
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, May 10, 2008 - 07:34 pm:   

If it's something fairly straightforward, I could ask my parents or one of my relatives who speak Welsh...
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7278
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, May 10, 2008 - 08:57 pm:   

Well, for one thing, iis there a welsh word for vampire?
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7279
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, May 11, 2008 - 08:43 am:   

Or word or words that might be used for a vampire, like "NightWalker" or etc.
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Pmx
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Username: Pmx

Post Number: 1567
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 11, 2008 - 11:33 am:   

http://www.geiriadur.net/

fampir

and other related words...
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Pmx
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Username: Pmx

Post Number: 1568
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 11, 2008 - 11:37 am:   

and if I may be so bold as to say "ugh vampires!"

Don't know what your timeframe is but you may want to ask Liz to run it by John...surely he knows a Welsh or two...or at least he knows most everything...:-)
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7280
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, May 11, 2008 - 12:16 pm:   

Thanks. PMX...
Are you related to the late Post Merdian.
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Pmx
Intermediate Member
Username: Pmx

Post Number: 1569
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 11, 2008 - 05:56 pm:   

I am as always PseudonyM. With an extraneous 'x' tacked on to meet the three character username requirement.

Or if one prefers the 'x' simply enhances the unknown, mysterious nature of X...:-)
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 171
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 06:47 am:   

Fampir (the 'f' is pronounced like the 'v' in English) is the only form I've been able to find too. I expect it is based on the original slavic words for vampire (I doubt if it existed in old Welsh).

There are all kinds of creatures in Welsh folklore such as witches, ghosts, goblins, little people, and phenomena such as corpse candles, but I can't recall any stories about vampires. I'll see if I can find any references.

Sorry I haven't been of more help with all this - I've spent most of the day in hospital having tests and am due back in tomorrow. If I find any references to vampires in Wales in my books on Welsh folklore I'll let you know. ;-)
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1037
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 07:32 am:   

I think I need to make a new movie watching rule. My first rule was "no movies with Freddie Prinz Jr." My new one is "no movies with Nicolas Cage." I watched two painfully bad movies with him over the weekend, Next and Ghost Rider. Next further diminishes my respect for Lee Tamahori (one good movie and each subsequent one seems worse than the previous one...I didn't think he'd sink lower than XXX 2, but Next was worse). Ghost Rider...I put it on mute so it wouldn't hurt quite as much.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 42
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 07:56 am:   

I watched "The Orphanage" this weekend. Still marinating about what I thought about it. Though greatly influenced by del Torro, I didn't think it wasn't anywhere near as good as The Devils Backbone or Pan's Labyrinth.

It had some very haunting (of even the non-supernatural variety) moments, but a lot of it was just someone wandering around a creepy old house. I thought that the climax of the movie was very surprising. The end was not. Sack-head kid was very creepy. There's a lot of good stuff coming out of Spain these days.

I watched "The City of Lost Children" for the first time this weekend too. While visually interesting with the jumble of bridges and iron and brick buildings over murky water in the ubiquitous night, I wondered why I had sat through the entire thing.

The whole movie came off a little too absurd and existentialist (and yes, I realize this is a French movie) for my tastes. I dunno, I think I expected more. Maybe for it to have been a little "meaner." The opening scene set up the film as skin-crawlingly creepy/sinister but the rest was very comical. The whole movie was little more than a swarm of incongruous images ending without much of a point or real resolution.

My tastes may just be too pedestrian for a movie like this, but I liked Dark City better. Anyway, just some thoughts. Feel free to blast away with both barrels if you must.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7281
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 08:15 am:   

Thanks, Huw. I really appreciate it...As well as any info about interesting creatures.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7282
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 08:26 am:   

My god, Robert, I had to review both, and those are two of the worst Cage films ever. I feel for you. I have to say, though, that Lord Of War is kind of an interesting movie, but not because of Cage.

Clint, I didn't think that much of the Orphanage, or of the Devil's Backbone, and I particularly disliked Pan's Labyrinth for the heavy debt it owed to a much better film, Victor Erice's The Spirit of the Beehive, one of the best films of the 70s. I have never seen a movie so praised that had such blatant break in character as PL, and I'm always horrified when I see Del Toro's name attached to any property for which I have hopes.

As for Juenet, I like Delicatessan, though it owed some heavy debts, too. Thereafter I lost interest in Jeunet.

I think a film you might enjoy is Leolo, one of the great black comedies.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 43
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 08:37 am:   

I'll have to check out Leolo and the Spirit of the Beehive then. Thanks for the recommendations!

Just out of curiosity, Lucius, what did you think of Gilliam's "Brazil?"
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1038
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 09:25 am:   

Clint, I think you got the point of City of Lost Children, it was supposed to be absurd and existential. That appealed to me when I saw it, but I have little desire to watch it again.


Lucius, I had forgotten those reviews. I guess I focused on the Grindhouse review on the same page. I got the impression that Tamahori doesn't have a high opinion of women after watching Next...not with Biel falling for Cage with his creepy stalker vibe.

With Del Torro, I wonder what he'll do with The Hobbit. Will it be closer to Pan, or closer to Mimic or Hellboy? I fear the latter. Although at least this delays his take on Lovecraft. Reunited with his co-scribe from Mimic, I think At the Mountains of Madness will be bad.

Ug, I just saw that after Lovecraft, Del Torro is attached to do Doctor Strange.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7283
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 09:27 am:   

Acrually, I liked it quite a bit the last time I saw it. I thought Delicatessan owed a lot to Brazil, as a matter of fact. And you?

Spirit of the Beehive is a wonderful film that PL basically redid in a rather hamfisted way. Erice makes about one movie per decade, so his work may be done.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7284
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 10:11 am:   

Robert, agreed with you on Tamahori. He wants to be a woman too much to like them.

Doc Strange was my favorite comic. Well, maybe he'll do it better than Zach Snyder would have. He might do okay with the Hobbit, because of Jackson's involvement, but that's a pic I'm not that interested in seeing. But I'm certain he'll mess all over Lovecraft.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 44
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 10:49 am:   

It was good stuff! I liked it a lot. I don't think any studio today would take the risk of making it, much less having the wide release that it got when it first ran.

I like the del Torro movies, but, I'm getting sick of his constant use of still pools of water in dark rooms and his whole maze motif. It's time to move on to some other evocative form of imagery.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 325
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 11:48 am:   

I was going to watch Next because it's a Philip K. Dick story, but Cage is just too awful to watch. And that director too...whooh...I'll pass.
Watched an old DePalma movie on tv, Raising Cain. Has DePalma made a whole career out of ripping off Hitchcock? Obession ripped off Vertigo, Dressed to Kill ripped off Vertigo and Psycho, Body Double ripped off Rear Window, and a few others. Raising Cain ripped of Psycho. DePalma "wrote" Raising Cain too. God, what awful dialogue, and right on the nose too. There's one scene where he pushes a car into a lake and it's a complete rip off of the same scene in Psycho. He even steals from Dario Argento, who himself took things from Hitchcock. The end scene where Lithgow's character is hidden behind the woman and is revealed when she crouches down is stolen from Argento's Tenebrae. I suppose he thinks of it all as homage. DePalma is a hack! And that Femme Fatale movie with Rebecca Romain was one of the worst movies I've ever seen. After all the flack he got for it, he was trying to say it was a parody of bad American movies. Yeah right!
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7285
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 11:51 am:   

Hell, a movie like Chinatown, like most of the great pictures of the 60s, 70s, and 80s, couldn't get made today. Brazil wouldn't stand a chance.

I don't care much for del Toro. If you watch Spirit of the Beehive, I think you'll see how much more allusive and evocative Erice is than Del Toro in capturing the feeling of childhood. Like Cuaron and (sad to say) inarritu, he's been eaten by Hollywood.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7286
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 11:54 am:   

In Depalma's career, I'd say he rpped off Argento even more than Hitchcock. I just saw Argento's newest, Mother of Tears or whatever, and PU...it's way bad.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 326
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 12:01 pm:   

Yeah, Argento's completely lost the plot. Not that his older movies were very well made, but they had a little certain something in the direction that made some of them interesting. The stuff he's done in the last 15 years or so has just stunk. Mother of Tears is supposed to be the big end to his trilogy that started with Suspiria. Another really awful one is Stendhal Syndrome, where he directs his daughter getting raped. It was so bad it was laughable. Especially the scenes where she puts on a blonde wig and is interrogated, and it's supposed to be like Basic Instinct. Ugh.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7287
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 12:27 pm:   

I lost interest in Argento a while back...I think it was a long while back.

Raising Cain was a raging piece of shit. It's hard to believe that they felt good enough about it to release it.
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1039
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 12:38 pm:   

Stendhal at least had some visual flair at times, which is usually the best I can hope for out of Argento. I generally just expect some dream inspired moments in otherwise uninteresting films.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1472
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 01:52 pm:   

Advice to all: avoid Raul Ruiz's KLIMT with John Malkovich, an obtuse, surreal, confusing collection of tableaus that put Klimt in various Lynchian settings and give Malkovich a chance to purr one-liners about art and critics. Although visually interesting, the plot doesn't make much sense and certainly doesn't tell us much about Klimt or his art.

Had a much better time watching THE HUDSUCKER PROXY which was sharp, funny and extremely well art-directed.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 327
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 03:08 pm:   

Klimt was pretty bad, but like you say, visually interesting. Ruiz has done some strange stuff. I saw one called The Hypothesis of the Stolen Painting which has an interviwer and an art collector walking around talking about art and as the film goes on it gets into some strange cabalistic, magical stuff with references to Baphomet, if I remember correctly. Hardly a conventional narrative film, but interesting.
Three Crowns of the Sailor was pretty weird too. Sort of Lynch-like too, if Lynch was a foreign director shooting on a small tv movie budget, and trying to be more colorful. Don't know that I exactly liked it, but it was different.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7288
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 03:49 pm:   

The best film about a painter I've seen about a painter bar none is Chi-Hwa-Seon. It's directed by Kwon Tak Im. Great movie. Netflix has it.
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1040
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 04:09 pm:   

Chihwaseon was good. I can't remember any other film about a painter that made an impression on me, except perhaps Erice's Quince Tree of the Sun.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7289
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 05:32 pm:   

I liked that one too, but not so much as Chihwaseon.
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 02:29 am:   

At the risk of drawing down the wrath of better-educated (or high-falutin) students of cinema and human behavior, I thought "Lust for Life" and "Pollack" were pretty good. Even if "Lust for Life" had some clunkiness here and there, ol' Kirk did a helluva job and they actually delved into the act of artistic creativity, which was pretty rare for films back then. And although I don't know much about Jackson Pollock,
I did feel as if Harris did a good job in his interpretation of a painter struggling with demons (creative and personal). But I tend to like populist and the rara avis points of view when it comes to art (or entertainment, depending on what/who is under discussion).

Hey Lucius. Long time no post.
DTS (formerly of Kansas City). (By the by: U wuz robbed in them there recent Nebula awards).
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 2
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 02:30 am:   

Uh, make that "Pollock" re. the film title -- not pollack (or polack -- maybe my bigotry seeping through).
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 45
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 07:40 am:   

I thought "Vincent and Theo" was pretty intense. Messed up, sure, but well-shot and well acted. Tim Roth does go over the top sometimes, but it's great to watch the guy work.

Has anyone seen Factotum yet? If so, was it any good? Matt Dillon as Bukowski seemed like a stretch to me.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7290
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 08:32 am:   

Watch Roth go over the top bigtime in Hulk 2!
I sort of had some affection for Vincent and Theo. But in my experience, Chiwhasweon is the gold standard of painter films. Take a chance and give it a watch.

Factotum's all over cable these days. It was okay. and Dillon did a pretty good job, and there were. as you might guess, some interesting characters; but this mythologizing of Buk ought to stop, I think. When I was 19 Iread with Bukowski , a very poor opening act for the man. He was especially ascerbic that night, drunk as God, and threw up into a baby grand that was on stage. :-)

Dorman! Hey! Is that you? Cool. I can barely remember Lust for Life but recall thinking it was sort of clunky. Pollack, to my mind, was not a great film but had a couple of good performances. As for being "robbed," well, I'll probably get robbed several more times this year. I just don't have that many friends in the field and awards aren't that important to me. It's like Tom Disch said, Every child must go home with a prize. But anyway, Stars Seen Through Stone made it into the Nebula volume, so that's nice.

How's OZ?
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1041
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 08:43 am:   

I liked Pollack, it was nice to see a biopic that didn't whitewash him. That's too common in biopics.

I don't think I can watch Hulk. Norton is always stuck in Fight Club in my mind. Plus I'm getting burnt out on superhero movies. Besides Batman, I don't have much interest in continuing with the genre.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7291
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 08:56 am:   

Two words. Louis LeTerrier. He directed the Transporter movies and now Hulk. It's going to rough-going.
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Clint_harris
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Username: Clint_harris

Post Number: 46
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 01:33 pm:   

Are we to expect a homoerotic fistfight between the green hulk and the grey hulk, slathered in motor oil ala The Transporter? *shudder*
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7293
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 02:30 pm:   

No doubt.

The Abomiation has a huge schwanstucker. ;)
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 04:24 pm:   

Lucius, yup, none other. Been keeping my nose to the grindstone as I sort of start over with the freelance gig. OZ is beautiful. As you've noticed, the fascism (government-wise) as eased up quite a bit (and most of the "laws" regarding average joes over here are pretty much ignored --even the cops are laid back until someone goes postal -- a rare occurence when compared to America).

You've got the right attitude about the awards. I enjoyed the DAGGER KEY collection and now I'm looking forward to seeing the HUGE best of Subterranean book land on these far shores.

Hey without wandering off far from the subject of films for too long, have you read _The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao_? Just bought it up myself (Amazon, the cure for outrageous Australian book prices), and I'm enjoying the first chapter.
Take care. I'll drop in more often now that I've finally gotten myself to register.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7294
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 08:38 pm:   

Yeah, I liked Diaz's book a lot. But I don't want to read a lot more geek lit. It's becoming tiresome. I'm off to Switzerland and Brazil in a couple of weeks, but Ill be checking in here and you can always reach me at lucius4@earthlink.net.

Good to hear from you, man.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1042
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 05:07 am:   

I watched THE DRAGON PAINTER, finally something that was good. It was a silent film about a Japanese painter who was a bit crazy. It's amazing that Hollywood was putting out movies with Japanese actors and depth of character in the 1910s and 1920s, but we lost the idea of non-white leads for many years and we still have a big lack of depth.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1473
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 06:19 am:   

One that needs to be mentioned in any discussion of painter movies...Peter Watkins' faux-docudrama EDVARD MUNCH. Long, and a bit too immersive in the disease-repression-and-madness milieu of Munch's Norwegian upbringing for most folks, I would reckon, but if you are looking for a movie that really explains what makes an artist tick and how it translates onto the canvas, EM is pretty much without peer for me.

That having been said, never saw Chihwaseon, Tree of the Sun or Andrei Rublev.

FACTOTUM did not move me much. Dillon did not display much of the spark that makes an artist. Smug drunk who can write. Big deal.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7296
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 07:43 am:   

That's waht Bukowski was more or less -- smug drunk and a decent writer.
Never heard of Magic Painter...must look for it.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1043
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 02:55 pm:   

Dragon Painter, being silent, is a fairly simple story. I guess it's just sad that a silent movie has more interesting portrayals of Japanese characters than most modern movies from the US.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7298
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 04:00 pm:   

Well, yeah...but it didn't take that to tell us. Holywood's been pointing the direction ever since the Bond films. And we still have a few good filmmakers, though the majority are resolutely indie. For instance, I still have scenes from Keane running through my head.
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Pmx
Intermediate Member
Username: Pmx

Post Number: 1570
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 06:43 pm:   

I carry the Tarkovsky torch as Andrei Rublev is mentioned.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7299
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 08:22 pm:   

Is it anything like the olympic torch? Let me call some Tibetans...
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 328
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 09:31 pm:   

Lucius, have you heard of a movie called Chemical Wedding? Directed by the second unit director on Brazil and Time Bandits. According to imdb it's about "a shy professor who brings Aleister Crowley back to life." Sounds kind of cool...but, Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden is the co-writer. Hmm...here's the official website
http://www.chemicalweddingmovie.co.uk/
The synopsis looks kind of interesting.
For some reason they're using names of real life people for the fictional characters. Mathers was Macgregor Mathers, head of the Golden Dawn. Victor Neuman is Victor Neuberg who was Crowley's follower. Haddo is the name of the character Somerset Maugham used as the evil Crowley figure in his novel The Magician. I guess it's supposed to be clever. Not sure what to think of this with Dickinson's name on the credit, but might be worth checking out.
They should have got Joss Ackland to play Crowley.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 329
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 - 09:49 pm:   

Also heard about a cool sounding movie from Argentina called La Antena. A silent fantasy that is like Tales of Hoffman and 1984. When the characters speak the letters appear in the air in front of their faces. Supposed to be visually stunning. Sort of Gillian-esque too. Sounds pretty interesting.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7300
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 06:59 am:   

I've seen La Antena, in fact I just blogged about it. I liked it, though not as much as early Guy Maddin fillms such as Careful. It's themes struck me a bit unsubtle and been-done.

On the other hand, I've never heard of Chemical Wedding. Sounds intriguing.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1474
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 07:50 am:   

So sorry I missed Maddin's SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD; I TiVo'd it and let it expire. <sigh>

Question about SciFi Channel original movies. As a longtime fan of cheeseball exploitation films, I have to applaud these low-budget wonders as the true descendants of Ed Wood sci-fi. But I have to say I continue to be amazed that they manage to get people of real talent to star in them. William Forsythe in that one about the man-shark, John Savage from THE DEER HUNTER in CARNOSAUR, Coen Bros. repertory company regular Jon Polito in the hilarious ROCK MONSTER. Lucius, as someone who knows a bit about this stuff, why do legit actors lend their talents to this stuff? Is it just the money?
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 330
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 10:10 am:   

Chemical Wedding is playing at Cannes, and Bruce Dickinson is jetting in on his private jet. I wonder if they'll let him in, or if he'll be stuck outside with Lloyd Kaufman and the Toxic Avenger. lol
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7301
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 10:14 am:   

Well, some need the work, obviously. Or else they slept with somebody's wife and this is their way of repaying them. They only pay 10 K for those scripts. Looking at Forsythe's and Savage's upcoming flicks, I'd say the work motive is pre-eminent as both their careers are in decline. Forsythe, for instance, has another scifi picture coming up that could be a Sci Fi Channel script, the Platform. Other than that, I suspect some actors do its as a favor to a friend or may for their sci-fi freak kids.

I found SMITW sort of disappointing.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 331
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 10:40 am:   

10k? That's pathetic. I was offered a shitty 1k option once by some "entertainment lawyer" who was trying to produce movies, and the purchase price if they decided to buy it would have been 10k. I never signed the option. He hasn't produced anything yet anyway and I doubt he ever will. They tried to screw me on the option too, saying it was $1 for first six months, $450 for next six months, and $550 for next six months. Yeah right! They just wanted to tie up my script for six months while they had one of their stooges look at it and decide if it was worth producing.
I know the Sci-Fi channel doesn't accept unsolicited scripts. So I guess they have a stable of hacks that churn out their endless stream of crappy creature features.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 332
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 10:42 am:   

Not that I couldn't use 10k. But the low purchase price for features is around 50k. I know the budget would have been about 1 million too. So that percentage is pretty awful.
The budget on those Sci-fi channel movies has to warrant more than 10k purchase price on the script too.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7302
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 11:35 am:   

"Stable of hacks..."

Rockne O'Bannion etc.

I stopped inquiring when I heard the script price, so I don't know the film budgets, but I would imagine you;'re right. The last option I did in Hwood was a 15k option and a buy price based on budget with a floor of 250k....and that was this year. It wasn't for a script, but one of my books optioned to an indie production company. It's probably going to have low eight figure budget. So yeah. I guess Sci Fi get what they pay for.
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Pmx
Intermediate Member
Username: Pmx

Post Number: 1571
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 18, 2008 - 08:52 am:   

"Is it anything like the olympic torch?"

Good question. Recently I watched a woman run down a highway carrying an Olympic torch or what I believed to be one. Absolutely no one around. I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7311
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, May 18, 2008 - 11:04 am:   

She was being pursued by astral lamas.
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Jts
New member
Username: Jts

Post Number: 24
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 08:33 am:   

I'm not sure if anyone has heard this but Wernor Herzog is planning on remaking Bad Luitenant with Nick Cage playing the role originally played by Harvey Keital.

If this does go ahead, will that make it the quickest film to be remade after its original release date?.

Here is a link for anyone interested-http://twitchfilm.net/site/view/bad-lieutenant-remake-gets-interesting/

I very much doubt this will work though, in fact the only good thing I can see coming of this is that perhaps it will be the final nail in the coffin of Nick Cage's career.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1054
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 08:59 am:   

Yuck, it's a remake and it has Cage in it. I like Herzog, but the two negatives more than outweigh my interest in his work.

But 17 years isn't the quickest remake. Maltese Falcon first came out in 1931, then a different version came out as "Satan Met a Lady" 5 years later. Then in 1941 they made the version most are familiar with. Three versions of the same story within 10 years.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7317
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 08:59 am:   

Cage is doing wonderfully well with shit like National Treasure 2 and Ghost Rider, both big hits.

Heck no, there are tons of remakes done quicker. Quarantine, a remake aof last year's Rec, will be in theatres this fall. If we're tallking about same-language films. I'd have to check, but I;m certain there have been quicker remakes.

Let's use the new thread, ok?

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