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LS
Posted on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 09:51 pm:   

†††By Alistair on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 02:08 am:††Edit

Hey, I wonder what would happen if you drank red wine and listened to the Love, Love album... Nah, let's not think about it.

This puts me in mind of Larry Coryell, who's also played alongside McGlaughlin and Di Meola and De Lucia etc. For me, he's the best among these guys, much more naturally gifted than technically awesome, and he's also done some great "mainstream" jazz albums as well fusion, and has a couple of great accoustic albums too.

Jk,you might be interested in checking out the eletronic jazz, funky fusion thing that Coryell did with The Eleventh House in the early seventies. It's crazy music and has a kind of humour about it, which makes it even more appealing. Check out the covers of their albums, like this one, and you can see that these guys meant business (note the guy on the bottom left. He may well be the first Klingon to feature in a human musical ensemble):

http://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/the_eleventh_house/the_eleventh_house___l evel_one/
†††By ls on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 03:47 am:††Edit

Definitely, Coryell was great...I think because he had a rock sensibility that kept hin grounded. I remember his band, the Free Spirit, and his playing on the Steve Marcus projects, Count's Rock Band and The Lord's Prayer -- I really love those records, though they're generally scorned by jazz purists. They also featured Miroslav Vitous, Herbie Hancock, Steve Smith, etc, and were produced by Herbie Mann, on whose Memphis Underground record Coryell played along with my personal favorite guitarista of the time, Sonny Sharrock. The first time I heard that weird double picking Sharrock did, it reminded me of the vocalist, Leon Thomas.
†††By GabrielM on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 08:41 am:††Edit

For vocal flamenco, I really love the late Camaron de la Isla. There's a few classic collaborations he did with Paco de Lucia when they were younger, but I prefer his later stuff with Tomatito. He was a serious smoker and died of lung cancer in the early 90s. The smoking had quite an effect on his voice, making it deeper and raspier, but still incredibly soulful, like late Billie Holiday. There's some anthologies of his stuff availalbe in the US. He was also one of the first flamenco singers to use electric instruments.
†††By Ls on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 09:05 am:††Edit

Thanks, Gabe. He sounds intriguing,
†††By jk on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 10:08 am:††Edit

Yeah, Sharrock's a great guitarist. I like Ask the Ages, the album he did with Pharoah Sanders, produced by Laswell. And of course Last Exit were a great skronk band. I finally managed to find a Japanese copy of the self-titled Last Exit album recently.
†††By LS on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 10:54 am:††Edit

I got all his records, from Black Woman and Paradise to Live in New York, the Last Exits, the black album that's essentially an in memoriam compilation. Wish there were going to be more.
†††By MarcL on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 11:08 am:††Edit

I only know Sharrock from Space Ghost - Coast to Coast, but that is truly badass.
†††By ls on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 11:17 am:††Edit

Better hurry and catch that matinee, marc...

Did he do the theme? Wow. Missed it.
†††By MarcL on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 11:47 am:††Edit

According to Wikipedia, the soundtrack for Space Ghost was his final project. I recognized his name from the credits.

Pavement also played a wicked version of the SG theme on one episode.
†††By ls on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 11:58 am:††Edit

Shit, t hate to put down Space Ghost, but I kinda wish he'd done something else at the end.....
†††By mike m on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 01:36 pm:††Edit

Love, Love is a killer. Roughly speaking if you think of Herbie Hancock's Sextant, and then Eddie Henderson's first two electric albums (Realization and Inside Out) as albums two and three of Sextant, than Love, Love could be the fourth album. There was apparently a lot of material left over when Mwandishi ended and the Head Hunters picked up.

Dig Coryell quite a bit as well, although he's pretty patchy, I tend to like most of his late 60s/early 70s albums. Live at the Village Gate has to be the current running favorite, due to its stripped down, raw Hendrixy vibe.

Corea was on Bitches Brew and I think he was either joined by Jarrett around then or soon after because the band had double keys until not long after the Isle of Wight gig. I've got a lot of live electric Miles shows, but nothing with Coryell, at least in the 70s.

As far as flamenco-influenced rock goes, there were a number of Spanish bands in the 70s doing this sort of thing. The most famous example is Triana, but there are others like Iman Califato Independiente, Mezquita, Cai, Alameda, the list goes on. From an American perspective there's the Sabicas album "Rock Encounter" with Joe Beck on guitar, but I don't think it ever made it to CD (while most of the Spanish bands have).

Favorite Sharrock has to be "Ask the Ages." I like his playing on some of the old Herbie Mann albums as well, although mostly just for his playing.
†††By jk on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 01:37 pm:††Edit

Have you heard that Brute Force album that Sharrock is supposed to be all over?
†††By LS on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 02:17 pm:††Edit

Now that one's new to me, JK.

My favorite Sharrock is still the first album -- my jaw was on the fucking floor, and I guess it still is, But Ask The Ages is up there.

Love Live at the Village Gate....
†††By Alistair on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 11:09 am:††Edit

I've never heard Sharrock before. Sounds like I've been missing out on something good.
†††By LS on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 11:19 am:††Edit

Oh, yeah. You should seek him out. Ask the Ages would be a good starting point. Then the first album.
If you like the less scholarly side of Coryell, I should think you'll like Sharrock.

Jeez, all this 70s stuff. Ever heard the Jazz Composer's Orchestra. The first album was outstanding. Coryell's on it, along with Cherry, the Bleys, pretty near everybody else...


Old thread too long,,,
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jk
Posted on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 10:13 pm:   

Momus reviews the new Scott Walker album The Drift below. Out in May!

Horrorpop!

Fuck me, this is terrifying! Iíve come by The Drift, the new Scott Walker album. Donít ask me how. Itís on 4AD. I used to be on 4AD, but thatís by the by the by the by. But the thing is, this isnít a pop record, itís a nightmare. Itís a horror film, part Cocteau, part Jodorowsky. Itís a donkey being slaughtered, itís a sudden screaming orchestra, itís Elmer Fudd jumping out from behind a pillar and turning into a cloud of bees and stinging your face with a million ghoulish obscenities!

In fact, at the first listen thatís the main thing you notice. That things jump out at you, like jump cuts in a horror film. Completely unexpected things, things youíve never heard on a pop record before. Everything is ghostly, drifty, abstract, croony, brooding ó and suddenly it all erupts into noise, sheer livid horror.

If this is a horrific record, itís also an incredibly bold and original one. The clarity of Walkerís voice, the strangeness of his arrangements (he claims in this interview for BBCís The Culture Show that he doesnít do arrangements any more, just puts ďblocks of soundĒ here and there) and the startling poetry he comes up with combine to make you think ďWhat the fuck are the rest of us doing with this medium? Why arenít we treating it like sculpture, the way Scott is? There are no rules! Anything is possible!Ē
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LS
Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 - 06:00 am:   

We're talking about an album, right? From Momus' description, it sounds like some kind of bizarre collage and not that attractive. I'm gonna get it when it comes out, but from the description Walker sounds better in theory than in actuality, like an album I'll put on twice and then sell. I like difficult music, I listen to a lot of jazz that drives people crazy, the old NY Art quintet, Ornette's double quintet, early Ayler, but I've that found that pop records that are described in this way usually are more influential than listenable, and that the musical ideas contained in them are recycled from jazz and the avant garde. I think I'll pick up a used copy of Tilt and see what that does for me.
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 - 06:28 am:   

I love that Jazz Composers Orchestra record!

Considering Ornette, Ayler and co (and I always think of Art Ensemble of Chicago here too) have you ever checked out Sonny Simmon's Burning Spirits? Almost as intense as an early Brotzmann album.

Another musician for the Sharrock fans is guitarist Tisziji Munoz, very much like a Santana/Sharrock combination doing charts from Coltrane's Ascension. Guys like Pharoah Sanders, Ravi Coltrane, etc. tend to be his sidemen on occasion.
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LS
Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 - 06:43 am:   

Thanks for the tip on Munoz, mike. And the Sonny Simmons, an album I'd forgotten about.

Yeah, that JCOA record was sweet, huh?
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 - 10:37 am:   

Regarding The Drift, I don't think it has surreal cut-up collage type stuff like Nurse With Wound or something. I heard a bit of a track online and it still is a "song". It's just that the songs are way out there. I think he meant working more with orchestral blocks of sound, that type of thing. But there probably are jarring atonal noisy bits mixed in with it. Some of Tilt sounds almost avant garde classical, like Scelsi or something.
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ls
Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 - 11:25 am:   

I don't mind noise. I don't mind Nurse with Wound sometimes. David Tibet...Hey. Anyway, I'll listen. I'm just not sure it's my kind of thing exactly.
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 - 06:15 pm:   

Just got Sir Richard Bishop's Fingering the Devil on Latitudes. Rick Bishop from the Sun City Girls went into the Southern studios in London when he was on tour and laid down 50 minutes of solo acoustic guitar stuff. It's pretty cool, and recommended if you like the other solo discs on Revenant and Locust. It's one of those limited editions though, better grab one quick if you're interested, it's destined to become ebay fodder. I got mine directly through the Southern records website.
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ls
Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2006 - 06:34 pm:   

Thanks, jk. I'll do so immediately.
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jk
Posted on Saturday, April 29, 2006 - 09:42 pm:   

Lucius, have you seen the Sir Richard Bishop CDRs up on ebay at the moment? They're being sold by Bishop himself (esotericbooks is his seller name-it states the seller owns the copyright in the CDRs so it must be Bishop himself). I've never seen these things before. I just was checking to see if Fingering the Devil is up there yet. He's selling that too, stating it's out of print and this is the only time it will be up on ebay (sold by him). Those limited edition (50 or 100) CDRs look pretty cool, but heck if I'm going to pay good money for a crummy cdr that's going to crap out eventually.
Maybe they'll be reissued as regular cds by Locust or some other label in the future. Looks like he sells lots of rare occult books too.
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LS
Posted on Saturday, April 29, 2006 - 10:24 pm:   

I don't use ebay--I used to, but when my identity got stolen a second time, I took it as a sign. I occasionally make use of a couple of DVD sellers I found on Ebay, but that's it. So, the answer is no. :-) They sound cool.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2006 - 06:49 am:   

I liked the last few Tool albums. I'm a sucker for music that's strongly influenced by 70s King Crimson. But the new Tool isn't very good. It's like their last two, but without the memorable parts. I can listen to this one and not remember anything interesting on it.

After 11 years, King Crimson reformed and completely changed styles. They reformed again in the 90s and played something different again (although not as far removed from their 70s work). I think Tool needs to reinvent themselves, because they're pretty stagnant now.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 09, 2006 - 06:08 am:   

Just a quick RIP for Grant McLennan of the Go-Betweens, who died over the weekend.
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jk
Posted on Tuesday, May 09, 2006 - 07:57 pm:   

What?! That's a real shame. Damn.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 11:32 am:   

On Mon. night, saw the opening night of Tom Verlaine's tour. First chance I've had to see an electric solo show. My reaction was kind of mixed. Some of the artsier, more complex, polyglot tunes from his only occasionally successful SONGS AND OTHER THINGS did not come across well, while his more straightforward tunes and older songs ("Clear it Away," "Words From the Front") worked beautifully. The man is still a terrific guitar stylist who has made some great music. I'm glad I went, particularly given how rarely he tours these days.
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Alistair Rennie
Posted on Sunday, May 21, 2006 - 03:56 pm:   

Well. Owing to your gracious recommendations, guys, I got hold of some Sonny Sharrok. And.... Good God in Heaven, it really is extraordinary. It's not just his playing, which is supreme, but it's the music itself. It's like nothing else I've ever heard, and if that's a cliche, what the hell. But listening to his stuff seems like listening to some kind of ultimate concentration of music in general. You can hear traces of just about anything in it, ranging from jazz to indi to metal to folk or whatever (even if he precedes some of this). Is this a typical reaction to Sharrock? The albums I've got are "Highlife" and the most amazing "Space Ghost Coast to Coast", plus I have another couple of what must be earlier songs. There's a song on Space Ghost called "Out to Launch", which surely says it all (was Space ghost some kind of TV show?). And I've had a couple of beers, so the smile on my face is very healthy.
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Alistair Rennie
Posted on Sunday, May 21, 2006 - 04:01 pm:   

Right now I'm listening to a song called "All my Trials". This is a song that could surely put an end to hostilities and strife the whole world over. Wonderful stuff.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, May 21, 2006 - 04:26 pm:   

Yeah, my reaction to Sharrock was pretty much WTF! I heard him in the 70's, the Black Woman album, which featured that melodic doublepicking that i believe you hear on some tracks of Highlife, if I recall...It was like the first time I heard Leon Thomas and said, Holy Shit, is that sound coming out of his mouth? Anyway, it's cool you're digging it....
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 09:23 am:   

Did anyone pay attention to the Eurovision competition this year? I'm rather disturbed by the winner, Lordi:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5ZfQMOHB5k&search=Hard%20Rock%20Hallelujah%20Lor di%20Finland%20Eurovision%202006

It's the sort of thing that is funny at first, but then I began to wonder how serious they were. Plus, is that really the best song?
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 09:26 am:   

Oh, in case you can't watch it, their performance looks kind of like Gwar, but without the tongue-in-cheek way that Gwar does it. The music is pretty generic metal. The lyrics: http://www.eurovision.tv/english/2115.htm
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 09:46 am:   

Wow...

As to whether it's the best song....I'll guess we'll have to wait for the Rockoning to find out.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 10:20 am:   

Robert, you're kidding, right? This was some sort of a prank, right?


RIGHT..?????????
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 10:41 am:   

I only wish I was kidding. I've heard that Eurovision winners are usually bad, but I think this lowers the bar.

What makes it even more wretched is it's gotten stuck in my head now.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 02:36 pm:   

I thought the Eurovision winners were usually bubble-gum popsters singing about bluebirds and rainbows.

Oh well, I had been wondering what Henry Rollins had been doing with himself lately; now I know!

And how on earth could THAT get stuck in your head???
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 02:56 pm:   

I wish I knew how that could get stuck in my head.

Have you seen the show Rollins has been doing on IFC? It generally has a few brief rants by him, an interview, and a musical performance. The brief rants aren't that good, he works better if he has more time to develop. The music guest aren't anything I care about (Death Cab for Cutie, Ben Folds, Ben Harper). But his interviews are really interesting. His choices are not based on people trying to promote current books/films/CDs, but are just based on him wanting to talk to the person. He had Ozzy, Werner Herzog, Bill Mahr, and Jeff Bridges.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 05:35 pm:   

I don't get IFC, but I would file a Henry Rollins talk show in the "Life's Too Short" file. I have tons of respect for Black Flag, but Rollins himself as a performer/personality has never impressed me. I couldn't imagine one cogent observation emerging from a Rollins-Maher skull session.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 05:55 pm:   

Life's too short? This from a man who's flying cross country to see the Seagal blue's band?

Henry's interview with M Madsen was hilarious.
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ben peek
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 07:33 pm:   

eurovision is never about 'good' music :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 06:21 am:   

Lucius, so what's your point? :-)

It's not like HR is incapable of being witty or amusing. I love the title of his book "Art to Choke Hearts"! I just think a solid thirty or sixty minutes of HR ranting/cogitating/brainstorming would be a bit too much to take. With the right interview subject (Herzog, Madsen, etc.) I don't doubt there could be flashes of inspiration.

I could be wrong, but that's the way I feel...
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 06:22 am:   

I have had a change of heart. I am now devoted with all my heart and soul to spreading the fame of Lordi beyond the icy reaches of Finland to all corners of the known universe. Hail Lordi!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 06:52 am:   

The Madsen interview was funny because Rollins was trying to be serious, to talk about acting, MM's process, and Madsen was doing his I'm just a casual god who fucks a lot of women thing, and then they started to talk about MM's poetry, which even he thinks sucks...They were never on the same page and kept on going despite that.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 07:22 am:   

Has anyone heard anything about TELL ME DO YOU MISS ME, the documentary about Luna's last tour?
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 11:02 pm:   

I just saw the Steven Segal Blues Band.

"I asked for chicken, but they gave me alligator ass..."

I don't know what else to say. Going to bed.
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PM
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 05:57 am:   

Was it everything that you thought it would be and little of what you wanted it to be?

Did you go backstage and/or interact with the man?

And was the lyric/line directed toward yours truly :-)
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 06:14 am:   

Seagal's going to be playing in Pittsburgh in a few weeks. I don't think I can bring myself to spend $25 to see him.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 07:30 am:   

Don't go!

No, the lyric was not aimed at anyone...

The highlight of the evening was a song entitled Feets Don't Fail Me Now. Dave G who was here commented that he wondered how much one had to pay a high-priced, high quality back-up band, all black, to repeat the line Feets don't fail me now?

When S introduced the band, that was another highlight. He tried to talk like an Afro-American, introduced several of the group as his "Memphis chillun," and introduced the female singer as Light Milk Chocolate she so fine. God. It made me embarrassed to be human.

They buried S's guitar in the mix except for a couple of incompetent leads, and they tried to bury his singing.

It was appaling.
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PM
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 07:56 am:   

"I started out early on playing blues because those were the guys I watched and grew up with and learned from. I did branch out and play things like rock but I guess I just learned the blues too well."

"I am hoping that I can be known as a great writer and actor some day, rather than a sex symbol."

"Talk to My Ass."
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 08:12 am:   

Yeah, well, that says it all...
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 04:18 pm:   

I†concur with everything Lucius said, but I would only add that it was everything I could have ever hoped for and 50% more. I kitsch-tastic extravaganza. And I should note, it was sold out.

seagal may be a pantomime guitarist, but he pantomimes with great guitars: a vintage Flying V and a Gibson Explorer!

The Portland Mercury dedicated an entire (side-splitting) issue dedicated to Seagal the Man the Myth the Legend. What serious artist could inspire that?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 04:49 pm:   

He does play a mean real air guitar.
As you're going to see him for an unprecedented 2cd time, I insist on a report.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 05:49 pm:   

At the risk of annoying et al I don't think I can just let this stand.

I consider it loathsome that some star fucker can hire a black band and go out and sing/play "the blues".

And pack the house. Folk aren't expecting much beyond a spectacle and of course the band is just a throwaway. Just part of a sick joke.

I'd like to have seen him dodge a few beer bottles :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 09:59 pm:   

Is singer-guitarist who can't sing or play any more loathesome than actors who can't act and directors who can't direct?

No.


And you'll be gratified to know that most people really seemed to dig him.....
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 11:22 am:   

Thanks. I think I'll skip Seagal.

Pelican is playing in Pittsburgh in about 2 and a half weeks. I want to see that show, but I may have other commitments that night.

I found another metal band worth pointing out: Taint. They're a Welsh sludge band, with some similarities to Isis and Neurosis.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 11:45 am:   

Somebody else recommended Taint recently. I'll definitely check 'em out.

File Segal under social/cultural research. I was frankly astonished to see how many 20 somethings were into him. There were some older people who were there who were fans, a few had seen him the night before in Seattle and the previous night in Spokane. But the majority of the people were young and digging it.

One thing I forgot to mention -- Segal had his own security and they wouldn't let this handicapped guy because his crutches could be used as weapons. One look at this guy, his legs all twisted, and you knew he wasn't using the crutches for weapons, but Segalls security treated him like shit. Isn't that illegal--banning the handicapped?
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 07:12 pm:   

If it's not illegal it's certainly in rather poor taste.

Returning to loathsome...my point is not about actors who can't act or directors who can't direct.

That's incompetence.

It's not quite about being a poseur either. Seagal can honestly claim to have fraudulent qualities.

It's more about engaging in a musical tradition and piling on the oppression.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 08:07 pm:   

It seems like you're splitting hairs to me...not to mention looking for something to get exercised about. There must be something in your neighborhood to get pissed off about that you could actually do something about. Seagal's a bad joke who's not doing himself any good in the long run.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 07:32 am:   

If you want to go after millionaire carpetbaggers misappropriating the culture of the oppressed for profit, take a whack at Paul Simon. He went there first. And he's easier to beat up.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 07:48 am:   

Yeah, good point. Simon gets a pass from most people, gets credit for starting world music (a joke, since he was preceded decades earlier by a number of jazz musicians, notably Don Cherry, who sought to bring African and other music/musicians into the mainstream), and had made music that made me gag it was so sugary. Plus Edie Brickell could beat him up.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 01:22 pm:   

I am morbidly curious at the Paul Simon/Brian Eno collaboration, but can't bring myself to buy it. I'm afraid at the end of the day it's going to be really interesting Eno soundscapes under typically dull and awful Simon songs.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 06:17 pm:   

Ewwwwwwww.....!!!
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 06:19 am:   

You must have seen his appearance on SNL...
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 06:44 am:   

Not recently...but I have bad memories of Simon. Hasn't he hosted SNL like 8 times?
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 07:35 am:   

He was on recently, showcasing his Eno-produced material. I saw him do "How Can You Live in the Northeast" and was underwhelmed. Intersting music, atrocious melody and lyrics...
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 08:43 am:   

That's an awful name for a song....maybe the awfulest.

The Answer to his musical question -- Because I live on a 20 million dollar estate surrounded by alligators and nukes...
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PM
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 05:46 pm:   

Next up...David Gabriel...
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 06:41 pm:   

You mean Peter Gabriel? If so, he's a different story. He ploughed a lot of money and weight into realworld records which was a major player in popularizing African pop music...and he made stars out of people like Baba Maal and Rossy and Sam Mangwana etc, so it could be said that he gave something back.
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jk
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 06:50 pm:   

Maybe Seagal could get Eno to do a remix of "Talk to My Ass." Eno could apply his oblique strategies and sonic landscapes to an avant remix of Seagal's blistering, blues-drenched kiss-off song. Hey, if Dr. Eno will whore himself out to Paul Simon, why not Seagal? Now that might be a worthy remix project.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 06:56 pm:   

I think that would be awesome. "Talk to my Ass (The Conversational Mix)"....Eno could adopt a blues swagger, too. Maybe he could learn aikido.
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jk
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 07:07 pm:   

Or he could get Lou Reed to teach him martial arts. Sensei Lou. I talked to someone online not long ago who said that Seagal was his sensei at some martial arts center in L.A. He said Seagal was arrogant. Can you believe that? Seagal arrogant? I hope Seagal doesn't rush down to help all the poor and downtrodden if there's another big hurricane like he did with Katrina, all that black dye might get blown out of his hair if the winds are still too strong.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 07:18 pm:   

Last story about Seagal in NO I heard, he tried to come onstage with Allan Touissant and Touissant had him tossed from the club....

Poor sensei...
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PM
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 09:37 pm:   

Shock the monkey...

Neither Peter, Paul, nor David...
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, June 03, 2006 - 10:21 am:   

What's it all mean?
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, June 03, 2006 - 10:42 am:   

Listened to Carla Kihlstedt's Two Foot Yard. Avant rock at its finest. Kihlstedt, who's a founder of Sleepytime Gorilla Museum, plays violin and sings. I like her stuff, which ranges from ambient to bizarre, to the Musuem's records.
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mike m
Posted on Sunday, June 04, 2006 - 03:52 pm:   

You ever check out Charming Hostess? Kihlstedt is on the "Eat" album. Sort of avant/klezmer rock, little bit of Art Bears in there too. The two main SGM guys are on this as well. Like their early Idiot Flesh stuff as well.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 04, 2006 - 05:07 pm:   

Klezmer music makes me nervous, but in Kihlstedt's hands it might be worth it. Jeez, mike, have you heard everything?
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mike m
Posted on Sunday, June 04, 2006 - 05:19 pm:   

Ha! I must have used to think it was possible to anyway. :-) I used to write for a zine that came out of the SF bay area that's always covered a lot of avant rock, so I got to hear quite a bit.

BTW, you ever get a listen to those Area discs? Curious if you enjoyed em.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 04, 2006 - 05:26 pm:   

Yeah, I did, though the music was less interesting to me than the singer. The guy had a set of pipes. I liked Crac the best. I'm thinking about getting a live set. You have a rec on which is best?
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mike m
Posted on Sunday, June 04, 2006 - 05:33 pm:   

I think Are(a)zione is probably the only one you need, the two posthumous shows have poor sound quality. Although there's a strange live record by them called Event '76 that's mostly a free jazz work, but includes Steve Lacy. Stratos has a few solo albums to his name, although they're usually just voice and extremely experimental, but demonstrate an even wider range than the Area albums.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, June 04, 2006 - 05:38 pm:   

Thanks. I might try to go for one of the Stratos albums too. The guy's amazing.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 05, 2006 - 06:04 am:   

I've heard one song by Charming Hostess. I liked it since the vocals drew from Bulgarian Women choirs. I thought it sounded more like Bulgarian folk mixed with rock, rather than klezmer. I haven't gotten a full CD though.

I also tried another of Kihlstedt's bands, Tin Hat Trio. They were mellow jazz/folk/classical stuff. Pretty good.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 05, 2006 - 07:19 am:   

Yeah, I've been meaning to pick up some Tin Hat. Charming Hostess goes on the list, too. Klezmer music just doesn't grab me. I was into this jazz clarinet player, Don Byron, and he suddenly started playing klezmer music in this concert I attended and it was a fucking shock. Never got over it. :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 08:27 am:   

Mike, if you're out there...there's a box set of stratos recordings available for 80 bucks. Worth it?
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mike m
Posted on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 10:37 am:   

I found the Stratos solo albums pretty tough going and not very listenable, even if what he's doing is technically amazing. It just depends how experimental you want to get and how much you can deal with solo vocals. I can't remember what Area albums you bought, but I'd be sure you check out Caution Radiation Area, Maledetti and/or Event '76 before heading into the solo works. Those albums have some of his weirder experiments without totally crossing into the avant-garde.

And sorry if the klezmer reference on Charming Hostess made it sound like they were entirely so. Here's a review I wrote on the Eat album for better reference:

http://gnosis2000.net/reviews/charminghostess.htm
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 11:02 am:   

Thanks, Mike....
I bought Macht Arbeit Frei and Crac. I'll follow your advice re Stratos. Maldetti, Area (A) zone, and Event 76 are on the list.

And thanks for the Hostess review.....
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 07:12 am:   

I've searched all the geek sites, but can find no mention of this album. Don't know the name, but it was Leon Thomas and Nana Vasconcellos live at Montreaux. Does anyone have a line on that.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 10:52 am:   

In my desperate search for new pop music that's decent, I have found Liars' Drum's Not Dead. Anyone else like it?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 11:05 am:   

Don't know it....
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mike m
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 11:57 am:   

I'm not sure if Nana is on it or not and am not near the LP at the moment, but there's a live at Montreux album by Leon Thomas called Gold Sunrise at Magic Mountain from 71. I suspect the one you want is later though?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 12:14 pm:   

I can't remember. Maybe that's the one I'm looking for. Thanks. Do you know if anyone is selling it?
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mike m
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 12:58 pm:   

I don't think it's out on CD, I bought an LP from dustygroove.com a few years ago and I don't think they carry it anymore. Might be able to find it through gemm.com?
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 01:10 pm:   

T'anks, man.
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 04:53 pm:   

I'm almost certain that it's Gold Sunrise at Magic Mountain.
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mike m
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 05:46 pm:   

I checked the LP, there's a "Na-Na" on percussion and berimbau, so it must be the one you're looking for. Neal Creque on piano, Cornell Dupree on guitar, Victor Gaskin on bass, Oliver Nelson on alto sax, Sonny Morgan on conga and David Lee, Jr. on drums. They do The Honey Man, Chains of Love, Cousin Mary, Na Na, and Umbo Weti.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 05:59 pm:   

I looked on Gemm. They have it, but only on vynil and I no longer have a record player. Sigh.

Thanks, guys.
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PM
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 08:31 pm:   

As far as I know it's never been released on CD.

But someone who owned the album could record it to a CD.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 09:30 pm:   

Well, anyway. It sure is a good record. I shouldn't have gotten rid of my records, but I got tired of moving albums.
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PM
Posted on Thursday, June 08, 2006 - 12:18 am:   

CDs brought a few advantages but more than a few have reconsidered dumping their vinyl.

One of the great things about the internet though is being able to find things...so maybe someone will pop up with this album at some point in time.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, June 08, 2006 - 07:36 am:   

Say, guys, this is the best music search site I've ever seen...They have a bunch of sellers for this LP...

http://www.musicstack.com/tsearch/leon+thomas/gold+sunrise+on+magic+mountain
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 08, 2006 - 07:42 am:   

72,00 for a cd....Ouch,
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 05:42 am:   

Does anyone have recommendations on the best Tom Verlaine CDs? I saw him play on Saturday and liked his stuff. I have no clue which CDs are supposed to be good though.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 06:07 am:   

The classic Television album is Marquee Moon, but I'm not that familiar with his solo out put. Dave G probably has something to say about this.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 06:13 am:   

After looking a bit, I think most of his set came from his new vocal album (he also released an instrumental album this year). Maybe I should start with it.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 06:28 am:   

Yeah, if that's what you heard and liked, but you can't go wrong with a best of Television comp, which can be had pretty cheap...
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 06:45 am:   

The really kick-ass Verlaine solo disc is Dreamtime. When he played here, he also did "Words From the Front" from the CD of the same name, which is quite good. Dreamtime (from which "Clear it Away" made it into this year's live set) has been reissued a couple of times (once by Rollins' Infinite Zero label) and can usually be found.

The hardest thing about TV is finding which of his discs are still in print. They tend to go OP pretty quickly.

You could do a lot worse than digging up a copy of the comp A Miller's Tale, which collects most of his solo high points and includes an extra live CD.
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R.Wilder
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 07:07 am:   

The first two Television records were remixed, repackaged and reissued by Ryko disc about two years ago, so they should still be around. "Little Johnny Jewel" single is on "Marquee Moon," which would be the best of the two. "The Blow-up" is still available as a two-disc set, too. That's a killer live record, originally only a Roir cassette (come to think about it, I saw it recently on vinyl, too). "Warm and Cool" was just reissued a month or two back, with a bunch of alternate takes. The new instrumental Verlaine is akin to "Warm and Cool."

Tommy's playing Chicago tonight. Wish I could go.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 08:37 am:   

Oops, sorry, I meant Tom Verlaine's solo stuff goes out of print fairly quickly.

This weekend, I had a chance to screen W.T. Morgan's documentary X: The Unheard Music, which I really enjoyed.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 09:56 am:   

I heard Dreamtime a long time ago and was pretty underwhelmed. I actually like one or two of the other solo records better, but not enough to recall which ones they are. Verlaine sounds like he's noodling to me.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 10:11 am:   

Through most of the set, he didn't sound like he was noodling. But one of the last songs dragged on a lot. Verse, solo section, verse, solo section, etc. I think there were 5 or 6 separate solo sections in it. He avoided entirely instrumental stuff.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 10:37 am:   

I like Verlaine, but he tends to fall into that mode on some of his albums, which is why I prefer Marquee Moon. I'd like a highlight package of his solo stuff so I may follow D's advice and get the Miller's Tale,
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 11:01 am:   

He did play some obscurely-constructed tunes when I saw him. If he would just play his best stuff, in a tight, high-energy fashion, it would be awe-inspiring. He does have the flaw of many ultra-creative folks of trying to do everything at once.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 11:06 am:   

Maybe that's it...or maybe that just the nature of the beast, that's how his music manifests....spottily....
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 12:46 pm:   

Supposedly he's spent like the last five years scoring films in some midwestern university archive. Terminal obliqueness would be an occupational hazard.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 12:58 pm:   

There you go....

That is a hazard.
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Robert Wexler
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 05:08 pm:   

Marquee Moon is one of my all time favorite albums. I've been listening to Adventure lately, after getting the re-issue from the library, but his solo stuff never did much for me except for Warm and Cool, his intrumental album. There's a lot of noodling, but it works for me there. He just released two new albums, one instrumental one with vocals. I'd like to pick them up eventually.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 05:31 pm:   

Long time listener, first time caller? :-)

Yeah, I feel pretty much the same.
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jk
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 06:13 pm:   

Got Scott Walker's new one The Drift. I have to admire the experimental nature of the album, there's nothing else that really sounds like it, and he obviously put a lot of effort into it. On the other hand, after listening to it I kind of feel like someone just punched me in the stomach.
And it must be the only album with a song about Mussolini's wife that features a side of pork being repeatedly hit.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 06:44 pm:   

If you hadn't know it was pork, would you have known it was pork, as opposed, say, to beef or human flesh? As
opposed to wet papier mache? Reason I ask, every review I've read mentions the pork, and I thought SW mght be playing a hell of a joke on everyone and making the pork noise by means of synthesizers or treated percussion.... :-)

Ordered it, but haven't got it yet.
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jk
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 06:55 pm:   

He said it was pork in an interview in Mojo magazine. It does sound like meat of some kind is being punched, not a synth or percussion. You'll know it when you hear it. Someone is making a movie about him, and there were some clips online showing them hitting the slab of meat in the studio.

Other strange sounds include Scott playing saxophone which sounds like a donkey braying, and the song contains the lyrics "I'll punch a donkey in Galway". Hmm, no idea what he's on about with that one. He also had the producer's brother make a special wooden box that they could bang. There's some really nice string arrangements too that move into Ligeti or Xenakis-type territory.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 12, 2006 - 07:13 pm:   

Sorta like Rocky... :-)

Well, I should have it in a few.....
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 06:04 am:   

Spent a good deal of last night listening to Un Viaje, Cafe Tacuba's three disc live set plus concert video. It's great. Cafe Tacuba, for those unfamilar with them, is the greatest of the Rock en Espanol bands. They're first album, Re, was a mix of Punk and norteno, and over the course of ten years, they've become sophisticated and very eclectic. Recorded with lots of screaming in the Palace de Desportes in Mexico City, this ranks with the best live sets I've heard. Just a great experience. And you get three cds and a dvd for 20 bucks on Amazon. If you haven't heard any rock en espanol, you need this...
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jk
Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 07:03 pm:   

Did you pick up the Free America series of reissues Lucius? A series of jazz albums made in France in the early seventies. Albums by Alan Shorter, Frank Wright, Paul Bley, Art Ensemble of Chicago, Emergency, Roswell Rudd, Clifford Thornton, Anthony Braxton, Steve Lacy, Archie Shepp. Some really cool stuff. Similar to the Byg-actuel stuff released in France in the seventies. There were 15 discs reissued a year or so ago, in limited editions. Most of them are still available.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 07:09 pm:   

I got a few of them. The Shepp stuff, AEC, Rudd. Those are the guys I track. Don't much care for Bley or Braxton as leaders.
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mike m
Posted on Friday, June 16, 2006 - 07:12 am:   

Ever check out some of the goods on these labels?

http://www.ninewinds.com/

http://www.cryptogramophone.com/
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 16, 2006 - 07:34 am:   

I own a couple of the Nels Cline CDs, but most of that stuff is new to me.

Thanks, Mike...I think. :-)
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mike m
Posted on Friday, June 16, 2006 - 10:04 am:   

Those labels are trouble. :-) I can't think of too many releases I've tried out that weren't great (although I prefer live Nels to studio Nels). I really dig Jefferson Slinky on Nine Winds (I think there's some crossover with the SGM/Charming Hostess axis as it's a SF bay area jazz label). There's an album by a group of musicians on Crypto called Bone Structure I think you'd probably like. Both labels have a sort of avant edge to them, although I'd say there's probably more composed material on Nine Winds and more improv on Crypto.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 16, 2006 - 10:15 am:   

Live Nels is always better, though I like his early albums on Soul Note. I'll check out Bone Structure. Nine Winds, too. My interest was piqued by the album with the Bernie Maupin, Nels, and the violinist.
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mike m
Posted on Friday, June 16, 2006 - 11:14 am:   

There's a vendor called www.indiejazz.com that carries both labels and several others as well. I'll have to check out that Maupin too, been listening to a bunch of old Mwandishi and Headhunters shows of late.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, June 16, 2006 - 11:52 am:   

Mwandishi.....Mmmm!

Yeah, I think that was one of the links I tried. I need to make more money.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Sunday, June 18, 2006 - 09:19 am:   

I got the new Scott Walker. I have not heard anything quite like it. Perhaps it's a bit like some contemporary classical composers (some of George Crumb's work springs to mind). Kayo Dot's mellow parts are also a bit similar.

I don't know if I like it, but it's unique and interesting.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, June 18, 2006 - 10:36 am:   

I find I'm liking The Drift the more I listen to it. It's certainly challenging, but it's the kind of record that reveals different things on new listens.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 05:28 am:   

After getting Verlaine's newest CD, I prefer him live. It was more intense, with more powerful guitar. On CD, it's not as impressive.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 05:35 am:   

But isn't that always the case? Live is more intense than CD. I haven't heard the new one, but I really like a couple of his CDs, esp Marquee Moon. But live, the band was better.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 05:50 am:   

It's usually the case, but not always. Opeth comes across better on CD. The same holds true for The Gathering. Live, Baroness sounds just like on CD, so it's not more intense. But that seems to be a reflection of how they record. There are also bands with a lot of studio work that is usually missing live.

With Verlaine, due to the live site, I was expecting something more rock and not quite as...pop isn't the right word, but it's close.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 07:38 am:   

"I'll punch a donkey/In the streets of Galway..."

Hmmmm, this new Scott Walker is going to be a little harder to digest than I thought.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 08:11 am:   

Still listening to The Drift.

I swear there's a guy doing Donald Duck impressions at the end of "Escape." No lie.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 08:41 am:   

I caught the Donald impression too. It adds a bit of humor to an otherwise bleak album.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 09:01 am:   

Just got it. Haven't listened yet.

I have to admit I don't get Opeth. They're like pop metal. Or Metal goth. It's pretty for a few spins, but ultimately trivial. It seems to replace real passion with hauteur.
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jk
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 11:06 am:   

Yeah, the Daffy Duck voice is saying "what's up doc?". I like that line in Cassocks Are, "you can easily picture this in the current top ten." Har har, yeah right. Well, The Drift is sure a change from the last song he sung on, Only Myself To Blame from the soundtrack album of the James Bond film The World is Not Enough(!).
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 11:48 am:   

I enjoyed Opeth on Blackwater Park, but my interest has faded. I originally liked their blending of death metal with Nick Drake influenced folk. Each album sees them loosing more of the folk and picking up more progressive rock influence, and I'd rather listen to the original 70s band they copy. Plus, their live shows were rather dull.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 11:53 am:   

Yup, I agree. Never saw them live.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 12:05 pm:   

Kind of enjoyed the new Sonic Youth. Although I love their artsy side, it's kind of refreshing to hear them make a nice pop record, unfettered by downtown pretensions. Kind of a throwback to the Bad Moon Rising days...
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jk
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 12:19 pm:   

Downtown pretentions, yeah that would describe them. And they hang out with Sophia Coppola too don't they? Maybe Sophia could film her next movie at one of Kim's "art" installations.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 01:21 pm:   

Pretensions are fun, in small doses.
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mike m
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 02:50 pm:   

I liked Opeth for a little while, but I found their musical structures to be too similar from song to song. I could feel the dynamics before a change would come - no surprises. For a death or black metal/epic prog rock crossover I get a little more out of Enslaved.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:25 pm:   

Yeah, I was with 'em for a nanosecond. But Black Metal, except perhaps in Scandinavia, is a pose, and they never seemed to have the right attitude.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:42 pm:   

Nick Cave can pull of dark/disturbing/evil lyrics much more effectively than any metal band I've heard. Murder Ballads makes death metal seem cartoonish.

My hopes for good metal CDs this year come from Isis. They've got two albums due for release this year. There is an official album, and an "In the Fishtank" collaboration with Aereogramme.

Maybe Virgin Black will be interesting. They have three CDs due out this year. One is pure classical music (with the Adelaide Symphony), one mixes orchestra and metal, and the final one pure death metal. They're supposed to all be different movements of the same piece. I like their classical/metal blendings, but three CDs will likely be overkill.
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mike m
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:45 pm:   

Demon est Deus Inversus always summed it up for me. And it seems like none of them knew Venom weren't serious.
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mike m
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:48 pm:   

Virgin Black were kind of a goth-ish band weren't they?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:53 pm:   

I like Bathory, the prog devil music band Fields of the Nefilim, I like a bunch of devil and black metal bands, even some SLayer - "I drink the vomit of priests," while patently insincere, captured a certain elan. :-)
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:55 pm:   

A lot of people label Virgin Black as gothic metal. I view them as being a little different from gothic though. I view them as doom metal mixed with classical music (not neoclassical shred) and an operatic singer (one of the two metal singers I've heard who actually shows opera training).
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mike m
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 03:59 pm:   

I tend to like the death and grind bands most, Morbid Angel, Immolation, Agoraphobic Nosebleed, Cephalic Carnage etc. I like my metal ugly. :-) I liked some of the Bathory stuff but couldn't stand the guy's wailing, so my interest is limited. In fact Enslaved kind of strike me as a latter-day "Viking Metal" era Bathory.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:11 pm:   

I really like only one Bathory album, can't recall the name, but it was Viking era--I should probably buy some Enslaved. Not much on grind bands. You're right. Uglee.
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mike m
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:15 pm:   

Probably Hammerheart.
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jk
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:16 pm:   

Sunn o)))'s Black One album is pretty interesting. Stretched-out droning waves of feedback with vocals from Leviathan and Xasthur. I find the vocals pretty funny, when they can be understood. The music is more interesting to me than the standard black metal, it's more experimental. They're taking influences from minimalist composers and Indian music as well as Black Metal.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:21 pm:   

Hammerheart. Right.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 04:58 pm:   

Great names. I remember a marquee at the Paradise Theater in Boston for a metal matinee:

Death
Famine
Destruction
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PM
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 05:12 pm:   

"Doom, despair, and agony on me!" ---HeeHaw

Sorry just couldn't resist :-)

And everytime I think of Tampa, well can't say it gets me in that doom and gloom mood.

Now Sweden. The Swedes have it in spades...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 05:46 pm:   

Tampa?
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PM
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 07:36 pm:   

Yep, Tampa, FL stomping ground of any number of death metal bands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_death_metal
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 07:54 pm:   

Everyplace is the stomping ground of death metal bands.

New thread,

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