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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 03:14 pm:   

   By Robert on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 06:51 am:

The latest parody trailer: Brokeback to the Future
http://www.filmthreat.com/index.php?section=videos&Id=9
   By Dave G. on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 08:29 am:

No, the only Smoke music I heard was on the s/t to the movie. I'll have to check it out.
   By Lucius on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 08:49 am:

Go to CD baby == They have both CDs, Popiscle and A New Reason to Fast.

Brokeback Mountain's already a parody,
   By Rich Patterson on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 10:04 am:

Ang Lee (upon winning the Golden Globe for best director): "I spend so much time making movies I sometimes get too uptight, too critical to enjoy this. [But this year] I have seen and loved so many of my colleagues' films. That makes this award ... so much more special because I think it has been an amazing year for American cinema. Thanks to my fellow filmmakers for strengthening my faith in movies."
   By jk on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 10:23 am:

And Ang should have thanked the part time journalist/auto parts salesman, and the various starstruck wannabe journalists who are part of the 80-something strong Hollywood Foreign Press because of the great buffets. Gee, what an honor for Ang to be recognized by such a great group of people. Pia Zadora anyone?
And Brokeback looks like a steaming pile o'shite/trojan horse being used to desensitize people to a certain lifestyle. And Hollywood wonders why box office is down and the Oscar ratings will be down even lower than last year's? Because they are smug idiots making movies for some audiences in L.A. and New York, and ignoring everyone in between.
   By Lucius on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 10:30 am:

"And Brokeback looks like a steaming pile o'shite/trojan horse being used to desensitize people to a certain lifestyle."

Basically I saw it as an attempted monument to American tolerance, which as we all know, really exists only in a tiny minority of American hearts.
   By jk on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 10:45 am:

Well, it looks like a joke to me. A hollwyood version of gay cowboys. I have an uncle who is a real West texas cowboy, and that kind of thing would never happen, because they raise their children in such a way that the thought wouldn't even occur to them. Of course if the person was born completely gay like Christopher Lowell or Harvey Feirstein or something, then that's one thing, but the characters in the movie don't act like they are gay and have no other choice. To me the movie is a joke.
   By jk on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 11:36 am:

I also find it fairly amusing that anyone who has a bad word to say about it is branded either a homophobe or a closet homosexual (not saying you're doing this, but I've seen lots of it). If you're so intolerant that you have a bad word to say about the movie I guess the next step is...going into a bar and chopping someone up with a hatchet. Um...yeah.
   By Lucius on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 12:02 pm:

It's based on story by E Annie Proulx, one of a great collection, Western Stories, I think is the name, and this particular story has the ring of authenticity. There are some things about the movie I like, the evocation of different decades, for one--but I thought the acting was overrated. Basically, I'm agreeing with you. It's not that good. But every once and a while Hwood feels that have to make an "important" movie, and this is one such. Pile of shit? I don't know if I'd call it that, but I didn't find it very affecting. They used to market a certain kind of movie as Ladies Matinees. Many of them starred Lana Turner. This seems to fall into that genre. A big Technicolor tearjerker attended mostly by women who keep their hankies handy.
   By jk on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 12:29 pm:

Has anyone seen The Silver Globe by the director who did Possession(the movie where Isabella Adjani has sex with an octupus monster). The Silver Globe is supposed to be an out there sci-fi movie, but has never gotten a dvd release, to my knowledge. I've seen stills of The Silver Globe, and it looks pretty amazing.
   By Lucius on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 12:46 pm:

Perhaps because it's unfinished? See article...

http://www.fright.com/edge/silverglobe.html
   By jk on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 12:51 pm:

It states in the article it did get a release in 1987. I'd still like to see it, even if the director considers it unfinished. Looks pretty interesting.
   By Lucius on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 12:56 pm:

Yup, I agree.
   By jk on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 01:02 pm:

I read an interview with Zulawski, and he said he was friends with Tarkovsky, and that Tarkovsky was criticizing him for making "commercial" films. As if Possession or The Silver Globe are commercial! And Zulawski told Tarkovsky he was "talking a bunch of crap." Ha ha.
   By MarcL on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 02:42 pm:

Larry David on Brokeback Mountain:

http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/01/02/opinion/eddavid.php

   By MarcL on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 02:45 pm:

Just picked up a copy of Kurosawa's THE BAD SLEEP WELL. All this old Kurosawa I've never seen...makes me happy.

Criterion has a DVD that pairs Kurosawa's THE LOWER DEPTHS with Renoir's LA BAS. I'm not quite in the mood for either one. Anyone seen them?
   By jk on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 02:49 pm:

Is that La Bas based on the Huysman book? Down There, the one about devil worship in France?
The Bad Sleep Well-great movie.
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Nathan
Posted on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 08:00 pm:   

Proulx's collection is called CLOSE RANGE: WYOMING STORIES, and is just tremendous. I haven't seen the movie, so I won't comment on it; but the stories are beautiful. The woman knows how to wield a sentence.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 08:30 pm:   

Well, I had Stories right. I thought it was good, too...

Watched the Grizzly Man thing again -- I'm sorry, I think the guy was on a bad ego trip, This shit about being a sanurai and a flower. Good lord! It's like the guy said in the movie, Treadwell acted like he was dealing with a bunch of people in bear suits.
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jk
Posted on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 09:19 pm:   

God, that guy was so annoying in Grizzly Man, I had to turn it off and restart it later. He obviously had mental problems and needed to be on medication. I don't think he was doing anything brave or noble, I just think Herzog likes to provoke, and put outsiders on display.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 09:47 pm:   

I think Herzog knew what he was doing by exposing this guy. Like his dad said, Treadwell's downfall was losing the Cheers gig to Harrelson. Amazing, that that was the start of the great eco-guy.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 01:24 pm:   

I'm sorry I missed GM. I couldn't get home in time and some of us Luddites don't have TiVo.

Here's something to bat around. I have seen this movie a bunch of times and it never fails to delight me with its wit.

MOUSE HUNT, directed by Gore Verbinski and written by Adam Rifkin.

Granted, Verbinski seems to have been sucked into the big-budget sequel vortex that is Hollywood, but MH is a hilarious film.

The set design is terrific. The filmmakers really try to create a parallel reality, part Edward Gorey, part Terry Gilliam. Nathan Lane and Lee Evans are hysterical. It's the last great performance Evans, possibly the most gifted physical comic of our time, has given. Christopher Walken has a hilarious cameo. I can't think of another movie that uses slapstick so intelligently. Tim Burton only wishes he was this good.

Regardless of what you think of these guys' later work, MH is a lost classic.

Rifkin is also the guy who wrote THE DARK BACKWARD, a 1991 Judd Nelson/Bill Paxton movie renowned for being one of the lowest box-office grossers of all time, but actually a sort of maliciously humorous sleazefest in the vein of John Waters.

OK, feel free to start eviscerating...
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 01:26 pm:   

Oh, and just to close the loop on Masters of Horror, I watched Haeckel's Tale on Friday. Not a bad little episode. Very lurid, grisly, downright prurient...everything cable should be! And Sat. night, they re-ran Carpenter's Cigarette Burns, still the best of the series despite a noncommittal perf from Norman Reedus.

The DVD might be worth buying after all.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 02:18 pm:   

Yeah, I like MH, for Lee Evans alone. Evan is a great comedic actor despite Hwood's subsequent misuse of him.

Who can forget Funny Bones with Oliver Platt and Evans?
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 05:05 pm:   

The solo bit that Evans does is almost superhuman.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 05:09 pm:   

I saw THE NEW WORLD last night and enjoyed it, although there were some disjointed moments that make me curious about what Malick cut to get it down to 135 minutes. (I saw a late show, and I was glad it didn't go on any longer than it did.)

It also sharpened my appreciation of Bruce Beresford's BLACK ROBE, a movie that is in some ways similar, though much more bleak.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 05:10 pm:   

Yup...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 05:51 pm:   

Yeah, BR was great. TNW's going to have to wait til I get back from Honduras.

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Lucius
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 10:41 pm:   

watched the season-ending episode of Surface tonight. Pretty cool. What started out as a series redolent of 50s sci fi, ended with the world flooded, engineered sea monster attacking on many front, the discovery of a mono-rail leading down into the Marianas Trench under an research facility....I'm watching more faithfully next year.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 11:23 pm:   

Well, that's not a show it ever occurred to me to watch.

On the other hand, we just got into Season 1 of Lost, and although it took a while, we're now pretty hooked. It took a while for them to get enough balls in the air for me to enjoy the juggling. By now it's obvious that the best bits are simply the various elements of inexplicable mystery. By the time you realize the explanation for the last mystery is unsatisfactory, you're already one or two mysteries beyond that one. The continuous breadcrumb trail of puzzles is what makes it all work.

That and Terry O'Quinn.

Taken in isolation, individual parts of the show aren't all that great...even if you take it as low budget, B-grade entertainment, it's effective, and raises a question: Why is crappy B-grade TV better, more original, than its crappy B-grade theatrical counterparts?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 04:32 am:   

You know Lost doesn't work for me anymore. X-file me once, shame on you; X-file me twice, shane on me. I quit watching a while back. Yeah, the cast is good, etc, but they're just going to leak out shit for the next few years, bring in new people (that's going to one overpopulated little island), and finally fizzle out. At least something happened in Surface. Armies of sea monsters, monorail to the Marianas Trench, flood. It doesn't have the cast or production values of Lost, from which I am thankfully unhooked, but it's not a cheat.

As to your question, I don't think B-grade tv is better than B-movies. I'd rather watch a John Carpenter marathon than a season of Lost any day,
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Robert
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 06:07 am:   

I'm still hooked on Lost. I keep hearing that the producers have a set 6 year storyline they want to run, so they won't just continue endlessly or fizzle. I can't say whether that's true or not, but I'm still giving it a chance.

I was never X-filed. It only took a few episodes watches sporadically to realize they couldn't keep their conspiracies straight. At least with the smaller scale on Lost, they won't have as much of a problem with that.

I'd like to watch Surface, but now I've missed an entire season, and I wonder how easy it will be to jump in.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 06:29 am:   

Where have ya gone, Carl Kolchak???
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 08:48 am:   

Here's what's happened on Surface. While skin-diving off the coast of SC, male protag's brother is scarfed by sea monster. He finds evidence that the govt is involved and starts detecting, becomes obsessed, leaves behind wife and family, He meets single mom oceanographer who loses her grant and affiliation because she gets too close, leaves kid with ex and together she and the guy go off and get chased by agents and have various adventures leading to finale. A teenage boy finds a sea monster egg, raises "Nim" as a pet, catches a fever from the beast that imbues him with weird swimming powers and the ability to transmit shocks. Now he, his girl, and the other two, along with his pet. all end up in a flooded Wilmington with sea monsters everywhere. Sea monsters are chomping people, the govt scientists have fled into the Mariana's trench, and...

That's not the whole Magilla, but it gets you there.

As to Lost, I got a distinct "they're all dead" vibe before I gave up on the show. I prey that's not the case.
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Robert
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 09:24 am:   

Thanks for the summary.

They're not dead on Lost. That's one of the few things they've said definitively. In theory, we're supposed to learn the cause of the plane crash and resolve the Walt kidnapping plotline this season, so at least something will be resolved.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 12:42 pm:   

Well, maybe I'll test out an episode, then. :-)
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 02:52 pm:   

There are some real duds among those episodes though.

Out of the 12 I've watched, about half are total wastes of time.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 03:19 pm:   

i gave up on LOST for the whole 'nothing will be revealed' aspect of the show. since they're bringing in new people, and i read an interview with one of the ex-scriptwriters who said the network didn't want answers, and wanted to down play the spec-fic element, which seems to be the case from what i saw, i just gave up...

also, the backflashes, they got annoying.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, February 12, 2006 - 09:42 pm:   

Anyone know when The Piano Tuner of Earthquakes is coming out? It's a Brothers Quay film, and Terry Gilliam is one of the producers. There are some still up at imdb and it looks pretty mindblowing, as you'd expect from the Quays. It's their first feature length live action movie in color, too.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 08:37 am:   

Had a chance to screen the first season of the BBC Comedy NIGHTY NIGHT. This one perhaps raises/lowers the bar on tasteless bleak comedy to a level that will never be surpassed. Selfish, cretinous libertine beautician with cancer-patient husband decides to be shut of him, stuffs him in a hospice, convincing him that he is about to die, while attempting to ruin the life of wheelchair-bound MS patient next door and seduce her doctor husband. And, believe me, this does not begin to let you in on how depraved this show is. Makes John Waters look like Frank Capra. You have been warned.

It does have pretty funny moments, though, if you can suspend any notion of human empathy for 30 minutes.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 09:18 am:   

Also had a chance to screen Barbara Kopple's HAVOC with Ann Hathaway. I had seen Kopple's AMERICAN DREAM and was aware of her award-winning HARLAN COUNTY USA, so I couldn't understand how her movie (scripted by Stephen Geaghan) got such infinitesimal publicity and no theatrical release.

Now I know. Just a bad, bad film. One of the worst I've seen. It makes its points with a sledgehammer and a tire iron and even then is unconvincing. The whole bored-rich-teen-driven-to-thrillseeking plot is moldy to begin with and is done in an exceedingly inartful manner. Geaghan writes like someone who has only read about poor people in books, and his cast of hilariously overacting whiteboy gangbangers (led by Joseph Gordon Leavitt, who needs to destroy every extant copy of the film) would not look out of place in a DON"T BE A MENACE TO SOCIETY-type Wayans parody. Ann Hathaway is just so ridiculously jaded and stupid that I didn't give a toss about her character, even when she did the "noble" thing near the end. This is the kind of movie that makes you wish an earthquake would break Cali off and put up out of our misery once and for all.

Funnier, however, than NIGHTY NIGHT.
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Robert
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 11:43 am:   

JK: I don't know about the release date, but a friend saw it at the Toronto Film Festival last year. She thought it was pretty good, but couldn't tell me much beyond that.

Dave: Why did you want to watch Havoc? From what I heard, the only reason to see it is to see a lot of Hathaway.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 12:07 pm:   

After sitting once through the interminable INSTITUTE BENJAMENTA, I think I prefer the Quays at shorter length, directing dolls, dust and screws instead of human actors.
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Robert
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 12:44 pm:   

I liked IB visually, but it did drag. The Quays admitted IB was far too long (or far too short, depending on their mood). I expect Piano Tuner will be more interesting.
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Save The Quays
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 01:04 pm:   

For their second feature, the Quay Brothers use real actors and full-scale sets to recreate their grainy puppet aesthetic. It's a surreal experience, maddeningly incomprehensible and dull, but with an evocative beauty.
  Malvina (Cesar) is a young opera singer set to marry her beloved Adolfo (Saracho), but at the wedding the sinister Dr Droz (John) kills and then kidnaps her. In his isolated mountain lair, he revives her and plans to stage a cataclysmic opera with her and his seven mechanical tableaux, which the piano tuner Felisberto (Saracho again) is getting into shape. But Felisberto falls for Malvina, and with the help of Droz's housekeeper (Serna), develops a plan to rescue her.
  The film looks amazing--dark and shadowy, playing with light and mirrors, investing a lush, old world elegance to the grey and grim settings. It looks and feels like a cross between a Guy Madden movie and one of those creepy-sad puppet shows in Being John Malkovich. Except that the Quay Brothers neglect to include any wit or humour. As a result, it feels self-indulgent and almost painfully dreary, like an exercise in pure artistry and tone, without any consideration for the audience's need to connect with the story or characters.
  Performances are almost irrelevant, as actors are used merely as figures by the directors. They do add a level of pathos; Saracho manages to inject some curiosity and optimism to counter everyone else's melancholy. But it's all so heavily stylised that there's no one we can really identify with, and no energy at all. Much of the sparse dialog consists of pretentious cliches and ponderous poetry that can't mean much to anyone beyond the Quays.
  The plot is structured in a series of blackout scenes without any sensible transitions between them. As a feature film, it's clunky, draggy and uneven, and it only keeps us awake due to the otherworldly beauty of the virtually colourless design. And as the story mixes Svengali, Faust and the Phantom of the Opera into an eerily subdued tale, there's also something primeval that grabs our interest, even if we never feel an emotional punch.
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jk
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 01:24 pm:   

Hey, I'm not watching a Quay film for the well-developed characters, dialog, or plot. Yeah, it would be cool if they could have that stuff too, but the visuals are so good it's enough to sustain my interest. At least they aren't churning out the same old Hollywood shite, and haven't gone to Robert Mckee's screenplay conferences, and aren't making films by committee, and having some a**hole Producer tell them they need to change everything, and add plot point one on page 30 and plot point 2 on page 60 of the script. And I'm sure if their script was sent into any of the big studios, the expert "reader"(ha ha) would give it terrible coverage and it would never have a chance of being made because the main protoganist doesn't move the story forward, and the audience can't identify with him, so they don't know who to cheer for, and blah blah blah.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 01:31 pm:   

I had seen AMERICAN DREAM and liked it. I thought a no nonsense documentarian like Kopple would bring a certain journalistic rigor and realism to the material. I also had enjoyed TRAFFIC, so I figured the script would be something better than an ABC Afterschool Special.

Ann Hathaway naked was just a bonus, or so I thought!

As it turns out, you are correct, non-Hathaway-stalkers need not bother. It's lame, and A.H. ain't all that.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 01:33 pm:   

When it's a slog just getting through a precis of the plot, that's a pretty good indication that you are in for a painful viewing experience.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 05:49 pm:   

Compared to the Quays' shorter works, the visuals in Institute Benjamenta were not enough to make up for the leadenness of the rest of it. It was as if they had enough miniature gears and springs to make an exquisite timepiece, but decided to try and build a locomotive out of them instead. My favorite parts of IB were specifically bits that could have come out of one of their short works. And if we are to laud them for not bowing to the formulae of Hollywood, then we might as well wish they'd eschew the feature film format altogether.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 07:27 am:   

I have the Quays short films DVD and haven't watched it yet. Any particular films of special interest on there, you Quayophiles?
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 02:36 pm:   

Street of Crocodiles.

Also, the book it's based on, by Bruno Schulz, is fanastic.

See, if the Brothers Quay ever really hit the feature film bigtime, we'd be able to browse the supermarket racks and pick up tie-in movie novelizations such as THE BROTHERS QUAY'S STREET OF CROCODILES BY EANDO BINDER, JR.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 02:37 pm:   

Dave...I can't believe you have that DVD but haven't watched any of them yet.
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Robert
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 07:47 am:   

Street of Crocodiles is good. It's amusing to watch Cabinet of Jan Svenkmajer and then watch some Tool videos. While the Quays took inspiration from Svenkmajer and made their own video, Tool did some really blatant copying.

I really wish we could get In Absentia or their newer shorts.
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Robert
Posted on Friday, February 24, 2006 - 06:09 am:   

I saw Brother Grimm last night. I knew it wasn't going to be good, but I didn't expect it to be that bad. Something I've liked about Gilliam movies is you aren't quite sure where they are going, they usually have something to surprise me. It was obvious where this was going the whole time. It was tedious waiting for the characters to realize what the audience knew the whole time.

I'd rather just watch the Three Amigos again. It's largely the same story, but it's much more entertaining.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, February 24, 2006 - 04:58 pm:   

Brothers Grimm was a big fancy fart.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 07:22 am:   

Damn. Don Knotts and Darren McGavin in the same weekend. R.I.P. Damn.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 01:23 pm:   

I just watched RUSSIAN ARK this weekend and was curious as to people's opinions of it.
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ben peek
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 02:28 pm:   

i liked it a fair bit. it was quite beautiful, i thought, and interesting in the way it was narrated.
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Robert
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 05:56 pm:   

I enjoyed it. It was shot beautifully, and the way it was done in one continuous shot was great.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 10:30 pm:   

Needed more Don Knotts.
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ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 03:40 am:   

you're just picky, marc ;)
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 06:24 am:   

What movie doesn't need more Don Knotts?
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 08:33 am:   

At first I had kind of a ????? reaction to RUSSIAN ARK because I did not know what point the director was trying to make. But after reading a couple of essays on the film, I am more comfortable with its theme. I am a little bit of an art buff, so I found the experience of watching the movie (over and above its technical virtuosity) really pleasurable; any film that stars Rembrandt, Canova, Van Dyck and El Greco deserves three stars for that alone. As an evocation of a historical dream and a celebration of the Hermitage as a sort of historical ghost ship, carrying as freight the history of the Russian people, it works wonderfully well.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 12:31 pm:   

Honestly, I tried to like it, theoretically should have, it was technically amazing, but I ended up with my finger on the fast-forward button, pretty much immune to its spell. Maybe I just wasn't in the mood. It does hold up better than most movies at high speed, however.

...still doesn't excuse the lack of Knotts.

THE GHOST AND THE RELUCTANT RUSSIAN ARKONAUT WHO COULDN'T SHOOT STRAIGHT.

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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 08:27 am:   

Anybody heard of a movie called STORIES OF LOST SOULS? It looks like a portmanteau with an all-star cast (Blanchett, Bettany, Knightley, Gandolfini), but I have heard absolutely zilch about it and it appears to have gone straight to DVD. What's the skinny?
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 08:28 am:   

http://youtube.com/watch?v=BCRITsdDvhw

Pretty brilliant stuff.
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Robert
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 01:09 pm:   

That's best recut to be "brokeback" I've seen.

I got a big kick out of Toy Story 2: Requiem
It's footage from TS2, but sound from Requiem for a Dream
http://www.filmthreat.com/index.php?section=videos&Id=52&archive=&match=&page=0


I haven't heard anything about Stories of Lost Souls, but the description sounds interesting.
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Robert
Posted on Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 02:05 pm:   

I've now seen the theatrical version of Nightwatch. It's an improvement over the Russian DVD. The subtitles are cleaned up to make it less confusing. I was expecting more from the subtitles. A few appear in frame, but most still lurk at the bottom of the screen. Some are bright red and disperse like swirls of blood in water. I hoped for more like that.

Some people in the theater were upset at the end. I guess they didn't know it's part of a trilogy, and the lack of happy ending bothered them.
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jk
Posted on Monday, March 06, 2006 - 03:08 pm:   

Has anyone seen Werckmeister Symphonies?
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jk
Posted on Monday, March 06, 2006 - 04:03 pm:   

oops, Werckmeister Harmonies.
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Lucius In Honduras
Posted on Tuesday, March 07, 2006 - 06:24 am:   

I'm not a fan of Bela Tarr, he's too artsy for my tastes, but I've seen several of his films, including Werckmeister Harmonies and Damnation, and I certainly found that stimulated thought about the cinema, about why these films worked and what didn't work about them, and I also think Tarr comes up with a great weird scene or three. Did I like Werckmeister? Let's say that I appreciated it.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 07, 2006 - 10:30 am:   

First review of Day Watch (sequel to Night Watch, second in trilogy):

http://www.twitchfilm.net/archives/005365.html

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Robert
Posted on Monday, March 13, 2006 - 07:01 am:   

Bird People in China was great. I'm not a fan of Miike's horror films, but I really liked this one (and Happiness of the Katukaris). It amazes me that Bird People is directed by the same guy who did Ichi the Killer. He's definitely a versital director.

I also tried watching Kingdom of Heaven. After about an hour, I realized I didn't care enough to finish watching it. I didn't even make it that long in White Noise (so dull).
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 04:43 pm:   

I haven't see any movies lately, but I do have a ticket to see Steven Seagal doing his blues thing at the Tractor Tavern in Seattle, May 24th

:-)
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 05:15 pm:   

ManyMoodsofSS
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 06:59 pm:   

Pretty cool, Marc...
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 09:10 pm:   

I just watched GRIZZLY MAN today. What a great documentary. Perfect match of subject and director. Disturbing and, I suspect, haunting. Herzog's appreciation of Treadwell's filmmaking, and his careful separation of Treadwell as actor versus filmmaker, is what made it work for me.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 10:02 pm:   

I didn't find it disturbing. I had a different take. I thought Herzog was at his most cynical in presenting Treadwell whom he clearly thought was a pathetic madman. His appreciation of his filmmaking was perhaps sincere, but it was outweighed, IMO, by his sly choices and in his presentation of Treadwell's female friends. I thought it was good, but as a documentary about a nut, I much preferred his film about Kinski.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 11:55 pm:   

It doesn't displace MY BEST FIEND in my affection, but I didn't expect an unbiased documentary from Herzog. The moment when Treadwell rants about the forest service, Herzog deliberately evokes Kinski. Lots of beautiful stuff in Treadwell's footage, too.

I just finished watching Geoffrey Rush in THE LIFE AND DEATH OF PETER SELLERS. A really disjointed and unsatisfying film, in spite of some good performances.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 06:17 am:   

I watched that Rush film--I agree. Going to V for Vendetta this weekend -- not expecting much..
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Rich P.
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 06:30 am:   

Really enjoyed "3-Iron" (my copy is called "Locataires"), one of Kim's best.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 09:00 am:   

Yeah, I liked 3-iron a lot. ADDRESS UNKNOWN is a pretty good but much older Ki Duk KIm movie.
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ben peek
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 04:41 pm:   

i love that seagal pattern, marc.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 05:33 pm:   

As do we all.... :-)
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 06:11 pm:   

Nothing more frightening than an aroused Seagal.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 06:24 pm:   

Mischevious is my favorite...
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ben peek
Posted on Thursday, March 16, 2006 - 04:16 am:   

it's either mischevious or petulant for me.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 16, 2006 - 05:41 am:   

Though wistful is pretty evocative...
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Rich P.
Posted on Thursday, March 16, 2006 - 11:46 pm:   

I like regretful. Perhaps because it exposes a more vulnerable Steve than the one we usually see.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 02:08 pm:   

Amusing info on the TV-broadcast version of Grizzly Man (from the Ebert review site) with response from Herzog:

Q. My roommates and I go to school in an area that does not get many independent films -- let alone Werner Herzog documentaries -- so we were excited that the Discovery Channel decided to air "Grizzly Man." Unfortunately, the rhythm and beauty of Herzog's film was destroyed by the Discovery Channel's decision to stretch the doc to three hours and add lots of commercials.

With as little as five minutes between commercial interruptions, the film was rendered unwatchable. I understand that licensing can be expensive, but why would the Discovery Channel be so incredibly disrespectful to the film and its audience? And why would Herzog allow such a travesty?

Clint Bland, College Station, Texas

A. Werner Herzog replies: "The answer to the interruptions by commercials lies completely within the rules of the market: Discovery financed a good part of the film, and they are a company which is out there to make money. However, Discovery added a full hour to the film (discussions, additional footage from Timothy Treadwell's treasure trove, and other statements) without delineating clearly where my film ends and where the additional materials start.

"Many viewers believed that the appendix belonged somehow to my film, as Discovery placed the end credits of my film at the very end of the three-hour special. I had no prior knowledge that this would happen. But we should not forget that Discovery supported my film, and made it possible that we have it now.

"The only consolation I can offer is the DVD, and the knowledge in my guts that this film will pass the test of time, and that a TV airing like the one on Discovery belongs to the ephemeral and fleeting moments we have to endure.

"Sure, centuries from now our great-great-great-grandchildren will look back at us with amazement at how we could allow such a precious achievement of human culture as the telling of a story to be shattered into smithereens by commercials, the same amazement we feel today when we look at our ancestors for whom slavery, capital punishment, burning of witches, and the inquisition were acceptable everyday events."
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 04:44 pm:   

I didn't mind the commercials. They did break the film, but the extra material was nice -- I saw the film as basically informational.
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PM
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 07:14 pm:   

Last time I saw Seagal he was submerged...
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 09:55 pm:   

I plan to tune in if the Discovery Channel runs it again, just to see the extra stuff. Plus it's probably a version my kids can watch, since they've undoubtedly pared back or bleeped the raging fucks. The grizzly photography is awesome, and Treadwell's family of foxes are beautiful...one of my daughters is a fox and wolf freak, so she'd go crazy over that stuff.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 10:23 pm:   

Yeah, it's interesting stuff...and they did bleep the cussin.

Saw V for Vendetta. It's hard to know what they had in mind. Every time Hugo and Natalie start talking, the picture flatlines. Stephen Rea's only function is to perform the Morgan Freeman role and explain everything immediately after it happens. The action sequences are pretty good, but most of the film is shot in static TV style cinematography on sets that look like 60s tv...It's a mess.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 10:25 am:   

Has anyone seen Malpertuis, the film directed by Kumel starring Orson Welles? I've been waiting forever for a region 1 dvd, it's only region 2 so far (besides a most-likely shoddy bootleg region 1 that's been doing the rounds on ebay.)
Anyway, I thought Daughters of Darkness was ok, but supposedly Malpertuis is way better? BTW, I read an interview where Kumel completely dismisses Daughters of Darkness as commercial crap.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 10:34 am:   

Yeah, I have sorta....I watched slightly less than half of it and turned it off. It's very....stodgy, mannered. It struck me as non-commercial crap. The acting borders on the ridiculously bad...unless they were trying for that, and then I don't know what to think. Haven't seen DOD, but if Malpertuis is better, I'm not going to.
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Robert
Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 06:47 am:   

The version of Malpertuis making rounds on eBay is bad (although I cleaned it up a little and gave it menus and chapters for my own copy). There are some really interesting ideas (like having one actress play 3 different roles), but the execution is cheap, and the ending really sucks. I think the legendary status comes largely from being unavailable for so long. Since nobody could watch it, they imagined it better than it was.

I named my laptop after the book, and it's been a constant souce of problems. It's on the 5th repair since January. Naming a computer after a cursed house seems like a bad idea now.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 09:05 am:   

I have some kind of import version for which I paid 3O bucks--the version available on Diabolik...and it for sure sucketh.

I've never named a laptop, and hearing you story I'm staying away from it.
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Yasmine
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 05:19 am:   

Sorry to change the subject but has anyone seen the new remake 'The Hills Have Eyes' - this may already have been discussed but here in the UK it's just come out. I'm not sure why we are getting so making remakes at the moment - why mess with a good enough film?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 08:11 am:   

I haven't seen it. but it was directed by the guy who directed Haute Tension, which was at least stylish, so it's probably OK.

Why we're getting so many remakes is, plain and simple, because there's a paucity of imagination in Hollywood and remakes have a built-in audience, as do comic books, which we're also getting a lot of...Remakes don't do that well, generally, but they rarely lose money.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 09:16 am:   

The real mystery for me is why Erika Christiansen is doing this film. She was a pretty hot property after TRAFFIC, but she has gotten ice-cold since.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 09:41 am:   

No mystery. She probably got paid. The hot-cold thing probably means she can't act a lick, and her perf in Traffic was a product of direction, like Shues in Leaving Las vegas
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 12:13 pm:   

Can't act? I suppose you never saw a little film called SWIMFAN? :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 12:41 pm:   

:-)

What can I say?
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 05:58 pm:   

The directors need to step up and save Hollywood :-)
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 06:52 pm:   

Watched a couple of Allen Clarke movies today. Scum and The Firm. Scum's an early Ray Winstone flick about prison and The Firm stars Gary Oldman, back when G was acting his ass off, as a guy who by day is a lawyer and by night is a soccer hooligan. Both are worth watching, but the Firm is especially good. If you haven't seen Clarke, he was a really excellent director, a gritty naturalist Another interesting Clarke film is Made in Britain, featuring an 18 year old Tim Roth as a skinhead.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 22, 2006 - 06:38 am:   

My friend David from London was incredibly psyched, during a recent visit here, to find a new Clarke box set.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 22, 2006 - 08:01 am:   

I think there are a couple of new boxes available.'

So did you look into Portland prices?
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, March 22, 2006 - 08:20 am:   

No, not yet...See? You're starting to get the Seagal Road Trip itch, too, ain't ya? I knew it!
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, March 22, 2006 - 08:32 am:   

I can't afford the time, but I want to see you thrust the treatment into his face.... :-)
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 10:27 am:   

I finally saw OLDBOY. Lots of fun! Can't say I found it genuinely unnerving or anything, in spite of its obvious desire to freak...it had a fine high energy though and there were some great moments. I thought the air went out of the thing completely near the end, in an endless orgy of exposition that made the movie actually boring for a short stretch. Too bad Park couldn't have worked out a smoother way of revealing all the secrets. As a movie with similar themes but a completely different approach, I think The River was far more effective at creating actual dread (and truly haunting).
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 11:06 am:   

Well, the River is a great, great film; Oldboy is a terrific melodrama, much as a you describe.

You ought to check out Nobody Knows. I think that would be right up your alley.
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 11:23 am:   

Forgot to mention what a great performance the lead in OLDBOY gave. His ghastly grin was worth the whole movie. Yes, you're right, it's sheer melodrama and very good at that. The River's nothing of the sort.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 12:09 pm:   

OK, so I was kind of kidding about Seagal, but the more I look into it...Dante's is a great club (a friend and I saw My Morning Jacket there a couple years ago) just down the street from my favorite hotel. It's Seagal at 8, Suicide Girls cabaret (with reduced price admission for sex workers) at 12, and Memorial Day off the next day. This could just be doable. Whadaya say, Lucius, you in?
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 12:21 pm:   

Dave, I already got a ticket. I'm down.

Yep, Marc. The lead actor in Old Boy is great. I also saw him in Crying Fist, in which he plays a hasbeen boxer who earns a living by letting officeworkers vent their frustrations on him and beat him up in the streets.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 12:22 pm:   

Dave..I'm down for Suicide Girls too.
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 12:48 pm:   

Sounds like a party to me!
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 01:45 pm:   

Yes, indeed!
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 02:06 pm:   

Locked and loaded. I just ordered my ticket!!!!!

Seagal
Strippers
Sex Workers
Sleeping in on Monday

It truly gets no better than this.

And Steve Gordon is a big ol' grump.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 02:46 pm:   

You know it!
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, March 24, 2006 - 08:06 am:   


http://www.stipkomedia.com/contentengine/gallery5/details.php?image_id=12580&ses sionid=97cf8b0f3f2797275554854ca555643f

Just when you think it can't get any better, it does.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 24, 2006 - 08:32 am:   

Steve with his peeps
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ben peek
Posted on Friday, March 24, 2006 - 07:16 pm:   

why do i have the sudden urge to listen to this...
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, March 24, 2006 - 08:24 pm:   

Because...it's ineffable? :-)
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, March 25, 2006 - 01:47 am:   

it does have a certain unspeakable quality to it, yes. plus, the way those black people are looking at him, all hopeful, and like...
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jk
Posted on Saturday, March 25, 2006 - 10:46 am:   

Hey, Seagal is the next Clapton! I think he should use that photo as the cover for his next album. He could call the album "I Was Born A Poor Black Child."
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, March 25, 2006 - 12:38 pm:   

I think that is the album cover for MOJO PRIEST
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Bob K.
Posted on Saturday, March 25, 2006 - 08:49 pm:   

Nice one, jk. Here's the full Steve Martin quote:

"Huh? I am not a bum. I'm a jerk. I once had wealth, power, and the love of a beautiful woman. Now I only have two things: my friends and... uh... my thermos. Huh? My story? Okay. It was never easy for me. I was born a poor black child. I remember the days, sittin' on the porch with my family, singin' and dancin' down in Mississippi."

Perfect.
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PM
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 10:22 am:   

After League Of Extraordinary ... Alan Moore had enough.

He was interviewed last year and expanded material from that interview has been made available:

http://www.comicon.com/thebeat/2006/03/a_for_alan_pt_1_the_alan_moore.html

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PM
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 10:28 am:   

The picture of Seagal on the porch is one of the funniest things I've seen in a while.

Hopefully someone at some point will record his "live event" as it cracks me up just thinking about Seagal performing on stage...but who knows maybe he'll transform my hardened heart!
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 10:59 am:   

As to moore, V for Vendetta wasn't that great. It was an okay comic, but I didn't feel as if the wachowskis were ruining a Great Work Of Art.

Seagal is a pretty decent guitarist, but blues feeling may be beyond him...
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PM
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 11:48 am:   

Moore discusses how they fundamentally mis-portrayed the political message. Whether that was due to misunderstanding or commercial reasons, etc. remains a question.

But that's been the rule with adaptations anyway.

Warner Brothers will continue to make movies using his work.

For me it's not so much whether the movie was great or not but rather the story of how the author is unable to remove himself from his work. He struggled and finally was able to get his name off V. It wasn't an issue with Constantine though. They were willing to remove his name.

He doesn't want his name on his work that they own and he doesn't want the money. And of course he wants ownership back.

There are those who decry Hollywood/corporate publishing practices but he's an example of someone who is actually doing more than talking. He's given up millions and is willing to continue to do so.

So regardless of whether his comics, the films based on them, or his later writing is valued I have to give him credit for doing what so many just yak about.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 12:04 pm:   

But he's a nut....

Why is it a virtue to give up money when you achieve nothing by doing do?

It's not.
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PM
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 12:44 pm:   

Undoubtedly he's an eccentric. I don't agree with all of his positions.

But he's passionate about his work and wants to have ownership of it. Supposedly he was to have ownership of it and DC screwed him.

Of course DC/Warner Brothers continue to profit by his work and they're willing to give him money. But he wants ownership and doesn't want the money.

He continues to work but has selected another publisher where there's a comfort level.

It's a virtue because he sets an example that one can be successful by turning down the wealth that he could have. If one accepts that Hollywood and large publishing companies are corrupt he's done more than complain but still take a paycheck.

Granted that's in stark contrast to those who are trying to make as much as they possibly can. (I'm not trying to aim at anyone on this board.)
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 01:15 pm:   

If he wanted to be radical in the way you suggest, he should take the money and use it to launch a campaign against the movie. Or give it to charity. Not taking the money is the act of a dolt.
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jk
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 01:53 pm:   

Or just think of all the rare Austin Spare paintings he could buy with that money. When is his huge compendium of "magic" supposed to be coming out? I read an interview where he was going on about a lizard entity that he was in constant contact with as a result of his working with magic. Wonder what he was on? Anyway, anyone read his book Voice of the Fire? Is it any good? I'm kind of interested in his work, but I can't really get into comics.
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Lizard Entity
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 03:36 pm:   

Alive...yessssssss!
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PM
Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 - 04:14 pm:   

Well I thought I was going to be the first out the gate with Jim Morrison...

Moore just isn't the sort of personality to launch a campaign. It's just not him. I think that I should expand the point a bit.

He's been contractually obligated to be paid and the case of the films he's given the money to those who worked with him.

His "campaign" is more insidious. If he were to be given ownership of his work then there wouldn't be any more movies. It's understandable that DC/Warner aren't about to give him that as they would lose millions over time.

He would allow his work (the comics) to be reprinted but that would be done through a different publisher.

While he doesn't sell like Rowlings he has over time and continues to sell enough that DC/Warner aren't going to release his work back to him.
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ben peek
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 04:43 am:   

jk--

i read VOICE OF THE FIRE and i really dug it. i think it's moore's best work, really, in any medium. the first chapter, written from the point of view of a cave boy with a limited dialect is a bit hard going, and i've known a few people who struggled with it, but it's fully worth going through, i say.

i always thought V FOR VENDETTA was a bland graphic novel, and i've liked moore's things beforehand. as for his decision to remove his name, i believe it came more out of the fact that someone sued him over LEAGUE OF..., suggesting he'd written it as a smokescreen to cover the theft of intellectual property, and he was offended by this. i can see where he's coming from, but since they're going to make the films anyway, he should just take the cash, put it to use on living expenses or give it to charity. the real statement would, i think, be to say that no, he would not sell his work to hollywood, though i suppose he doesn't do this for the sake of the other creator.
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Rich P.
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 06:06 am:   

Watched HAUTE TENSION last night, which I hold responsible for the weirdest/most twisted dreams I've had in months. Soon as I regain my senses, I'm goin' for THE HILLS HAVE EYES.

Really enjoyed SYMPATHY FOR LADY VENGEANCE. I'd almost say it was a better movie than OLDBOY except that it didn't have a single defining moment like OLDBOY did. Pretty friggin' great though. Curious what you thought of it, Lucius…
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 08:41 am:   

Yeah, I thought it was a better movie than Oldboy. OB was mainly a collection of moments, the octopus, the hallway scene, etc, But LADY was a real movie. I have a findness for OLDBOY but I respect LADY more...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 08:43 am:   

Ben, I agree completely about V for Vendetta and Moore. I'll have to check out Voice of Fire.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 08:51 am:   

I thought HT was a stylish movie for the slasher genre, even if the "twist" was a bit predictable. Great slimy killer, nifty lesbian erotic undercurrents...a definite cut above the standard Friday the XIII tripe.
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ben peek
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 05:34 pm:   

lucius, they reprinted VOICE OF THE FIRE a couple of years back, i think, and you can pick it up pretty readily these days. it was a nice reprint edition, too, came with jose v. photography art in it.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 06:37 pm:   

Thanks, Ben. I see it's available on Amazon.
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jk
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 12:35 am:   

Just read the following in an interview with Alan Moore: "I focus on a second century snake deity named Glycon, whom I've connected with with the used of hallucinogenic mushrooms and with the snake energy common to many of the world's belief systems." I'd hazard a guess that the magic mushrooms have more to do with it than the snake energy of the world's belief systems. Wonder what they talk about? If it were me, I'd ask Glycon if he could give me the winning lotto numbers. Ha.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 06:42 am:   

I know Glycon, and believe me, he's no Ouruburous. :-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 12:14 pm:   

"Glycon the snake deity"...I think I'm going to use that as my euphemism of choice from now on. "Come on, baby, it's time to worship Glycon the snake deity..."
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 12:39 pm:   

And suppose that special someone says, I know Glycon, and believe me....

:-)
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Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 01:14 pm:   

All hail the all-powerful Glycon! :-)

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