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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 07:56 pm:   

By Dave G. on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 12:05 pm:Edit

Kind of enjoyed the new Sonic Youth. Although I love their artsy side, it's kind of refreshing to hear them make a nice pop record, unfettered by downtown pretensions. Kind of a throwback to the Bad Moon Rising days...
By jk on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 12:19 pm:Edit

Downtown pretentions, yeah that would describe them. And they hang out with Sophia Coppola too don't they? Maybe Sophia could film her next movie at one of Kim's "art" installations.
By Dave G. on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 01:21 pm:Edit

Pretensions are fun, in small doses.
By mike m on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 02:50 pm:Edit

I liked Opeth for a little while, but I found their musical structures to be too similar from song to song. I could feel the dynamics before a change would come - no surprises. For a death or black metal/epic prog rock crossover I get a little more out of Enslaved.
By Lucius on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:25 pm:Edit

Yeah, I was with 'em for a nanosecond. But Black Metal, except perhaps in Scandinavia, is a pose, and they never seemed to have the right attitude.
By Robert Devereux on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:42 pm:Edit

Nick Cave can pull of dark/disturbing/evil lyrics much more effectively than any metal band I've heard. Murder Ballads makes death metal seem cartoonish.

My hopes for good metal CDs this year come from Isis. They've got two albums due for release this year. There is an official album, and an "In the Fishtank" collaboration with Aereogramme.

Maybe Virgin Black will be interesting. They have three CDs due out this year. One is pure classical music (with the Adelaide Symphony), one mixes orchestra and metal, and the final one pure death metal. They're supposed to all be different movements of the same piece. I like their classical/metal blendings, but three CDs will likely be overkill.
By mike m on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:45 pm:Edit

Demon est Deus Inversus always summed it up for me. And it seems like none of them knew Venom weren't serious.
By mike m on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:48 pm:Edit

Virgin Black were kind of a goth-ish band weren't they?
By Lucius on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:53 pm:Edit

I like Bathory, the prog devil music band Fields of the Nefilim, I like a bunch of devil and black metal bands, even some SLayer - "I drink the vomit of priests," while patently insincere, captured a certain elan.
By Robert Devereux on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:55 pm:Edit

A lot of people label Virgin Black as gothic metal. I view them as being a little different from gothic though. I view them as doom metal mixed with classical music (not neoclassical shred) and an operatic singer (one of the two metal singers I've heard who actually shows opera training).
By mike m on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:59 pm:Edit

I tend to like the death and grind bands most, Morbid Angel, Immolation, Agoraphobic Nosebleed, Cephalic Carnage etc. I like my metal ugly. I liked some of the Bathory stuff but couldn't stand the guy's wailing, so my interest is limited. In fact Enslaved kind of strike me as a latter-day "Viking Metal" era Bathory.
By Lucius on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:11 pm:Edit

I really like only one Bathory album, can't recall the name, but it was Viking era--I should probably buy some Enslaved. Not much on grind bands. You're right. Uglee.
By mike m on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:15 pm:Edit

Probably Hammerheart.
By jk on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:16 pm:Edit

Sunn o)))'s Black One album is pretty interesting. Stretched-out droning waves of feedback with vocals from Leviathan and Xasthur. I find the vocals pretty funny, when they can be understood. The music is more interesting to me than the standard black metal, it's more experimental. They're taking influences from minimalist composers and Indian music as well as Black Metal.
By Lucius on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:21 pm:Edit

Hammerheart. Right.
By Dave G. on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:58 pm:Edit

Great names. I remember a marquee at the Paradise Theater in Boston for a metal matinee:

Death
Famine
Destruction
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 05:17 am:   

So far, my favorite "metal" release recently is Kayo Dot "Dowsing Anemone with Copper Tongue." It's not always metal, and gets pretty mellow. It's part 70s King Crimson, part contemporary classical, and part drone metal (like Sunn o)))).

On a related topic, I saw Pelican live last night. I can add them to the list of bands I prefer on CD. They bounced around a lot live, so it wasn't a dull performance, but the music works much better when you can hear all the dynamics. Loud amps and bad acoustics hurt the sound.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 06:50 am:   

I hate that when you go to a club and the pa turns everything into a sound-fart. It's happened to me too many times to count. The worst was when I went to see the Tony Williams Lifetime -- I was down front, close to the PA, when the speaker blew -- I couldn't hear right for three days. It's really bad when all the lyrics get turned into yadda yadda yadda and the dynamics are lost.
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:09 am:   

Although if it was Tony singing, it probably wasn't a bad thing. :-) On the other hand one of the best live shows I own comes from that original Lifetime trio mowing down a New York audience. With the amount of distortion they used it's not a surprise they destroyed PAs.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:15 am:   

Larry Young was so great...and no this was with Jack Bruce on vocals. Somehow I don't think it was the singing that did it.
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:27 am:   

Yeah I'm a serious Young freak, from Grant Green to Unity to Mother Ship to Lawrence of Newark (couldn't quite do the Fuel albums though). Was psyched to find a Lifetime performance on DVD from Montreux. A bit after their peak lineup (Ego line up from 71), but Young and Williams make it all worthwhile.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:30 am:   

Where do you find this stuff?

I saw Young a couple of times with Lifetime, and once in a weird solo gig. He was awesome.
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:36 am:   

Usually dimeadozen.org. Wouldn't be much trouble to send you a copy next time I'm burning. Managed to find some great electric Miles DVDs as well (although I'm not sure any of them are quite as great as the Isle of Wight show released as Electric Miles). This sorta early, abstract fusion hits closest to home for me musically.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:42 am:   

Yeah, well, I won't turn it down. Electric Miles is great. I really like his Dark Magus. That stuff does it for me. Let me when you're burning and I'll get you an address. Meamwhile I'll check out dimeadozen. I've been thinking about writing a script about Miles, sort of a weird biopic, but not too Hollywood. You'd have a heckuva score, anyway.
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:53 am:   

Will do, probably next time I see a good DVD-R sale. There's a few videos from the '73 European tour floating around from TV broadcasts (which I think was pretty close to Dark Magus). Another item really worth finding is a show (I forget the exact date) in March during the same stint that the It's About That Time release was recorded in 1970. It's a little more abstract than that disc but at least as good (and the quality is also outstanding).

dimeadozen.org is a pretty addictive torrent site, the sheer amount of good stuff there is overwhelming.

I'd love to see a script like that!
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 08:55 am:   

Speaking of Miles did you ever check out any of the Ian Carr/Nucleus stuff? Listening to a nice show this morning from 72.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 09:04 am:   

Never heard of it. What is it?

Dimeadozen sounds like I shouldn't go there. All that sounds great--whatever you feel like doing.

I'm seriously thinking about next year for a Miles project.
You couldn't do a straight biopic cause Miles was even a worse guy than Ray. But you could do something real interesting. I've been turning it over in my head for a while and have come up with some angles of attack that sound promising. Anyway...next year.
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 09:22 am:   

I believe Ian Carr wrote a Miles bio, but he was the leader of the British jazz-rock group Nucleus who were one of the earliest of the bands doing the style in the 70s. All the early ones are great and available on double discs from BGO (which you can probably still find from waysidemusic.com): Elastic Rock/We'll Talk About It Later, Solar Plexus/Belladonna, and Labyrinth/Roots. Belladonna has one of Allan Holdsworth's earliest performances (although I'm not really a fan, he's pretty good here) and ER and Talk were a pretty strong influence on Area's Arbeit Macht Frei. But I'd probably go with Labyrinth/Roots first as they're closest to the Electric Miles sound. All 6 of those are great though. They had some crossover with the Soft Machine as well.

Yeah dimeadozen is painful. You know when you have to start storing things on spools that enough is enough. But it shouldn't be a problem sending some of this stuff your way when I get rippin again.

I hear you on Miles. The first thing that popped to mind with your script idea was Miles chewing into Steve Miller in his autobio. And even if deserved that was the least of his issues.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 - 09:53 am:   

Yeah, he's a real character. If it was another time in Hollywood, I should think a movie would have been done already. As it stands, it's a wonderful chance, if the script is done right, for a black actor to do a complex and challenging role, and maybe get noticed.

Thanks for the info....
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 22, 2006 - 06:48 am:   

Well, I don't think Scott Walker's my cup of tea. I appreciated the album, but I can't say i enjoyed listening to it. It seem overintellectualized, and that kind of thing just doesn't suit my ear. I'm glad I heard it, but doubt I'll be giving it many spins.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 06:07 am:   

I'm coming to the same conclusion about Walker.

Besides him, I've been listening to the new Alejandro Escovedo CD. It strikes me as simply good rock, with some interesting keyboards and arrangements from John Cale.

Escovedo was supposed to give a free concert here about 2 weeks ago, but got some sort of eye infection and had to cancel. He'll be back in a few more weeks, but it won't be free this time.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 06:40 am:   

Is he still performing with that orchestra, that has a cello section etc.? If so, it''s worth seeing. The orchestral rendition of Iggy's I Wanna Be Your Dog is worth the price of admission. I like Escovedo live--he gives pretty good show.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 07:01 am:   

I don't think he's with the orchestra. The place he's playing on his next Pittsburgh visit is tiny, it will be a struggle to fit a drummer and bass player on stage with him.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 07:10 am:   

Well, it's probably still good.
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GabrielM
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 09:00 am:   

Lucius -- I really like that live Cafe Tacuba album as well. A lot of live albums these days seem engineered so that the audience sounds recede, but here they really sound like an active participant. And it's a good set too.

Been listening to Guillermo Klein. Argentine jazz guy, plays piano but his music is usually for larger ensembles. Came to New York, hung out with the Knitting Factory/Tzadik crew, then went to Spain and I think he's back in the city now. Anyway, he does a real interesting mix of jazz and Latin and the New York downtown sound.

I bought and listened to that Sunn album but I can't get into it. The drone stuff itself is interesting, but then you get this guy muttering occult stuff in some demonic voice and I get the giggles, which I doubt was the intended effect. It's the part of metal that really annoys me -- the music itself is interesting, but then you have these really silly trappings. And the song titles? "Cursed Realms of the Winterdemons"? Good grief.

On the metalish side these days I like Boris, a trio from Japan with a female guitarist who have a BIG sound. On PINK they do shoegaze and thrash and post-rock on different songs, and sometimes even on the same song, and they sound great. Also Jesu, who on SILVER do some beautiful shoegaze metal.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 09:28 am:   

I've heard Boris and was intrigued. Jesu, I haven't heard. And yeah, that Cafe Tacuba album is terrific. Best live rock album in many a year. I'll look for Guillermo Klein when I come to the city. Thanks for the recs.
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jk
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 06:05 pm:   

Jesu is the new project of Justin Broaderick from Godflesh.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 23, 2006 - 06:20 pm:   

I think I'll do me some Jesu....
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 05:21 am:   

For more drone metal, you could try Khanate. The lyrics aren't quite as silly.

I liked the one song I heard by Jesu.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 05:50 am:   

How silly are the lyrics.....? Never mind, I can guess.

Yesterday I played most of the box set of the Miles Davis quintet Live at the Five Spot while I worked. Great stuff. Too great...I didn't get much done as a result. About the only kind of music I can work to is reggae, because it's got that steady rhythm, and sometimes that doesn't get it. Mostly I just leave the television on with the volume turned low. Guess I'm never gonna be one of these cool guys with an esoteric soundtrack for their novels, like I wrote chapter three of my book to Topless Coroner and Mutatis Mutandis. With me, it's I wrote Chapter Three while listening to the Young and the Restless. :-)
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jk
Posted on Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 10:32 am:   

Yeah, the "vokills" on Sunn o)))'s Black One are pretty over-the-top, but that's part of the fun. I don't know how you can understand what they're saying though. I can only understand two words in Cursed Realms(of the Winterdemons). "Black science" is croaked at one point, other than that I can't understand a word of it, so it works ok as a weird droney electronic metal track.
As far as Khanate, they're ok too, but the singer sounds like he's being stuck with a red-hot poker. Those throat-shredding screams are more disturbing to me than the vocals on black one.
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jk
Posted on Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 10:35 am:   

Here's a sample of the lyrics from Black One for you Lucius. Vibrate! hehe

It Took The Night To Believe

perverted within a viewing
standing alone
it took the night to believe
the beacon lingers
come to grasp
to the edge of orion
repeatedly defiling the wind's daughter
cry yourself to ash
what is destroyed by fire
a perfect silhouette
dialates full
the withering egg
unurished
cloak thyself
in salutations of crescent eye

vibrate
believe
vibrate
defile
vibrate
believe
vibrate
defile
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 10:58 am:   

Wow, I'll have to cleanse myself before listening... :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 25, 2006 - 09:11 am:   

Listened to Flood by Boris. Pretty good stuff. What Sunn o))) album should I start with.

My favorite metal band currently is Ephel Duath.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, June 25, 2006 - 10:42 am:   

I'd start with Black One by Sunn o))).
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 25, 2006 - 10:46 am:   

Okey doke...
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jk
Posted on Sunday, June 25, 2006 - 10:47 am:   

And work your way back if you like that.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 26, 2006 - 05:18 pm:   

I will....

I got a package of CDs from Elliott Sharp today -- some of them look outstanding, especially an album of film music.....
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 06:59 am:   

Ho ho, "my boy Taj Mahal"...Tonight is the Birchmere gig!!!


Kickin' Blues Brother
Steven Seagal, Between Projects: Major Motion Picture And Major Mojo

By J. Freedom du Lac
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, June 27, 2006; C01



ATLANTIC CITY

Steven Seagal is surrounded, and somebody's flashing a gun. Uh-oh .

Bring on the carnage and the mayhem and, just maybe, one of those epic post-brawl soliloquies in which the rock-'em, sock-'em action hero preaches about the environment as the bloodied bad guys limp away!

Okay, maybe not. Wrong scene, wrong script, wrong medium.

It's just past midnight at the House of Blues' Harlem Ballroom, and Seagal has been backed into a corner by the good guys: About a hundred autograph-seeking fans, one of whom has peeled back his shirtsleeve to flex his gun of a biceps in the hopes that the ponytailed martial-arts master, movie star and, of late, Muddy Waters wannabe will sign the arm with a Sharpie.

Seagal manages a smirk, then scribbles his name on the guy's skin. Next!

"I watch your movies every day," another fan says. Seagal nods, then signs the man's ticket stub.

Slumping behind a folding table, the 55-year-old actor appears exhausted and a bit irritable -- perhaps because he slept only an hour the night before, then spent half the day stuck in traffic en route from a gig in Hagerstown before getting onstage to lead his touring band through nearly two hours of high-octane blues. He pounds the table with his left hand, which is roughly the size of a bear paw. He exhales. He looks at his watch. The line keeps moving.

"Your movies inspired me to go into martial arts," says another fan. Seagal nods again and signs again, this time writing his name on the cover of an "Under Siege" DVD.

"Is there going to be an 'Under Siege 3'?" ("I hope so," Seagal says softly. Scribbles on an 8-by-10 photo.)

"You're awesome! When's your next movie going to be in theaters?" ("Probably next year." T-shirt. Keep moving, please.)

"Steven, I love your music ."

Suddenly, Seagal looks up. His posture has changed. So has his disposition. "You enjoyed the show?" he says, smiling.

"That was impressive," the fan says. "You can really play, man. Keep on doing it."

"Thank you, brother!" Seagal says as he signs a copy of his new blues CD, "Mojo Priest." He shakes the man's hand, thanks him again, then expresses his elation over the whole evening, saying: " LawdhaveMERCY !"

If you really want to get Steven Seagal going, tell him he's no Russell Crowe -- or, for that matter, Don Johnson, Kevin Bacon or Keanu Reeves.

Don't worry; your solar plexus will remain intact.

"I've been playing music since I was a boy," Seagal says. "I'm a musician, man. This is what I do. I got a little bit of pride about the blues. I'm not like these actors who can't play."

This, of course, is what we've come to the House of Blues to discern.

Just as many musicians apparently want to be actors, many actors want to be musicians. And most of them can't play the part credibly.

But Seagal is out to prove he's no dilettante -- that as a singer, songwriter and guitarist he is serious about the craft, and that he knows his way around a fret board and a 12-bar blues. In short, that he's not Bruce Willis.

Last month, Seagal released "Mojo Priest," which features both blues classics ("Hoochie Coochie Man," "Dust My Broom") as well as his own compositions, including "Talk to My [Rear End]." The songs are performed by Seagal along with a lineup that includes blues luminaries Ruth Brown, Bo Diddley, James Cotton, Pinetop Perkins, Bob Margolin, Robert Lockwood Jr. and Hubert Sumlin.

Big City Blues magazine, which put Seagal on the cover of its current issue, called his guitar work "exceptional" and Seagal himself "a natural -- a very talented musician." Amazon.com's review is less effusive, calling the CD a "well-intentioned star vehicle" but cautioning that "neither Seagal's whispery/raspy vocals or hotshot guitar solos are particularly memorable . . . Lovers of deep blues won't find much of interest here."

"Mojo Priest" is Seagal's second album, after last year's "Songs From the Crystal Cave," with its reggae dancehall and Indian instrumental flourishes. That CD, which features Stevie Wonder and members of Bob Marley's Wailers, was never released stateside, though Seagal says it's better than "Mojo Priest."

Seagal the bluesman is now trying to gain converts in concert on a month-long U.S. tour that stops tonight at the Birchmere. Fronting an eight-piece band, Thunderbox, whose shifting lineup includes guitarist Bernard Allison, son of the late great Luther Allison, Seagal is performing nightly in front of crowds comprising movie fans, martial-arts nuts and skeptical musicians and blues fans.

And he seems to be winning them over. Even the members of Aretha Franklin's band who sneaked in a side door after their concert in an adjacent theater roared their approval at the end of Seagal's set. (Earlier, Seagal had introduced Franklin on the House of Blues main stage at her camp's behest.)

"Every single place we've played, we've burned the house down," Seagal says in that same smoldering low murmur of a voice that starred, along with his high-flying feet and hard-chopping hands, in such late-'80s and early-'90s action-flick hits as "Above the Law," "Hard to Kill," "Out for Justice" and "Marked for Death." (His more recent output has been less successful, save for 2001's "Exit Wounds," in which he was featured opposite the rapper DMX.)

"People are surprised because they just know Steven as an actor," says Miles Copeland, the music-biz veteran who shepherded the Police to international stardom and is now managing Seagal's music career. "But I'm telling you, the guy can play an instrument and he's actually really good at it. That separates him from almost all of the actors who want to make a music career. And he's serious about it.

"I told him he'd have to play these grungy clubs and some real [dives] where real blues musicians would play, and he said: 'Let's do it!' He's focused on making it as a musician. He's paying his dues, just like everybody else."

Truth be told, however, Seagal isn't exactly suffering for his art: When he has to fly to a gig, he travels by chartered jet, and he also stays in expensive hotel suites, Copeland says.

"The spending isn't in line because on one end, he's a superstar, and on the other end, he's trying to establish himself. So he's playing these dinky little places. But you can't get the guy to fly economy and stay in a one-star hotel. He's just not going to do it. So we're in the presidential suite in every hotel and we're playing a 300-seat club! Let's put it this way: He's not making any money on this tour. But we have to prove to people that he can tour and that he can play."

He has already convinced blues veterans like Hubert Sumlin, a revered guitarist who played on some of Howlin' Wolf's great 1960s Chess Records sides -- including "Wang Dang Doodle," "Shake for Me" and "300 Pounds of Joy."

"Man, I couldn't believe it until I heard it," Sumlin says in a phone interview. "But he's for real, man. People are going to see that he got it. . . . I told him, just brush up on your singing. That's all. But the guy got it. Man, I'm 74 years old, and I've been out here a long time. I done heard everybody I wanted to hear. And I'm sure he can play."

Margolin, a guitarist and singer who played in Muddy Waters's band, says in an e-mail from a tour stop in Switzerland that he hasn't heard "Mojo Priest" yet. But Seagal acquitted himself in the recording sessions, Margolin writes: "From what little I heard, he sounded good."

Seagal assesses his playing -- a fingerpicking style that seems to owe a lot to both Albert Collins and Albert King -- this way:

"I'll say I'm an average guitar player, and some people like the way I play. Let's put it this way: I've played with the best of the best and made a lot of people happy. So I must be doing something right."

Seagal has apparently been befriending blues musicians for years -- dating, he says, back to his childhood in Michigan, where he claims to have learned in the laps of great but unknown Mississippi Delta bluesmen who'd moved north to work in the steel mills. Whether this is true is unclear; a 1990 People magazine story quoted Seagal's mother as saying the family moved to Southern California when he was 5.

Could it be another bit of myth-building? In 1988, when his edgy-man-of-mystery public image was being perfected at the outset of his career, Seagal suggested to the Los Angeles Times that he'd previously worked for the government as a spook -- a claim that was refuted in various published expos?s. (The actor eventually told Larry King on CNN: "I am publicly denying having ever worked for the CIA.") Over the years, there have been questions, too, about the details of Seagal's martial-arts training and teaching in Japan and so forth.

Whatever. As an adult, Seagal has collected bluesmen friends and teachers almost as obsessively as he's collected guitars and guns, and he casually peppers conversation with references to his relationships with some of the greats. As in: "I remember talking to B.B. King once" and "my boy Taj Mahal" and "Bo Diddley is a dear friend of mine." (In the Big City Blues piece, Diddley says of Seagal, "I think I've found me a new good buddy.")

Seagal even says Sumlin "is like a father to me." And, in fact, Sumlin will be just that in "Prince of Pistols," a movie scheduled to begin shooting next month in New Orleans, with Sumlin, who is black, playing the father of Seagal, who is white but seems to have picked up the patois of an old black man from the South.

"Hubert has said some things to me that can make you cry; he's like a holy man to me," says the famously spiritual Seagal, a student of Zen and Tibetan Buddhist philosophies who was once, controversially, proclaimed to be the reincarnation of a revered Buddhist lama. "If you saw Hubert in India or Tibet, you'd walk up and do prostrations."

They didn't fall prostrate in Atlantic City when Seagal took the stage. But at least he got an ovation in his latest incarnation, prompting Seagal to shout, " That's what I'm talkin' 'bout."

2006 The Washington Post Company
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:05 am:   

"high octane blues..."

Who wrote this? A PR flack?

I've been trying to erase that fucking concert from my head, but now I just had a horrid flashback....
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:13 am:   

Boy, The Washington Post has sunk to new depths...or maybe I just haven't been keeping up. J. Freedom du Lac? Is that one of Seagal's characters?
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:37 am:   

No, it's their new post-Richard Harrington music scribe. The text of the story omits the pictures that accompany it, one showing him onstage in AC wearing the same sleeveless kimono thing he had on in Dante's and one showing him at a signing wearing what looks like a polka-dotted smoking jacket...

The man rules. :-)
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:40 am:   

Wait, Seagal thinks his previous album is better? Aren't musicians required to say their new album is their best work ever?

Film Threat had something about him recently
http://www.filmthreat.com/index.php?section=features&Id=1759
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:51 am:   

The new post guy is fucking idiot.

Now Robert's URL, that be the truth of the matter...
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 10:16 am:   

He actually liked Mojo Priest and was saying nice stuff about it on his blog a couple of weeks ago...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 10:20 am:   

Like I said, he's a fucking idiot...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 10:55 am:   

Too late, though it may not come off. Don Cheadle was the obvious choice....I may still do a Miles thing, but not a script.


NEW YORK (Reuters) - Jazz legend Miles Davis, who was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Monday, may be resurrected in a biographical movie with Don Cheadle playing the lead, Davis' family said.

His nephew, Vince Wilburn, told reporters after Davis was inducted into the Hall of Fame that Sony Pictures was working on a movie as well as planning several CDs to celebrate what would have been Davis' 80th birthday later this year.

"People are submitting scripts to Sony Pictures," Wilburn said. "A few names have come up (to play Davis) but Don Cheadle's name keeps coming up," he said.

Wilburn said the movie could touch on Davis' private life as well as his career as a groundbreaking jazz musician who later branched out into music that crossed over into rock and funk.

Wilburn said a possible director for the film was Antoine Fuqua, best known for "Training Day," the movie for which Denzel Washington won a best-acting Oscar in 2002.

Davis' son, Gregory, recalled touring with his father, who died of a stroke in 1991, and said he would have been proud of the honor bestowed on him at Monday's gala ceremony in New York's Waldorf-Astoria hotel.

"We're very proud because this man's ancestors came out of slavery and he's an international icon all over the world and America should be proud of him," he said.

Asked about Davis' reputation as a tough and difficult man, his daughter, Cheryl, conceded that image was accurate at times but said there was another side to him. "He wasn't an angry black man ... he was very humorous. ... He lived life to the fullest and he absorbed cultures from all over the world."
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 12:09 pm:   

Du Lac may be an idiot, but he's replacing a guy who called Godspeed You Black Emperor's last show at the 930 Club the Worst Show of the Year.

So, he may be an idiot, but at least he's not a g-damn idiot, which is a step in the right direction.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 12:26 pm:   

Well, let's just say that there has not been a recent history of good music reportage at the Post. For Christ sakes, he sounded like he wanted to lick Seagal's balls.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 12:59 pm:   

Well, jeez, Lucius, who doesn't? :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 01:22 pm:   

Moi, for one. Let's take a poll.

Actually, with his insane physical skills, Seagal probably does his own ball-licking.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 01:54 pm:   

Remember, we can get "100% Pure Steven Seagal Juice" without licking him directly: http://www.xoxide.com/lightning-bolt-asian-experiance.html
Did they sell any of it at his shows?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 01:59 pm:   

I didn't see any, but then I didn't get close to Seagall -- they may have collecting drops of his essence to brew the lightning bolt juice.
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 06:44 pm:   

If Seagal plays a white man who has a black father in his new movie, shouldn't it be called The Jerk II? Or was there a The Jerk II already? Maybe The Jerk III? "He was born a poor black child."
Somehow I doubt Seagal's movie will be a comedy though. At least an intentional comedy, there will probably be plenty of unintentional laughs, as with everything the multi-talented Seagal turns his hand to.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 06:48 pm:   

Seagal wants so bad to be a black man. He does a terrible impression during his stage show -- I would think that the blacks he plays with would find it insulting, perhaps even disturbing....
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 06:56 pm:   

Yeah, I would think so too. That "my boy Taj Mahal" comment Seagal made in the article made me cringe. I have a feeling I'd be doing a lot of cringing if I went to one of his shows.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:05 pm:   

I got cringe fever. Thankfully the PA was so bad, I couldn't hear much of the lyrics, but what I did hear was godawful. That whole article made me want to barf. The Wash Post, for Christ sakes!
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:09 pm:   

My guess is that his band is in it to make a livin' and obviously are dealin' with it...

And no tellin' what sort of stories they have to tell!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 27, 2006 - 07:15 pm:   

Oh, for sure,

No telling...'cept after the Master dies. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 07:23 am:   

Well, while we're on the subject...

I have returned, musically and spiritually refreshed by yet another dose of the magical blues stylings of Mister...Steven...Seagal...

Musically, the band was a little tighter and the offerings were a little more interesting than at Dante's. Steven still came onstage in some sleeveless, vaguely asian-looking thing and, like Portland, he still glowered and grimaced over his axe while the other players took the solos (although some leads he did play himself). The crowd was older, more sedate, less into it than the Dante's crowd, but the Scot opener guy got a better reception and did a song he had worked out with the male Seagal backup singer that was actually quite good. (You got the sense that the singer was grateful for the chance to really show his chops.)

The most unsettling thing about Seagal's set was, when he was introducing the band and they were soloing "around the horn," the lady backup singer kept singing this chant about how "Steven Seagal been so good to us"...It was vaguely reminiscent of something unsavory from the distant American past, if you know what I mean. He continues to call his musicians "his chillun." And, for Lucius' edification, yes, "Feets Don't Fail Me Now" was a prominent part of the set.

Unlike the Dante's show, he did a signing session afterwards! My friend Carolyn, who notices these things, said he was wearing a lot of pancake on his face and chest, and definitely shoe polish on the hairline. When I got to the desk, I told him I had seen the band at Dante's in Portland and he perked right up and asked me how I had enjoyed the show and said that he thought Dante's was a much liver crowd than the Birchmere.

Somewhere in cyberspace, there is a picture of me and the Seag, which I will save as a keepsake and display proudly whenever I have the chance.

The tour is over, but the legend lives on! Bring on PRINCE OF PISTOLS starring Seagal and Hubert Sumlin!!!
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 08:18 am:   

"Unlike the Dante's show, he did a signing session afterwards! My friend Carolyn, who notices these things, said he was wearing a lot of pancake on his face and chest, and definitely shoe polish on the hairline. When I got to the desk, I told him I had seen the band at Dante's in Portland and he perked right up and asked me how I had enjoyed the show and said that he thought Dante's was a much liver crowd than the Birchmere."

questions and comments:

What portion of your anatomy did you have signed? Never mind. Don't answer that. Did you get your T-shirt?

A liver crowd? They were a drunker and thus less discerning crowd, Steve.

Feets Dont Fail Me Now - Gack!

Steven Seagal been so good to us -- Lurch noise.

There's a picture -- where?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 08:22 am:   

BTW, Hubert Sumlin guests on Elliot Sharp's Blue For Next album.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 08:51 am:   

I had an 8" x12" glossy ($15 at the Birchmere gift shop) signed. No anatomical parts. The guy behind us in line was going to try to get Seagal to break his arm, rather than sign it, but I don't know how that worked out.

T-shirt? Oh yeah...

I haven't seen the picture yet, but it's out there...trust me...
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 09:03 am:   

And where will said photo reside -- in my place, it would iind a home above the tp dispenser, but I suspect not in yours.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 09:13 am:   

I recently rediscovered a band I listened to years ago - Tribe After Tribe. They did 2 albums on Megaforce, they mixed African music and rock. The first was more pop, while the second was acid rock. Both featured some great drumming (the sort of stuff that is usually called "tribal drumming" by critics, like playing toms really makes you sound tribal).

After those two, I always assumed the band broke up, since the singer joined up with some Pearl Jam guys for "Three Fish," but it turns out the band is still around (although band is a misnomer, since it's really just one guy and guest musicians). The albums were just released on tiny European labels. I just got two of them, "Pearls Before Swine" and "Enchanted Entrance." Both continue with the African acid rock vibe. They fill my desire for good rock music, which is getting harder to find in the indie scene right now.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 09:22 am:   

"Both featured some great drumming (the sort of stuff that is usually called "tribal drumming" by critics, like playing toms really makes you sound tribal)."

Worked for Bow wow wow. :-)
That's sort of what we did with my band in the 70s, psych rock mixed with african stuff. I'll definitely give them a listen.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 10:23 am:   

I am thinking of creating a Seagal shrine in my office, with The Man's portrait as its centerpiece.

I can't wait to see what my man J. Freedom has to say about the show.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 10:30 am:   

"I came three times during the guitar solo." :-)
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mike m
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 11:04 am:   

J. Freedom du Lac was the Sacramento Bee's regular media columnist for the last few years, it's hard to believe he's with the Post now.

http://www.sacbee.com/content/lifestyle/columns/dulac/

It says he was born on Haight Street in 1970, which was probably at least a year or two too late. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 11:36 am:   

A man whose sole attriibute in life is his name. :-)

I guess it's not really surprising. The entertainment and pop culture pages are increasingly being turned over to blank, giddy types.

For instance, I was acquainted with this woman who, by all reports, was crazy as a shithouse rat when it came to relationships, this according to several trustworthy sources and considerable evidence. She had a peppy sort of personality, a happy surface hiding a twisted depth, and that got her over with some people. She put up a good front. At one point, when I still believed she was sane, she convinced me and several others that this man she had been dating had threatened her with an ax and was stalking her. We decided to have a talk with the man for the purpose of dissuading him in this. Turns out he had dated the woman a couple of times, was now deeply involved with someone else, and hadn't seen my acquaintance in some time (and hasn't seen her since), a story which checked out. He was greatly surprised by our accusations. Certain other of her relationships had equally gaudy, delusional endings and/or histories. After the "stalking" incident, I lost touch with her for a few years. Then she emerged as a pop culture columnist for a major newspaper, writing articles about how tough it was to find a date in the modern singles world, a task for which she was incredibly well-suited.

The point being, perhaps J. Freedom du Lac has something of a similar future.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 12:07 pm:   

No doubt Mr. du Lac will become a convert to hip-hop and go-go and write a book about DC's "street level" practitioners who could have made it big but opted to "keep it real."
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 12:13 pm:   

I, for one, can't wait to read it. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 01:22 pm:   

It will be the thinnest book in the Library of Congress: Chuck Brown and His Influence on American Popular Music
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2006 - 01:35 pm:   

But it will be a triumph for Freedom du Lac...yeah, boy!
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 01, 2006 - 04:22 pm:   

Mike, you ever hear about a 70's Norwegian band called Aunt Mary?

This is what I listened to today --

BURIAL: Burial CD (HDB 001CD) 16.00
"This first album on Kode9's Hyperdub label comes from the mysterious Burial. On this self-titled CD debut, Burial carves out a sound which sends the dormant slinky syncopations of UK garage, via radio interference, into a padded cell of cushioned, muffled bass, passing through the best of Pole's Berlin crackle dub. Burial explores a tangential, parallel dimension of the growing sound of dubstep. Burial's parallel dimension sounds set in a near future South London underwater. You can never tell if the crackle is the burning static off pirate radio transmissions, or the tropical downpour of the submerged city outside the window. In their sometimes suffocating melancholy, most of these tracks seem to yearn for drowned lovers. The smouldering desire of 'Distant Lights' is cooled only by the percussive ice sharp slicing of blades and jets of hot air blowing from the bass. Listen also for a fleeting appearance from Hyperdub's resident vocalist, the Spaceape unravelling his crypto-biography. In its loud quietness, Burial takes his kitchen crackle aesthetic neither from the digital glitch nor merely a nostalgia for vinyl's materiality. Instead, as 'Pirates' suggests, Burial crackle mutates the tactile surplus value of pirate radio transmissions. Burial's mix is haunted. Echoed voices breeze in and out, on road to another time. Pirate signal from other frequencies steams in. A tidal wave of noise submerging all but the crispest syncopations. The noise is not violent, but caressing, tickling, exciting the ends of your nerves. Seducing you in."

I thought the above desc, taken from Forced Exposure, was pretty...well, descriptive --
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jk
Posted on Sunday, July 02, 2006 - 10:51 am:   

Lucius is a Forced Exposure customer huh? I've been ordering from them for years. They have a pretty good selection. And you're right there on the cutting edge with The Wire too Lucius, they are big on tht kode9 stuff in the new issue. He he. I might have to check it out.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 02, 2006 - 11:18 am:   

Oh yeah. I blow a lot of money at FE. The Burial thing...I don't know. It just suits my mood at the moment. Kind of crawly and dark and rainy and nice. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 03, 2006 - 08:56 am:   

so my other FE purchase is Lagos Stori Plenti, a compilation of new urban sounds from Lagos, Nigeria, one of the most impoverished cities on the face of the earth, giving out into streets that run between canyons of garbage. The former president had grandiose plans and built a copy of the Vatican cathedral, only half again as big, in the city, and also an 8 lane highway leading into the city. A famous photograph of the highway taken at rush hour shows the road occupied by a single cyclist. Anyway, this is compilation of VA, the tracks a weird and wonderful mix of rap, dancehall, salsa, and Afrobeat, bespeaking the desires and angers of this tragic yet vital place. Absolutely brilliant. I can't stop playing it.
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jk
Posted on Monday, July 03, 2006 - 10:17 am:   

Is that one of those Sublime Frequencies releases?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 03, 2006 - 10:20 am:   

It's on Out Here records, a German label.
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mike m
Posted on Monday, July 03, 2006 - 11:17 am:   

Yeah, I know Aunt Mary, or at least a couple of their albums, I think "Janus" is usually considered the best. They're basically an early hard rock group, maybe a little Sabbath, Blue Cheer etc. Quite good, but not top tier.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 03, 2006 - 11:53 am:   

Thanks Mike, I was curious -- I saw their album on FE and figured you'd know if anyone did. This one was Janus.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 07:54 am:   

Lest we forget--Rock Star Supernova begins tonight. Oh boy!
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 08:25 am:   

That should up the knucklehead quotient by at least a power of four.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 08:27 am:   

Yup. Should be tastee.... :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 08:29 am:   

I just don't think there'll be any moments like that guy saying, Sorry, but we don't think you're right for our band, INXS...

Like you're not a mutant dwarf...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 08:42 am:   

Thanks for the reminder. I can't wait to see how bad Rock Star will be this year.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 08:55 am:   

Oh, yeah, I seen some of the cast members. Like this one guy who dressed haut couture street who claims to have lived on the streets for years. It's gonna be classic.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 10:09 pm:   

Actually there were a couple of interesting singers on Rockstar Supernova -- Dilliana, though i know they won't pick her, because she's too much like them. Lukas had a kinda weird style. I doubt we'll be seeing Chris after tomorrow -- somebody should have told him in rehearsal that cover of Roxanne was godawful.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 06:27 am:   

I got a laugh at the beginning when the band and producer were talking about how they wanted to do something new. I can't imagine a band with those members and working on such a mainstream show really doing anything new. It will be the same old stuff, just in different clothes.

I was hoping for more of a train wreck in the first episode, but only Chris and Phil were really bad. Most of the others didn't do much for me. I enjoyed Josh's performance, and Dana and Patrice did OK. Patrice didn't sound as good on Somebody to Love as Heather did last season.

Dilana could be interesting. I didn't like her performance last night (first completely still, then too manic with the jumping around). But she at least seemed unique, unlike somebody like Ryan, who seemed like dozens of other singer/songwriters.

I was disappointed that the metal singer didn't make the final cut. I guess he wasn't young enough.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 07:22 am:   

Heather was a good singer -- she ripped it up last year. I liked Josh, too -- I just don't know what he's doing on the show. I have a feeling the trainwreck is coming. The girl who did the evanescence song could be bad--or good--and the guy who sang all sweet and falsetto, he could bomb. I like Dilana. She'll at least be fun.

Ditto on the producer. Maybe he has something new in mind -- like a triple homicide.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 08:13 am:   

I've been tempted to get Heather's album. I've heard a little bit of it, and it sounded good. There was a strong blues and Southern rock vibe to it.

For this season, there are plenty more chances for it to be bad. I wonder what the guy who sang Coldplay will sound like if he tries something more aggressive. He could work well, or he could sound bad.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 08:19 am:   

I'm thinking bad....very bad. Plus they didn't love him. They didn't love lots of them. Like, Magni...He's an early exit. Back to Iceland.

Me, too. I can't listen to Mp3s so I'm just going on feeling. What's her last name?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 08:21 am:   

I was speaking about Heather's last name...
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 08:35 am:   

Luttrell...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 08:37 am:   

It's Heather Luttrell. You can get her CD through Amazon. I'm tempted by downloading it through iTunes.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 08:51 am:   

Thanks, Robt...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 11:43 am:   

Carla Kihlstedt is a busy woman. I just found another project she works on, Book of Knots. It seems to be more avant-garde rock, a bit like Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. Tom Waits is on the new CD they're doing.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 12:25 pm:   

Yeah, she gets around.

I still haven't listened to the last Kihlstedt thing I got.
Must. Stop. Buying. CDs. :-)
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 07:14 pm:   

Sad to say Chris didn't get cut yet. I thought his performance on the Doors song was just as bad as the Police one.

Matt leaving was disappointing. His choice of Duran Duran was weird, but he sounded good singing it. Of the bottom 3, he was the one who could actually sing well. I was hoping to hear more from him. And maybe we can ditch Chris or Phil next week.
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LT
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 07:26 pm:   

It comes on here in a half hour. Must say I'm bummed about C's survival, but I'm ready for his Doors trip...
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luciusx
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 09:55 pm:   

Well, that guy was an idiot to choose Duran Duran...and to say he loved them. Whoa. That was the end.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 05:15 am:   

I expect to see Matt fronting some sort of Coldplay type band pretty soon. His singing and look made me think of the guy from Keane. He's got a good voice, but didn't seem to get the style of music the band wants to play. The heavy Duran Duran song would have been appropriate if he were auditioning for an AOR band like Journey (they seem to need a new singer now).

I'll try to delay my comments on the future shows.
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luciusx
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 06:10 am:   

Rockstar: Journey? Yecch.

Chris and Phil won't be around long, I'm pretty sure. Nor will the Mexican-American woman, Ryan. Josh won't win, nor will the two women close to the bottom 3 last night. In fact you can rule out all the women except maybe Dilana. So it's already down to a very few, really. Lukas looks like a natural fit, but his personality may not translate. Magni might be a sleeper, though I doubt it.

The train wreck is coming....
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 06:23 am:   

They could still do Rockstar: Van Halen. Or maybe they can put together another band next season. I'm sure there are plenty of musicians willing to whore themselves on TV.

Out of the performances so far, Dilana and Lukas seem to be good matches for the band. Maybe somebody will surprise us and be a bit different next week.

I'd like to see more of them playing songs that don't play to their strengths. That way, we'll get to see whether they can do a good job on anything, or get a really awful performance (like Chris & Phil).
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luciusx
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 06:42 am:   

Dilana and Lukas -- Agreed. I'd be really surprised if we don't get some terrible performances. Some of these people are just bar band singers and it's gonna show.

Storm, the Portland girl--I forgot about her. She has a lot more fluidity and flexibility in her voice than she's shown. I've seen her and she's got a big following in the NW. She might be a contender.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 07:02 am:   

Finally saw Supernova last night.

Wow.

Far worse than even last season. "I wouldn't be here if I wasn't one of the best singers in the world." Priceless.

Why doesn't Rockstar do an "auditions" show to highlight the worst and freakiest. I can't even imagine how comical it would be.

Choosing Duran Duran for those judges is like sending a Dr. Suess manuscript to the Booker Prize selection committee. Instant suicide.

I could not understand their relatively benign comments to Phil, who was the worst singer of the three. Guess cool song selection trumps good pipes? Chris massacred LA Woman in a way that was borderline sacreligious, but so over-the-top it was almost enjoyable. His gusto won out.

I wouldn't pay to see any of these guys, but if I saw a Dilana-led band on the tube, I probably wouldn't change the channel. She's interesting in a freakish kind of way. She exerts a certain mutant magnetism. Hope she wins.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 07:19 am:   

I had always thought Dave Navarro was just a guy they hired to sit in the chair and make inane comments. I thought he was just in it for the easy money. But I noticed he has an Exec. Producer credit on the show. Did he actually dream that concept up? If so, I have a lot less respect for the guy...
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Luciusx
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 07:20 am:   

You wouldn't pay for these guys yet you'll spend 60 bucks on Seagall tickets...

I'm not too sure, Dave...

There's a few, IMO, who might be okay, but yeah, it's gonna be a dark ride...

Auditions would be excellent.
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luciuss
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 07:24 am:   

Maybe Navarro had the concept, but whatever, he's such a sleazebag. I expect him to leave a trail of slime. He looks in good shape, but he has an aura of rot about him...
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 07:40 am:   

Navarro wasn't an executive producer last year. Maybe he got the credit by bringing Tommy Lee in for this season. But he's not the only sleazy guy this year. Phil gave off a sleazy vibe when he was putting his arms on Brooke. It looked like she didn't enjoy it.

I didn't think Phil was the worst. Chris was wretched on both songs. Phil was too, but his style of bad matched the song a bit better. I laughed when Chris went on about being one of the best singers in the world.

Auditions would have been entertaining.
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luciuss
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 07:54 am:   

Yeeh, I forgot to mention that about Phil. What a sleaze. I thought she was gonna clobber him. And she that thing about, You're not up here for that....Phil just didn't get it.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 08:52 am:   

You almost have to respect Phil a little for that. I mean, what is rock and roll good for if a no-talent schmendrick with a few instants of fame can't mack on a tarted-up made-for-TV f***bunny like Brooke Burke? I mean, come on guys, step up to the plate! Whatcha waiting on?
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 09:04 am:   

Oh, by the way, sea-monkey-boy Lukas is a dick.

I think that the dark horse is the tantalizing Storm Large (a name even Lucius Shepard couldn't have come up with).
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luciuss
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 10:01 am:   

Maybe the winner should get to assault her...until her good friend Dave Navarro leaps in to save her.

Yeah, Lucas is a dick. What a shocker. A lead singer a dick. It's unparalleled. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 11:50 am:   

Lucas looks like Booji Boy from the Devo videos auditioning for Insane Clown Posse. Perfect ending: champion Dilana making out with Brooke Burke as the finale's closing credits roll. That might temporarily restore my faith in rawk.
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luciuss
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 12:03 pm:   

Booji Boy's a contender, but I'm pulling--fruitlessly--for Dilana.

Faith in rawk=Cafe Tacuba.
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 01:02 pm:   

1. Dilana
2. Storm

After that, it's a 12-way tie for last.
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luciuss
Posted on Friday, July 07, 2006 - 01:22 pm:   

You haven't seen 'em all. Wait'll next Wednesday.
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 08, 2006 - 04:01 pm:   

We were talking about Larry Coryell recently. Just found his first album, his rock band, the Free Spirits, is out on CD. I remember it as being not great, but really interesting. As far as I know, this is Coryell's only rock recording, though he does appear on Steve Marcus' Count's Rock Band, which has a rock-y vibe. And I did see him once, jamming with a Detroit percussionist at he old Eastown theater.

Anyway, FWIW....
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 08, 2006 - 08:22 pm:   

Jamming in a rock context, I should have said.
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mike m
Posted on Sunday, July 09, 2006 - 04:12 pm:   

Cool to hear, that's the one from 66 or something isn't it? The earliest I've heard are Lady Coryell and Coryell. Both pretty patchy but some nice tracks.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 09, 2006 - 04:22 pm:   

Yeah, I think. Check it out of Forced Exposure. Patchy, I think, is a good way to describe this, but like I said I haven't heard it for a while.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 06:44 am:   

Escovedo was good last night. There was no string quartet, but he did have a cellist. Plus, for a guy often associated with alt. country, he put on a really heavy show. I'm pretty sure I've seen metal bands that weren't as heavy as him.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 08:09 am:   

Just got the news...Syd Barrett dead at age 60 from diabetes complications.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 09:28 am:   

Robert == Ok, I know basically the show you saw. Yeah, he does play heavy--it's those punk origins coming out.

To bad about Syd...
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 10:33 am:   

I can't wait for Rock Star. That's tonight, right? Down goes Chris.
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 10:49 am:   

Yeah, RIP Syd Barrett.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 01:05 pm:   

Rock Star is 9 eastern time, right?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 01:14 pm:   

Yup.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 07:27 pm:   

There were a lot of bad performances tonight. Chris and Phil both had the same problems they had on the previous episodes. I'm confused as to why the band compliments Phil. Jenny struck me as being bad tonight, and Zarya seemed really bland. She struck me that way in the first episode, and this just reinforced it. Dana also seemed bland. She sang a lot better than Zarya, but she still needs some grit, or sleaze, or something to give her a bit of edge. Maybe that will come with age.

Jill caused me to appreciate Dilana a lot more. When Jill was hopping around, her singing suffered, she couldn't keep the mic in a good location. Last week, Dilana was able to jump around a lot more and still keep singing. After tonight, I'm more sold on her. I'm still thinking it will largely be between her and Lukas.

I didn't really like Storm's first performance, but I liked her more tonight.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 07:37 pm:   

Well, I'll comment after I've seen it, but it sounds interesting. I thought it was gonna be Lukas or Dilana from the git-go. Storm's a dark horse. I've seen her perform and when she's doing her own stuff, she's awesome.

Why the band likes Phil? Maybe they dug the way he assaulted Brooke last time. :-)
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 07:41 pm:   

What time does it come on in your time zone?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 07:46 pm:   

Nine Pacific, but don't worry about it -- i don't mind hearing about it early--in fact, it's cool--and anyway, next week I'll be in a totally different time zone.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 07:51 pm:   

New Thread.

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