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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 09:18 am:   

I was just trying to find a copy of R. G. Van Vliet's novel, Soledad. Mine's worn out and I needed a replacement. Ir wasn't listed on Amazon, and I finally tracked down a copy courtesy of TCU press. To my mind, Van Vliet is a great unknown writer. He wrote poetry and a couple of novels before dying an early death from cancer. Soledad is a masterpiece of naturalistic writing. It's the story of an epileptic cowboy who kills a wealthy Mexican man on a cattle drive and becomes obssesed with the photograph of a woman he finds in the dead man's pocket. There's an amazing description of a tornado, a lot of great set pieces....Anyway, it occurred to me there must be other Great Unknown Writers or Books out there. Anybody got any suggestions.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 10:59 am:   

Rudy Wilson, "The Red Truck" (Knopf). Came out in '86 or '87 and attracted a cult following among my friends. It's hard to describe; two people's wanderings through the deep south, told in some of the richest, most suggesting prose I had ever read. The book is long out of print and almost impossible to find. (I actually found a copy at Powell's last time I was in Providence.) This work has been almost completely forgotten, as has its author. A shame. I had a dream last night that a friend of mine found a carton of these books at a bookstore and I bought every one.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 11:02 am:   

Sounds really cool! I'll try to find a copy.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 11:13 am:   

Actua[[y found copies on Amazon. And Overstock.com. Ordered one. A:lso found this:

Rudy Wilson, author of four books, best known for THE RED TRUCK, published by Alfred A. Knopf, is accepting book length fiction manuscripts (novels, novellas, story collections...) for critiquing, editing, and for possible inclusion at PINECONE PRESS.

He has an MFA in English/Fiction Writing, from the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, where he was a manuscript reader for admissions to the prestigious graduate writing program. He taught Fiction Writing Workshops there for one year, on a Teaching-Writing Fellowship.

Wilson has received a James Michener Fellowship, a CCLM-GE Award for Fiction published in THE PARIS REVIEW, and an NEA Fellowship for Fiction, in 1989.

Wilson has appeared in Gordon Lish's QUARTERLY, has three stories in the Winter '94 Indiana Review, and a novella coming out this fall by Primal Publishing, in Boston. In addition to appearing in numerous publications, he had his own arts newspaper, demitasse.

He has conducted a series of workshops in fiction writing since 1986 in Iowa, Minnesota, and Maui. Rudy Wilson will be glad to receive manuscripts to offer writing advice and/or edit for publication. Fees are open. You can contact Rudy via e-mail at this publication, or by calling (515) 469-6648
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 11:25 am:   

Jeez, you know, I have the Quarterly story somewhere in one of my million boxes of books. Don't recall what it was about, but I recall it was good. My Boston friends Mic and Lauren ran a micropress called Primal Publishing that did editions of a story by Wilson called "Past Pixie's Place" and a second, very very limited edition novella called "A Girl Named Jesus." They are in sporadic contact with the guy and a couple years ago, held a rare reading/signing in Boston by the man himself. (To my chagrin, I was out of the country and missed it.)

All this is making me want to dig out my old copy of TRT and re-read it!
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Rudy Wilson
Posted on Wednesday, March 08, 2006 - 07:55 pm:   

I came across this site accidentally. My name is Rudy Wilson and I was really glad to see that some few people have enjoyed The Red Truck...It eventually was picked up by a re print company, a weak company that is hard to find, replicaBooks, but there are copies here and there...Thank you so much for your kind comments...I've written maybe 8 more books and haven't had much luck, Random House telling me 'they're in it for the money now that they are a huge conglomerate!" They actually said that! Well, thanks and best to all.. Rudy W
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, March 09, 2006 - 04:08 pm:   

I noticed that Amazon is now offering some kind of internal service (through a third party called Booksurge) to let authors (or whoever owns the (lapsed) rights) of out of print works to distribute them through Amazon. I didn't get very far on the link for one of my own OOP books (which is to say, all of them), but you might have more persistence:

http://booksurge.com/amzn/outofprint/

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Olivia
Posted on Thursday, March 09, 2006 - 07:36 pm:   

Not sure if it is your speed, but about 20 years past I encountered John Cowper-Powys "A Glastonbury Romance." Very popular in its day, rarely read today except for rare reprintings (which happened in the mid 1980's).
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 08:02 am:   

Dear Rudy,

Oy! Eight more books looking for a publisher! You have my sympathies and understanding. . . I've had a couple of books published and am not at the level of eight homeless manuscripts yet, but I'm getting there. The publishing biz nowadays is enough to make you want to shove your head through a brick wall. Hang in there; perhaps the world of "content distribution" will change dramatically in the next ten years, and all of us "content providers" will look back on these lean years and congratulate ourselves that we got through such times. Barry Malzberg has written very powerfully about the sudden collapse of the magazine fiction market (particularly the SF markets) in the late 1950s, and how much of an entire generation of writers was forced out of the business for the most part. Yet, eight to ten years later, the situation had improved greatly -- not soon enough for many writers, but soon enough for some. Let's hope that things will soon get better in our time, as well.

I'll start looking for a copy of The Red Truck. Thanks for dropping by these boards!
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MarcL
Posted on Sunday, May 07, 2006 - 11:12 pm:   

Dare I resurrect this thread?

Lucius, I seem to recall some connection between you and Stephen Wright...am I totally brainfogged? A blurb from him on one of your books, or vice versa?

Anyway, his latest, THE AMALGAMATION POLKA, is quite great. I loved GOING NATIVE. This is more like THE SOTWEED FACTOR with a bit of Cormac McCarthy and whatever. Dark and funny and energetic, the story of a kid born to abolitionist parents, the Civil War in the offing.
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ls
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2006 - 06:18 am:   

!We exhanged blurbs. Blurb-cest. I greatly admire SW. Thanks for the tip....
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2006 - 08:33 am:   

Marc---

Just FYI, Stephen Wright was one of my college advisers. I used to run into him a lot around the Strand bookstore, but I haven't seen him in several years.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2006 - 10:27 am:   

Cool! Well, he's doing great stuff. I honestly didn't know how he'd follow up GOING NATIVE and he did something laudably unpredictable.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2006 - 10:56 am:   

Ever dig up that Rudy Wilson?
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Kwame
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 10:12 am:   

Anything by Can Themba. South African journalist who published many articles and short stories in "Drum" magazine in the 1950s.
Somewhat better known, but not nearly as well-known as he should be: Amos Tutuola's "The Palm-Wine Drinkard" and "My Life in the Bush of Ghosts".
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 10:38 am:   

I read and the Palm Wine Drinkard, have the other Tuotala, but haven't gotten to it yet. Can Themba is new to me. Thanks.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 05, 2006 - 10:39 am:   

I read and loved, that should read.

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