Good Movies 30 Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Shepard, Lucius » Good Movies 30 « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 - 01:29 pm:   

Anyone seen this? GUY X?

Rudy Spruance (Jason Biggs) is lost. He has been left in the middle-of-nowhere among the snowy wastelands of the Arctic. No one comes except a swarm of blood-thirsty mosquitoes. As we awakens in an army hospital, that doesn't officially exist, Rudy understands what it is to be on the sharp end of a 'small clerical error.' "You'll want to scratch," a nurse tells him when he come round.
Rudy enlists in order to escape a little prison time for burglary. His fellow soldiers are a right bunch of rag-tag misfits: there's Lavone, a wannabe beat-poet; the sadistic Sergeant Genteen; and Petri, the base dealer who thinks that sci-fi movies are the pinnacle of art; finally, there's the base commander, Colonel Woolwrap, who thinks that Rudy was much like him when he was a young man.

However, Rudy doesn't see himself under the tutelage of Woolwrap or anyone else's for that matter! But then Rudy meets Sergeant Irene Teale - beautiful, intelligent and most importantly, sane. Unfortunately, she's also Woolwrap's girlfriend… Stars Jason Biggs, Natascha McElhone, Jeremy Northam & Michael Ironside.

It's not a great movie, but it's incredibly atmospheric and has great dialogue and is way weird. A black comedy/thiller.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 - 02:26 pm:   

Natascha McElhone is about as good as it gets. Loved her in Laurel Canyon.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 - 02:29 pm:   

Got my Seagal ticket in the mail today. Wheeee!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 - 03:18 pm:   

You're nothing if not predictable, Dave. Actually, she's not well cast in this and wears lots of clothing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 06:30 am:   

Hey, if admiring beautiful actresses is wrong, I don't wanna be right. I still think she was quite good in LC. What do you mean? Army sergeants don't typically look like Natascha Mac? Guess I'd better see if I can rescind those enlistment papers, then...:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 07:13 am:   

She was all right in LC, she's not that good an actress....

In this, she woefully out of place.

If you want beautiful actresses, check out the new LAW AND ORDER show, Conviction. It's ridiculous. They don't even have a token woman who's at all plain.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 08:01 am:   

Well, that's because to accurately reflect the legal profession, you would have to have a procession of hot, gorgeous supermodels, right?





:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 08:09 am:   

Prosecute me, baby....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 12:26 pm:   

Just wanted to drop a note about a pair of flix I saw recently. The more interesting is Kurosawa's PULSE, which I found quite disturbing and visually arresting despite its somewhat incomprehensible plot. The overall sense of malaise and depletion and some of the visuals, like the plane crash, are mesmerizing, even if one never fully understands (and maybe this is part of the point) what is happening.

Also saw THANK YOU FOR SMOKING, which was amusing as far as it went, which wasn't far. Some cheap barbs lobbed at the most sedentary of sitting ducks (Big Tobacco) and the far-too-easy-to-lampoon culture of inside-the-Beltway spin. Overall, a rather smarmy exercise sure to keep you feeling superior. Watchable only for the presence of Maria Bello and the first and last big-girl role for Katie Holmes, assuming you get a print from which the sex has not been excised.

Note: TYFS was a last-minute substitution for NIGHT WATCH, which had been shuttled off of E Street Cinema's screens (boo, hiss).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 12:27 pm:   

Oh, sorry, and also for the presence of Sam Elliott, looking like a roughly-weathered version of Wade Garrett from ROAD HOUSE.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 12:36 pm:   

I liked Pulse -- they pushed the remake release date to the summer, which usually presages a further delay, but I saw the trailer before they stopped showing it -- I think they used zombies instead of ghosts.

TYFNS --- No way I want to see it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 01:16 pm:   

The idea that a door with the spirit world opens and people begin to drift away out of sheer emptiness is very mysterious and horrific, but in a very novel way. I frankly didn't understand the internet connection, though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 02:27 pm:   

I've got PULSE on my Netflix list. (Finally broke down and am trying Netflix, which means I'll get to see a bunch of foreign movies I haven't been able to track down.) CURE continues to haunt the corners of my mind, so I'm hopeful about PULSE. I've got to remember to throw the other two Vengeance flicks into my queue.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 07:10 am:   

I had some friends over last night and we watched two of my favorite recent movies, Keane and Head-on. Keane i
was, I think, in many ways the best American film of last year, with an incredible perfomance by Damien Lewis. It deals with a disturbed man searching for his missing daughter (who may or not be real) at the Port Authority in NYC, who gets involved with a mother and daughter in a cheap hotel. Kerrigan just lets the story play out, not commenting, and the tension is generated not by a screeching film score or melodrama, but by the acting. Head-On is the story of Sibel, a Turkish girl and German citizen who gets away from the restrictions of her fundamentalist family by making a marriage of convenience with a Turco-German barfly, allowing her to pursue a life of screwing and drugs. It plays like a rock song. Great acting, great script. I can't recommend these two films too highly. Also watched Alan Clarke's film for television Elephant, which was the model for Van Sant's Columbine film of the same name. It's the recreation of 18 Irish separatist murders, one after and another, with just the raw sound and no commentary. I can't imagine this film making it on TV over here.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 09:14 pm:   

Gary Farmer, AKA the great Gary Farmer of Pow Wow Highway and Smoke Signals et al, just ordered a signed copy of TRUJILLO from me. I'm stoked!!!!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 02:38 am:   

hey, that's heaps cool :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 04:10 am:   

I didn't mean to go off, but this guy's a personal icon, one of America's best character actors. I got a little excited. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 04:50 am:   

Just ordered the following;

A dark and disturbing hit at European fantasy film festivals, Feed (Australia, 2005, 105 min), Feed concerns a cyber-cop (Jack Thompson of Breaker Morant, The Sum of Us) who finds a web site devoted to “feeders and gainers,” people who are obsessed with obese people and deliberately overfeeds them for sexual play .  Yet it seems one man is going too far: he’s feeding women to death and publishing the details on the site. To find the killer, the cop must infiltrate this world.

Also, Haneke's Cache is out on all region DVD,
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 06:15 am:   

I just bought a copy of MAREBITO for my wknd entertainment...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 07:28 am:   

Marebito's a neat movie.

I also ordered a copy of Milano Calibro 9, a dynamite gangster flick from the seventies and A Bank, a contemporary Italian gangster flick that has a big rep.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 10:56 am:   

Wow, Lucius, that Gary Farmer news is awesome!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 11:45 am:   

Yup. Like I said, I got a little excited.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 12:00 pm:   

Sort of like the way you must have been when I told you I read Valentine, right? ;-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 12:05 pm:   

It was the same but different... :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 03:10 pm:   

What will happen when Seagal gets his copy?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 03:13 pm:   

I assume he'll have his agent read it....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius S
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 08:11 am:   

Saw one of the weirdest movies ever, a Thai ghost story called Tropical Malady, which got a good deal of critical attention and won a small award at Cannes. The movie divides into two halves, the first involving a homosexual courtship between a soldier and an ice plant worker, and the second telling of the soldier being stalked through te jungle by a tiger ghost, who appears to be the ice plant worker. I think some cultural stuff got in the way of my comprehension, but nonetheless the second half of the film is exceedingly creepy. Worth checking out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jk
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 10:44 am:   

Here's the email address for Steven Seagal's production company Steamroller, if anyone wants to send their comments or movie ideas. He he.

steamrollerprod@aol.com
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 11:48 am:   

I agree: Tropical Malady is worth checking out, but surely not worthy of its massive critical praise; and there definitely is a serious cultural disconnect for Western audiences. The relationship in the first half is quite cheesy, so the "magic realism" in the second half is all that makes it worth seeing.

Saw Slither last night, not a bad homage to small-town, alien-invasion horror films from the 80s. Frequently gory, occasionally witty, and through and through quite entertaining, even though it peters out in the last 10 minutes. A b-movie worth checking out, destined to become a cult classic alongside Peter Jackson's early works.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jk
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 11:56 am:   

Anyone see Valerie and Her Week of Wonders? I was really blown away by this. It's a Czech film from the early seventies. It's a strange horror film which is like a weird psychedelic dream. It's sort of a combination of a vampire horror film and fairy tale, with some really incredible imagery.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius S
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 12:19 pm:   

Valerie's amazing. The director, Something Jires...I've never seen anything else he's done, but he's great in this one.

Slither...is that Eli Roth? Swore off him for life, I'm afraid. I guess I'm kinda weary of homages to bad movies. If I'm missing out...Oh, well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius s
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 12:41 pm:   

BTW, grabbed a copy of Day Watch, the sequel to Night Watch, available at Exploited Films.....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 12:57 pm:   

Van Sant's LAST DAYS casts quite a spell. I was dubious about seeing a fictionalized version of Cobain, but it worked in a different way than a simple biopic would have. And in the last frame I'm staring at this odd looking guy going...is that...the kid from Witness?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius s
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 01:11 pm:   

Yeah, I put that on my best of the year, and I too really was surprised after GVS's last few pictures.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 04:42 pm:   

Slither is by James Gunn, the writer of the Dawn of the Dead remake, a film I also liked quite a lot, though only in its director's cut rendition.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius S
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 04:52 pm:   

I didn't bother seeing DotD. Or Day of the Dead. I've had all the zombies I need, I guess. The many Japonese zombie movies ODed me. Maybe I'll check out Slither.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 10:55 pm:   

Dawn of the Dead remake is really a great movie that just happens to include zombies and to be a remake of a Romero flick; I highly recommend the director's cut DVD (a lot of my favorite bits were things that apparently weren't in the theatrical release). The latest Romero zombie movie is awful, but this one is really great. I was not drawn to watch it until I had many many people tell me how much they'd loved it. Hearing that Slither is from the DoD guy makes me want to see it, actually.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Saturday, April 01, 2006 - 10:57 pm:   

I'd given up on Van Sant, but this made me think of going back to see the last few I'd skipped (Elephant, for one). Should I not bother? Of course, it doesn't matter how much I enjoyed LAST DAYS, because at one point I start thinking, EVEN COWGIRLS GET THE BLUES, and that almost destroyed my mood.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius s
Posted on Sunday, April 02, 2006 - 06:41 am:   

Okay, I'll watch Dawn of the Dead,

I don't think you need to watch Elephant or Gerry, Elephant is sort of insulting in that it blames a Columbine like shooting on two gay students and, much as I liked seeing Matt Damon die of thirst, watching a couple of guys wander in the desert quickly loses its appeal.

I attended the premiere of Cowgirls...Shudder.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Sunday, April 02, 2006 - 07:16 am:   

I wasn't impressed with the Dawn of the Dead remake. It was an homage to zombie movies, instead of trying to do anything interesting with the genre.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, April 02, 2006 - 08:28 pm:   

Stanislaw Lem died last week.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Sunday, April 02, 2006 - 10:04 pm:   

i thought DAWN OF THE DEAD was a nice homage to video games. it'll kill a couple of hours, but i dont reckon it's worth finding in any important way. course, i saw the theatre version, so i've no idea how different the dvd release is.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 05:49 am:   

Neither do I -- how different is it?

I went to a preview last night of Lucky Number Slevin, a thriller that too clever by half for its own good. Tarrentino-esque. But watching Morgan Freeman and Ben Kingsley chew the scenery was sorta fun, and--here's something I never thought I'd say--Josh Hartnett wasn't bad. I don't get what Paul McGuigan's doing making his second straight movie with Hartnett (wicker park, the remake of the excellent French movie, the Appartement, was the first), but I'll forgive a lot from the guy who directed Gangster No. 1. Someone should notify Bruce Willis that he is, in fact, dead. But all in all, it's not deep, but it's shallow, and it was a fairly entertaining waste of time....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 06:32 am:   

Dave did you notice this post from JK upthread?

"Here's the email address for Steven Seagal's production company Steamroller, if anyone wants to send their comments or movie ideas. He he.

steamrollerprod@aol.com
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 06:37 am:   

No, I didn't notice it. Is that better than sticking my treatment in his guitar case? :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 06:39 am:   

Couldn't say the differences between the theatrical and director's cut of Dawn of the Dead, since I've only seen the latter version. From my experience, those who really like this movie have seen the director's cut.

Saw Pulse the other day too, and agree completely with Dave: it's a very creepy and interesting film, but what is up with the Internet stuff?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 06:47 am:   

Better for you, not for me.... :-)

Truthfully, I don't recall being troubled by PULSE, the Internet stuff, but it's been a while....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 07:54 am:   

I also didn't really get the stuff with The Forbidden Rooms either...Are people trying to seal in the ghosts? One of those movies that its best not to think about too deeply. Same, but to a lesser extent, with MAREBITO. Creepy film, but one that will give you a headache if you try to make logical sense of it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 09:21 am:   

What were the logical flaws in Marebito.....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 10:55 am:   

Well, the more I think about it, the more sense it makes. I retract that comment. Also, I don't want to inadvertently dish out any spoilers.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 11:44 am:   

'cause nothing bothered me about it..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 12:53 pm:   

[SPOILERS APLENTY FOR J-HORROR FANS]

I suppose once you accept that the tale was an insane fantasy, that his search for "horror" culminated in his own madness, and that the subterranean "mountains of madness" were really just a visual metaphor for his own deteriorating mental state, it all fits. I think what threw me were his protestations toward the end that he had not gone insane, but was still capable of understanding his deeds. I did not view those sentiments with enough skepticism...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 03:56 pm:   

CURE was also inexplicable on a literal level, but that added to the quality of nightmare and made it something that continues to gnaw and nag at me, instead of something that resolves easily and is instantly dismissed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, April 03, 2006 - 11:45 pm:   

I just watched CRASH. It's a goofy jigsaw puzzle that is about racism in the same way that "The Gift of the Magi" is about poverty. I hadn't expect such a novelty-plot. Seriously, it's a roomful of O. Henry's working overtime. I laughed a lot.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 03:47 am:   

I agree with you as to Cure and many J-horror flicks. They enlist the quality of nightmare that's effective without being logical. It never bothers me, or rarely does.

Crash is an ABC afterschool special gone wildly wrong.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 10:04 am:   

American Beauty is to Happiness as Crash is to the movie I'd really like to see.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 10:23 am:   

American Beauty....Another sparkling treat! It brings to mind the classic line from Dodgeball... "I just threw up a little in my mouth."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 10:40 am:   

Does anybody know of any good websites that offer quality criticism on little-known sci-fi/fantasy/horror films from the world over, the kind sold on Diabolik? It'd be nice to read more about some of their films before jumping into the blind buy. Thanks.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ls
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 10:50 am:   

Midnight Eye is a good J horror site that Marc turned me onto.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 11:44 am:   

Thanks. I'm familiar with Midnight Eye, Koreanfilm.org, and Twitchfilm.net but haven't been able to locate any sites that discuss little-known films like Malefique, Feed, Hotel (Germany), Calvaire, etc. I guess I should just live dangerously and shill out the money for these discs.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 11:48 am:   

that's what I do and i bought em all :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 12:38 pm:   

HOTEL and CALVAIRE sounded interesting. What was yr reaction?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 02:03 pm:   

Werner Herzog takes a bullet during an interview.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=o5uoa1v__W4

Be sure to watch to the end, where he drops trou and shows the wound.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 02:04 pm:   

I previously wrote my reactions to these films. Calvaire was pretty effective, but I thought it could have stood a few more minutes -- it felt truncated. Hotel was a very creepy film that didn't have much of payoff, as time has passed an ending that I thought underplayed has come to seem very effective....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 02:05 pm:   

I recently discovered Twitch and it's a nice addition to my daily rounds. Thanks for the other listing (Koreanfilm.org).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 02:38 am:   

Herzog soldiers on for cinema.

Crazy boxers too. It is practically absurd.

But the bears were more dangerous than the air rifle. I have mixed thoughts about someone lacking "fear" as opposed to taking unnecessary risks.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 07:54 am:   

Saw Haute Tension yesterday, which I know has been discussed here before. I thought it was a wicked, intense slasher film with a twist ending that doesn't make much sense or play fair with the viewer, but nonetheless works dramatically. Now I'm interested to see what Aja did with the Hills Have Eyes remake.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 10:36 am:   

HT was definitely an OK addition to the genre. Doesn't take much, granted, but Aja at least showed a little style.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 10:39 am:   

Not my favorite genre, but Wolf Creek, I thought, was superior to Haute Tension.

I'm kind of interested in Silent Hill, because it was made by Christophe Gans, who directed Brotherhood of the Wolf.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 10:47 am:   

BTW, Gans is now filming Rahan, the french comic set in the dark ages, featuring his Wolf star, Mark Dascascos....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 11:09 am:   

What I liked about the Silent Hill trailer was that I couldn't instantly predict everything I was going to see, which left me with some hopes for the film. Roger Avary seems to have enjoyed himself, too. I came to the Silent Hill games too late to play them as they were initially received (the first one especially looks like crap now) but they found good analogs in the film for things that were a result of hardware limitations (such as the ashen fog that is initially the result of being unable to render distant objects on the screen). I'm definitely going to see this one right away.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 11:31 am:   

Yeah, I may go to see it as part of a double feature, the other being American Dreamz, the send-up of American Idol. I just like the concept of a town that's been burned and ashes are still falling from the sky...but then the idea of a foreign director doing an American film makes me uneasy. It's never worked out in the past.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 12:01 pm:   

But those games were created by a Japanese company doing their impression of small town America. So it should be just weird enough to work.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 12:10 pm:   

I'm gonna go...but I'm hedging my bets. I also like Radha Mitchell, who can act better than she did in Pitch Black, as witness High Art and Marc Forster's SIDS film, Everything Put Together.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 08:12 pm:   

aw, man, now i'm interested in SILENT HILL. i dug BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF a heap--though the new film sounds more interesting for the dascascos element.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 08:39 pm:   

Rahan sounds cool, but Silent Hill...I don't know, Whatever, I guess I'm down for it...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 09:09 pm:   

I watched the sequel to Night Watch, Day Watch. Pretty much the same experience as the first movie. Rough subtitles, confusing plot, etc, but once you get through the first half hour, it's a pretty smooth ride, with funky grubby Moscow as the backdrop for some cool FX and a thin story... I hear this is to be the second of, wait for it, nine movies. The whole film is about the rise of the Great One, Anton's son, and the rise of a Great White Witch, Svetlana. Anton spends part of the film in a woman's body, and the whole thing winds up in an apocalyptic party on the top floor of a fancy apt building that destroys half the city...but only for a while. I like the energy of these movies, if not all the particulars, but I can see the Western influences creeping in, and I'm not so sure I'll like the third.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 05:38 am:   

Kiyoshi's Kurosawa's homage to John Carpenter Guard from Underground is coming in April. I hear this is a freaky scary movie.

Available now, 13 (Tziamet), tthe brilliant French Thriller, from Xploited Films.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 08:13 am:   

From what I've read, the Kurosawa picture sounds like a tense little slasher picture, however hampered by budgetary restraints. Though, I must admit, I'm souring a bit on KK: I started with Cure, a masterpiece, went to Pulse, a good film, and then to Bright Future, which I thought dull and socially heavyhanded. Is there anything in his catalog to rival Cure?

How was the picture quality of the Day Watch DVD?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 08:26 am:   

Hey, man! I got one eye, I'm not much of a guage of picture quality. It was visible -- that does it for me. :-)

I liked Bright Future. But you might try Charisma....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 09:48 am:   

Anyone seen the Russian film, COME AND SEE?

The trailer is here, and part of the trailer is a quote by J.G. Ballard: "The greatest war film ever made."

http://www.play.com/play247.asp?pa=srmr&page=title&r=R2&title=902952

The other one Ballard liked was Fires on the Plain, which is truly a masterpiece. This looks amazing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 10:07 am:   

if this is the film I'm thinking of, it's been available on Amazon for a long time. I bought my copy off a dealer, there are usually a bunch for sale used and new. It's a 1985, very brutal, about WW11, the central character a young boy, and it is excellent....Should be in the library system.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 10:08 am:   

It's a 1985 film, I meant to say.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 10:20 am:   

Thanks Lucius, I'll check out Charisma.

Come and See has been available from Amazon for a while, though it may be OOP now. It's being released in R2 at the end of April, in a newly remastered version with all the bells and whistles.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 10:31 am:   

Well, it's an excellent film, but since I never watch any of the extras, the bells and whistles are lost on me; so I'll stick with my old copy.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 11:37 am:   

A recommendation from Ballard is enough to get me to watch.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ls
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 11:57 am:   

That was a probably a blurb given to the original release, But either one is good pick-up.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:09 pm:   

Yeah, I found it on Amazon and at the library, so I'll be watching it soon. I'm sure the existing DVD will be just fine on my crappy TV. And you really should see Fires on the Plain...it's from the maker of the Burmese Harp.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:36 pm:   

I saw Fire, but a very long time ago -- it's been a while between viewings, though, and maybe it's time for another. I wish it was on DVD....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 09:10 pm:   

Watched Milano Calibro 9, a great little gangster film from the 70s, featuring a terrific performance by Mario Adorf that may well have served as the model for Joe Pesci's character in Goodfellas.... Director Fernanco di Leo was a big influence on Tarantino and made some of the best Italian noir. This one has a spendid twist at the end.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 07:24 am:   

I just saw on Twitch that Dellamorte Dellamore will finally get a US DVD release. I got a Spanish DVD (where they retitled it "Mi Novia es un Zombi"), but it will be nice to have a domestic release.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 07:29 am:   

Excuse my ignorance...is that a giallo?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 07:42 am:   

No, although it is directed by Michele Soavi, who studied under Argento. He also worked on Baron Munchausen, and this is like trying to mix Gilliam and Argento. It's a weird mix of zombie film and art film.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

lS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:21 am:   

Wow. Sounds cool. Italian cinema, particularly the last twenty years or so, is one of the huge gaps in my knowledge, one I'm attempting to fill in.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:44 am:   

It's an entertaining movie, but there are some Ed Wood moments (night shot from one angle, day shot from another; a neck wound that disappears and reappears).

When I first saw it, it was titled "Cemetery Man"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:28 am:   

Now that sounds more familiar; I remember seeing ads somewhere, but I didn't see it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 10:26 am:   

Yeah, it's known in America as Cemetery Man and for starring, of all people, Rupert Everett! It's filled with absurd, comical moments and has a great surreal atmosphere -- it ends on a particularly poignant apocalyptic note. But it's not really scary or suspenseful.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 10:29 am:   

Well, it's a trailer for a game and not a movie, but this is what I've been working on. I didn't have anything to do with making the trailer itself, but so I'm pretty happy with it:

http://www.eurogamer.net/tv_video.php?playlist_id=247&s=l

It's a streaming trailer. The downloadable versions are sort of a pain to deal with.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ls
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 10:30 am:   

I don't require fear to like a movie... :-) Thanks, kellys.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 11:27 am:   

I'm finally watching Season 5 of Oz on DVD. This show never settled down for a minute. It's exhilarating. The thing that makes it really interesting to me is that every episode was written by its creator, Tom Fontana, with the occasional co-writer. That gives it an authorial coherence that most shows lack.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 12:35 pm:   

I got tired of it, because it was to a prison as Platoon was to a real war. Prison, no matter your place in it, involves long stretches of boredom. People nourish vengeance for long stretches of time. I understand that for dramatic reasons this wasn't plausible to show, but nonetheless I kept getting thrown out of the show because of that. This said, I liked the first season, season and a half, well enough. It was nicely done, I simply couldn't appreciate a lot of it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 12:50 pm:   

Oz, to me, was a bit like a prison drama as re-imagined by Mary-Ellis Bunim and the "Real World" team. Just about everything that happened was implausible, calculated to shock. It rang false.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 01:14 pm:   

I don't think Oz was supposed to be realistic. I doubt it even affected a realist stance, but some things struck me as just wrong. There simply isn't that much communication between the races in prison, for one thing. A great prison drama that adheres to realism would thus be difficult to film. In the interest of drama, one has to sink to Shawshank levels or indulge in the hyper-realism of Oz, or else find some other way of indicating the real without stating it. I thought Oz was a worthwhile try.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 04:39 pm:   

The BBC version of the Office knew how to capture moments of utter banality.

One also thinks of any number of cop shows that like Oz have far more excitement than they ought to :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 07:52 pm:   

The banal is a fit subject for comedy, but less so for drama.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:22 pm:   

Now see, I thought the fact that Fontanta wrote every episode was a glaring weakness. The guy clearly over-extended himself, and hence we got absurb storylines like the drug that prematurely ages a prisoner for a reduction in his sentence, or the Cask of Amantillado-style walling up of the preacher in the kitchen, for chrissakes. Or the rivalry between nazi-boy and what's-his-face that devolved into complete farce. I wanted to like Oz but it was just too fucking ridiculous. If Fontana had just had the courage to hire good writers and trust them, I expect we would have gotten a much more sensible show.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:41 pm:   

jesus, is that what happened to it? I don't recall any of that.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mike m
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:41 pm:   

Interesting to finally hear about Milano Calibro 9, the movie. I've had the Osanna soundtrack for years and had no idea it was a crime movie, I'd have never guessed from the music. Any comments on how it worked?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:44 pm:   

Lucius, you probably jumped ship before Fontana went totally insane.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:50 pm:   

The soundtrack in the film is credited to Luis Enrique Bacalov -- I don't know if it's the same you have, but it works beautifully with the film.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:54 pm:   

Nathan, Yeah I guess so. I'm not sure how I would have reacted to stuff like you describe. One part of me thinks it might have been cool to just do a poe acid trip in a prison, but I guess not...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mike m
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:57 pm:   

http://www.moviegrooves.com/shop/milanocalibro9soundtrack.htm

Yes, it's the same one, there are more details at the above link. The orchestra meets rock thing was fairly big in Italy at the time, almost like a delayed reaction to the Moody Blues. Osanna's third album Palepoli is probably one of the best rock albums I've run across in years of collecting.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:00 pm:   

Wow, live and learn. I got some orchestral rock from Italy somewhere in the stacks, but I can't remember what. I'll try and find Palepoli. Thanks for the link...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mike m
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:08 pm:   

http://waysidemusic.com/default.asp

carries both soundtrack and Palepoli. And I can vouch for great service here for lots of good stuff.

The other orchestral rock band that comes immediately to mind is the New Trolls and both of their Concerto Grosso albums, although neither album is entirely successful. And there was also Banco who did an instrumental album, I think it was Di Terra. I grabbed a nice DVD from dime a dozen that had some RAI TV footage of far more obscure bands experimenting with the format (many clips seem to be from one television show featuring various rock groups playing with an orchestra). But in a country and era where Van der Graaf Generator could play to 500,000 people, anything could happen.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:17 pm:   

Hey, Mike....thanks a lot. I appreciate it. Oh, boy! More ways to spend money.

Van de Graaf Generator played to half a million people in Italy? Whoa! Well, the 70s were weird over here.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:19 pm:   

I meant, weird over here, too....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mike m
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:27 pm:   

You're welcome, I'll go buy another book :-). I'm a bit fuzzy on the history but I know that there were a lot of political rallys that had rock bands linked to them at the time. The 500,000 quote came from an old article in Ptolemaic Terrascope, a British psychedelic rock zine, on VDGG. I guess Charisma did good promotion in Italy, because Genesis was huge there too.

Another band you'd probably really dig is the jazz-rock band Area, they've got an incredible vocalist, Demetrio Stratos, who takes the Leon Thomas paradigm forward. Was apparently a big influence on Mike Patton as well. Either Arbeit Macht Frei or Crac are good places to start and Wayside probably has those. Maybe I should buy two books!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:42 pm:   

Nathan, everything you're describing as insane is precisely stuff I loved; maybe my expectations were different. Certainly they pushed it as a Berry Levinson production when it first came out, and one might have expected something akin to Homicide. But watching it at this remove, all the over the top surreal touches are what make it truly enjoyable (for me). The bricking up of Luke Perry was a highlight. When he came back and haunted his tormenters, I loved that too. Eight episodes per season seemed manageable for one writer; and I'd rather watch one guy follow his obsessions than see it filtered through a dozen other sensibilities, and watered down. That's done all the time and, yes, produces all kinds of good shows. But Oz is interesting to me because it resisted that. I'm not watching it for any sort of realism.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 10:18 pm:   

I think it'll have to be a couple of books, Mike. :-)

I ordered two Area albums, as well as Palepoli, immediately. Demetrios Stratos sounds like he was my kind of guy. I'm a Leon Thomas freak -- saw him several times, once with Pharoah, once with a jam band composed of Airto, Nana Vasconcellos, and Egberto Gismonti, once with Don Cherry, and once with another jam band featuring Jaco Pastorious and Herbie Hancock. I'm really intrigued by what I read about Stratos.

Thanks again!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jk
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 10:53 pm:   

I've been meaning to check out Area too. I've been pretty impressed with Il Balleto Di Bronzo's-Ys album, pretty heavy prog album with some really cool guitar parts.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 05:53 am:   

Marc, it's entirely possible -- even likely -- that I brought my own expectations to the show, and that they didn't jibe with Fontana's intent. Someday I'll rent the DVDs and give them another day in court. I did like Eamonn Walker and J.K. Simmons .... I think what bothered me is that the more surreal aspects of the show seeped in in later years, which subverted the style they'd already established. I don't know; I found it very jarring.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ls
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 06:28 am:   

I'll add my two cents, not having seen the episodes you mentiioned. It seemed to me the guy was going fpr a kind of realism from the outset, but it wasn't ever realistic--the rawness had a shock value, and the writer was attempting to present a compressed reality a la Platoon. Some of the characters were good, like the older balding guy (i don't recall the name), but the Muslim preacher guy was all wrong to me, as was the interaction of the Rita Moreno character with the prisoners. The second season, it seemed to me things started getting loopy -- I can't recall why I thought this, but I lost interest. I guess I'm more of a literalist than Marc where prison is concerned.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mike m
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 01:07 pm:   

Excellent, and no problem on the books, I enjoy them immensely.

I'm way into Leon myself, particularly with Pharoah and Santana on Welcome and Lotus. In fact, I was amazed to find out that the Santana band did "Creator Has a Master Plan" on that tour, among other jazz viginettes, as they're all snipped out of Lotus. There are a few beautiful live recordings floating around though.

Area is truly tremendous. Their guitar player often ran his axe through a VCS3, it was years before I learned that some of the synth leads were actually guitar lines. I like a band that can still surprise me after many listens. There's an article on the band here for some more info:

http://gnosis2000.net/reviews/area.htm

I really like Balletto di Bronzo's Ys as well, it's definitely one of the legendary Italian progressive rock albums. And of course there's always that other big Italian movie/rock connection with Goblin and Profondo Rosso, Suspiria, Zombie etc. Several of their soundtracks make good albums in their own right, especially Suspiria. 1972-77 was a musical golden age over there.

Am very curious about Leon playing with Herbie. I've got a Headhunters show with Jaco on bass from February 77, does that sound about right datewise? I'm pretty sure I just grabbed a Freddie Hubbard show from around that era with Leon on it as well.

Here's another resource you might be interested in that covers a lot of jazz/rock fusions:

http://www.freeform.org/music/kozmigroov-index.html
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 01:31 pm:   

Re Herbie-Leon. I was in NYC a long time ago, late seventies, I think, and I walked by a little place in the village that had a hand-lettered sign in the window which read Tonight Only--Herbie Hancock, Jaco Pastorius. A little wine and coffee place. Fifteen buck cover. I asked if the sign was for real, and they said, yeah, so I came back at night and watched Herbie and Jaco play for about a half hour, with a percussionist whose name I didn't catch; then Leon Thomas walked in and they played for another hour and a half for about a couple of dozen people. It was fucking fantastic. One of those things that seem to happen for me only in NYC.

Thanks for the link. Guess I'll have to check out Ys as well. Any other recs? I'm totally lost when it comes to European prog rock.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mike m
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 02:14 pm:   

Sounds like a great experience. You a Hermeto Pascoal fan?

You might find this link useful, it's an article I wrote on the progressive rock genres:

http://gepr.net/genre2.html

That's an overview of sorts and gives an idea of how much is out there. I'll list a few albums I really like, although it's fairly random and not totally representative:

First era:

Gong - You (or Angels Egg) (International)
Colosseum - Valentyne Suite (England)
Amon Duul II - Yeti (Germany)
Magma - Hhai/Live or many others (France)
Khan - Space Shanty (England)
Hatfield & the North - any (England)
Jumbo - Vietato ai Minori di 18 Anni? (Italy)
Univers Zero - Ceux du Dehors or many others (Belgium)
Robert Wyatt - Rock Bottom (England)
Ash Ra Tempel - s/t, Join Inn, Inventions for Electric Guitar (Germany)
Crucis - Kronologia (Argentina)
Gracious s/t (England)
High Tide - Sea Shanties or s/t (England)
Marsupilami s/t (England)
Embryo - Steig Aus, Rache, Rock Session, many others (Germany)

Some modern stuff:

Azigza s/t (San Francisco area)
Sleepytime Gorilla Museum - Grand Opening and Closing (San Francisco)
Indukti - S.U.S.A.R. (Poland)
Happy Family - any (Japan)
Bondage Fruit - any (Japan)
Anglagard - Hybris (Sweden)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

LS
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 02:46 pm:   

Thanks, Mike.

Yeah, Hermeto was the guy who brought me to Brazilian music. Haven't listened to him for a while, Have a few old solo abulms, a few with Airto, Airto and Flora...After that I got deep Milton, Jorge Ben, etc,. and then....you know.

I don't need a new thing, but looks like I got one.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register