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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, February 11, 2007 - 07:37 pm:   

Watched Tokyo Trash Baby. Kind of a Japanese chick flick about a waitress obsessed with a guitar player who lives down the hall from her apt, and a gentle chiding satire on consumer culturee. She goes through his trash every night and decorates her apt with what she finds. It's smart, hip, well-made. It could probably be a pretty good American remake, if they kept it from being too cutesy. I really enjoyed it. Shot in a kind of punky style, with occasional scenes shot with one motionless camera. The lead, Mami Nakamura, is terrific and extremely good-looking.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 07:19 am:   

Saw FACTORY GIRL Sunday night. Despite the massive publicity offensive designed to finally make Sienna "Not the Nanny" Miller a star, I have to say that she is going to have to wait a bit longer.

The principal culprits were the screenwriters, whose script was riddled with usual lazy expository devices (framing flashback interviews, press conference reporters hurling out expository questions, ie, "So, Andy, are you really giving up painting?") and certain of the cast coughHaydenChristensencough who turned in performances sure to merit mention at this year's Razzies.

I liked Guy Pearce's Warhol well enough, but Christensen's "folksinger," a laughably transparent Dylan, was awful, and the Dylan-Warhol face-off, which should have been a fulcrum of the plot, was just a fizzle.

Giggles could be overheard throughout, and well deserved they were. At the end, I found myself wondering "what the hell was that all about"? "Why did these people matter?" "Why should I care?" A sure sign of failure.

Personally, I much preferred I SHOT ANDY WARHOL.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 07:23 am:   

Extra special Razzie to Meredith Ostrom, who didn't have much to do as Nico except to look good, but whose pronouncement that the Velvet Underground was a blending "uff myoozik und aahhhhhtttt" will be fodder for midnight-movie drag queen impersonation for years.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 07:26 am:   

The idea of Darth Dylan sounded bad. Plus reviews of the film seem to be uniformly bad.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 07:42 am:   

I loved I SHOT ANDY WARHOl and I was looking forward to this...Now I think I'll give it a pass.
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Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 07:49 am:   

I heard Christensen was pretty good in Shattered Glass, that movie about the New Republic writer who fabricated many of his sources. Has anyone see it?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 07:54 am:   

Yeah, I saw it on cable -- he was okay. I mean, he wasn't Alec Guiness, but he didn't embarass himself. As apparently he has here. The movie wasn't all that compelling--kind of a better than average Movie of the Week type thing.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 08:01 am:   

Hayden was all right in GLASS, which was a better-than-middling entertainment. I liked it. His performance in FACTORY is just inexplicable. It's definitely an impersonation: a haircut, a pair of Wayfarers and an adenoidal sneer.

The whole thing is just very very facile. Edie is the poor little rich girl, abused by a wealthy, insensitive family, used and discarded by Warhol. Dylan is the hard-edged truth teller, who sees with laser-like focus through Warhol's veneer. It's more melodrama than drama. You don't get the sense that there is any emotional depth to any of these characters. Hell, Jimmy Fallon does as well as anyone and that's really a statement. And boy does Edward Hermann look bad.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 08:11 am:   

The Situation would have been the better choice.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 08:12 am:   

A little off-topic, but just so everyone knows I'm not exclusively a hater...Very quietly, after a lackluster Season One, Gervais and Merchant's "Extras" has become the funniest thing on the tube. As good as "The Office UK".
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 08:21 am:   

Yes, Lucius, unfortunately the choice wasn't mine. I'm going to see THE SITUATION tmw.
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Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 08:30 am:   

The Situation isn't playing here in the mountains; damn you all and your proximity to sophisticated urban centers! I'm left with Ghost Rider and Norbit.

And Netflix, thank god ...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 08:36 am:   

Have to check out Extras. Sad to say I have a novella called Extras; I'm currently shopping for another title. I also have a novella called Vacancy, which is coming out in the spring, and just learned there's a movie of that name due out in June. Ack.


Nor is it playing here, Nathan. I had a screener.
I doubt the Situation will get wide distribution -- it's not doing that well out east. I wonder if it will even hit Portland.
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PM
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:34 am:   

Extras is hit or miss.

You'll most assuredly want to check out the season two episode with Bowie...'cause everyone loves Bowie:-)
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:42 am:   

Rick Gervais and Bowie...that's beautiful. Is that playing now?
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PM
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:56 am:   

Season two is at episode 11. The Bowie appearance is ep 8. And of course HBO will replay the second season.

Gervais does that "I'm an ass" and "embarrassing pie in the face" sort of comedy.

I'm lukewarm about season one. But Bowie provides Gervais a distinguished humiliation...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:58 am:   

Excellent. I'll try and wath for it.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:58 am:   

Watch, damn it!
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 10:34 am:   

I think it's episode 9, actually.

You can see the Bowie scene all over youtube by typing "gervais bowie extras." He serenades Gervais with a song about his selling out as an actor while the crowd applauds. It's special, as is Andy's appearance at the BAFTAs (Episode 10) and his performance in a gay-themed play directed by Ian McKellen (Episode 11). The show is really hitting its stride.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 10:56 am:   

Cool, thanks...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 12:33 pm:   

Watched it. Pretty special. If it keeps up that standard, it's gonna be good.
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jk
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:26 pm:   

I'll have to check that out. Loved the British The Office, but season one of Extras didn't impress at all. He seemed to have lost it.
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jk
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:31 pm:   

Lucius, you going to see The Number 23? Joel Schulmacher and Jim Carrey, what a combination. The poster has a picture of Carrey with 23 written all over his face, like Sam Neill in In Mouth of Madness. "Upon acquiring a mysterious book in which the number "twenty-three" seems to take on powerful cosmic significance, a once-sane man gradually becomes obsessed with the idea that the frequently recurring number may in fact hold a deadly secret."
Sounds like somebody was reading Robert Anton Wilson. The movie probably will blow big time, considering who directed it. The David Sylvian mailing list is promoting the fact that one of his songs is in the movie. I probably wouldn't be too proud of that fact. Well, Sylvian's got alimony to pay.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:36 pm:   

Yeah, I probably am. I know it's gonna blow, but I'm a sucker for illuminati stuff...It's got to be better than Ghost Rider.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 09:38 pm:   

The trailers look half-decent, too....
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jk
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 10:13 pm:   

Well, Cage isn't in it, that's one plus. I wonder if Ghost Rider will continue his string of flops? Wicker Man, The Weather Man, ...
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 - 10:45 pm:   

Extras Season 2 is loaded with good stuff--someone had them all off BBC and I watched them a couple months ago. There's a good bit involving Daniel Radcliffe and Diana Rigg. The best part of the show is the non-romantic relationship between Gervais and his best friend. She is awesome, but the chemistry between them is something you don't often see on TV. It's just right. But I liked Season 1 a lot, too.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 03:02 am:   

Gervais is probably banging her. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 06:49 am:   

Radcliffe shoots a condom like a slingshot and it lands on this prim old lady's head. Later on it the show, he calls her "Dame Diana" and I'm thinking "Holy crap, it's Diana Rigg!" She's still kinda sexy in that whole Helen Mirren-kinda way...:-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 07:23 am:   

There's an alt-country band called the Five Chinese Cowboys that has a song called "She's A Waitress," whose opening line kind of says it all about mirren and her ilk...

"She reminds me/of my mother
in a dirty kind of way..."
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 07:45 am:   

One of the more interesting Nicolas Roeg films has just gotten a DVD release. Track 29, starring Gary Oldman and Theresa Russell. Script by Dennis Potter who wrote "The Singing Detective." I don't know if I'd call it a great movie, but it's curious, weird, eccentric, all those things we either love or hate about Roeg...
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Huw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 08:29 am:   

Is that the one that starts with Oldman yelling "mother!"? It rings a bell...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 08:33 am:   

I haven't seen it in a long while, but I think so. Theresa Russell plays a woman who's married to a guy who's deep into electric trains...
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 08:34 am:   

Has Roeg's INSIGNIFICANCE ever come out on DVD? Just watched BAD TIMING and found it just OK.

Defamer.com has called Mirren "its favorite DILF [MILF with D standing for "Dame"]. The Los Angeles magazine cover she did featured beaucoups de cleavage...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 09:23 am:   

I don't know about Insignificance.

Defamer ets one right. Did I mention that she's slated to play the love interest in a script a friend wrote about the Oscar Bonavena-Mustang Ranch murder?
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 09:32 am:   

You mentioned the movie; I don't think you mentioned Dame Helen...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 09:35 am:   

Yeah, her husband, Taylor Hackford, is supposed to direct.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:56 pm:   

I've only seen – and loved – Roeg's DON'T LOOK NOW. What do you guys consider Roeg's other key films?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:09 pm:   

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0484881/

Roeg's new one with SUtherland, Miranda Richardson, and Rita Tushingham sounds interesting. Otherwise, for me it's Performance, Insignifance, Track 29. I didn't care much for Walkabout and The Man Who Fell To Earth was kinda interesting, but not all there somehow...though it's worth a look. He's got a really odd resume.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:10 pm:   

Aside from Don't Look Now, which is great...
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:13 pm:   

Anybody see Eureka? Wasnt that one of his?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:16 pm:   

I don't know -- haven't seen it.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:21 pm:   

Thanks Lucius. That helps – especially since PERFORMANCE just was released today.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:26 pm:   

Most of Roeg's flicks are flawed, so be prepared. :-)
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:34 pm:   

I grew up on Hollywood 80s films – I can handle flawed. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:40 pm:   

How about deeply flawed? :-)

Cool.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 05:58 pm:   

I loved WALKABOUT when it first came out...Might have had something to do with it featuring a naked Jenny Agutter. I haven't seen it in years. I watched TRACK 29 right after seeing THE SINGING DETECTIVE, and wasn't too pleased with it, but yeah...it's odd and obsessive in that Potterian way.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 06:01 pm:   

I don't generally like movies about lost children, though lately I have like some -- but Walkabout didn't strike me as being anything special.
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 07:52 pm:   

Yeah, Eureka was a Roeg film with Gene Hackman as a prospector who hits it big. I think Rutger Hauer was in that too.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 08:11 pm:   

Watched L'avventura, Antonioni's early masterpiece,the first of a trilogy of films about the idle rich, their alienation and spiritual exhaustion--it still holds up remarkably well after almost fifty years. Incredible B&W cinematography, every frame a work of art. It's slower than slow, but mesmerizing, atmospheric. It begins with a young woman gone missing, the classic mystery set up, but Antonioni takes the narrative in unexpected directions. I've watched the trilogy (La Notte, L'eclisse) backwards, also The Passenger and Blow-up, over the past couple of months, and these movies just continue to blow me away...there's a feeling of tremendous depth and grandeur even in desolation that you don't feel in many directors today--only Claire Denis springs immediately to mind as an inheritor of this cinematic tradition. Anyway, I used to like L'avventura best of all Antonioni's films--now maybe I like the Passenger better, but it's really splitting hairs.

It's too bad that Zabrsikie Point basically short-circuited A's career, making it hard for him to raise money. He might have gone back to Italy and made great movies...he wasn't the first foreign director ruined by Hwood, but he was one of the greatest.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 08:13 pm:   

Mickey Rourke was in Eureka and oddly enough I was watching an interview with him on the Angel Heart DVD.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 09:44 pm:   

Yeah, Antonioni is good. Ever seen Il Deserto rosso (Red Desert)? It is set against a strange industrial backdrop...probably somewhere in Northern Italy.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 10:08 pm:   

Yep. Seen almost all his work up through Zabriskie Pt. Pretty great.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 10:51 pm:   

The Rosi film I saw the other day reminded me a bit of Antonioni. Of the latter's films, I think L'avventura is the one that stands out the most though. I think the reason is that he sets you up for a mystery and then, about twenty minutes into the film, completely abandons that plot line without any explanation....The exact opposite of Hollywood film-makers who for the most part feel like they need to explain everything and have films neatly tied together - making the movies very unlike actual life.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 12:32 am:   

I love the whole core mystery of Blow-Up. It's like an entire movie about a shadow in an Edward Gorey drawing. I need to see the others.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 12:36 am:   

Oh...watched Little Miss Sunshine tonight. I liked it, but it was way too pat...like one of those fairy tales where every token introduced early on is met with a conveniently interlocking solution later. The actors made it worthwhile; a lesser cast and it could have been just miserably bad with so many bare bones of contrivance poking through. To unfairly compare "indy" genre movies, I preferred The Squid and The Whale, which at least didn't feel like a Wes Anderson pastiche, and had a lot more unpredictable and real moments.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 03:53 am:   

Movies like Sideways and Little Miss Sunshine piss me off--they're R-rated sitcoms that try to make quirkiness a franchise item. Like Marc says, the casts are charming (though with me, it's funny--I started out thinking Steve Carel was overrated, then swung aroud to his side, and since have swung back to feeling that he's no Ricky Gervais), but there's something so smug and slick about the writing, they put me right off.

Antonioni...what can you say? He's made a handful of utterly great, groundbreaking movies. Even Zabriskie Point has its moments. Its shocking to watch his movies after a long time, shocking to see how good they are and shocking to recognize how the aesthetic of contemporary films has run away from the whole New Wave thing...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 05:19 am:   

I haven't liked Steve Carel in film or The Office. However, he was great on the Daily Show.

I watched Idiocracy. Marc was right, a few funny bits, but it really wasn't good.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 06:41 am:   

I sort of swung around on Carel when the Office came on, but he's not subtle and he just didn't have a long shelf life with me--now I have an aversion to him.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 07:43 am:   

Lucius - Yeah, I watched Sanjuro by Kurosawa the other night and had the same feeling. Basically it was better than anything I had seen for the past 6 months or more - and that is a lot of films.

As for Sideways and Little Miss Sunshine, I can definately see where you are coming from, but as far as comedy goes, they still seem better than the alternative.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 07:55 am:   

I don't know. I think the alternative is a genuinely funny film, like office space, that arises from normal life instead of a contrivance....this type of film is starting to have aspects of a franchise.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 07:57 am:   

Brendan and Lucius: If you don't mind going back a couple conversations, to Italian crime film. If you were trying to sell a novice on this genre, what two or three pictures would you recommend to them?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 08:39 am:   

I've got to let Brendan take the lead on this, but Milano Calibro Nine is a terrific film, with a great villain, and the movie B recommended to me and I ordered is supposed to be Umberto Lenzi's best film, which is a good recommendation in itself. It's called Almost Human. I really haven't delved deeply into this genre, and its clear that Brendan has seen many more than I.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 08:41 am:   

I will say that I think the Italian Crime film is a far deeper genre as far as good films go than the Sphagetti Western.

There's a modern day crime film I recommended manythreads back -- I'll have to look for it.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:03 am:   

Lucius, actually, as perverted as this might sound, I found Sideways to be more funny than Office Spaces. Maybe it is because I partially grew up in California and am familiar with the scene....

Kelly, as far as Italian films go, a good place to start is probably Milano calibro 9.

After that, here are a few others in no particular order:

Tony Arzenta

La Banda del gobbo (Brothers Till We Die)

Il Boss

Cani arrabbiati (Rabbid Dogs)

Banditi a Milano

Non si sevizia un paperino (Don't Torture a Duckling)

Milano odia: la polizia non può sparare (Almost Human)

Roma violenta

La Banda del gobbo I personally love, but I wouldn't watch it unless you can get subtitles, as a lot of the charm revolves around Tomas Milian's voice and the funny things he says in Italian - which are untranslatable. Non si sevizia un paperino is more of a giallo than a cop flick, but I think it is cool. Rabbid dogs is a sadistic road flick. Il Boss is a classic Mafia film as is Tony Arzenta, the latter starring Alain Delon and both having Richard Conte. Roma violenta is the weakest of the above named, but it is a very typical sort of "nasty cop" film, featuring the wooden Franco Nero look-alike Maurizio Merli. As I recall there are some good car chases though (as only the Italians can do)and some rather brutal violence.

There are probably about 70 or 80 more that are definately worth seeing, but these you might actually be able to get hold of as I think they are sort of famous.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:06 am:   

Lucius, yes, I'll be interested to hear what you think of Almost Human.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:10 am:   

Speaking of westerns, has anyone seen anything by Sergio Corbucci? I think some of those are pretty good. Also there are some others like Run Man Run, O'Cangaçeiro and Tepepa that have a strong social message...sort of.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:23 am:   

I saw Tepepa a long time ago, and don't recall it clearly -- plus I think I saw the US version, which is much shorter.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:32 am:   

Thanks Brendan. That's more than enough for me to get started.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:38 am:   

Yes - there is an English version that is like 40 mins, which I haven't seen. But cutting that much out of a film surely ruins it.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:40 am:   

Didn't Corbucci do The Great Silence, with Klaus Kinski and scored by Morricone? That's pretty great, if I'm remembering correctly.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:48 am:   

It's funny, Brendan, none of those three westerns as listed on IMDB have Corbucci as the director. One is by Giovanni somebody, one by Solima, and another by Gino something -- I should have written them down. Are those pseudonyms?

The Great Silence is my favorite SW.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:57 am:   

I saw "The Great Silence" by Sergio Corbucci. It was good.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 10:09 am:   

Lucius - Ah, sorry. Those were the "non-Corbucci" westerns. I think I wrote that too fast.

The Great Silence is Corbucci. His other good ones are Vamos a matar Companeros and Django. There is also one called Il Bianco, il giallo e il nero...but it is a comedy and really only for die-hard Milian fans (he plays a Japanese guy).
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 10:11 am:   

oops, forgot to mention Il Mercenario in which Jack Palance is a weed smoking badie.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 10:18 am:   

I got to have Il Mercenario. :-) Palance was a notorious Hollywood pothead!
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 10:24 am:   

No DVD, and the one that was out is said to be bad. I bought a cheap VHS tape--we'll see how that works out...
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 11:18 am:   

Well, if it is cheap, that is a plus. Even if it is in English it should be ok, as 2 of the principal actors are Americans, i.e. Tony Musante and Palance. I seem to recall also that in the Italian Franco Nero's mouth is moving in an English speaking manner....Actually almost all SWesterns were done where the Italian and Spanish actors mouthed the English words so they could be dubbed in English.

And maybe Palance is smoking the real stuff?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 11:48 am:   

Yeah, maybe... :-) He and Mitchum used to drug it up together, so it weren't no stranger to him.
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 12:20 pm:   

You had to talk SW. I've been lurking here for some time, but I had to register. I'm lost.
Corbucci's best is "The Great Silence", of course, but "Il Mercenario" and "Companeros" are excellent, too. "Il Mercenario" is unavailable except as a bootleg of the Japanese DVD, but Anchor Bay put out a good Region 1 edition of "Companeros" -- go for it.
"Run, Man, Run" was directed by Sergio Sollima, but the Blue Underground DVD seems to be OP. His other SWs are "The Big Gundown" (go for the Franco Cleef DVD-R) and "Face to Face" (don't know about the American DVDs, sorry -- I bought the French and German releases).
Most of these are available from Xploited Cinema. If you can read Region 2 DVDs, the German ones from Koch Media are stunning.
Jean-Daniel (Lucius' French translator)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 12:51 pm:   

I wondered if you could resist this thread, Jean-Daniel. :-) Thanks for the info.
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 01:21 pm:   

I keep exploring the field and coming up with weird movies. Latest ones are a SW reworking of Don Juan and a beckettesque one which could have been titled "Waiting for Django". I kid thee not.
Thanks, Brendan, for that Italian Crime recommended viewing list.
One of my dealer is Trash Palace, which I think needs no introduction to you connoisseurs out there.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 01:30 pm:   

Maybe if Beckett had witten Waiting for Django he'd have been more fulfilled... ;)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 01:35 pm:   

Ohm yeah...I notice that Trash Palace has another Palance SW, God's Gun...
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 01:45 pm:   

Hi Jean Daniel - Yes, it sort of sucks that so many good films are hard to find.

I watched a Mitchum film last night, The Enemy Below. Mitchum might not have been a great actor, but I sort of like him.

Another very fun SW is Requiescant, starring the ultra cool Lou Castel and has Pasolini too.

If you want weird though, go for O'Cangaçeiro. It is set somewhere in South America and has Milian sporting an afro and a machete and leading a band of rebels against the government.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 06:48 pm:   

Mitchum was awesome--Track of the Cat, Cape Fear, Night of the Hunter, the Marlowe films, his noir stuff. He was a great regional actor--he played the hell out of southern roles, better than any leading man before or since. If they had him playing Rhett Butler, GWTW would have been a better film.


Cant find O Cangaceiro...
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 09:45 pm:   

"God's Gun" is not very good. "O Cangaceiro" is on my want list, but very hard to find indeed. And if you like weird Lou Castel movies, go for "Matalo!"
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 10:40 pm:   

Thanks, Jean-Daniel. I'll check for Matalo. I think I'm going to go for that four disc Sergio Sollima set...
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 11:15 pm:   

Yeah, Night of the Hunter is one of the best films...He is truly scary in that.

I have Matalo, but the version I have is defective so it has a weird fuzziness and I can't manage to sit through it - but from what I can see it is interesting.

O'Cangaçeiro is pretty readily available in Italian but maybe there isn't even an English version. Who knows.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 11:26 pm:   

He's pretty damn scary in Cape Fear, too. The man might not have been a great actor, but he was a legit movie star...
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 11:27 pm:   

Lost tonight had some of the old magic. Clever use of the flashback formula, a couple twists, and strong indications that they're moving back to address the core mysteries (they as much as state this in the previews) instead of just action.
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 02:54 am:   

Funny thing about the Koch Media products: it seems the English subs are (sometimes shaky) translations of the German dialogues, which makes for some weird lines. In one movie, the Tomas Milian character refers to the Virgin of Guadalupe, and the subs says "the Virgin of Kuala Lumpur".
Also from Koch Media (in Italian with English subs), and sold by Xploited: the Django Box features two flamboyant outings starring Gianni Garko, plus one minor effort with John Richardson, the Hallelujah box has two very funny movies directed by Anthony Ascott (Giuliano Carnimeo), plus a weird revenge story starring Peter Lee Lawrence.
But the two most sublime offerings of them all are Ferdinando Baldi's "Blindman" (with an English track) and Enzo Castellari's "Johnny Hamlet" (Italian with English subs).
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 03:13 am:   

Yeah, Blindman is pretty funny. The only thing I really don't like about the film is Ringo Star who really could not act. It is still a classic - a western ripoff of Zatoichi.

I am trying to figure out if I've seen this Hamlet film you are mentioning... I definately have one where the film begins with him playing Hamlet in a town, holding a skull and saying to be and not to be and so forth....And later he disguises himself as a priest, then an old man etc. But I am not sure if this is the same film. Maybe it is different.
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 04:35 am:   

Brendan, this movie that begins with the Hamlet monologue is "A Man Called Apocalypse Joe", starring Anthony Steffen. This first scene is impressive, though soundless (why, I don't know).
The Castellari movie stars Andrea Giordana, Gilbert Roland and Horst Frank.
Believe ir or not, there is another Hamlet-inspired spaghetti western, "Dust in the Sun", written and directed by Richard Balducci (a--shudder--master of the French farce); it's rumored to be very bad.
Spaghetti writers were good when it came to plot recycling: Phedra, Electra and other Greek tragedies, Shakespeare, Don Juan. The mind reels.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 05:45 am:   

Last night's Lost was the first interesting episode this season. It was Desmond's flashback, but it wasn't really a flashback. He was reliving his life before he got to the island, but with the memories from the island. It was probably just in his head, but perhaps not. At the end, he explains that he still gets flashes of things that will happen.

It touches on the ideas of pre-determination. If somebody is going to die, the person can only be saved for a limited time. Saving him one day will lead to another cause of death the next day. Desmond is trying to save Charlie, twice averting his death, but he's sure that something else will kill Charlie soon no matter what he does.

I doubt they'll keep things interesting, but it was nice to have an episode that was different.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 07:16 am:   

"...something else will kill Charlie soon..."

His contract's up? :-)

Didn't watch last night. Watched two guys pounding each other in the UFC. Oh, well.


Re SW, I never related to the overtly humorous films in the genre, but inadvertant or not, you gotta love the Virgin of Kuala Lumpur. Sounds like an alternate history title. I also like the conceit of using boomerangs in a Westerm as in Matalo. Wasn't this done in an older American western, too?

Anyway, ordered the Sollima box...
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 07:59 am:   

One good episode in...how many lame ones? You guys...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 08:12 am:   

Lame ones...7 this season. Despite saying Charlie will die, I don't think he will. The premonitions will be used to show there is no predetermination.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 08:27 am:   

1 out of 8 ain't bad for American TV, but it's pretty crappy. And I bet you're right about the predetermination. Presbyterians used to call that predestination. ;)

Let the know if the Foot comes back, okay?
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 08:48 am:   

I'll let you know. I don't expect a return this season.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 09:45 am:   

Since I bashed The Departed here a while back, I gotta say, I was wrong about this film. While watching it on DVD the othe night, I stopped comparing it to Infernal Affairs and appreciated it for what it is: a black comedy about post 9/11 Americans, particularly, white men. Machismo, racism, misogyny, uber-patriotism, the American dream – it's all mocked. I know I'm not changing any opinions here, but since I contributed to bringing down Scorsese's film here in the past, I thought it right to admit that I've had a change of heart about it.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 09:53 am:   

I don't know, man. Just because it's politically correct doesn't make it a good film, and doesn't change the quality of the performances. Maybe I'll watch it again.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:07 am:   

When I saw it in the theater – approaching it like a serious policier – I had a lot of problems with the performances, too. Now – watching it as a farce – the over-the-top across-the-board acting works well for me. Of course, maybe I'm just trying to justify liking a bad movie?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 10:11 am:   

Like I said, I'll watch it again and see what I think. If it's a farce (in the genre sense of the word), I still may not like it--I don't dig farce. I'll rent it from Netflix.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 02:22 pm:   

Lucius - You should enjoy the Sollima set. The opening credits alone of his films are practically worth as much as the films themselves.

Jean, yeah, .... Anthony Steffen ... That is a guy who was in some bad films. I'll have to track down the Castellari. I've seen some films by him and they are good, Keoma, La Polizia incrimina la legge assolve, Vado, l'ammazzo e torno. This last one (I go, I kill and I return) I recall as being cool in a low-budget sort of way.
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 05:09 pm:   

kelly, i'm just going to go with you justifying why you like a bad movie :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 05:14 pm:   

:-)

Brendan, can't wait!
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 07:18 pm:   

I'd like to second Dave's recommendation for My Little Eye, a terrific low budget horror flick based on a reality show that gets five people, strangers, to live in house for six months--if no one leaves, the collect a million bucks. Good little thriller.
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2007 - 11:02 pm:   

Brendan, that Castellari movie is "Any Gun Can Play". There is a so-so American Zone 0 DVD from VCI Entertainment. Great fun.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 12:19 am:   

A couple other interesting SW:

I Giorni dell'ira (Van Cleef and Gemma)

Ci risiamo, vero Provvidenza (a comedy, which is not a plus, but it is so bizzare that it is interesting - Tomas Milian playing his Provvidenza character, which is basically Charlie Chaplin turned bounty hunter)

Tempo di massacro (Franco Nero and George Hilton kill a lot of people)
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 06:50 am:   

Provvidenza: definitely a guilty pleasure. Try Tresette, too.
I giorni dell'ira (dir. Tonino Valerii) and Tempo di massacro (dir. Lucio Fulci) are part of the "family drama" vein of SW: dark secrets, shaky father/son relationships, blood and death galore. Very Mediterranean stuff.
We haven't mentioned so-called "political" SW like Quien sabe?, Tepepa, and--maybe the weirdest of all--Requiescant. This one has everything: an orphan whose entire people has been slaughtered, a decadent Southern landowner, a woman thrown into a padded cell, torture scenes, frying pan fu (to quote Joe Bob Briggs) and... Pier Paolo Pasolini as the revolutionary padre.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 07:38 am:   

I'd really like to get my hands on Requiescant. Any suggestions?
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 07:58 am:   

Oops! Misspelled it on xploited search.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 08:16 am:   

ummm. I only have the Italian Requiescant. I think it is a great film, but I don't even remember torture scenes. Maybe he was whipped? For me the reason the film is good is because of the story-line and Lou Castel who is a very interesting gun slinger - as he certainly doesn't look the part - and that he prays over the guys after he kills them. The level of violence/weirdness I wouldn't put too high. For that you probably have to go with something like The Four of the Apocolypse - which is a truly lousy film, but is blessed with one of the most sadistic characters I personally have ever seen in films (once again played by Milian).
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 08:29 am:   

I see that ebay has it for 18 bucks though.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 09:00 am:   

Thanks, Brendan.
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jk
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 10:05 am:   

I really liked the early 70's Italian movie Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion. A corrupt police chief murders someone and flaunts it in front of his clueless colleagues, who can't guess he did it. Great movie, with a cool Morricone score.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 10:35 am:   

I'll definitely check 'er out. Thanks, JK.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 10:40 am:   

Indagine su un cittadino al di sopra di ogni sospetto...Yeah, I've got it but haven't watched it yet. Petri, the director, seems very cool...He did a lot of work with Volontè and Mastroianni.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 09:13 pm:   

Finally got to see Milano Calibro 9, I've had the soundtrack for maybe 15 years. Seems there's some stuff on the album, that's not in the movie, and I noticed a New Trolls piece in the movie that's on a different album. Anyway I loved the way it turned everything on its head in the end. Anyone know if the two movies that are supposedly part of a trilogy are any good?
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 09:30 pm:   

Nope, never seen 'em.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 09:36 pm:   

Can't find investigation of a citizen above suspicion on DVD? Any ideas?
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Friday, February 16, 2007 - 11:24 pm:   

What films are supposed to be part of a trilogy?

I googled Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion and it said Netflix has it......
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 04:28 am:   

Just watched a really bad film called Django il bastardo - Strangers Gundown - dubbed in English. A really low budget affair with the cameraman working overtime to try and instil some life into the wooden Anthony Steffens and gunfights happening on average of about one every three minutes.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 06:26 am:   

Netflix doesn't have it -- they have it listed as a Save, in other words, if it ever comes out on DVD, they'll send it to you.
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jk
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 10:37 am:   

Doesn't look like Investigation of a Citizen is available on dvd. Unless there is an Italian disc. Looks like there was a British disc that's now deleted. I've been waiting for a region 1 forever, guess I'll have to keep waiting. Wikipedia states it won an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film and won the Grand Prize at Cannes. Hmm...and they can't put it out on dvd? What a joke. I originally saw it on Bravo about 12 years ago, when they actually used to show good movies once in awhile, instead of the endless parade of crap they now show.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 10:51 am:   

That's a drag, man. Fuck. I remember the movie, but never saw it. Looks like I'm out of luck.
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PM
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 11:00 am:   

Wonder if a rights issue is holding up the DVD release...
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 11:09 am:   

Probably something like that.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 11:18 am:   

It is available in Italian, I would bet also with Spanish subs somewhere or other.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 11:40 am:   

I'll keep trying.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 01:45 pm:   

I saw a very cool film by Lizzani, the guy who did Requiescant, called "San Babila ore 20 un delitto inutile". It is about a group of fascist teenagers who go around terrorising members of the Communist party.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 02:22 pm:   

Another one inacessible... :-)
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 07:00 am:   

Yeah, I almost feel like writing a bunch of subs and releasing them myself.

Here is a link to some SW trailers:

http://www.spaghettiwestern.altervista.org/VIDEO.HTM
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 07:07 am:   

Watched Wilderness...a pretty good formulaic slasher movie set on a British prison island for troubled youth. You learn who the killer is pretty early on. None of the kids seem worth saving, so watching them getting torn apart by killer dogs is kind of fun.

Also watched Koctebel, aka Roads to Koctebel (sp?), another Russian father and son road movie. The kid (he's unnamed) and his dad travel by foot and freight from Moscow to Crimea, to start a new life. The kid dreams of a life by the sea,the father is distracted from his goal by drink and women...It's been compared to Tarkovsky, and the comparison is apt as to the picture's flaws -- the directors fall in love with far too many of their shots. Not as good as the Return, but still a interesting film with strong performances...
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 11:08 am:   

Good stuff coming from Criterion in May, for those of us who don't own overseas' discs of these titles: Army of Shadows, Vengeance is Mine, and Sansho the Bailiff.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 11:33 am:   

It's cheaper to get the overseas discs, probably. I've got two of them, so I'm gonna pass. Though I'd buy a Criterion disc if they did Investigation of a Citizen....
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 08:06 am:   

Lucius: Actually, I find that buying Criterions from deepdiscountdvd, which offers them from $20 to $27, is cheaper than buying many overseas' discs. Not always, but most of the time, especially when considering the crappy exchange rate of late. I've also never liked the fact that PAL discs are sped up, so I consider the Criterion NTSC editions to be the best, most accurate versions of a movie on DVD.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 08:16 am:   

Well, that is cheap. but as you know, I'm not a stickler for technical purity, so I'd rather get 'em early...
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 08:53 am:   

Yeah, I should have remembered...

Incidentally, I watched Eastwood's FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS over the weekend. Absolutely terrible. Like a Hallmark movie-of-the-week treatise on war's affect on soldiers. I've heard good things about IWO JIMA, but after this travesty it'll be awhile before I give it a shot.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:25 am:   

I thought Iwo Jima and Flags were the same film. Stupid me.

On another note, watched on old film last night called "Bring me the head of Alfredo Garcia" but found it dull and pointless.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:34 am:   

I hadn't realized they were different films until recently. I just wasn't paying much attention to Eastwood.

I didn't care for Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:50 am:   

That sucks about ALFREDO GARCIA. I just bought it, after going on a small Peckinpah kick. He's a deeply flawed filimmaker, but there are some great moments of violence and pathos in most of his 60s and early 70s films. I had high expectations for ALFREDO GARCIA.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:57 am:   

Maybe you will like it. I have seen other Peckinpah films I liked. For me it sort of seemed like he was trying to do a modern twist on the SW and drawing a bit from Italian exploitation films. But with the latter, part of the charm is the silliness of them, while Peckinpah, in this film, seems to take himself dead serious. He also clearly has a fascination with Mexico, which is cool, and he does catch some footage which I can relate to. Unfortunately he seems to, in this fim like in the Wild Bunch (is that the right film?), have a slightly cliched bent on the country. I.e. Mariachi music and sleazy looking guys chowing down ravenously on beans.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:58 am:   

But, if violence is what you're looking for, there is plenty of that.

Somehow I guess I found the film sort of mean spirited.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:59 am:   

The Letters movie is supposed to be good, but I'm not buying it. IWO JIMA was so godawful, like all other Eastwoods lately, I don't need to see it. I mean, how good can it be.

If you want to see Warren Oates in a good 70s film, check out the Hired Hand or Cockfighter. Garcia is Peckinpah at his most desultory.
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PM
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:05 am:   

I found AG to be darkly entertaining in parts.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:11 am:   

I have Cockfighter on my to-watch list and am looking forward to it.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:19 am:   

There weren't enough entertaining parts for me.

You should check out the Hired Hand, too, Brendan. Despite the depths to which he's sunk (Ghost Rider), it shows that Peter Fonda had some talent.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:20 am:   

Can anyone believe Ghost Rider took in 45 million last weekend?
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:23 am:   

Just goes to show that most of the moving-going public is made up of fanboys.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:26 am:   

Yeah, but Ghost Rider? It's not even that popular a comic! And take it from me, this is right there with Albert Pyun's Captain America for the title of worst comic book movie ever. In fact, I'd think it wins, because Pyun's was inadvertantly funny. I know you're right, but whoa!
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:38 am:   

Should the Ghost Rider discussion be on the "Not just a sign, but the leading edge of the Apocalypse" thread? That a movie like it could take in such a large amount of money is surely a sign of something.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 10:50 am:   

Yeah, probably. It boggles my mind. It's so bad, so incredibly poorly made...Jesus. I'm having trouble writing a reveiw, because I just don't have the words to describe it.
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PM
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 11:06 am:   

"because I just don't have the words to describe it."

45 million dollars? Let me count the ways...
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 11:10 am:   

Yeah, I like old Peter Fonda.

I was checking out the "Top DVD Rentals" on Rottentomatoes.com and was amazed to see that most of them didn't even have a tomato. I guess this ties in with the Ghost Rider thing in that, to a large extent, people see movies much more based on hype than reviews. I think somehow people must be turned on by the poster with Cage on the back of a motorcycle. Maybe there is some kind of subliminal message in their like in the Howard Johnson's oyster ads.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 11:19 am:   

I'm going to get a hold of the Hired Hand. It does sound cool.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 11:35 am:   

It's very good, an understated, underrated little western.

As for Cage on a motorcycle, well, yeah....he sure looks cool with his dyed hair and his prosthetic grin.. :-)
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 05:23 pm:   

You thought Ghost Rider making 40+ million was the ridiculous movie news of day? Well, I just read that Ron Howard and producer Brian Glazer plan on re-making Michael Haenke's Cache. I kid you not. I can hear the movie-trailer voice now -- "From the Oscar winning duo that brough you the DaVinci Code comes a tantalyzing new thriller..."
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 05:31 pm:   

Jesus Christ! Wehn I read that my brain seized for a minute. Wow. Talk about hubris!
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PM
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 05:45 pm:   

Well I won't be able to die in peace until Brad and Angelina remake Gone With the Wind. Toss in a little Penn and stir in a shot for shot remake by Stone.

And Cage's success guarantees that he'll continue to visit our theaters...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 06:12 pm:   

He's already got three movies in the can. That was guaranteed beforehand.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 06:13 pm:   

And six more scheduled...
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PM
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 06:35 pm:   

I can wait a lifetime.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 07:15 pm:   

...for what?
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PM
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 08:03 pm:   

to avoid watching this sort of Cage film.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 08:32 pm:   

Okay. Wait there. :-)
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jk
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:15 pm:   

Cage is pompous as hell. He was on The Tonight Show promoting Ghost Rider, and Leno was talking about Cage's love of comic books. And Cage says he has other interests too, like "16th century German mysticism." Wow, bet that impressed Leno's audience.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 09:49 pm:   

Cage is an idiot. He probably had to be taught to say 16th Century German mysticism.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 11:26 pm:   

Maybe he really is a mystic. He seems to have philosopher's stone for turning a bad film into gold anyhow.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 - 11:40 pm:   

I think that may have more to do with this being February and there's no competition. Prior to this, he's had a string of losers.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 12:51 am:   

Watched a taut little British whodunit called Amnesia. A TV thing, with TV production values, but still very good.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 05:56 am:   

"Maybe he really is a mystic."

My flaming lips are at war with the mystic...yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 07:46 am:   

While laid up last week, had a chance to screen Lodge Kerrigan's 1993 CLEAN, SHAVEN. Very jarring and creative stuff, particularly an excellent performance by Peter Greene and a great soundtrack by former Hugo Largo bassist Hahn Rowe.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 08:10 am:   

That's a great movie. So is KANE. But Clean, Shaven is an amazing portrait of schizophrenia, though I don't know if that was a performance by Green or just hiim having a bad day. :-)
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 09:14 am:   

So did you like Cache Lucius, just curious? I am sure it has been mentioned somewhere on this thread, but I was probably sleeping.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 09:19 am:   

Oh, yeah! I thought it was terrific. Haeneke's best film. Daniel Autiel is great. One of my favorite movies last year.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 09:22 am:   

The only thing I didn't like about CLEAN was


[spoilers]






in the end how the detective shoots him through the car window but the daughter, sitting right beside the open door, doesn't get hit by any glass.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 09:34 am:   

Ok. And yes, of course a remake is laughable. I liked the film a lot also, but I think many people found it incredibly boring. But I guess Ron could throw in some of that cool Hollywood orchestra music and butter up the script a bit. Why not Cage for the lead? And some anorexic blonde actress for the wife role.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 09:43 am:   

I'm liking Hanks or Willis for the lead. The script...once Howard gets his hands on it, it may end up a comedy set in the old West. The concept of a hack like Howard directing Cache is obscene.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 09:45 am:   

I don't recall that, Dave. It's been a while. Not the sort of movie you want to see often. It;s incredibly uncomfortable.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 09:48 am:   

So we'll have two Haenke remakes on the horizon from Hollywood. Unlike the Howard one, his own FUNNY GAMES remake with Naomi Watts has me intrigued (even though I've never seen his original version).
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 10:05 am:   

Yeah, Hanks is actor who I am really not fond of.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 10:11 am:   

I'm not looking forward to Funny Games. I like Watts, but the fact that she has signed on tells me they're going to fuck with the ending, which renders the entire picture pointless. Plucky Naomi will not be treated as was the European actress in the original.

Hanks...an actor? News to me.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 10:20 am:   

Howard will surely bring in Akiva Goldsman for the script, the man responsible for such works of cinematic genius...Batman & Robin, Lost in Space, A Beautiful Mind, I Robot. I'm sure their remake will have a script just as brilliant as those films. Just thinking about it makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 11:01 am:   

It just keeps getting worse the longer you think about it....
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 11:06 am:   

Hey, Hanks used to be on that TV show in the 70's where he dressed like a woman. It is true that he has gone downhill from there, but...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 11:17 am:   

Bosom Buddies. I admit that was his peak, but....
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 11:24 am:   

Joe vs. The Volcano was his finest role. It was also a preview of his upcoming career: he played a man with limited mental capacity (later redone in Forrest Gump), he suffered from an illness that would kill him (Philadelphia), he had romance with Meg Ryan (Sleepless in Seattle), and he went crazy while stranded in the South Pacific (Castaway).
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 11:33 am:   

I know someone who thinks that about Joe and the Volcano, but I can't recall the picture that well...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 11:47 am:   

It's not worth recalling.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 12:42 pm:   

:-)

Gotcha.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 12:57 pm:   

Another thing that five days of enforced captivity before a TV set has taught me.

D.E.B.S. could very well be the great undiscovered classic of our generation.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 01:16 pm:   

Is that the one with Landau and Queen Latifah?

Did you have a flu?
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 01:23 pm:   

Sprained ankle.

No, this was the one with Jordana Brewster and Devon Aoki, or as I like to call her, future Oscar winner Devon Aoki...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 01:37 pm:   

Haven't had the pleasure. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 02:20 pm:   

A film with teenage schoolgirl secret agents in criminally short skirts and a bitchin' lesbian love subplot could only be eclipsed by a movie full of smokin' thirtyish actresses playing teenage schoolgirl secret agents in criminally short skirts.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 02:25 pm:   

Is that D.E.B.S?
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 03:37 pm:   

Oh Yeah!!!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 04:34 pm:   

Well, I have to check it out sometime, I guess, maybe... :-)
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Jay Todd Steneker
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 10:20 pm:   

I watched Atash a terrific film made by first time director Tawfik Abu Wael. Its a kind of family trajedy with the current Israeli-Palestinian conflict casting a shadow on the events though never directly adressed, with some remarkably beautiful photography to boot too.

Highly recomended
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 10:57 pm:   

Yeah, I saw it a while back, about the old guy who drags his family out of town because he's ashamed of hos daughter (for no reason). Very cool movie and real pretty pictures.
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Rich Patterson
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 12:40 am:   

Was "Atash" the one called "Thirst" in English? If so, I saw it. I agree... beautiful cinematography, but the old guy pissed me off. When he was out with his boy in the forest and they thought they heard soldiers approaching, was he ready to abandon his kid and run away?

If I was forced to re-watch a Tom Hanks flick, it'd be "Money Pit"... :-)
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 04:27 am:   

"Was "Atash" the one called "Thirst" in English?"

Yes.

And of Hanks, LADYKILLERS deserves some special mention.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 05:26 am:   

It's too early to be talking about Hanks...
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 06:37 am:   

Anyone ever seen an Aussie film called THIRST about a "Prisoner"-style colony run by vampires, who "milk" prisoners for blood?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 06:39 am:   

Is that a 70s film? I think I've seen it. I have to admit I liked the Arab thirst better.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 08:27 am:   

Yeah, a 70s film. Used to run once in a dog's age on late-night tv but has vanished w/o a trace.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 08:57 am:   

I've got a copy somewhere in the stacks, I'm pretty sure. If I can find it, you want it?
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 01:13 pm:   

Yes indeedy!!!! Thank 'ee, good sir!
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 01:22 pm:   

I'll take a peek later on today maybe...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 04:50 am:   

Lost...back to normal, not that interesting. I never cared why Jack had tattoos, and finding out Bai Ling gave them to him didn't help. It was really a cliched story.

The foot hasn't returned yet.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 06:06 am:   

Yeah, you guys drew me back and I, too, learned about Jack's sex tour of PhuKet, which looked suspiciously like Hawaii. The worst thing about last nights episode for me was the blond woman who helped Sawyer escape. What is the director saying to her? Don't show any emotion? Never change your expression? Being stoic is one thing, but it's like she's just bored with the procedings. I don't blame her. And now we have another, older blond poised, stoic woman character in the sherrif. They're going to a spinoff -- Island of Poised, Blond, Emotionless Women. Well, they Lost me again. I miss the foot.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 06:20 am:   

The promos also promised 3 major questions would be answered. What happened to the people the Others kidnapped? How did Jack get his tattoos? We got answers to those, and I guess the 3rd question is "Will the show be good again?" We got an answer for that one too. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 06:26 am:   

We learned about the kidnapped people? Must have missed that. Unless, "we made their lives better," is the answer.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 06:35 am:   

I think "we made their lives better" is the only answer we'll get for now. That and seeing them come for Juliet's trial.

I figure they went 1/7 for good episodes, so it will be a while before they do something good again.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 06:51 am:   

So in other words, we know nothing. Yeah, 1 for eight now.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 08:33 am:   

Yeah it looks like we all got suckered back in. Especially after the "three big secrets are revealed" promo spots. I'm still trying to figure out what they were.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 08:47 am:   

We want the foot, we want the foot, we want the foot! :-)
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 09:27 am:   

Looks like we're getting a car next week :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 09:54 am:   

Oh, God. Not me, I ain't getting it, I did my obligatory one episode.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 10:09 am:   

I watched Friday Night Lights before Lost, that's the runaway best new show on TV right now. Never thought I'd like anything like it.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 10:12 am:   

I watched it a couple of times. Not bad. But the book is so much better, one of the best sports books ever, and I just can't get over the disconnect between the two.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 10:18 am:   

I'm coming to it tabula rasa, haven't read the book, didn't see the movie. It gets better every week, last night's was the best hour I've seen on TV this year, Connie Britton was just brilliant.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 10:31 am:   

Well, I don't know. The book is such a tear down of the whole HS athletic system, it's hard for me to relate to all the warm fuzzy stuff in the show.

Maybe I'll give it another try.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 10:43 am:   

Yeah, the warm and fuzzy soap opera-ish sort of stuff in any show is always a bit difficult to deal with. My family is from the south and went through a Southern Baptist phase so I guess a lot of the drama rings true for me.

You've definitely raised my interest in the book for sure. But my to read list is getting worse than my to listen to list and I don't have to tell you how long that is.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 10:54 am:   

Yeah, I know Southern Baptist and I guess that's true...What I miss is the dead honesty of the book. Like with that recent bit about a racist coach -- I didn't buy the resolution.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 11:05 am:   

True that was a bit pat, the tension should still be simmering. It also seems to be hurt a little by the way TV seems to contract actors in a show like that to less than the full run of episodes, meaning certain actors (like the guy who plays Smash) skip episodes. I'm hoping they don't completely drop that thread. It also seems a bit weak to me that the steroids issue seems resolved as well, but my guess is at least that issue will be back.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 11:12 am:   

I don't think they'll drop smash. One of the most poignant and important characters in the book is an elite running back who suffers a knee injury and then, against doctor's advice, plays and is ruined for life. They're setting up Smash to be that guy, I think.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 11:14 am:   

Interesting, and yeah it doesn't seem like it would be Riggins. I like the actress who plays Smash's mother quite a bit, but I think like all these large ensemble cast shows (especially Lost), the dispersion of the various storylines often weakens some of them over time. There's a whole dynamic in Smash's family that hasn't been touched on since the steroids with his sisters.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 11:25 am:   

Smash is sort of the central character in the book. His story eptomizes the essential experience of Permian HS football -- that's the hs in the book. And yeah, what you said about large esembles...Be better if they told their story in bigger chunks and limited the cast, Brit-style.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 11:30 am:   

Life on Mars started again on BBC recently, a series that's going to end after its second season for a total of 16 eps. I admit I find that pretty refreshing, but then again it's a small cast whose leading man has to be around pretty much the whole time. Apparently the Brits have limits on how long their actors are allowed to work in a day, which I believe contributes some to their shorter seasons.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 12:03 pm:   

Still haven't watched it. Too many movies...
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 01:55 pm:   

On tap for this weekend, Seagal Movie O' the Month, FLIGHT OF FURY. Can't wait.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 02:14 pm:   

Jesus, Dave...

I don't know what to say anymore. I mean, I think I lost consciousness during the last Seagal crapfest.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 02:16 pm:   

Well, Lucius, what can I say? True Seagal completism is not for the faint of heart.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 02:17 pm:   

This off Amazon...

Anyone who seeks out a Steven Seagal movie has certain expectations: Bone-crunchingly brutal martial arts action; spiritual or ecological wisdom uttered in Seagal's hoarse monotone; and one long relentless scowl. Flight of Fury fails to deliver on all counts. Seagal plays an ex-military guy who's the only man who can retrieve a stolen stealth fighter. So he goes to Afghanistan, where he teams up with a sexy agent of some kind (Ciera Payton, making her cinematic debut) to shoot a bunch of Afghan mercenaries and fly away. The only plausible explanation for this movie's existence is that Seagal and his producers bought some stock footage of jet fighters and decided to build a story around it. The action scenes are murky, brief, and edited to compensate for Seagal's increasing bulk. The rote dialogue--co-written by Seagal--is recycled from a dozen other action movies. And Seagal can't even muster the energy to frown, let alone scowl. This inert lump of a movie is the latest in a series of clumsy, incompetent, straight-to-video clunkers from Seagal, who is cynically squeezing every dollar he can out of his long-suffering fanbase. --Bret Fetze
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Huw
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 02:21 pm:   

I'm still recovering from his last straight-to-video epic, Attack Force.

Don't do it Dave! Rescue your brain while you can!
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 02:24 pm:   

It's too late... :-(
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 02:33 pm:   

"Bret Fetze"? I eructate on Bret Fetze!
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 02:43 pm:   

You think that's eructating? Wait'll this weekend.
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PM
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 04:22 pm:   

"True Seagal completism is not for the faint of heart."

It's a psychological condition :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 04:57 pm:   

Sadly, untreatable...
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 07:23 am:   

Saw the Lives of Others. Despite all the great reviews, I'm not sold on it. Its about East Germany, the DDR, and does an outstanding job of depicting the Orwellian police state and Florian Von Henkel Donnersmark is a fine new director, but I had a problem with his movie. The story concerns Weisler, a Stasi officer, who is ordered by a powerful minister to spy on a playwright and his, Georg Dreyman and his mistress and leading lady, Christa. Weisler is like a priest, like a Jesuit, a true believer in his job, his party, in the state. His surveillance begins on the playwrights 40th birthday, with Weisler in an upstairs windowless room, with a floor plan of the apartment below. Donnersmark seems to be exploring the notion that in the DDR this was the beginning of reality TV; correspondingly, the fattest files were those belonging to writers, artists, actors, etc. Weisler becomes involved with his subjects lives, intersted in them, absored by them, and when he discovers that he is carrying out the inverstigation because the minister has the hots for Christa, he begins to sympathize with them and contrives to let Dreyman know that the minister has designs on Christa. That's just the start of what is a compelling thriller -- but not a great movie. As weisler's sympathies turn, the movie banks and descends into a mushy humanism. He sheds a tear when Dreyman plays the piano after the death of his mentor, he seeks out books of poetry, and so forth. This change is not wrong per se, but the shift in the movie it presages is IMO ill-considered. Donnersmark seems preocuppied with getting things to work out right, and he almost does, but this gives his film a melodramatic resolution it did not need. In sum, well worth your two hours plus. Despite this major flaw, it's got great acting and great writing for the most part. This could be the beginning of a brilliant career for Donnersmark or another commercial disaster
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:05 am:   

How much did Dr. Pepper (who owns the brand? Pepsico or Coke?) have to pay the makers of THE NUMBER 23 for what is perhaps the most sophisticated product placement in film history?

Think about it. The makers of Dr. Pepper begin a new ad campaign, stressing the soft drink's 23 ingredients and riffing on the number 23 (announcer on television: "So at the end of the 23rd quarter, the score is tied 23-23"; dude draws number 23 on diner plate with peas) just before the ad blitz for the new Jim Carrey vehicle. And last night on NBC, a Dr. Pepper ad and an ad for the movie aired back-to-back on NBC.

Is it possible the whole concept of the movie could have been cooked up as a soft-drink tie-in? Could this signal an alarming new trend in cinema?
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:09 am:   

Dave, the 23 synchronicity thing dates back to William Burroughs and was popularized by Robert Anton Wilson through the Illuminatus Trilogy. I've been seeing about 10-15 23s a day since I was 16 years old.

But no, I ain't going to the movie. I don't even like Doctor Pepper.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:09 am:   

Dakota Fanning leaves the tweens and becomes a teen queen today!

Happy maladustment!
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:19 am:   

I thought I was going to the movie, but the reviews make it sound so horrible...It has a lower rating on Rotten Tomatoes than Ghost Writer.

Dave, I hardly think cross-marketing is a new trend, though this seems a bit of an escalation. But it's like Mike said...
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Jean-Daniel Breque
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:20 am:   

"The Number 23" may have a troubled release in France, due to the archbishop of Paris, whose name is Vingt-Trois (Twenty Three).
I kid you not.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:30 am:   

Wow. That is surreal, and boy wouldn't Robert Anton Wilson have loved it. Well, you're probably not missing much, Jean-Daniel.

Wonder where the old slang expression 23 skiddo came from. And how that fits into the overarhing scenario...
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:31 am:   

In 1984, the year of George Orwell's classic view of a totalitarian future, I was 23.

Since 1984, 23 years have elapsed!
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:39 am:   

23 is at 8% on Rotten Tomatoes, Ghost Rider is 27%. My first thought was "How did they find so many people who liked Ghost Rider?" That makes at least 27% of reviewers who have terrible taste (or are easily bribeable).
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:48 am:   

I can't believe GR is better than 23. I think it's a jim carrey backlash or something, because GR is excrable. The worst.

Dave, point taken.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2007 - 08:55 am:   

The one that cracks me up in the movie advertisement is "2 divided by 3 is the number of the devil" or whatever. I think old Bob would have thought the paranoia of the movie to be hilarious. The only thing you can probably say about 23 spotting is it's just a reflection of the way the brain works and what you pay attention to. Synchronicities are just off the map.

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