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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, December 24, 2006 - 07:10 am:   

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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, December 24, 2006 - 07:11 am:   

Jindabyne, Ray Lawrence's (lantana) new flick, is not as complex on one level as Lantana, yet on another tells us more about more people than did that movie. It doesn't feel as weighty, but like the Carver story its drawn from, it resonates long after viewing it. Laura Linney and Gabriel Byrne are married -- Linney has a past of head trouble and is considered unstable. Another, older couple is raising an adoopted daughter with sociopathic tendencies. Another couple is half indigent (maori or other, I don't know), and a fourth couple is young, living in an rv. In the opening of the movie, a young maori (?) woman is stopped on the road by an old man driving a beat-up four-wheeler. She is raped and killed (off-camera), her body hidden in a river accessible only to backpacker. The four men of the four couples go fishing in the river, and one finds the body. They decide to keep fishing, and tether the body to a tree. It's that decision that comprises the heart of the movie, as it becomes known and the town's reaction to it is profound. Lovingly shot and segmented in tight, short chapters, Jindabyne is a very, very good film. Beautifuly narrated and mounted. A couple of things about the ending sounded a wrong note to me, but that may be because I'm not Austrailian. I'm going to watch it again tonight.
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Rich Patterson
Posted on Sunday, December 24, 2006 - 05:53 pm:   

Some question as to translation of the title here, but have you seen a Korean movie called 'Hidden Floor' (or maybe 'Forbidden Floor'). Pretty good movie. A single-mom moves into a building haunted by the ghosts of folks forcibly evicted by renovators three years ago. Seems to pick up where ¡®Sorum¡¯ left off, as the woman moves into the same apt (504) that was haunted in that movie. Perhaps the same building after renovations?
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, December 24, 2006 - 06:03 pm:   

No, I haven't seen it, but I'm interested in a sequel to Sorumi. I'll look for it. It'll have to do til The Host and Still Life come along.
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Rich Patterson
Posted on Sunday, December 24, 2006 - 07:47 pm:   

Hey, I saw 'The Host' yesterday and the clerk at this book store I was in on the weekend showed me a poster for 'Still Life' - due out 12/28. Send me your mailing address and I'll send you all three as soon as...
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, December 24, 2006 - 08:13 pm:   

Done. Thanks a lot, Rich...
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Rich Patterson
Posted on Sunday, December 24, 2006 - 11:16 pm:   

Got it. Merry Christmas
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, December 25, 2006 - 04:16 am:   

Same to you, man.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, December 25, 2006 - 10:21 am:   

on second viewing, I still love Jindabyne. It's a movie that shows its heart more plainly than Lantana, which is both a strength and a weakness, and the characters are less sophisticated, rural working class for the most part. Gabriel Byrne is fantastic as the owner of the local garage, a beer swilling ordinary man who discovers the young woman's body and is profondly affected, yet who also is the one who tethers her to a tree and whose actions inspire the other men to continue on their fishing trip and, subsequently, is unable to articulate fully his reasons for so doing. It's his best role ever. Laura Linney is also great. Her role is somewhat easier, she plays Byrne's wife, an outsider in the bucolic environment. Full of rage that she has given her life to this man and his ordinariness, she sees his act as a personal betrayal. The scene in which she expresses this rage, chewing him out for, among other things, fucking like a robot, is extraordinary filmmaking. I could go on, but suffice it to say, it makes my top ten for '06.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, December 25, 2006 - 03:28 pm:   

I saw Blood Diamond on Saturday. It was pretty much what I expected. It was Hollywood doing an "important" movie, trying to put a face on the situation in Africa. Again Zwick does a movie about another continent where the native people can't do anything on their own, they need a white man to come in and save the day. Last time it was Tom Cruise, now it's Leonardo Di Caprio (who at least looked like an adult this time). They should have done more with Honsou's character, he barely even rose to the level of Di Caprio's sidekick.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, December 25, 2006 - 03:47 pm:   

I was going to drag myself down to the movies and see that -- I'm kinda glad I didn't now. I think I'm gonna hold out til the 29th when the Painted Veil and Pan's Labyrinth open.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 02:34 am:   

cool on JINDABYNE. i reckon i'll track it down--bound to be in video stores at least. about the only flick on at the theatres i'm interested in is BABEL, and even that might be a stretch...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 05:46 am:   

I haven't seen Babel, either. But everyone I know and trust who has seen it has warned me away. Thusfar I've heeded the advice.
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Jeff VanderMeer
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 06:29 am:   

Babel sucked. Every moment was melodrama so nothing was actually dramatic. I felt like saying, "Hey, c'mon. Can we have one or two moments of, I dunno, maybe somebody just going to the store to buy some milk?" There were some nice moments, but in general...blah.

JeffV
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 06:59 am:   

Yeah, that was I've heard. It's Inarritu's weakness and has gotten progressively worse.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 07:49 am:   

Agree on BABEL. It's all the more painful to watch because Inarritu has palpable talent. I mean, the dude can shoot a scene, but with each movie the self-importance becomes more suffocating. BABEL, in simplified terms, is CRASH for the art-house crowd.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 08:01 am:   

I liked 21 Grams for, especially, Naomi Watt's performance, but found the melodrama a bit stifling. Amores Perroes was his best.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 03:30 pm:   

well, there goes my desire to see BABEL, but at least i have my fifteen bucks still. for what it's worth, i liked AMORES PERROES, but i didn't see 21 GRAMS.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 03:34 pm:   

Always good to skip a Brad Pit perf. Use the extra geetus and but Jindabyne.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 05:24 pm:   

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM was predictable and not especially funny. Ricky Gervais gets three brief scenes, Steve Coogan more but briefer, and Ben Stiller does his usual thing. Leagues beyond the last family entertainment I endured (Deck the Halls) but it just made me want to watch Alan Partridge and Extras again. It will be forgotten instantly, unlike IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE, which I watched again. No matter how many times I see it, there's stuff in there that gets me. Especially the bit with the druggist in the beginning.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 06:04 pm:   

i kinda of like brad pitt at times. i don't know how it's happened, but some time round SNATCH, which is not a really good film except for pitt, i began to like him occasionally. he's no longer the turn off in a film he once was for me.

but, you know what, i think you might be right about using the money to find JINDABYNE.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 06:26 pm:   

Well, the best I've ever see Pitt is when he does that Dennis Hopper act he ripped off for 12 Monkeys and a couple of other films. He's pretty much negligible to me.

I prefer A Christmas Carol with Alastair Sims to It's a Wonderful Life. Got a thing about Jimmy Stewart I just can't get over.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 07:57 pm:   

Well that Sims version is awesome, as is the animated Richard Williams version where he reprised the voice of Scrooge in an art style that looked like animated engravings. I guess watching the new Museum movie and Wonderful Life back to back, I appreciated how unformulaic the movie is, and how much of a purely cinematic but personal vision comes through, which is why it lasts and the other will be forgotten. I've got no problem with Jimmy Stewart personally. The guy who can do Vertigo, Winchester '73 (and all those other dark Westerns), and It's a Wonderful Life...no problem with Stewart at all. I think it's generational, though. When I was a kid I thought he was lame. Then again, when I was a kid I loved Danny Kaye, who seems more and more like the Robin Williams of my parents' generation.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 08:02 pm:   

Alastair Sims is awesome. Period.

As for Stewart, he basically ruined for me almost every movie he was in -- I just didn't like him, except in light comedies when he was older.
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Jeffrey Ford
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 08:16 pm:   

Sim is great, but let's not forget the Mr. Magoo Christmas Carol. Magoo has real acting chops and what pathos he wrings from the musical numbers -- "Razzleberry Dressing" and "I'm All Alone in the World." Magoo can play both Scrooge and Robin Hood -- you name it.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 08:22 pm:   

Isn't Jim Backus dead. i.e. Magoo is too. But OK, yeah, Magoo's the shit.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 11:44 pm:   

Then Magoo morphs past Thurston Howell into Backus's other immortal creation: "And champagne!" "Mm...delicious."

When you said Stewart ruined movies for you, I thought you were talking about Patrick Stewart in his version of A Christmas Carol, which I would agree with.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 11:45 pm:   

Funny thing was, at the end of It's A Wonderful Life, both my wife and I found we were expecting/hoping to see the famous "Lost Ending" that Dana Carvey enacted on SNL years ago, where the town stormed into Potter's office, threw him out of his wheelchair and kicked the shit out of him.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 03:35 am:   

Well, yeah, Patrick Stewart too. Classic error of mistaking an accent for an actor.

There's nothing to really disagree or agree with. I just don't like JS. That Gosh whillikers, Aw gee spectrum of expressions, that orotund, spit-swallowing voice -- it just don't do it for me.
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Huw
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 04:22 am:   

I feel the same way about James Stewart - give me Gregory Peck any day.

I think George C. Scott played Scrooge well in the '80s version of A Christmas Carol.

Saw The Host (again) and Pan's Labyrinth over Christmas: both good, fun movies.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 04:41 am:   

Give me George C Scott or James Cagney over both Peck and Steward. But yeah, Peck found a couple of roles that suited his rather wooden style and did good. And he had that "dark brown voice."

Still waiting for the Host and Labyrinth.
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Huw
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 06:19 am:   

I enjoyed The Host, but more so the first time, I think, because I had no real expectations that it would be a terrific movie (which I don't think it is, to be honest: it's pretty good, and certainly fun, but not great), nor did I expect the frequent lapses into comedy, which I'm still not wholly convinced were a great idea. Still, better than the vast majority of Hollywood crap that's being churned out lately.

Pan's Labyrinth is a lovely movie - I wish Del Toro would make more like this instead of the likes of Blade 2 and Hellboy (which I thought were okay, to be fair). I wonder how many moviegoers were put off this film because of the subtitles... their loss.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 07:15 am:   

I never thought that the words "Ben Stiller" and "special effects comedy" could be used in the same sentence without triggering massive panic from coast to coast. Maybe it's better than the trailers looked, but, gawd, it looked awful. Ben Stiller + Robin Williams + a monkey. The end of life as we know it. I still think Stiller is this decade's Pauly Shore.

I saw the most blood-curdling, terrifying horror film of the year in my hotel over the helliday. It was called JESUS CAMP. I could not believe that cameras were allowed to film innocent children undergoing ritual abuse and brainwashing by nutty evangelicals. Truly frightening, sick-making and infuriating in a way that no slasher film could ever be.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 07:38 am:   

Stiller can act a little, but yeah, your point is well taken. Heard about Jesus Camp but haven't seen it, because I grew up among those people and don't really want to have to watch them more than I already have...
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ben peek
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 02:12 pm:   

what was that about the muppets earlier on? i liked MUPPET TREASURE ISLAND more than the xmas one, though the latter had michael caine. but yeah, the muppets--all cool :-)

i never understood the attraction to IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE, or jimmy stewart. both of them were a little too much for me.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 02:16 pm:   

I think any film that gets the overkill treatment that LIFE, A CHRISTMAS STORY and MIRACLE ON 34TH ST. get at holiday time would become a little much after a while...
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 02:46 pm:   

Muppets -- Bah, humbug!

:-)

Yeah, the old chestnuts sorta bite, but I can still do Sims in A Cristmas Carol.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 03:51 pm:   

Last Muppets ep I saw, years ago, I was dosed. One of the funniest things I've ever seen. :D Would never ruin the memory by watching it again.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 04:05 pm:   

Those two muppets in the balcony presaged indie rock criticism by 20 years or so. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 04:14 pm:   

True.

They weren't quite as sharp as the MST robots.
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ben peek
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 09:30 pm:   

i think i'm happy i live in sydney. those xmas movies like A CHRISTMAS CAROL and MIRACLE... and others you mentioned don't get played here much. happiness.

i always loved those two muppets in the balcony :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 09:36 pm:   

A Christmas Carol with Alastair Sim is great. The rest are, IMO, le crap.

I hate muppets, children under three feet tall, kittens, all things small and cute. :-)
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jk
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 10:19 pm:   

Lucius, have you seen Satantango, Bela Tarr's seven hour long film spread across three discs?
I can't imagine anyone having the stamina to sit through seven hours of one of his films.
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 10:51 pm:   

Or hating kittens.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 11:20 pm:   

I should probably go waaaaaaaaaaaaay over to another thread to say this, but I watched Talladega Nights and found it funny. I didn't like Anchorman at all, and I've had about enough of Will Ferrell at the movies, but there were a few insane moments in this one that had me laughing hard. John C. Reilly, Sasha Baron Cohen, Andy Richter...it's not completely dependent on Ferrell. (For that matter, the best thing in Anchorman was Steve Carell.)
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PM
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 12:50 am:   

Comedy has become a big black blot for me.
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 02:07 am:   

yeah, i never much liked kittens or small kids, either. until they can play video games, they're not real interesting ;)
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 05:11 am:   

Marc, I agree about Anchorman. Carell was the best thing in the movie. I never found Ferrell funny. Ben Stiller was funny when he had a TV show, but I haven't liked him since then.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:21 am:   

JK, I watched a couple of Bela Tarr movies, Wreckmierster Harmonies and another, and that was plenty for me.

Marc. Terry Bisson told me Talladega Nights was funny, but I loathe Ferrell so much, I haven't watched it yet.

Ben...exactly. It's good to be able to communicate with kids, to say things like, Go into the bedroom and bring me mommy's wallet, and have them understand. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:43 am:   

I normally agree that Carell is our best comic actor (see LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE if you haven't already -- Alan Arkin is terrific), but I thought the weatherman character in ANCHORMAN was badly written. I thought TALLADEGA NIGHTS had a few moments, but how much mileage can you get out of the conceit that NASCAR drivers are dumb, speed-obsessed rubes? What next? A mob comedy called "Whatsamattayou?"

Best Carell moments: His old "Produce Pete" skits on The Daily Show.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:46 am:   

They've already done a hundred mob comedies.

Carell's our best comic? Jesus, have we fallen that far?
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 08:09 am:   

Okay, how about "our best American commercially-successful mainstream comic actor"?

As far as "best" globally, I still like Lee Evans, although God knows when he'll be allowed to demonstrate his talents again.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 08:15 am:   

Lee Evans is truly amazing. Don't get me wrong. I like Carell. I just don't think he's astonishly gifted.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 08:26 am:   

Search youtube for "waiters nauseated by food" from the old Dana Carvey show. Carell and Colbert are the actors in it.

I think the writing in Talladega is superior to Anchorman. There are some great lines. The whole thing had a KINGPIN vibe...my favorite F.Bros movie, with the air of something despicable yet lovable at the same time.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 08:29 am:   

Right now, Steve Coogan is my favorite "comic" on the global scale, on the strength of the back-to-back character creations of Alan Partridge and Tommy Saxondale. I can't recommend Saxondale highly enough.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 08:51 am:   

Kingpin was, indeed, a funny movie. My favorite Farrelly as well, but I think I've watched it too many times.

I don't know Coogan.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 08:59 am:   

Coogan is awesome. Yes, Lucius, you know him. He was Tony Wilson in 24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE. He was terrific in the otherwise-spotty COFFEE AND CIGARETTES. BBC America has been running I'm Alan Partridge and, yeah, it's pretty gut-busting stuff. Haven't seen SAXONDALE.

I wouldn't put Coogan quite in the same league with Evans, but he's good.

His career took a battering from the flop of AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS, though, didn't it?

The irony of his C&C skit was that he was supposed to be the hot young wunderkind and Alfred Molina was supposed to be the has-been. Then, 80 DAYS tanked and Molina had Fiddler on the Roof and SPIDERMAN 2.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 09:04 am:   

Lucius, how does Lawrence's treatment in JINDABYNE compare with Robert Altman's handling of the same material in SHORT CUTS?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 09:18 am:   

Oh, yeah. He's a funny guy. I remember C&C and Tony Wilson. I'll look for Alan Partridge.

Dave, I think Jindabyne serves Carver better. Short Cuts had brilliant moments, but three hours of Carver and Altman was at least an hour too much, and I found it became tedious. Lawrence has opened up the materials of the short story, added a lyrical Autralian gloss, and done, overall, a wonderful job of illuminating the characters. There is a flatness of treatment of the characters in Short Cuts -- perhaps that was Altman's perception of middle class America from his vantage (not a middle class vantage), but I never thought of Carver's characters that way. I feel that Altman looked down on them and I didn;t get that with Lawrence. It's not a perfect movie. There are some points I'd like to question Ben about after he's seen it. But it's damn good.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 11:17 am:   

Oh...Jindabyne is based on Carver's fishing story...the one that Altman did with Buck Henry. Okay, I'll see it for sure. Carver is awesome.

I read that Slate piece about Children of Men. I'm looking forward to it. I know it's not saying much to say that Cuaron did the best Harry Potter movie by far, and I wasn't a big fan of WatchYu Say About My Mama, but A Little Princess is a great film. And so far he's never come close to doing a movie as shitty as several of Del Toro's. It's too bad that Cuaron picked such a weak piece of dystopian s.f. to base his movie on.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 11:26 am:   

Yeah, Cuaron's okay, and I will see COM, but I'm at best guardedly optimistic.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 12:11 pm:   

Saxondale was showing up on YouTube immediately after the BBC broadcasts, but I believe they were taken down not long after that. Alan Partridge, the first (and best) season, is now out on DVD. Partridge is a great loathsome character. Saxondale is totally lovable. That's why Coogan rules.

Coogan's great performance in Coffee & Cigarettes was the thing that got me going on him.
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Mike McLatchey
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 12:22 pm:   

Alan Partridge is the star of his own talk show or something isn't he? I managed to get a few episodes of it and will have to start checking them out over the weekend (not to mention Saxondale!) Speaking of Brit comedies, I've been really digging Little Britain of late and also watching the show that was the precursor to All in the Family, I think it's called Til Death do Us Part.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 12:39 pm:   

Molina: Can I get your cell number?
Coogan: (after epic squirming) Can I say..."no"...?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 12:40 pm:   

So what's the diff between the I'm Alan Partridge dvd and the Knowing me. Knowing you--the complete series DVD?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 12:45 pm:   

okay, I figured it out.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 01:20 pm:   

Marc: I agree with your thoughts on Cuaron. Though his GREAT EXPECTATIONS, in my book, rivals the worst of del Torro.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 01:41 pm:   

I forgot about Great Expectations. Surely DeNiro's most embarrassing moment and a truly execrable picture. Worse than any of DelToro's. And it starred Ethan Hawke.

I may have told this before. Hawke was in the Seattle area filming Snow Falling On Cedars. I chanced upon him while at the aquarium--he was standing all alone, staring at a large ray. We were for the moment by ourselves. I could easily have stepped up behind him and cracked his head on the glass, thus sparing America and Uma Thurman much suffering. The thought crossed my mind, but I failed the moment. Cause, I feel, for deep regret.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 01:43 pm:   

I think there are some duds in What we talk about when we talk about love, which is why i recommended the selected stories.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 02:57 pm:   

Lucius, more embarrassing than DeNiro's turn as Fearless Leader in ROCKY AND BULLWINKLE?
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 03:00 pm:   

I forgot about GREAT EXPECTATIONS too. I have avoided it successfully. I'll bow to the experts on that one.

Carver wrote a bunch of great horror stories. Yep.
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 03:25 pm:   

i saw GREAT EXPECTATIONS. i was working as a projectionist at the time, so i saw it for free over a couple of shifts. it's not deniro's worse appearance, i reckon. ANALYSE THIS and ANALYSE THAT are worse. how about the joel schumacker film he made, where he plays a racist cop? maybe that was just a crap film, though.

but how about JACKIE BROWN? i suppose he's not bad in it, just hopelessly squandered on a roll with no point.

my vote, for carver collection, btw, is WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT LOVE, cause it has 'why don't you dance?' in it. it's one of my fav carver stories.
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Jeffrey Ford
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 03:38 pm:   

Got a phone call from Lucius a minute ago. He asked me to put a note here that his computer has crapped out, and he doesn't know when it will be back up. You'll see him here when it is.
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PM
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 03:46 pm:   

JACKIE BROWN is mildly amusing at points and yes one has a sense that DeNiro sort of crashed the party. He was the odd man out throughout.

As to Hawke there was GATTACA and perhaps lung cancer down the line.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 03:52 pm:   

I never saw Great Expectations, and have no plans to change that. The South Park version of it was great.
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PM
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 04:39 pm:   

"He asked me to put a note here that his computer has crapped out"

Could it be the kittens? :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 05:25 pm:   

Hey, I liked Jackie Brown. First time in years de Niro has played himself.
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:11 pm:   

hey, lucius, back so fast :-)

i wanted to like JACKIE BROWN. i liked pam grier in it a lot, but i dunno, it just didn't do it for me. maybe if it was half an hour shorter and tighter. but then i like tarantino's other films, so...
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:25 pm:   

Yeah, I thought it was seriously fried, but it was just the power supply.

JB could have been a bit shorter, but so could have Pulp Fiction. They could have lost the Bruce Willis character as far as I'm concerned. I like movies that go slow, and I like Grier and Forster, jackson, Keaton. I liked the ending. Bridget Fonda's greatest role. DeNiro playing himself (he is reputedly a true retard)...

so what's not to like?
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:45 pm:   

yeah, i don't disagree that they could have lost bruce willis in PULP FICTION. i liked the section though, so i wasn't so fussed. i think in JACKIE BROWN i didn't like jackson--certainly i didn't mind the others. but maybe in the end it just didn't work for me. no huge loss, i guess.

i got a copy of JINDABYNE, btw. will attempt to watch it tonight.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:57 pm:   

After you watch it, I have a question for you.
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 06:59 pm:   

cool.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 11:38 pm:   

I just spent some time looking up Lee Evans and watching some of his routines on youtube. Great stuff. I remember him from Mousehunt.
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ben peek
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 03:27 am:   

watched JINDABYNE. i quite liked it, actually. less melodramatic than LANTANA, but still quite intense and beautiful. i especially liked the way that the aboriginal aspect of the film was worked in, though i knew, the moment carmel, the aboriginal girlfriend appeared, that it would be an issue in the film. but still, i think it was worked nicely, and gave the whole thing its climaxes and beats.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 04:09 am:   

Well, that was what I was going to ask about, the aboriginal stuff. That rang true, did it? Okay, that was my only caveat. Yeah, intense and beautiful. That pretty much says it. The movie grows on me the further I get from it. I may wind up liking it more than Lantana.

Marc, Evans is amazing, isn't he?
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ben peek
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 04:56 am:   

yeah, the aboriginal stuff is true. i don't know how accurate the actual funeral is, but given that everything else was doing well, i would imagine that it was as close to the real thing as an aboriginal community would allow to be put into film.

the stuff about showing the body of the dead, and offering a warning on TV, is very true. that reporter is an actual SBS reporter, and it was pretty much word for word how she does it. (i last saw her doing it when they were showing photos of a guy who died in police custody a while back--the cop got off free, which i'm sure shocks you all.) for all the other stuff, i would imagine they went to pretty detailed lengths to get aboriginal advisors in and so forth, so i reckon you could put your faith in it, film wise.

the white/black divide in jindabyne itself might not be that strong, btw, but i've not been there since they took us up as kids, and i certainly didn't pay attention to that stuff then, so i have no idea.

have you got a dvd of THE PROPOSITION, btw? if you flip through the extras in that, there's a doco about making the film, and they have an academic/aboriginal rights activist pearl (i forget her last name), there, making sure that they are respectful to the land and all that. it's interesting to see how much of the land itself becomes important to the culture, but if you don't believe in that stuff, it'd be real frustrating to have to deal with it, i think.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 05:13 am:   

I'll check the Proposition. I sorta thought it rang true. Things aren't that mellow here...trust me!

I'm beginning to think that Lawrence might be capable of taking Autrailian film to another level; I'm really interested in what he does next.
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ben peek
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 04:09 pm:   

yeah, i reckon it's cool. added to that, there was never any backlash against the film for its portrayal of the aboriginal stuff that i can remember of--and it's the kinda thing that would have happened, if it had been way off.

i'll be interested to see what lawrence does next, too. there was a lot in JINDABYNE that suggested he was able to make australian films without giving into the whole local demands side. using people like byrne and linney as the main stars, for example, and taking a script inspired by the carver short story, and then not giving into a sort of 'this is the true australia' kind of thing that happens when most films leave the urban landscape (yet he was still capable of showing all the beauty that's out there). it was really good to see.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 04:16 pm:   

Well, it did it for me, that's for sure. It's like a carver story. It sort of swells in your brain after the fact. I thought Rabbitproof Fence, though not as impressive, did a pretty good job of that not getting into the "true Austrailia" thing.

Maybe next he'll do a Paul Hogan movie. :-)
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ben peek
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 04:31 pm:   

i didn't see RABBITPROOF FENCE. there were a lot of interviews about people crying on set when the aboriginal children were taken away, and how important it was to australia, and so on and so forth. it kinda turned me off it. i support the aboriginal rights and recognition deal--it's really quite important--but that kind of stuff turns me off going and seeing something. like i'm being told what to think before i get there.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 04:53 pm:   

Well, there was no crying over here. :-) It's a decent movie. Very matter of fact. And the Brits aren't painted as nustache twirling villains, just as wrongheaded. You may want to rent it sometime.
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ben peek
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 05:06 pm:   

yeah, maybe. i got a whole culture 'it's good for you so watch it' thing i got to get over first. it's a completely unreasonable thing, i know, but that's how it is sometimes.

:-)
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 05:27 pm:   

I understand. It's just kind of a good movie -- it's not "important" you see it.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 07:21 pm:   

I enjoyed Rabbit Proof Fence, but we didn't have anybody painting it as important. I went expecting a movie about perseverance and music by Peter Gabriel, and I got what I expected.

With all the talk about Latana, I should watch that. I'll see if I can get to it tomorrow morning.

The comments about Talladega Nights intrigued me, so I watched it. It was more entertaining than I expected. However, if Lucius loathes Farrel, it won't change his mind. Sacha Baron Cohen was the best part of the film.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 07:36 pm:   

Yeah, Farrell is pretty heinous. Enjoy Lantana.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 03:27 am:   

I saw Talladega Nights on the airplane and thought it was funny (yes, I drank a half litre of wine).

Rabbit Proof Fence was good.

Saw another Sacha Baron Cohen film the other night: "Ali G inda House". Profoundly stupid but it still had me laughing.

I have a Thai film to watch later called Monrak Transistor that looks like it will be good.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 03:31 am:   

Comparing Rabbit Proof Fence to The Proposition, I thought RPF was by far the better film. The Proposition I found sort of boring and the pseudo-mystical take on a bunch of idiots killing each other didn't really do much for me.
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:20 am:   

i liked THE PROPOSITION for the way it portrayed the country. a harsh, unpleasant, hellish place. but i enjoyed the film not for the plot about the brothers, but rather for the plot involving the british soldier, played by ray winstone, and his wife, who was played by a well known actress, but whose name has completely slipped my mind. emily someone, i think.

hey, lucius, you remember the film CHOPPER a few years back? apparently dominik, the director, has a new film coming out called THE ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES BY THAT COWARD ROBERT FORD.

it stars brad pitt :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 06:04 am:   

Emily Watson. You shouldn't forget Emily Watson. ;)

Yeah, it's from the Ron Hansen novel which was pretty good. And it's supposed to be pretty good, too. Slow-moving, poetic, etc. But Pitt....I don't know.


I liked Rabbitproof Fence better than the Proposition as well, but I enjoyed the latter film's attempt at an Aussie Sphagetti Western. And I almost always like WInstone and Watson.

Monrak Transistor, huh? Sounds cool.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 06:14 am:   

I looked it up. I saw that guy's first movie, Ruang talok 69, and it was superb.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 06:41 am:   

Cool. I flipped through a few scenes and it looks nice. I ended up slipping on a matinee of Dead or Alive 1 just now as I didn't feel like working. A pretty good film by Miike with a truly strange ending.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 06:44 am:   

I looked up Ruang talok 69 - it sounds definately worth while.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 06:48 am:   

Oh, it is! It's a terrific thriller. I'm looking for a copy, actually -- so if any out there knows where I can find one, please give a shout.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 07:00 am:   

I looked for a copy just now and couldn't find anything with english subs.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 07:14 am:   

I can't eiher. I saw it at a festival some years ago and it was subtitled, but....
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 07:24 am:   

Funny, the only language the film seems to be available in is Castellano under the title Seis Nueve.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 07:36 am:   

Where did you see that? Spanish is good for me.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 08:00 am:   

Here:

http://www.zonadvd.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=5418
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 08:04 am:   

Actually, when you hit checkout it says the subs are Spanish...12.99 not bad.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 08:24 am:   

Thanks, Brendan. I appreciate it.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 08:31 am:   

No problem. I remember last time i was in Spain how amazed I was at the films they had available in Spanish. Anyhow, good luck on getting hold of it.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 08:45 am:   

Thanks, again.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 09:37 am:   

Lucius and Brendan, no need to order some obscure Spanish disc of Ruang talok 69. It's available, retitled, in R1 with English subs.

http://www.amazon.com/6ixtynin9/dp/B0006J289Q/ref=pd_bxgy_d_text_b/002-6819118-8 017641
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 09:43 am:   

Thank, Kelly. Muy bueno.
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 01:34 pm:   

yeah, emily watson. i spaced on that totally. my bad. as for ASSASSINATION... i reckon i'm going to cautiously look forward to that, even with brad pitt. i remember when i first heard about eric bana playing chopper read, i thought, 'no fucking way,' since all bana had done was some bad tv comedy and a bit in THE CASTLE. but then the dude was great, so...

you speak spanish, lucius?
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 01:46 pm:   

Thanks Kelly.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 02:01 pm:   

According to screening audiences, most of whom rated the movie highly, Casey Affleck outacts Brad. What's that tell you?
:-)

Most screening audiences are, to my mind, not overly discerning, still it's not a good sign.

Spanish. Depends on how long I've been since I've been in CA, but sorta. And I can read subtitles.
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PM
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 02:45 pm:   

Whatever happens with Brad I'll give him the credit of trying to be in "good films". "Good films" as in about as "good" as can be expected in a Hollywood situation where humongous sums of money are involved.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 03:08 pm:   

Good films? Like Troy, like the movie he made with Julia Roberts, like Meet Joe Black, like Oceans 11, 12, 13, 14, like the dumb spy thing. with Redford, like Mr and Mrs Smith, like Fight Club, like Seven Years In Tibet, Sleepers, Interview with a Vampire, the Devil's Own, like etc. Every once in a while he makes a good choice, but your credit is misplaced.
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jk
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 03:35 pm:   

Hey man, don't forget Brad Pitt's a great humanitarian too. He said he won't get married until all people are allowed to get married. It sent shockwaves throughout the world. The things he won't do for the good of man.
Or maybe he saw a picture of Jon Voight and thought to himself, "If I marry her, she'll look like that, with boobs, in a decade or so."
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PM
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 03:42 pm:   

Yet there were even worse movies:

Miami Vice, Starsky & Hutch, Dukes of Hazzard, etc.

If he'd been in these films it wouldn't have made them any better.

Troy was a bad fit. Troy should have been burned :-)

But it didn't seem to be egregious miscasting to put him in at least most of the other films that you mention.

The better question is what film(s) should he appear in? When most if not all of the films are "bad" then it presents a real difficulty in picking a "good" film. As if a "good" film can even be made when it's going to be a big budget film.
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jk
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 03:46 pm:   

Lucius, have seen the the Russian film 4, directed by Khrzhanovsky?
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 03:53 pm:   

Yeah, I enjoyed 4, though it won't be to everyone's taste, being sort of experimental. I really liked the scenes in the village.

To answer your question, PM, he's a lousy actor so putting him in lousy movies is fine with me. I just wish he'd stay away from films that aspire to be good, because he usually brings them down in quality. The new David Fincher project, based on a Fitzgerald story, will surely be horrible, but all the more horrible for Pitt's presence.
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PM
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:08 pm:   

I'm not so confident that the Pitt replacement would "save" the film.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:15 pm:   

Couldn't hurt.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:21 pm:   

The new David Fincher movie is ZODIAC, based on the non-fiction book by...drawing a blank. It's due out in March. With Mark Ruffalo, Downey Jr., and Jake Gyllenhal, and with a cool 70s vibe, I'm really looking forward to it. Like MEMORIES OF MURDER, it's suppose to be more about the cops than the killer.

Speaking of Fincher and Pitt, FIGHT CLUB, regardless how you feel about it, is one of the more interesting Hollywood projects of the last decade.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:23 pm:   

Lucius: I see Fincher is filming the Curious Case of Benjamin Button now.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:23 pm:   

I liked Fight Club, and Pitt was good in 12 Monkeys and Snatch. But for every decent film, he's got a dozen roles like Oceans 12 or Cool World.

I didn't like 4. I liked the start, when everyone was in the bar, but it dragged a lot after that. A bit more editing could have made it more enjoyable.

I watched Lantana this morning. Very well done film.
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:24 pm:   

i liked FIGHT CLUB.

i'm, personally, a little disturbed by casey affleck, since he connects too easily to that black hole of acting, ben affleck. but like i said, i've liked pitt in a few films now, such as SE7EN, SNATCH and 12 MONKEYS. i even liked him in OCEANS 11, but that film was pretty forgetable on nearly every level, so i was looking for something to save my time...

but, mostly, i'm putting my faith in dominik for the film being good. i really dug CHOPPER, and i say this having a personal dislike for mark 'chopper' read, who the film is based on. (he's just a loser.) i certainly wouldn't put my money down i pitt to make the film great :-)
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:24 pm:   

I took a chance on "4" and ordered it from deepdiscountdvd for $19.
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PM
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:32 pm:   

Likely it would just be another actor that you don't like. Say Affleck, Damon, Law, DiCaprio, etc.
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 04:44 pm:   

though, with all this talk of fincher's films, while i liked FIGHT CLUB and SEVEN well enough, i thought THE PANIC ROOM sucked hugely. i'm kinda unsure about this new film of his--i'm thinking he might be miss more than hit.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 05:05 pm:   

Every time someone says Pitt was good in....I say, ask them if he was manic, because he does a great Dennis Hopper-in-Apocalypse Now impression, and this stood him in good stead in Monkeys and etc. His entire acting style seems based on that one DH role, except when he's playing a cool dude. That bugs the hell out of me. For me, Fight Club reeked. The twist, which you could see coming a mile off, was just stupid. The flters Fincher used made the movie look tawdry, etc, etc. But if you guys liked it...hey, it's all a matter of taste. An interesting project? I guess, but the book was popular so it made sense.

When you use Memories of Murder as a comparitive, Kelly, remember that Fincher's last film, I think, was The Panic Room.

I'm not interested in him anymore. It's going to take a serious recommend by multiple people before I go to see another of his movies. 7even was Ok, but I didn't think it was special. It had cool credits though. And yeah, Benjamen Button's the Fitzgerald movie I mentioned.

I don't think you'll like 4, Kelly. I liked it, but I had very specific technical and atmosphereric reasons for liking it after the people leave the bar. But I hope you do.

As for Dominik, Ben, I hope he survives his Hollywood experience. Most Aussies haven't. Take a look at Peter Weir, at Kiwi Lee Tamahori. Noyce seems to have come out the other side of it, but he's an exception.
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 05:31 pm:   

the strange thing about me and FIGHT CLUB is i hated the book. it's just trash, far as i'm concerned. i tried another of palaniuk's books, SURVIVOR, and had much the same experience.

anyhow: i hope dominik survives hollywood, too, but as you say, plenty haven't...
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 05:51 pm:   

I agree about the book, and the author's pretty fucked up, too. But yeah, I'm keeping my fingers crossed for Dominik--he's got good source material, at any rate, and I hear tell the movie hews closely to the book.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Saturday, December 30, 2006 - 11:49 pm:   

Even though I also thought PANIC ROOM was trash, I have hope for ZODIAC because of what's being said in the advance reviews. That Downey Jr. gives the performance of his career; that it's a rich character piece, not an action film; that it's deeply rooted in the thrillers of the 70s (think Pakula). And, the fact that Fincher blew his last outing has got me believing he'll hit it out of the park this time. He's been an inconsistent director his entire career, giving us both good and bad. History says he's ready to produce something good.

There are two films from '06 that I really want to see that my local video stores will never carry -- 4 and The Death of Mr. Lazarescu. I opted to buy 4 first. At the least, from all the reviews I've read, it has some amazing imagery and a really surreal look of modern-day Russia. Whether I'll like it, we'll see.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 12:18 am:   

They have 4 at Netflix. I had never heard of it, but it was in someone's best of the year list in The Wire magazine's new issue. The sound design is supposed to be excellent, and something about a scene with a banquet of crones.
I think Lazarescu was at Blockbuster.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 12:53 am:   

I agree with Lucius on this one. I thought Fight Club was ok, but over-rated. But watching Brad do "crazy" makes me wince a little. I have to admit to sort of liking the dumb spy thing with Redford though (Sleepers). But I have a soft spot for that sort of thing.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 12:56 am:   

The film I probably enjoyed the most in 2006 though was Borat. But being in Switzerland I tend to get stuff a bit later than others, so there are a number of films I still haven't had the chance to see.
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Huw
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 01:54 am:   

That Redford/Pitt film (SPY GAME, was it?) had me cringing most of the way through, and laughing hysterically at the end, where Redford launched a heroic rescue mission from a supposedly US-occupied Pescadores (Penghu Islands, part of Taiwan, and nothing to do with the bloody US!).
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 04:24 am:   

Right I got it confused with another Redford film. In my memory they are sort of welded together. Hmm.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 05:23 am:   

Well, let me know if it's good, Kelly. Though "the performance of his (Robert Downey's) life" isn't a phrase that stirs me, I have some hope left for Gyllenhal and Ruffalo is usually good.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 05:31 am:   

In Spy Game, the part that got me (well, one of the parts) was the little jokes between Pitt and Redford about how handsome each other was. That was just fucking horrible. I kept wanting to yell. Cut!
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jk
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 01:57 pm:   

Lucius, have you seen any movies by director Theo Angelopoulos?
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 02:36 pm:   

I saw Ulysses' Gaze with Harvey Keitel. It was okay, but pretentious as all get out and full of unecessary style. It lost to Kusturica's Underground at Cannes in 90-something and Theo was really, really cheesed off. He's one of those guys who thinks he's a poet with a camera, and even when he manages poetry, it just pissed me off. I haven't bothered to see another and a friend told me that all his films are more or less the same. I think he's one of those guys who lets out a sigh before he shoots and says to himself, Now I wlll make art. I recall Keitel's character was named A and was contemplating the profundity of stuff. Gaah.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, December 31, 2006 - 03:33 pm:   

Heh heh. Guess I'll give it a pass. Sounds pretty pompous, in a Tarkovsky-wannabe kind of way.
Saw an old Giallo called Short Night of the Glass Dolls that was pretty entertaining, bad dubbing and all. Had a cool Morricone soundtrack, and the story was ok-missing girl turns out to be killed by old Satanists holding onto their power.
The interview with the director was pretty funny. He said his camerman worked for Pasolini and kept saying to him "What are we doing? We're making a piece of shit." So the director and the camerman ending up exchanging punches.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 12:14 am:   

Yeah I saw Ulysses Gaze and it is exactly like Lucius says and there is really not a lot more boring than watching Keitel contemplate the profundity of things. I can't even remember the story, just him wandering around somewhere not saying a lot.

Jk, ever seen "Non si sevizia un paperino"? sounds like a similar plot to the film you watched.
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jk
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 10:55 am:   

Yeah, I saw it. It's Fulci's Don't Torture a Duckling. I don't remember much about it. Something about kids being murdered and a priest I think.
The one I saw had Barbara Bach in it. Aldo Lado was the director.
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Huw
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 11:22 am:   

That's not the one with the quacking serial killer, is it? Or was that New York Ripper? ;-)
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jk
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 12:34 pm:   

Haven't seen New York Ripper. I did see House By The Cemetery not too long ago, and it had the most obnoxious kid actor in it, with terrible dubbing. I think an adult dubbed the kid's voice. Fulci's movies are usually entertaining because they're so bad. "The maestro" indeed.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 12:51 pm:   

No quacking serial killer. The duck has to do with a toy that turns out to be a clue to the murderer or something of that sort.

Well, I watch Fulci's films in Italian and the voices are bad too. One advantage though is not having a translated script as some of the stuff in the original italian is really classic, whereas the English versions I think have cornier, stiffer scripts....

Just saw Monrak Transistor. Good film - strange combo of musical, romance, crime and I don't know what. Hard to categorise.
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Huw
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 01:19 pm:   

Seriously, I heard there's a serial killer who talks like a duck in one of Fulci's movies! I think it was New York Ripper.

Today I was foolish enough to rent and watch Pulse, the US version of Kiyoshi Kurosawa's excellent Kairo. It's an utterly abyssmal piece of crap, a film made by idiots for idiots, a film with no idea of how to create suspense and atmosphere or how to orchestrate a feeling of dread. It's just horrible. Horrible! I'm trying to figure out a way to retrieve the brain cells I lost while watching this mess...
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jk
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 01:29 pm:   

Yeah, allmovie says the killer talks like Donald Duck in New York Ripper. They call it a "shameless piece of work." Guess I'll move it up on the Netflix queue. Lol.
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Brendan Connell
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 01:31 pm:   

Hmm. I'll check it out. Actually, my favourite Fulci film is a western called Tempo di massacro with Franco Nero. Of course I am a Euro-western nut, so that might account for it...
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jk
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 01:32 pm:   

Oops, that's "shameful piece of work." "Pandering to the lowest common denominator as never before in his career." Sounds like a classic.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, January 01, 2007 - 02:24 pm:   

Huw, regarding Pulse, what possessed you? I will offer up a prayer for your brain cells.

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