Good movies 22 Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Shepard, Lucius » Good movies 22 « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, October 09, 2005 - 11:52 am:   

†††By Rich Patterson on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 09:03 am:

MF to Jet Li:

"Pianos are a lot like people... When you pound on a person they get out of tune."
†††By Lucius on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 09:31 am:

"sniff, sniff...."
†††By MarcL on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 09:46 am:

Rich, are you serious? I hope so.

Speaking of hilarious quotes, the trailer for Brokeback Mountain contains even better lines than that, arranged for maximum comedic effect. I understand audiences have been greeting it with cries of derision, but I found it impossible to watch it and not laugh in disbelief at the Marlboro-man set pieces and the awful lines:

"Ah wish Ah knew how ta quit yew..."

It's comically pretentious, and the trailer is paced like a parody of itself.

http://movies.yahoo.com/feature/brokebackmountain.html

Modern audiences may be barbarian for laughing down serious movies, but howling is a perfectly legitimate response to this trailer.
†††By Lucius on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 10:05 am:

Yep, he's serious, but Million Dollar Baby's just as bad.

Does Morgan Freeman do a narration for Brokeback...
†††By Rich Patterson on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 10:09 am:

Absolutely, Marc. And that line is from when they first meet. MF doesn't yet know Danny is a fighter. Kinda surreal.
†††By MarcL on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 10:17 am:

"I knew when I met that gal that someone would be puttin her down for her own good."

We should have a contest. Morgan Freeman gives the homespun, heartfelt, soulful yet gritty pitchline for every movie ever made.
†††By Dave G. on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 10:55 am:

Jeez, and Ang Lee really needed a big comeback from THE HULK. Mebbe this here ain't the one.
†††By MarcL on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 11:05 am:

That smelling-the-shirt scene says it all.

"Yew boys sure found a way to make the time pass up there..."
†††By Lucius on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 11:23 am:

And I had such hopes for Jake Gyllenhall....
†††By Lucius on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 12:46 pm:

Got Malpertus, the purportedly great, surreal baroque epic based on the novel by Jean Ray, the Belgian Poe, about an immense haunted house, Malpertius, featuring Orson Welles. This film has a big rep but hasn't existed in watchable form till recently.


When am I going to have time to watch this shit?
†††By StephenB on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 11:18 pm:

Well, you are your own boss...
†††By Lucius on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 04:33 am:

Yeah, and I'm a bastard.
†††By Dave G. on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 06:16 am:

If I were you, I would definitely quit myself, so you could have more "you" time...
†††By Robert on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 07:00 am:

A lot of the reputation for Malpertuis comes from not existing in a watchable form. Since nobody could watch it, people couldn't see what it was really like, and imagined a great film. It's a decent film with a terrible ending.
†††By Lucius on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 08:02 am:

Yeah, I watched some of it last night and wasn't all that impressed...but I'd like to read the book.
†††By Robert on Friday, October 07, 2005 - 08:14 am:

I know it's cliche on adaptations from books, but the book really is a lot better. I wish it was possible to find other works by Ray in English.
†††By Lucius on Sunday, October 09, 2005 - 11:46 am:

Well, i had only watched a little of Cookers, but enough to know it was a creepy little item; Friday night I watched the rest and I have to admit it got to me. Exceptionally creepy and atmospheric. A very good little horror film.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Patterson
Posted on Monday, October 10, 2005 - 07:05 am:   

Just watched Cookers. Pretty cool. Good acting - I especially liked Dorena, but they were all convincing speed freaks. IMDB shows itís a few years old. Did it only just come out on DVD? Thanks for the rec.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Monday, October 10, 2005 - 07:47 am:   


Yet another remixed movie trailer: this one for Eli Roth's notorious, gory-as-hell
horror movie, CABIN FEVER. This trailer makes it look like sappy, sentimental
Oscar-Bait about friendship. (Absolutely no gore or horror at all in this trailer,
btw: in case you're scared of that.)

http://www.ifilm.com/ifilmdetail/2681515
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 10, 2005 - 08:30 am:   

Rich,
it's just out on DVD, I believe. I was surprised to see it at akk. It was a very little movie, played a repertory house in Portland....

I agree about the speed freaks. To my mind, they're the most authentic dopers ever put on film.


Adam..very funny

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 10, 2005 - 09:09 pm:   

Anybody seen Tarkovsky's Sacrifice? Can you reccomend it?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 06:32 am:   

Cabin Fever wasn't all that gory...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 06:46 am:   

...or that good. Check out Cookers. Not gory at all...but good...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 07:46 am:   

CF was no classic, but I thought it conveyed a certain pervasive sense of dread. But I am anxious to see COOKERS.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 08:00 am:   

I thought CF had a pervasive sense of ickyness. Not a good film. Have you ever seen Hammerhead, with William Forsythe? Half Man, Half Shark, Mortal Terror... :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 08:32 am:   

I tried watching Hammerhead, but like most of the Sci-Fi channel movies, it was terrible. I didn't finish watching it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 09:08 am:   

Ohmigod. It sounds like an absolute classic. It makes me want to write a script expressly for Forsythe, to give him the Oscar-calibre role he has been waiting for his whole career...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 09:24 am:   

Haven't seen Hammerhead, but I thought Dave might appreciate it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 - 05:17 pm:   

Hmmm, let's see. Seagal, one-time box-office king now reduced to making direct-to-dvd tripe funded by former Communist government film commissions. Forsythe, one-time top-dog character actor now reduced to making chintzy sci-fi channel potboilers.

Am I the only one who sees this? These guys need a good script reuniting Richie Madano and Gino Felino! I'm thinking pre-quel!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 12, 2005 - 09:32 pm:   

Watched the Austrailian film TRACKER. Good movie, beautifully shot. Kind of a John Ford western shot down under. Four men, a black tracker, a policeman, a guy who's been dragooned into helping him, and a young deputy new to the territory pursue a aboriginal man accused of murdering a white woman into the outback. The men never address each other by name, they become who they are -- the tracker has a mysterious, mystical edge. It's fairly predictable, but it works.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2005 - 08:26 pm:   

Saw The Last Great Wilderness dir by David McKenzie. Charlie is driving to Skye to burn down the house of the man who stole his wife; on the road he meets Vincent, a smalltime criminal who is fleeing men who seek to kill him. In the midst of the highlands, they run out of gas and are forced to hike to a big old house in the middle of nowhere -- there they meet a odd group of people -- a beautiful frigid woman, a weird doctor/cult leader, some odd seniors, etc. Something, Vincent and Charlie feel, is not right. All in all, an inventive and interesting thriller that is never what it seems....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JTS
Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2005 - 09:34 pm:   

yeah the last wilderness is an excellent film,
lucius have you seen McKenzies other film Young Adam, would you reccomend it. Thanks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2005 - 10:02 pm:   

Oh yeah. Almost forgot. Found this weird Norweigian DVD of an unreleased black comedy called The Big White starring Robin Williams and Holly Hunter (whose last few roles I've liked, particularly the amputee in Jesus' Son) and Giovanni Ribisi. Hollywood black comedies are usually just extra whacky comedies with somebody getting dead and the rest a happy ending -- this is no exception, but it's sort of enjoyable because of Hunter's Tourette's housewife and Rbisi's loser insurance investigator and his girlfriend's Psychic Hotline worker and the Alaskan strip club culture in which the whole thing is set.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2005 - 10:15 pm:   

JTS, yeah, I have to overcome my bias toward Tilda Swinton--I think she's worth watching in anything--but yeah, I thought Young Adam was a better film than Wilderness, with a very intriguing narration. Ewan MacGregor's character is terrifcally written.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 08:23 am:   

How was the David Byrne s/t for YA?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 08:54 am:   

I haven't seen LAYER CAKE, so I can't opine on his charisma or acting ability, but am I the only one who thinks Daniel Craig is a little lacking in the looks dept. to be playing James Bond?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 09:19 am:   

I didn't notice the soundtrack that much, so I guess it worked. As for Craig, he's too good for Bond; Bond was supposed to be rugged, not a shirt model like Brosnan and Moore.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 09:26 am:   

Am I the only one who doesn't care about Bond? The movies are mostly terrible, especially the recent ones. Why should I care who is cast in a movie I don't want to watch?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 09:27 am:   

Well, he's certainly got the rugged look down pat.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 11:34 am:   

Just discovered that TURTLES CAN FLY is now available on DVD. This is probably the best movie I've seen in the last year.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 11:41 am:   

Yep. Picked it up, Marc....

No, you're not the only one, Robert...That's what I meant by saying Craig was too good for Bond.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 09:52 pm:   

i wish they'd just stop with the bond films, myself. but then i wish they wouldn't make a lot of films.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, October 14, 2005 - 10:58 pm:   

I haven't followed them at all after Connery. Sorry, Hollywood!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, October 15, 2005 - 04:53 am:   

Hey, I'll check out the new guy -- I'm sure the movies will still be rotten excessive cartoons, but what the hell, after Sound of Thunder, I can sit through anything....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2005 - 02:16 am:   

Let's not forget the Bond women...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2005 - 02:30 am:   

Watched Transporter 2 for $1. The gut wrenching aerial shots would have worked better in a thriller.

Impressed by the lack of deaths. Had to set some record for an action film where practically no one dies...

Granted I should have stayed home and baked. The original Transporter now seems even better.

Looking forward to another miserable experience with Domino.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2005 - 07:09 am:   

Domino is purported to be unwatchable, one of the worst films ever made....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2005 - 08:05 am:   

This might interest Mark, Robert, etc....

he H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society presents its all new silent film of The Call of Cthulhu. The famed story is brought richly to life in the style of a classic 1920s silent movie, with a haunting original symphonic score. Using the "Mythoscope" process ó a mix of modern and vintage techniques, the HPLHS has worked to create the most authentic and faithful screen adaptation of a Lovecraft story yet attempted.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2005 - 06:54 pm:   

Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man was wretched.

Domino has moments that could easily have been edited out --- these moments remind one stylistically of early MTV videos though they're shot with a higher production value.

I like Walker and Rourke and Coleman. They're playing predictable parts. Wouldn't consider these to be bad performances just familiar ones.

The movie shows no mercy toward 90120. So if one has any love for this show or a couple of its actors then one can understand why Domino isn't winning any favors.

Even though this is an action film (of sorts) one has to follow it and pay attention. This may have exceeded some expectations. There's a tad of sophistication in the storytelling but it doesn't mix so well with those quarter tossing shots that just don't work. The quarter tossing shots are the ones that seem shot straight from some 80's MTV video.

And let's not forget the girl. My name is Domino. Love her voice. If you don't like her voice or her look then little surprise this movie will leave you cold. And really the same for lil underwear girl in Transporter 2.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 06:30 am:   

I would see Domino for its awfulness and for KK, but I have to see A History of Violence first.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 06:31 am:   

Lucius, I saw The Machinist the other night and thought it was pretty decent. Am I right in thinking you've gone on record as hating it? Pourquoi?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 07:23 am:   

I didn't think it was horrible, just horribly derivative of David Fincher's excessively mordant Seven, and for all its pretension, it wound up being pretty much a standard issue morality play. Pretty good sound track, though. I preferred Anderson's previous two movies. I was let down because I was expecting better.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 07:51 am:   

My son the architect turned me onto this. For those who delight in cinema explosif.

http://www.implosionworld.com/
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 10:05 am:   

Tasteful boom boom.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 11:09 am:   

So it's official. Poor old 60-year old Rocky Balboa and 60-year old Clubber Lang are gonna lace 'em up and Do It One Mo' Time! Art imitates life? Ugh.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 11:12 am:   

I found a trailer for Call of Cthulhu here:
http://www.cthulhulives.org/CoC/trailer.html

Looks rather cheesy, but it could be entertaining.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 11:37 am:   

I read that they were in talks with Roy Jones, Jr to play Rocky's opponent.

Somehow I have no difficulty believing that this Rocky just like the upcoming Rambo will maintain their respective traditions (and perhaps trajectories too)...

But having said this Stallone is in good shape and there's no reason (appearance-wise) that he can't do an action picture. Same for Arnold.

But I'd rather watch Stallone in Get Carter or something of that ilk as opposed to another Rocky or Rambo...even another Demolition Man:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 11:55 am:   

Thanks, Robert....

You'd rather watch Stallone in Get Carter, PM? Wow. Have you ever seen the original?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 12:16 pm:   

It'll be interesting to see if Stallone can still show emotion without busting any stitches.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 12:55 pm:   

First Blood was unsettling as is to be expected. Never really interested in Rambo afterwards. Will Rambo this time around go to Guantonimo?

Rocky. Another ongoing trail of tears. Let's see will the next Rocky be down and out both financially and personally? Will he be beaten on the streets and then return to the gym to train and later emerge victorious?

When I mention Stallone in Get Carter or Copland or even Assassins I'm saying that those roles are more appealing to me than Rambo or Rocky.

Not suggesting that the remake of Get Carter is better than the original. Really just saying that I'd rather watch a film in the vein of Get Carter than to be splattered with another Rocky or Rambo.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 01:00 pm:   

I visualize Rocky's single tear in profile as he sits alone by a darkened window. It's likely raining outside as the camera draws closer to him.

It's quiet except for the rain. Here comes the camera closer, closer. Rocky by the window in profile is sad.

As the camera continues an inexorable closeup the tear begins to form.

No need to worry folk there's going to be another Rocky film and all will be well in the end...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 01:45 pm:   

I find concern over this topic baffling.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 02:16 pm:   

Perhaps others have a potential Rocky scene they wish to share.

When I think of yet another Rocky movie I recall Barton Fink and wrestling pictures.

And I think of Lucius who undoubtedly could write a worthy boxing screenplay and Stallone who will once again draw from his well...

Somewhere out there Seagal is out for justice but there is no justice to be found...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 04:34 pm:   

All that Rocky movie needs is Morgan Freeman's narration.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 05:09 pm:   

The Rocky franchise depended on the mix of camp and vigorous physical action. The action scenes are going to be laughable in this one. It's going to look like an old man bar fight. (Rocky's fight with Tommy Morrison in V actually WAS an old man bar fight...) And the bathos of the aging warrior heading into the winter of his years, raging against the dying of the light...etc etc. is going to be an irresistible maw into which Stallone will be sucked. Rocky III is the universally-regarded best of breed (no coincidence it's the one they are harkening back to in VI) because it was damn funny. A whole generation of young men went around saying "I predict PAIN" and "I do not accept Balboa's challenge because Balboa IS no challenge" during boozed-up Sat. nights. Where is the humor going to be this time? Nobody wants a downer Rocky, but this can't be anything but.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 06:15 pm:   

Or Tony Scott as the director...

I'll share a Rocky scene.

Rocky, his hair graying, sits in a wooden chair, shirtless and trouserless. He is wearing boxing gloves and a diaper -- the diaper is leaking. He is expressionless, staring listlessly out a window, blinking against the winter light. The room he occupies is sparsely furnished. A bed, a tv set, a throw rug, and the chair. It's clearly an instituitional room. The door opens and a male orderly enters bearing a tray with a glass of water and meds in a tiny paper cup.

Orderly: Aren't you cold, Mr. Balboa?

Rocky: Is it time?

Orderly: Yeah.

The orderly catches a whiff of the diaper, makes a face.
He forces the meds on Rocky, and Rock, dutifully, swallows them down.

Rocky: Gimme my robe.

Orderly: Which one you want?

Rocky hesistates, then: The one with the yellow dragon.

Orderly: Got it right here.

He rips a sheet off the bed and throws it over Rocky's shoulders.

Orderly: Let's go.

Rocky stands, shuffles toward the door, shadow-boxing. His punches are slow, feeble-looking.

Rocky: We got a good crowd, Mitch?

Orderly (opening the door for Rocky): Yeah, Rock.
You sold out the Garden again.


A hydrotherapy room. Orderlies, nurses, patients are ranged along the walls, shouting, making bets, as a blond nurse in bra and panties sashshays around the room, holding up a card on which is stenciled ROUND ONE. One of the patients holds up a metal bedpan and strikes it with a rubber hammer. Bong. Rock, his robe removed, shuffles forward, and from the opposite corner comes an equally diminished Clubber Lang...with a gray mohawk.

Second Orderly: You didn't change his diaper.

First Orderly: Naw, it's nasty, man!

Second Orderly: That gives him an advantage! I'm stoppin' this!

First Orderly (holds knife to throat of Second Orderly): You ain't stopping nothing!

Meanwhile, the two graying warriors have met at the center of the room and, just as we switch to the credits, they launch their first punches...

ROCKY IX:

DEMENTIA

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 06:17 pm:   

We cross-posted, Dave.

I think a downer's just what the series needs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 06:51 pm:   

Well done Lucius.

I read that they wanted the script to be poignant. Addressing Dave's relevance request this sort of popped out in all it's generic glory...

Rocky, present age, has been beaten and lies unconscious in an alley just a couple of blocks from home.

He lies prone on his back bruised and a bit bloody. A trickle of blood from his eye is beginning to pool.

Drops of rain (slow mo) strike his face mixing with his bloody trickle.

Ever so slowly he begins to revive.

As he turns he hears the faint meow.

A starving kitten lies nearby.

The kitten too weak to move or really meow looks at Rocky. They exchange wounded glances.

As Rocky begins to gather his strength and his ability to stand he moves over to the kitten.

Gently he takes the kitten and puts him/her in the pocket of that classic sweatsuit jacket.

Painfully he returns home with the camera catching kitten's head popped out of pocket.

Obligatory stairs stand in the way of regaining entry. Step by step he struggles...

Finally he makes it inside and prepares a dish of milk and begins to restore kitten's health.

After kitten has fed, kitten goes to sleep.

Rocky sits down by the window and the events detailed in the earlier tear jerking scene commences.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 06:55 pm:   

I woulda done it different. Rocky breaks the kitten's neck, drinks its blood, then, reinvigorated, makes his way home.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 08:42 pm:   

Wallace and Grommit shudder indoors.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 11:06 pm:   

"Two kittens in a glass of milk. That's what Rocky Balboa was drinking the night I took him in. They wouldn't be the last kittens he drank either, by the time I'd gotten through--- Are you kids gonna shut up or can I get on with the story?" - Morgan Freeman
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 03:31 am:   

this new rocky movie sounds great. and morgan freeman narrating? golly. i don't think i'll rightly be able to contain myself.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 07:07 am:   

I kinda like the idea of Rocky and Rambo, of characters one plays for one's entire life -- from there it's but a short walk to absolute immmersion in a character, birth to death, which puts us into sciencefictionland....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 07:59 am:   

and the brutal deaths of kittens...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:02 am:   

I gotta say, although I've never seen a Rocky movie, the one shred of creative respect I have for Stallone is that Rocky is his character, his creation. He didn't start by plugging himself into someone else's icon. Why not come back to it? What the hell else is he going to do with his career? STOP OR MY MOM'S GONNA SHOOT AGAIN? When you've got IP (and I use the I loosely), you might as well exploit it. He glommed onto some weird little nub of the collective psyche and you can't blame him for holding on like an enraged wolverine.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:05 am:   

Wish that Ford had done more BladeRunners though given how the followups frequently fail perhaps one was enough.

Weaver's Ripley was ok...writing/directing was not.

Eastwood and Wayne played their respective cowboys reliably.

Peta Wilson remains woefully underused...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:10 am:   

Yes I can hold Stallone and the studio responsible for more Rocky films.

It doesn't surprise me that he would want to do more.

As it's taken years to get to Rocky VI the studio wasn't exactly biting either...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:19 am:   

As King Kong approaches, my interest in it recedes. First, I found out Jackson is producing (and maybe more) a video game adaptation, Halo. Now, Howard Shore isn't doing the Kong music. Instead, James Newton Howard is. I don't have anything against JNH, but I don't have as much interest in him. I have watched movies just to hear Shore's music.

I often try to guess the composers for movies I see on TV. I find a lot of composers have little things that distinguish them from others and make them easy to guess, even when they try different styles. JNH doesn't have anything distinct, I can't recognize his music as coming from him (even in cases where I like his music).

I just get the feeling Jackson is going to descend into mediocrity, video game movies and switching composers are two signs of this.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:23 am:   

The video games go along with the merchandising.

There's money to be made in that arena.

Rest assured a video game will be released whenever possible for as long as it's profitable (or believed to be).

Or it goes the other way with the ongoing conversion from video game to movie...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:29 am:   

I agree with your prognosis on Jackson, Robert. I think we've seen his best and we differ only in that I've been off Kong ever since I saw the trailer.

In what sense, PM, do you feel that Peta Wilson is underused?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:39 am:   

Peta can bring the action and round it out with drama.

When I see other women in action roles I frequently think Peta would have been better...

But her time seems to have passed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 08:47 am:   

Here's my scene: As a news crew from Entertainment Tonight and reporters from various low-rent tabloids zero in, Rocky Balboa and Paulie emerge from a bankruptcy court in downtown Philadelphia. Rocky stammers out some answers to questions about how he came to this state, when his lawyer takes the microphone. "Mr. Balboa is the victim of some unfortunate investments in internet start-ups and was victimized, like millions of good Americans, by the collapse of the internet bubble. No more questions, please."

Just then, a voice breaks through the hubbub from the foot of the stairs. It is a gray and bow-legged Clubber Lang, sporting a threadbare Adidas track suit and Kangol cap. "Yo, Balboa. You was always a chump. Now you a broke chump!"

Rocky is taken aback. "Not this guy again. You don't need nothin' from this guy," Paulie retorts. "Whaddayou doin' here?" Rocky asks. "You lose your money, too?"

"I didn't lose nothin', fool. My money was in Tyco and Adelphia. You honkies stole it from me. And I'm gonna get it back!"

The reporters are in a frenzy, sensing a story.

Rocky rises to the challenge. "I'll fight you anytime, anywhere, Clubbah. Bring it on," Rocky shouts. "And the winner gets Larry Holmes!" Flash bulbs erupt in a shower of stars.

"Much as I would enjoy whupping you again," Clubber says. "We've got a better idea."

"We?" Rocky asks. "Who's we?"

The door of an idling black limousine opens and out slide a cameraman, a man holding a boom mic, Bob Saget, Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick. Saget strides to a prominent place and speaks: "What America wants to know is can two ex-champions share one apartment without driving each other crazy?" The theme from "The Odd Couple" blasts from the limo's sound system. "Let's find out on 'Rocky and Clubber: The Final Round' this fall on the dubba-dubba-double-U B!"

Rocky is confused by the sudden commotion. "Jeez, I dunno...Hey, Mick, what should I do...?" From the ether an apparition of Rock's old trainer Mickey appears, placing a spectral hand on his shoulder and answering gruffly: "Do it, Rock, cuz Mickey loves ya! And so will the 18-34 demographic dat dose advertisers go after..."

As Rocky descends the stairs, Saget thrusts a microphone in Clubber's face. "What do you think America's television audience can expect?"

Clubber turns serious. "I predict paaaiiiinnn..." he says, with obvious relish, climbing into the limo, closely followed by Balboa. Rock closes the door and leans out the window toward Saget's mic. "Azzzolutely," he concurs.

The limo roars off, to the elated cheers of the assembled press.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 09:12 am:   

Did you like Shore's music for LOTR, Robert? I didn't. Predictable, I though. And I know you have to do a certain amount of celtic lament, but jeez...The Naked Lunch soundtrack is my favorite Shore.

As to Jackson, he's already rich beyond his wildest -- I never can understand why, once they've made their pile, these guys don't make a few little movies, so they can hone their craft, invest more in story and character than in FX...Ego, I guess.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 09:38 am:   

Yes, I liked the music for LotR. I liked how he approached Fellowship of the Ring more like a horror score than an action score (even though it had it's share of action themes). I like picking out the variations on the themes that occur in the second two. I like how each culture got distinct music (Celtic for elves, different sort of Celtic for hobbits, Nordic for Rohan, male choirs for dwarves, pompous classical for Gondor). Not all of the styles thrilled me (especially the Celtic stuff), but I liked a lot of it.

I was really happy Shore did it, since I could just imagine how badly anyone else would have done.

The Cell is my favorite Shore. The movie isn't good, but I like the orchestral and Moroccan mix for the music.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 09:50 am:   

Yeah, I like the Cell score, though not the movie. As for LOTR, maybe I've just got a bug up my ass about the Celtic crud.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 10:14 am:   

LoTR was just one beautiful battle scene after another. I lost interest. Just another CGI spectacle though certainly rendered wondrously.

Enjoyed Viggo much more in History of Violence...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 11:49 am:   

Don't worry about Peta. When they make the movie of how the Rigas family robbed Adelphia's shareholders blind, Peta can play herself as the femme fatale whizzed around the globe on the company jet.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 03:37 pm:   

i think it's a real shame jackson hasn't gone back to not large films. one of my favourite things he has done was THE FRIGHTENERS--which isn't a small film, in the way of some small films, but it was it's own little thing.

i didn't mind LOTR, but KING KONG has that feel of more of the same.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 07:20 pm:   

Jackson, according to rumour, made another Hwood film after the Frighteners, which was never released.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 05:39 am:   

how true you reckon the rumour is?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 06:13 am:   

Has anyone made a big Hollywood movie and then gone back to smaller films by their own choice? I can imagine people making a Hollywood bomb and not getting any good offers after that, so they have to make smaller films. But I wonder how many fight off the Hollywood allure and go back to making something interesting.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 06:20 am:   

Didn't Soderbergh make FULL FRONTAL after OCEANS 11?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 07:31 am:   

Ben: Jackson's director's cut of the Frighteners will be out this November on DVD (at least in the states).

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 08:29 am:   

Robert, Phillip Noyce comes to mind. He's recently returned to Australia and made Rabbitproof Fence and The Quiet American.

Soderbergh's case is different; he sandwiches a pathetic side project on occasion between a pathetic big picture.

Ben, I've heard this rumor from different sources, both fairly reliable, in my judgement, but that's all I know...except that it's not supposed to be very good.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 08:49 am:   

Other than SS, I really can't think of any.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 09:54 am:   

Jackson is supposed to be making The Lovely Bones next. Which should be a return to smaller film-making. But I'll believe it when I see it.

Del Toro has made Pan's Labyrinth, which is supposed to be much more Devil's Backbone than Hellboy.

Soderbergh is one of those guys who seems to only make small films to test out DV technology, not to actually tell a personal story.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 09:58 am:   

There IS the case of the 4O's filmmaker, Oliver DeLorde, who made a series of poor quality westerns, then began experimenting with increasingly shorter forms of the western -- his masterwork, "Snapshot of the Massacre at Indian Wells," lasts only 2. 9 seconds, yet succeeds in constructing "a kinetic porthole into the old West, conveying an entire history." He grew ever more concerned that he had stumbled upon a great secret involving a certain vanished tribe and rarely went out in public during his final years, fearful that they would somehow extract their vengeance. His last film, "A Reckoning," lasts 0.3 seconds and has never been viewed, except perhaps by DeLorde himself. The film was found in his pirvate theater, un-rewound on a projector, and there was no evidence left of DeLorde other than his clothing, still buttoned, on a theater seat.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 10:16 am:   

Well, the big example of a director going back to small projects is Joel Schumacher (who is very much aware of how badly his Batman films sucked, and reportedly has a lot of fun letting himself have it on the DVD commentary tracks -- which have been described as almost worth subjecting yourself to the actual films). He made a few small films afterward, to redeem himself. Your judgment of his success will vary.

And then there's Robert Altman, who spent a number of years (following his late '70s flops) in the wilderness. But that was not so much a matter of choice.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 10:33 am:   

I work with someone who worked closely with Jackson on LOTR. I can ask if he knows anything about the post-Frighteners flick. I also enjoyed THE FRIGHTENERS, partly because it's so bipolar. It was one of the things that gave me hope for LOTR, in that it wasn't too freaking pretentious. I was happy to see LOTR go to someone with a grasp of horror rather than some fantasy director (if there is such a thing), and the early trailers for FELLOWSHIP showed that he grasped that horror was the overriding mood of the trilogy. You could see it in the hobbits' eyes. Jackson could get everything else wrong, but if he nailed that part, then I'd give him a lot of credit. And he did.

THE LOVELY BONES seems like a very deliberate return to the form of HEAVENLY CREATURES. Jackson spoke about wanting to return to small films. But it seems as if King Kong was something he wanted to make even before LOTR, and couldn't resist. I don't see him directing the HALO picture; it's going to happen with WETA, under his aegis, but that's all.

More importantly, here is some Segal info from Kung Fu Cult Cinema website:

Hollywood star Steven Seagal (55) is in town at the moment, promoting not only his latest movie but also a new CD. The actor appeared on the Tokudane wide show this morning, speaking fluent Japanese and doing a pretty good PR job. His latest action film, "Into the Sun" was filmed entirely in Tokyo and Seagal's dialog is almost all in Japanese, and Kansai-ben no less! He is married to a Japanese and has two children working in the entertainment business here as well as his own aikido dojo. But his American roots are there to see in his new CD, a blues album called "Songs From the Crystal Cave." He collaborated on the album with such major names as Stevie Wonder. Asked during the Tokudane show for a comment on Sylvester Stallone's new "Rocky 6" project, Seagal grinned as he said that Sly obviously didn't get much work these days.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 10:40 am:   

I'd say that Noyce is a better example, in that he appears to have forsaken Hollywood -- at least, all his Hollywood project apprear to have been abandoned. Schumacher is just another example of H-wood ego, an asshole pretending to be an artiste and making ridiculous pieces of shit like Tigerland...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 10:50 am:   

Wow, I hadn't realized Noyce had done big movies. I only knew him from Rabbitproof Fence and Quiet American. I'll try not to hold Bone Collector against him.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 11:07 am:   

Noyce did all the Jack Ryan pictures for H-wood (Hunt for Red October, etc). He came to H-wood's attention with a nasty little thriller, Dead Calm.

Seagal and Stevie Wonder...Wow.

I don't know, Marc. Filming a best-seller (an abusively bad one, imo) doesn't strike me as a returning to form, but rather pandering to the academy and all those who believe a little angel child lives upstairs and forgives her killer. I hope you're right, but I don't think so. I liked Fellowship, but the other part of the trilogy didn't work for me except as a collection of Great Moments In CGI. But he gets props from me for trying.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 11:35 am:   

I've seen a lot of Noyce films, but didn't realize who he was. There are many movies where I don't pay attention to the director.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 11:55 am:   

He also made the Saint. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 12:46 pm:   

Some ideas for the title of the next Rocky movie, adapted from other useless sequels:

Rocky 6: The Curse of Rocky Balboa (both Halloween and Puppet Master titled the 6th films with Curse).
Rocky 6: The Legend of Mickey's Gold
Rocky 6: Secret of the Ooze
Rocky 6: Seaside Pikachu
Rocky 6: Rocky vs. Predator
Rocky 6: Rocky vs. Demonic Toys
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 12:46 pm:   

The Saint...wonderful soundtrack moments with Shue.

Kilmer would likely have gotten a touch more praise if he had been in better shape...

As to directors who live(d) in the worlds of big and little films perhaps Raimi or Peckinpah. Peckinpah in the sense of doing his own sort of films.

Allen has basically done whatever for years.

Scorsese seems to have picked several projects without commercial concern.

Mel Gibson certainly has done projects "after his heart" so to speak and had the unintended consequence of having at least one blockbuster Passion...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 12:47 pm:   

Rambo vs Predator
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 12:51 pm:   

Rambo 6: Rambo Saves Christmas
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 12:54 pm:   

Sorry, I mean: Rocky 6: Rocky Saves Christmas.

Although why not have Stallone in a dual role, as his two greatest characters? I may have hit on a winner!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 01:07 pm:   

I must admit that in the saint, Shue's explanation of cold fusion, perfomed as a stewardess explaining the workings of a floatation vest, was bad movie acting at its best, but Kilmer was abominable. Sounds to me like you and dave should get together.

Rocky vs the Flying Saucers....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 02:02 pm:   

But was it as good as SHOWGIRLS???

Rocky v. the Smog Monster
Bride of Rocky
Abbot and Costello Meet Rocky

I would have Rocky Balboa forced to enter a Philly ToughMan contest and face deranged vet John Rambo for a $50,000 prize to pay off the mortgage on Clubber Lang's nursing home.

Rocky 6: Grumpier Old Men
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 02:41 pm:   

Just watched something called FRANKENSTEIN VS. THE CREATURE FROM BLOOD COVE. Brand new film, made by folks who said they wanted to emulate the Universal Classics.

Oh, dear.

There's a character in this thing who seems to be a deliberate attempt to channel Harvey Fierstien. He does not have that actor's subtlety, but quadruples his annoyance value.

David Gerrold is in it, playing "Writer." He speaks the single line, "Yeah, Whatever."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 03:04 pm:   

Yeah I'm not really saying that the Saint is a great film. Really just saying that I don't mind watching her stand around for an hour.

When one doesn't have the ability to see good films at a theater then it begins to boil down to who you'd rather look at for a couple of hours.

Rambo vs. Rocky
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 03:51 pm:   

I don't know where you live, man, but in Portland we have a wide variety. I feel badly for ya.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 04:55 pm:   

I'm sure you get around, Lucius, but based on my travels, Portland has an embarrassment of cultural riches. Particularly fringey stuff. Compared to Portland, DC is pop culture Jalalabad.

I think you should do a bio of Oliver DeLorde and call it "Robert Wilson in Reverse."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 05:06 pm:   

:-)


Compared to Seattle, Portland is Jalabalad. Maybe it's a coastal thing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 05:38 pm:   

Pittsburgh is inland, but we have a lot of interesting and independent movie theaters. There are 3 different theaters linked to the local film school, my old college has odd movies two nights a week (1 night good films, 1 night bad films). There's another independent theater that gets odd movies and often has talks by directors. I could probably watch a different indie or odd film every night of the week.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 06:10 pm:   

According to a friend of mine, Pittsburgh is like a combination of OZ and Paris in the 20's. :-) She says life is better there.

What's your college?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 06:35 pm:   

kellys: man, not a director's cut? jesus. i liked THE FRIGHTENERS, really, but i don't need the three hour version of it.in fact, i'd be quite happy if director's cuts stopped happening. i decided this after coming across the director's cuts for PEARL HARBOUR and KING ARTHUR. i mean, come on...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

kellys
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 07:04 pm:   

Ben: Don't forget about the king of director's cuts, Coppola. The Outsiders: the novel -- are you serious?

Fortunately, the Frighteners cut is only 10 minutes or so longer. Still, I agree, let the film stay as it lay.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 07:16 pm:   

As mentioned previously, I'd love to see the director's cut of A THIN RED LINE. The film clocked in at five hours and 45 minutes. The studio wouldn't release it, so Malick cut almost half the film out, including the central character, who no longer appears in the film. The directors cut of John Woo's first US movie -- I got a bootleg version of Hard Target with nearly a half hour put back in that totally changed the film, made it a worthy representative of the Woo ouvre. Obviously, a director's cut by a hack like Michael Bay is worthless, but they're really valuable sometimes, imo. I wish they'd been around in Orson Welles day.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 08:08 pm:   

Alien3 improves with its added footage. Still doesn't make it particularly scary but the story works better.

One would hope that one day the DVD releases would provide the additional footage for films such as TRL.

Touch of Evil has a good DVD release which attempts to "get it right".
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 08:18 pm:   

Director's cuts have indeed become too common, but, you know, I loved getting my hands on the 4-hour partial restoration of GREED, and of TOUCH OF EVIL.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 08:47 pm:   

Director's Cuts are ok, but they can be bad. The director's cut of Aliens revealed info too early in the film and spoiled some of it. The theatrical cut of Return of the King is better than the extended cut.

My college was Carnegie Mellon. They have movies 4 nights a week, $1 for students, $3 for others. Two of the nights are mainstream. It's nice if you can put up with college students (they're frequently too loud at the shows).

I don't know about the OZ & Paris idea, but Pittsburgh is nice. It's cheap, has good cinema and good food markets. The music scene is lacking, most bands skip the city and venues keep closing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 12:21 am:   

don't get me wrong. some director's cuts are good and fine things. i'd really like to see a director's cut for THE THIN RED LINE, and the restoration of A TOUCH OF EVIL was excellent. but, y'know, in regards to jackson, i'm well over director's cuts. LOTR did it to me. why even bother seeing the first version at all? just... way turned off.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 06:10 am:   

The DVD of Jacques Tourneur's CURSE OF THE DEMON features a lengthier UK cut called NIGHT OF THE DEMON. The conventional wisdom (and I agree) is that the American version goes off the rails when Tourneur gives in to the urge to show a klutzy, special-effects demon in the movie's climax. In the UK version, he does this in the first five minutes, effectively ruining any sense of suspense the film might have built up. So longer is definitely NOT always better.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 06:21 am:   

Oh, I agree.

Often, stuff is cut for good reason.

I happen to love YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN, and was intrigued by the many deleted scenes on the DVD.

Thank Gawd Wilder and Brooks cut them out. They all lay like turds. A "Director's Cut" would have sucked royally.

And whatever you think of APOCALYPSE NOW (I consider it a bit lumpy, carried by its occasional moments of genuine brilliance), the additional hour restored to make APOCALYPSE NOW REDUX was *all*, I mean, *all*, stuff better off discarded. Alas, the REDUX version seems to have become the accepted print of the film...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 07:31 am:   

I have the shorter version on DVD. It was nice to see the print the way it was originally intended to be presented, sans credits. Also, the bombing montage sequence was cool to see, although I'm glad it was an "extra" and not grafted onto the body of the film.

Never saw Redux, but some of the extra stuff (the ghostly French settlers) was shown in the HEARTS OF DARKNESS making-of doc. Interesting, but you're right, I can't see how they advance the story.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 07:35 am:   

Well, if I'm happy with a film, or if I think the film's unsalvageable, then I don't watch a director's cut or a bootleg. The idea of getting rid of all of them was what I was reacting to. But then even the "bad" ones have value to film scholars and such. For instance, while I agree that most of the added material in Apocalypse wasn't effective, it nonetheless was interesting to see what Coppola intended...and I think a shortened version of the plantation scene WOULD have been effective, if fact crucial to the historical perspective presented by the movie.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 07:48 am:   

A lot of times DVD packagers use "directors cut" or "unrated version" as shorthand for "Hey kids, more guts, t&a and swears!" But you're right, in the case of serious filmmaking, the longer cuts have value.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:15 am:   

My major problem with the plantation scene, which culminated in Willard getting laid and an earlier scene that had a laughing Willard steal vital equipment from Robert Duvall's mad Colonel, is that it humanized the man -- when the whole point of his character seems to be that he's a shell of a man. (That and the low-comedy Playboy Bunny encounter, really defuse the film as much as any of Brando's excessive droning.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:22 am:   

Not just serious filmmaking. In the case of Hard Target, a Van Damme picture, the studio cuts turned what I would call a mid-level John Woo movie, detaied by an eerily effective gay relationship between Andrew (whats his name, the guy who played the Mummy) and Lance Hendrickson, into a piece of crap with a dozen plot holes. One scarcely call a Ven Damme film serious filmmaking, but the picture was at least a serious entertainment prior to the cuts...and the discarding of the original New Orleans bluesy soundtrack.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:24 am:   

I felt a little humanizing of Willard was called for to point up his emptiness....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:27 am:   

...but whatever, my general point remains, I think, sound.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:28 am:   

Yeah, that too. I've seen "Director's Cuts", even of bad films, where restored footage clarified essential plot points the studio somehow believed unnecessary. (The first example that comes to mind: ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA, where in the studio cut, Robert De Niro exits a room via a secret passage we have not seen him be told about. And the most common cut of RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK -- whatever your opinion of the film -- completely goes off the rails when no explanation is given for Indy's survival on the outside of a submerging nazi sub.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:51 am:   

I thought that was just Spielberg's pulp sensibility. :-)

Yeah, good point about Once Upon a Time...

The basic thing is, just be careful about one's choice of director's cuts. As Dave pointed out, often they just mean more T&A, etc....which is cool for those who dote on such.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 10:00 am:   

I actually liked the Playboy bunny scene. I didn't feel it was any kind of comedy at all. It was a pretty chaotic and scary scene that showed we had completely lost control of these guys and the war in general. It was a good precursor to Willard's meeting with Kurtz.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 10:05 am:   

What an upset! You liked the Bunny scene! :-) Yeah, I don't have any problem with it. Worked for me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 10:08 am:   

Lucius: the original cut actually has an explanation for Indy's survival. Not a great explanation, mind you, but given the unlikelihood of so many of Indy's accomplishments, one in line with the rest of the film, that doesn't cause the tremendous dramatic hiccup of the theatrical version.

Dave: I'm not talking about the scene at their USO performance, which remained in the initial theatrical cut of the movie and does indeed work as intended. I'm talking about an awful subsequent sequence where Willard and his men find the bunnies alive after their copter goes down in the jungle, and trade fuel for sex. It's played for low comedy and is spectacularly jarring.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 10:33 am:   

Yeah, well, that would be an improvement, for sure.

As to the bunny scene, I assumed Dave was referring to the USO scene.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 10:49 am:   

The two versions of Apocalypse Now coexist easily in my mind. I loved seeing all the extra stuff in Redux, but I'd hate to think of it supplanting the original release.

I never saw the Dawn of the Dead remake in its theatrical release, but friends tell me that a lot of my favorite scenes from the Director's Cut are only in that version. These were the scenes that made me a fan of the movie. Not sure how I would have felt about it without them.

Again, I guess it comes down to the intention of the director (if they're involved at all) and what they're trying to accomplish in doing a recut version. I watched the deleted scenes from the original Donny Darko (already too long in its original release) and wished there had been even more deletions; and the director's whiny complaints about how he was forced to cut scenes that were utterly boring did not exactly fill me with the desire to watch his later preferred cut.

But there are certain movies I can't get enough of. Thin Red Line is one.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 11:30 am:   

I feel I've been maligned as a t&a voyeur. :-) Excuse me, I'm off to pick up the "unrated" version of THE GIRL NEXT DOOR...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 11:43 am:   

Everybody has a favorite dud directors cut. Mine is Bladerunner, which did one good thing (no voiceover), but that unicorn dream...Whoo boy. Then I didn't much care for either version of B-runner. I liked the parts with William Sanderson and Rutger Hauer, that's about it.

Dave, maligned? No, celebrated. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ATC
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 12:40 pm:   

I didn't say that, Dave. I just think we were talking about two different scenes.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 12:55 pm:   

Someone just described the Director's Cut release of THE WARRIORS, where Hill supposedly added horrible Sin-City style comic book graphics between scenes.

But there's still hope. A sublime "Final" trailer for TAKESHIS' is now up at the Kitano website:

http://www.office-kitano.co.jp/takeshis/

Made me laugh a couple times. This looks sweet.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 01:31 pm:   

That does look cool.

I have to see Stay tomorrow. Not looking forward to it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 01:44 pm:   

Any advance word on The Weather Man? Cage + Caine is not encouraging, but the commercial made me chuckle a bit.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 02:11 pm:   

Lucius: I join you in your foreboding, because I have to see it too. For a review. I guess you're doing the same.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 02:16 pm:   

Yup, ATC. Into each life a little pain....

No, I haven't heard a thing about Weather Man. Don't want to hear.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 05:12 pm:   

i didn't much mind the additions to APOCALYPSE NOW, really. i liked the stealing of the surfboard since it humanized willard a bit before the end. so that worked for me. i guess it was only to the end that the extra stuff bothered me, and perhaps because i was wondering when the film would end :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 05:33 pm:   

Yeah, it sort of goes into the crapper when Brando puts in an appearance.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:43 pm:   

Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang --- wonder how this one will turn out...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 09:58 pm:   

I actually talked to an acquaintance in the biz who's seen it, and he says it's not bad. It's hard for me to believe. I mean, Shane Black....Sheesh. The author of The Last Boy Scout. I don't know...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 10:36 pm:   

Snipes might have made the Last Boy Scout better with a few more tweaks.

I'm mildly looking forward to watching KKBB if it should appear round here...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 21, 2005 - 07:51 am:   

Horror fans, had a chance to watch Christopher Smith's CREEP with Franka Potente the other night. Pretty OK, but not special. Creepy setting (London Underground), but in the end relied to far too many cliches to keep the action moving. Not bad for a rainy day, but not really worth seeking out.

I watch flicks on my iMac, which functions as an all-region DVD player, but only lets you change the region a maximum of five times. How friggin' annoying is that? If Apple can let you change the region easily five times, it can design a permanent all-region player. Why do I think that the lawyers had something to do with this limitation? It's aggravating. Any Mac users know a good hack for this problem?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 21, 2005 - 08:11 am:   

I agree basically with yer review, but feel that most horror is cliched and that there were touches throughout Creep that made it a cut above the average, and I also feel that Frankie Potenta bring a certain elan to all her roles and is always worth seeking out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Robert
Posted on Friday, October 21, 2005 - 08:20 am:   

Dave - there are firmware updates out there, but I haven't tried them. The one I saw had a warning it could break the DVD drive, and I wasn't willing to risk that.

You might try watching DVD's in VLC Player. I've been told it will play any region DVDs, no matter what region setting you have on the Mac.

Or maybe try this form: http://www.videohelp.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=9
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 21, 2005 - 08:43 am:   

I did like the underwater cages (a nick from THE DEER HUNTER?) and that nutty scene where "Craig" imitates a doctor in surgery. Yeah, and Franka is worth watching. Yes, all horror is cliched. Sad, but true. I would advise fans to seek out DEAD END, which I found much more interesting.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, October 21, 2005 - 08:55 am:   

New thread below
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Werton
Posted on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 - 09:54 pm:   

Just saw"Frankenstein Vs. The Creature From Blood Cove" that Adam-Troy seemed to dislike so much. I didn't think it was *that* bad. A bit uneven, but not unwatchable. In fact, while I agree the Fierstein character was the worst part of the movie, the rest was reasonably enjoyable.
And David Gerrold had at least one other line, including the funniest line in the picture, referring to looking for giant ants in the Mojave.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 - 10:04 pm:   

From Frankenstein vs the Creature to Blood Cove to Machuca -- god knows, we're an eclectic bunch. :-)

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register