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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 03:57 pm:   

Ay, Captain.

Last I heard, the ol' doofus was up in Vancouver, shagging every fifteen year old girl he could grab...

When a child molester dies, there's a tupperware party in heaven...
   By PM on Wednesday, July 20, 2005 - 06:30 pm:

I'm losing my faith in tupperware...
   By MarcL on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 12:53 pm:

Couple more Korean movies just hit my playlist:

THE QUIET FAMILY, which gave rise to Miike's HAPPINESS OF THE KATAKURIS. I know Lucius is a fan of this one.

ATTACK THE GAS STATION! The person who lent it to me says it's one of his favorite movies, and it looks pretty good. I'll report in!
   By Lucius on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 12:57 pm:

Attack is a lot of fun! '

Quite Family.....You may not like that one as much. That's just me being weird.
   By Laird on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 01:16 pm:

Just rented The River by Tsai Ming-liang; The Missing Gun by Lu Chuan; and Bergman's The Seventh Seal.

I watched Gozu recently. Got milk?

   By Dave G. on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 01:25 pm:

Gozu gives a new meaning to "p****-whipped"!
   By Dave G. on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 01:26 pm:

I don't have any idea what it's about or whether it's any good, but you've got to love a movie called ATTACK THE GAS STATION.
   By Lucius on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 01:26 pm:



Moo....
   By Lucius on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 01:41 pm:

It's about --surprise, surprise -- an attack on the gas station by some Seoul punks, who take hostages etc. Interestingly enough, the guy who sold it to me said it was too violent for his tastes, and a friend told me it was sort of a comedy.
   By MarcL on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 01:43 pm:

I tracked down GOZU at a local video store...will rent soon.

Here's the blurb for Attack: "A quartet of disaffected Korean youths decides to rob a gas station. When they find out there is not as much money as they expected, they take over the gas station with the staff held hostage. Their wacky antics ensue kidnapping customers that complain about the service and staging fist-fights between street gangsters."

I love the valiant (if misplaced) attempt to employ "wacky antics ensue"!
   By Lucius on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 02:14 pm:

Misplaced? Pourquoi?

   By Dave G. on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 02:17 pm:

Sounds plenty wacky to me.
   By MarcL on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 02:46 pm:

Usually "wacky antics ensue" is placed at the end of the blurb, an equivalent to "nuff said."
   By Lucius on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 02:59 pm:

IMO, they didn't understand the meaning of ensue.....
   By MarcL on Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 03:26 pm:

"What is another word for 'include'?"
"How about 'ensue'?"
"Perfect!"

Hijinks follow.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 02:40 am:   

Just got back from The Devil's Rejects. Fucking masterpiece.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 05:44 am:   

Masterpiece? I might buy a real good Tobe Hooper flick, but I don't know about masterpiece. I will say if I were going to a movie today, if it were playing around here, i'd go see it, cause there's nothing out there. So why do you think its a masterpiece?
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:05 am:   

Yes, I was intrigued by House of 1,000 Corpses, but opted not to see it because the splashy, fast-edit, heavy metal promos on the WWE wrestling shows put me off. I figured it was just another high-tech hack-em-up. If Devil's Rejects is good, I'd certainly like to know about it. The trailer I saw was promising.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:15 am:   

I hear it's good for what it is, but what it is is a sick, twisted pyschobilly flick from the 70s. That gets a big so what from me, but like I said, I probably check it out if it were playing nearby...
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 08:44 am:   

Here's a subtopic of films I always wanted to get people's reactions on. I experience certain moments with films -- and I admire the directors who pull them off -- when I am gripped by a weightless, helpless, pit of the stomach,"oh sh**", sensation, sort of like the one you get just an instance before a car crash, or at the pinnacle of a roller coaster, where you sense that events are moving, slowly, inexorably into a very strange or violent place and there is no stopping them.

Among the moments that come to mind are:

--the final confrontation/torture sequence in Miike's THE AUDITION;

--the interview in Winky's between psychiatrist and the man who dreams about The Man Behind the Dumpster in MULHOLLAND DRIVE;

--the scene around the card table between Ethan Hawke and the gangbanger kids in TRAINING DAY;

--Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt driving Kevin Spacey out into the desert at the end of SEVEN.

Any of you folks have particular favorite, weightless moments in movies, where you are riveted and fascinated in anticipation of something horrible and unpredictable? (Yeah, OK, the gangbangers beating the crap out of Hawke was predictable, but I couldn't tell when or how it would go down...)
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 08:52 am:   

I think Training Day was a horrid film--there were no monents from that one. Seven, the same. Mulholland Drive....?

Jaws had a moment like that, I guess. When Robert Shaw gets eaten.

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Robert D
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 09:01 am:   

What happened with Night Watch? I can't find a release date for it anymore. That was one of the few movies I really wanted to see.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 09:20 am:   

Maybe Fox Searchlight bumped it to the fall....
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Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 09:44 am:   

Hey, nobody bothered to mention that my man, bizarro character actor numero uno William Forsythe, was in The Devil's Rejects...Now, I'm seeing it for sure.

TD overall disappointed, but I did like that one scene.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 10:02 am:   

Night Watch is still listed on Rotten Tomatoes as getting a limited release on Jul 29

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Robert D
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 10:16 am:   

IMDB has no release date for it, and Fox Searchlight no longer lists it in upcoming or current films. Their website still has links to NW, but nothing saying when it comes out.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 10:18 am:   

Oh well....
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 10:40 am:   

Fox has sunk too much money into the sequel to let it disappear. I figure they're repositioning it..
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 02:28 pm:   

I gotta back Jason on this one. Devil's Rejects was simply incredible. Light Years beyond what Zombie did in HOUSE..., which was simply the best grind house homage ever.

DEVILS REJECTS tires and succeeds at being much more... Think Natural born Killers without the turgid BS of Oliver stone... Think Man Bites Dog... Think Straw Dogs, or Pat and Garrette. Zombie never lets the view slip into that easy "slaughtermatic fun house ride" that most action/horror films do. He consciously sets up the viewer with a cliched montage, editing sequence where you identify with the euphoria of the killers, and then breaks scene/mood/feeling, and takes you out of it... quite effectively, IMO.

The dialog in the script.. the acting... the directorial ques... all were top notch. This movie was filled with little touches that push it head and shoulders above your average "cult horror" or "ground house" or even "violent rode movie" schtick.

I recomend trying to get beyond all the baggage that comes with "a rob zombie movie", The trailers are trying to sell it to the teenage horror audience. but I can tell you right off, this movie will NEVER find an audience in the theater. The few people who might be predisposed to like it will dismiss it out of hand (as lucius did).

If the movie had been made by an unkwown first time director, or an obscure asian/french/whatever director, it might have stood a chance of finding its audience.

Oh well. I had the pleasure of seeing one of the best movies of the last few years, bar none. I hope you all get the chance to see it.
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Rob D
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 02:43 pm:   

Maybe Fox decided to dub Night Watch, and that's why it's being delayed.
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PM
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 03:00 pm:   

Watched part of House of 1K Corpses and had to turn away. Rather watch live dogs ground...
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PM
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 03:09 pm:   

Lynch masters the uneasy moment.

A number of times in MD it's like being packed on a bus with a bunch of old men.

The music in MD is so oppressing/overbearing at times that it's a wonder it hasn't been banned for driving young folk to suicide.

And then there are the brilliant off-beat violent scenes...oh yeah and great sex and also great unhappy sex:-)
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 03:13 pm:   

I;m sorry, Jeremy. It's not one of the best movies of the last few years. I perfectly capable of believing its good. But not that good. Guess I'm gonna have to see it now.

BTW, re Stone, I was talking to a hollywood scriptwriter yesterday, and he told me that Oliver has a deep-seated Joel Schumacher side that is coming out more and more as he ages (see Alexander) and is going to dominate his old age.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 03:47 pm:   

To clarify, its my contention that no movie that contains the material in the Devils Rejects trailer can possibly be considered one of the best movies of the past few years; no movie in which three of the four main characters are psychotic killers, one of whom is given to clown make-up, can possibly be labeled one of the best movies of the past few years; no movie that panders so heavily to redneck horror film tropes can possibly be thought of as one of the best movies of the past few years. There have been some incredible movies released in the past few years. I don't buy that this is one of them. But I will go see it.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 03:56 pm:   

Has anyone actually seen Night Watch?

I have. And I'm hesitating to say anything because I don't want to spoil it for you, but...

Has anyone actually seen it?
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PM
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:00 pm:   

Peter Weller is almost a William Walker lookalike.

One could have imagined Stone gobbling on this story.

Manifest destiny...
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:01 pm:   

Yeah, I've seen it, Reveiwed it for FSF.

More on Rejects.....Now if you had said one of the best American movies of the past few years, I could easily have agreed with you.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:02 pm:   

Sorry, I'm getting off the main point.

I'm all for The DR's. Sounds good enough, and that's at least something after so many YEARS of merd.

But, the Night Watch question of mine still stands.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:12 pm:   

What I mean to say is that Night Watch is awful.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:18 pm:   

I respectfully disagree, It had problems, but i think none that the new edit and redone subtitles might not have solved.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:29 pm:   

I'm being too harsh, I know. Because I expected more.

I'll certainly look forward to seeing the new edit version. There's certainly enough in there to make a really good film out of it.

But I was so very disappointed when I saw it. I was hoping for so much more.

Apologies for the negative vibe.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:34 pm:   

No apologies necessary.....Let;s hope for the best with the new edit.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 04:55 pm:   

Indeed!

My feeling about the film is that it's the first of many challenges against the hegemony of Hollywood, and the more of that we can get, the better.

So let's hope to see a decent version of this film made that can really make the impact it so deserves.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 05:09 pm:   

And let's hope it gets released in the foreseable future!!!!
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 05:11 pm:   

Jeremy said all I had to say, but probably better. I will concede your point of "one of the best American movies of the past few years" because I haven't seen but a handful of recent foreign films.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 05:14 pm:   

"To clarify, its my contention that no movie that contains the material in the Devils Rejects trailer can possibly be considered one of the best movies of the past few years; no movie in which three of the four main characters are psychotic killers, one of whom is given to clown make-up, can possibly be labeled one of the best movies of the past few years; no movie that panders so heavily to redneck horror film tropes can possibly be thought of as one of the best movies of the past few years."

This makes no sense at all to me. Psychotic killers can't be good, but Inuit epics can? Jaws is, in my opinion, one of the finest films ever made, and it's about a fucking shark.
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 05:40 pm:   

You lost me there Jason. Jaws -- one of the finest films ever made?

You and Jeremy have certainly got me curious enough to want to see it. But, best movie in the last few years?

I half saw House of 1000 Corpses at a halloween party -- I was mostly occupied with a girl -- it seemed partly like an r-rated music video.

The only review I've read so far, in the Chicago Tribune, gave it a half star out of five. Now, getting a bad review, especially in mainstream source like that, can sometimes be a good thing....
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 05:50 pm:   

My Dear, StephenB. You are, evidently, but a young waif!

But, yea. Let it be known that Jaws IS probably the greatest film ever made.

Tis time, my young fiendish friend, if you can possibly pull yourself free from yon young wenches, that ye watched that film, with no distractions (especially of the female variety).
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 05:56 pm:   

More on Rejects.....Now if you had said one of the best American movies of the past few years, I could easily have agreed with you.

How? You haven't seen the movie. You can't make those judgements, at least with any credibility, based on a trailer..

BTW, re Stone, I was talking to a hollywood scriptwriter yesterday, and he told me that Oliver has a deep-seated Joel Schumacher side that is coming out more and more as he ages (see Alexander) and is going to dominate his old age.

No surprise to me there..
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Stephen
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:07 pm:   

Dunmore: You're right. I'm quite young, relative to the rest, on this board. At least, I'm pretty sure I am.

You're right though. I'm in no position to judge House of 1000 Corpses, because I barely saw it. I've heard mixed things from people. Maybe I'll give it another shot with my full attention?

Jaws is another movie that I've mostly seen disjointed at various times. It just became such a part of popular culture, that growing up, I guess I got tired of it. I remember hearing the soundtrack alone, constantly -- at swimming pools and such places. I'm not a Spielberg fan...
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Laird
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:08 pm:   

I enjoyed the Seventh Seal--one of those movies that demands another viewing to savor the nuances. Sydow was great in a role that really didn't call for a ton of screen time--we have a lousy tv, but I thought some of the shots of him at the beginning and toward the end were almost sublime. I liked the understated fellowship between the Knight and Squire; the stark yet elegant portrayal of the spectrum of human nature, the overarching black humor in the face of fear: highly affecting.

I have heard that some find the film trite or didactic. Perhaps such perceptions are inevitable when endeavoring to create something on this order, something beyond simple entertainment. I took SS at face value and enjoyed the hell out of it.

Tonight, The River.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:22 pm:   

Your views are refreshing and often more pertinent and spot on than those of us who think we know our stuff, StephenB.

But, wait. A big rec on Jaws. We're not kidding when we say it's that good. It really is. That's why Spielberg's more recent stuff tends to depress a lot of us here, I think I'm right in saying.

Because Jaws and (the earlier Duel) are great great films.

And, good grief, if I was brought up hearing the music the way you describe, I would never enter a bath! let alone a swimming pool.

StephenB--see Jaws! It is great.

Laird, my good man. What do you mean you "enjoyed" The Seventh Seal? It is, surely, the film to end all films!


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PM
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:22 pm:   

SS should be in the greatest movies thread...

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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:26 pm:   

Actually...

A much better film in many ways by Berman or Bergman is The Virgin Spring. It really is stunning. More so than The Seventh Seal.

But both are exemplary.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:29 pm:   

YES PM!
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:29 pm:   

Ok Dunmore, I'll watch Jaws. Haven't seen Duel.

Sounds like I'd really like Seventh Seal.
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Laird
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:34 pm:   

Dunmore,

In the spirit of SS, I am currently given to understatement. I think a hammer drives a nail as adequately as any sledgehammer might in this case. I am tempted to buy this film--something I seldom do...

PM--You are doubtless correct.

Best,

Laird
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:38 pm:   

No, Jaws is not about a fucking shark, it's about the people hunting and/or hunted by a fucking shark. Big difference.

Jaws is, by my lights, hardly one of the best films ever made, but it's a very good commercial film.

Psychotic killers are inherently boring because they can have no character arc. So a film about such must fascinate to the degree that the person watching is fascinated by the ways in which the human body can suffer insult--this is a rather limited palette for an "artist" like Mr Zombie.

Iniut epics...epic, rather; there is only one...that film is a remarkable for its story, its mis-en-scene, etc. There is not a single element of the movie that we've ever seen before. The same cannot be said of redneck psycho killers. There are a plethora of reneck psycho killers in American cinema. They have become something of a cliche, as I'm sure you know.

From what I've read pro and con about Rejects, the audience seems to agree whether they like the movie or not, that it's an effectively done albeit somewhat juvenile exercise in mayhem. To quote Jeremy, "This movie was filled with little touches that push it head and shoulders above your average "cult horror" or "ground house" or even "violent rode movie" schtick.:" You notice the comparatives he uses. That's more or less what I said. Better than your average grind house schtick. He chose to see that as dismissive...which I suppose it was by contrast to his effusiveness. But we said essentially the same thing. I just don't usually wax effusive over what is by most accounts a hour and a half of sadistic torture footage. That's not one of my obsessions.

I will see the movie. If I think it's the greatest thing since Technicolor, I'll happily admit I was wrong. If I disagree, well...I'll keep it to myself.

Note to Stephen: It's not necessary to see many movies to know they eat shit. Thus, if this has any merit whatsoever, that gives it a leg up over most American movies.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:40 pm:   

I think you'd like all of them, StephenB.

They are all, for different reasons, great films. And very important films to see! Let's not forget.

Before you can talk about films, you have to see these.

But be sure, StephenB, to see Duel. It is simply BETTER than Jaws, which is, in fact, nigh impossible.
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Dunmore
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 06:59 pm:   

I stand by Jaws! It is a great commerical film, as L says. But it is more than that, I feel. It is the best example of the perfection of formulaic narrative in film that has ever been made. Punto!

Look at all the films now, trying to be formulaic and failing miserably. They can't even DO FORMULA!!! Jaws did formula, and it did it perfectly.

It's not much consolation maybe, but...

Hollywood has lost the ability to do that now. That's what I find striking about the continuously bad films I see now, is that they can't even follow a formula!!!!

Och, time for me to go to bed.

But Jaws, StephenB! It's a film you must must see.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 08:19 pm:   

You know, I'm pissed off. The Devil's Rejects bettter be fucking good, because I just realized Jeremy hit me with this low-rent intellectual argument, to wit, if DR had been made by some obscure french or asian guy, we'd be hailing it's greatness. That's such a cheap shot, man, such a lame-ass tactic--and a patent insult, inferring that you alone of us all (and Jason) are capable of noticing what a masterwork it is, and that we, wearing our blinders of intellectual puffery, can only fail to apprehend its raw beauty. Bull-shit! I think you're a big Hills Have Eyes guy and this just floated your boat. There's nothing wrong with that. But don't go telling me I don't know what the fuck's up with movies. I like bad flicks and exploitation flicks as much as the next person, but I don't have to claim they're the work of master in order to justify liking them.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 08:46 pm:   

For one, Jeremy wasn't hitting you with anything. All of your posts follow his. He posted his opinion, and one that I happen to agree with, and one that has little relevance to you. It's directed at the legions of horror fans who are/are going to bash it for not having enough gore, not lingering on the killings enough, not having a crunchy metal soundtrack. Had it been directed by an italian guy, they'd be hailing it near and far.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 08:47 pm:   

For two, I very much doubt you'll enjoy it. Not because you don't "get it" but because it has a lot of hallmarks that I know you hate in films. Fucked up editing, filters left and right, sadistic violence. Plus it's got a very sentimental ending. I'll be curious to see what you think, but my money's on you hating it.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 08:53 pm:   

Well, I don't know those people, man, who complain that it doesn't linger over the killings. But I do hate filters, I do hate bad ediriing, and I'm of two minds about sadistic violence. Anyway, I'm going to try to see it Sunday night.
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PM
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 08:54 pm:   

I wouldn't expect an ode to pigeons...

I haven't seen DR and can only assume that it's a slaughter/torture show and if that's your thing well go bathe in blood:-)

For those who are suggesting that this is a great film perhaps it can be considered a contender within it's own rank...
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 09:10 pm:   

We who are suggesting that it's a great film are saying just that. It's a great film. Not a great 70s homage to Tobe Hooper and Wes Craven, a great film. As Lucius can attest, I don't bother justifying my taste. I like shitty movies as much as anyone, and more than most, and I've no problem accepting that because I like a movie doesn't mean it isn't shitty. If I wanted to suck off anything riffing on the 70s horror circuit, then I'd have my savior in Wrong Turn. I like Wrong Turn. Fun movie, cool little homage. Nothing special, but I enjoyed it. DR is a completely different animal.

I should point out that I'm not a good judge of violence in cinema. I don't think DR is particularly a bloodbath or a torture show, but I've been watching horror flicks since I was about six years old, so nothing fazes me anymore. Zombie could have the characters cutting holes into the sides of baby's heads and fucking the holes and I wouldn't blink. Graphic gore more than often is boring, not titillating (I have the same problem with action sequences, which tend to put me to sleep). End result, if you're looking to get off on some great gore and a cool brain-eating scene, this ain't the flick for it, any more than House of 1000 Corpses was.

Lucius: I said fucked up editing, not bad editing. I thought the editing was effective as hell.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 22, 2005 - 10:32 pm:   

I'm gonna shut up til I see it!

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Dunmore
Posted on Saturday, July 23, 2005 - 03:33 pm:   

Would I be out of place asking people here to name their three favourite films?

I know that (1) I might be intruding and (2) maybe there's a thread about this already, but . . .

I'm finding that the recommendations are so good and reliable here on these threads that I'm curious to see whcih films stand out as the best for you guys.

And to prove the point, I'll take the plunge! My three top films (no mucking around) are

Hold on. This is more difficult than I thought.

OK:

The Virgin Spring (as mentioned above)
Blade Runner (of course!)

and...

Duel (Yes! I think it was and is a beautiful film.)

Runners up include:

Jean de Florette
Il Postino
Nirvana
Jaws
Last of the Mohicans (Yes! I mean it!)
Barbarella (I'm not sure if I mean that or whether it's just wishful thinking).


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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 23, 2005 - 05:20 pm:   

I couldn't possibly reduce my list to three -- twenty, pehaps, and it would change hourly.
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Saturday, July 23, 2005 - 08:18 pm:   

I can name my top two. The third is subject to change.

1) The Seven Samurai
2) Lawrence of Arabia

There's maybe a ten-way tie for the third spot (which includes such films as CASABLANCA and A CLOCKWORK ORANGE) and maybe a twenty-way tie for the fourth. Further down than that it is nigh impossible to say.

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Dunmore
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 09:51 am:   

Yes, it is a cruel question, I know. I should rephrase it and say, give three recommendations of films worth seeing, spur of the moment choices, without any obligations to choosing the three best ever!

Best ever questions are well below the belt.

So 3 recs, unless anyone feels inclined to extol the three best ever.

Which, Adam-Troy, you have done, picking up the gaunlet and laying it right there on the line.

Lawrence of Arabia! Yes! A great film. Some great lines, like:

"Pound them, Charlie, pound them."

And:

"Jolly good about the squash court".

Peter O'Toole's performance was extraordinary in that film. I don't know anything about acting, but that scene when he takes the Arab boy into the officers' mess and asks for a glass of water (after crossing the Sinai, I think it is) is truly the best piece of acting I've ever see. Is that a fair assessment?

The Seven Samurai is one of those must watch films, and, you know, I've never seen it! But will as surely as I can.

Moment of controversy:

I was singularly unimpressed by A Clockwork Orange. I think the problem was that I read and finished the book exactly prior to seeing the film and, so, knew exactly what was going to happen and when. It took the sting out of it maybe. I enjoyed the book thoroughly. But the film I found kind of flat (maybe because I'd just read the book, of course). I just didn't find it as wonderfully exceptional as Kubrik's films normally are.

I much prefered (thinking of Malcolm MacDowel's strange roles) O Lucky Man. Ever seen that one? Bizarre 3 hour length film with music by Alan Price (who features in the film) which is astonishingly good music too.

But, yes, three recommendations! Including you, dear Lucius, if I may be so bold as to provoke 3 tasty films off the top of your head, well worth seeing!
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 10:26 am:   

Well since you put it that way....I'll give you six.

Lamerica by Gianni Aneli
The River by Tsai Ming-Liang
Derzu Ezala by Kurosawa
Devi by Sayajit Ray
Leolo by Jean-Claude Lauzon
Memories of Murder--Joon ho Bong

This is a list that includes my favorite policier for reasons of texture.

I'd also recommend Marooned in Iraq, The Return, Hanna Bi (fireworks),

I second Lawrence.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 11:47 am:   

Picking a top three is impossible, but I can give you three of my favorites.

Jaws
The Thing (Carpenter)
The Man Who Would Be King
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Dunmore
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 01:44 pm:   

These are great recommendations, Lucius. Thanks. My girlfriend tells me that Lamerica is a supreme film. Also, The River has been talked about alot and is a film that obviously needs to be seen.

It's nice to have films to aim for to see. Excellent.

And, Night Shade Books! Apart from the Man Who Would be King (which, bizarrely, apprently received terrible reviews when it was first released), which is indeed a fine and marvellous film, your mention of the Thing!

Oh indeed, The Thing is probably the only remake of a film that capitalises on the original to the extent of creating a masterpiece, although I understand that the original is quite a stunner in itself. But at the root of the matter is the fact that it's based on a Lovecraft story, which maybe explains the general consistency of greatness.

If I'd been less hasty before I'd have listed The Thing among my top three and probably also Halloween, whch wouldn't have left much room for any others.

But isn't it right that the questioner should become ensnared in his own questions?!!

For a final remark, any film I've seen of Kurosawa has been stunning. But I don't think I've seen enough of them!

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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 02:09 pm:   

Actually, I always believed that The Thing was based on the story Who Goes There by one of John Cambell's Psuedonym. Harry something.
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 02:14 pm:   

Actually, a quick check of IMBD verifies this....
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Laird
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 02:25 pm:   

I recall reading Who Goes There under the Campbell byline...many years ago and I don't recall the publication. Terrific story. More ado about milk.

Laird
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Bruce
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 02:55 pm:   

Don A. Stuart [from SF Hall of Fame's Best Novellas] was Campbell's handle for 'Who Goes There?, the wellspring of 'The Thing'. First published in 1938!
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Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 03:01 pm:   

Yeah, that's it! Thanks, Bruce.
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PM
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 04:34 pm:   

I don't think in terms of favorites but I'll throw out a few...

Man Bites Dog. A lesson in the corrupting influence of art.

The Maltese Falcon. No one cares quite like Bogart.

Dodeskaden. Good cryin' Kurosawa film...
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Bob K.
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 04:53 pm:   

My three favorites, without apology:

Casablanca
The first STAR WARS movie
The Jackson LORD OF THE RINGS movies

Runners up:

Seventh Seal (by Bergman)
Lawrence of Arabia
Derzu Uzala
Aliens
The Sixth Sense
Spinal Tap



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Rob Devereux
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 05:25 pm:   

Some favorites of mine, I guess a top 6 (just picking 3 is hard). I'm sure if you ask tomorrow, the list will be different.

Amelie
Cemetery Man (aka Dellamorte Dellamore)
City of Lost Children
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Dead Man
Fellowship of the Ring (I like the other two, but this was better)
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allOFthemWITCHES
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 07:00 pm:   

rosemary's baby
knife in the water
the tenant
(roman polanski is probably my favorite director)
mary poppins
onibaba
night of the hunter
the wicker man
the fellowship of the ring (much better than the second and third films)
indiana jones (all of them)
willie wonka and the chocolate factory
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Bruce
Posted on Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 07:07 pm:   

Three favorites:

Casablanca
Little Big Man
The Great Escape
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Dunmore
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:14 am:   

Yikes. I stand thoroughly corrected on The Thing.

I always though it was The Mountains of Madness it was based on, but Campbell it was, which gives me a good reason to seek out his story.

Thanks for straightening me out on that one.

Ah, a mention of The Wicker Man. Yes, a choice film.

Has it been discussed anywhere about the supposed remake starring Nicholas Cage? Sounds like a bad idea, but you never know.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:39 am:   

I saw Devil's Reject. I should preface this by saying that I rarely find movie violence off-putting or convincing. To me, one of the most effective war movies ever made was Ken Loach's Spanish Civil War flick, Land and Freedom, in which death was shown as banal and trivial -- when people died, there was a pop and they just keeled over, they didn't get yanked back and do a three and a half somersault with a twist and all that. Thus the violence in DR didn't bother me, except that it became tedious.

It has an outstanding albeit somewhat cartoonish performance by William Forsythe, perhaps his second best villian turn ever, the best being his role as Richie Madano in the Steven Sagal vehicle, Out for Justice, an underrated little movie that takes place in one night and does a pretty good impression of a HK flick. To say Forsythe is underappreciated is an understatement. Some of his best work is in movies that haven't even been released, like the Technical Writer and Victor Nunez's Coastlines, or in the little seen Hollywood picture Soundman. His best performance was in a little known indie flick entitled Palookaville. So it's nice to see him getting off in DR. Maybe he'll get some more work.

On the downside, the actor who played Captain Spaulding, the clown-faced serial killer, is terrible -- at least I don't think I was supposed to laugh out loud everytime he went into action.

The film was shot well, I kinda like the use of filters here--there was some good dialogue, and I suppose we should have a special place in our hearts for a film whose heroes are serial killers. But I gotta say I left the theatre feeling that Rob Zombie is one juvenile motherfucker. His efforts seem directed toward shocking America, and America, except for your PTA-Christian right group, who're shocked by anything, is beyond being shocked. I can't think of anything else he might have been trying to do except maybe he had some really broad satirical purpose. I hope that wasn't it. Truthfully, I was just kind of bored. I'm tired of comic book representations of evil, and this film had a definite comic book aesthetic a la Preacher et al. Wasn't the worst two hours I spent in a theater, but it was a long way from the best. Zombie has some virtues as a director--but as with his music, chops don't make up for not having anything new to say.

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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 07:20 am:   

Boy, did I miss some discussion this wknd!

Lucius, first of all thanks for giving props to Land and Freedom (which co-starred a college buddy of mine) and the almighty, all-conquering OUT FOR JUSTICE and, particularly, Forsythe's Richie Madano. I can watch this flick a million times and never cease to be amused and entertained every minute. When will Seagal get his due??? :-) On the Forsythe tip, a nod to another great, virtually unseen performance, as the addled, psychotic henchman to Robert Duvall's effete Southern gentleman bank robber in THE LIGHTSHIP, with Klaus Maria Brandauer. Saw it at the Boston Film Festival in the late 80's and it never surfaced again.

I am happy to read the debate -- albeit a bit more heated than usual -- on THE DEVIL'S REJECTS. Personally, I haven't seen it yet, but intend to. Like Nightshade, I have been a horror fan most of my life, and I think that some of the debate stems from the nature of the genre itself. The saddest thing about horror cinema is the way that a few dominant franchises (Jason, Freddy, Halloween) have hijacked the genre, spawning a demand for endless cheap and thoughtless sequels and knock-offs. As a result, critics (and many filmgoers) have tended to ghettoize the entire genre. And this sense of diminished expectations has led studios to greenlight more and more bad pictures. I still believe that it's possible to make great, quality horror pictures (PEEPING TOM, ROSEMARY'S BABY, CURSE OF THE DEMON, etc.) but they are so few and far between. Horror fans have been starved for excellence to the point where any mark of quality in the acting, writing, directing, cinematography, tends to inspire fulsome, excessive praise. Hence the remarks that inspired some of the back and forth.

I don't think, though, that the remark about films by obscure foreign directors getting more critical praise was meant as a slap at you or anybody in particular on the board, and there is a grain of truth in it. Look, for example, at the Australian indie zombie picture UNDEAD, which played in the local DC arthouse even though, by all accounts, it was no different than a lot of direct-to-video fare made on these shores.

I can't recall who made the initial reco, but many thanks for recommending GINGER SNAPS, which I watched this weekend. Well-made and acted, and a good measure more intelligent than the typical horror film, using the supernatural as a filter to view the ripening sexuality of teenage girls in a way that was smart and lively and non-exploitative. Not a great film, but definitely one of the best genre films I've seen in the last half-dozen years.

Also had a chance to watch Jonathan Caouette's TARNATION, which was really astonishingly original and incisive. One of the most daring documentaries I've seen. Really powerful, almost painful to watch.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 08:50 am:   

Yup. Forsythe, the poor man's Michael Madsen. I also like him in Extreme Prejudice, an underrated contemporary western with Nolte and Powers Boothe.

Apparently the Ginger Snaps sequels are equally good.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 09:13 am:   

When I was walking up to the counter of the store with GS in my hands, the girl at the register (probably no more than 19 or 20) chimed in with how much she loved that film. So I have to wonder...is there a whole cult following here I wasn't told about??? (She agreed that 2 and 3 were better, with 3 being the best...)

I wish there were some folks here who had seen TARNATION. Really worth discussing, don't you think?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 09:23 am:   

I think SNAPS qualifies as a cult film. Especially among werewolfettes.

Re: Tarnation, what's it about?
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Minz
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 09:56 am:   

Actually, as a huge Forsythe fan, I'd have to say his best role was as Al Capone in the remake of The Untouchables TV series. He was a tour de force--he put Bobby Deniro's performance in the Untouchables film to utter and complete shame. But Richie Madano does run a close second, from among a lot of great performances over the years. (Buck Atwater, Evelle Snoats are the honorable mentions for me.)
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 10:02 am:   

Have you seen Palookaville or Soundman or Coastlines? They are superior Forsythe.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 10:04 am:   

Speaking of Coastlines, it's astonishing to me that Nunez, dir. of Ulee's Gold, Ruby in Paradise, etc. can't get his films released.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 10:24 am:   

TARNATION is a 2004 documentary made by Texas native and NY resident Jonathan Caouette that chronicles his very messed-up family, particularly his mother's decline from gorgeous teen model into insanity after repeated hospitalizations and electro-shock treatments. The whole film was put together on iMovie software from Caouette's filmed footage, family snapshots, news video, answering machine messages, etc. and his editing of this sonic and visual collage is often quite compelling. It's certainly unlike anything you're likely to see over the next few years. It's riveting, unflinching, difficult stuff, but a work of great bravery and imagination.

At least that was my initial impression...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 10:32 am:   

Sounds more compelling than the teen model story they had on Good Morning America, about this teen model who overcame the shame of teen acne to become Ms Teenage America. Gag...
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 10:59 am:   

Lucius, if you're interested, Sam Fuller made a movie about that girl, I think. It's called THE BIG RED ONE...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 11:07 am:   

Yup. And it's sequel, the Big Red Boo Boo
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 11:12 am:   

lol
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Minz
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 11:16 am:   

I can't believe I forgot about Sid in Palookaville (one of the great "Heist" films). Soundman was okay. I've never heard of Coastlines. Does it at least have a video release?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 12:18 pm:   

Naw, Coastlines is absolutely devoid of exposure. It played a few festivals, where I saw it, and vanished. Incredible.

Anyone seen EYE OF GOD, a southern gothic thing with Mary Kay Place? Any good?
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 12:47 pm:   

Last wknd, I also picked up Season One of Rod Serling's NIGHT GALLERY, dated, for sure, but an interesting period piece nonetheless. Although Serling could lapse into silly trickery (as with THE TWILIGHT ZONE), when this show was on (as in "Make Me Laugh" with the great Godfrey Cambridge), it was pretty right-on and unlike anything else that was on the air. I want to hunt down Season Two, which includes all the real classic episodes!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 01:24 pm:   

Never liked NG. Never watched it. Never will.

:-)

No opinions on Eye of God? Guess I'll by it?
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 02:20 pm:   

Dave, that was me who mentioned Ginger Snaps. I'll check out the sequels. I usually don't like horror movie sequels....
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 02:52 pm:   

Dug GS intensely. I will also check out the sequels.
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 03:22 pm:   

Always thought that Seagal's best was Above the Law and then a steady decline into unwatchability.

---

My issue with horror films is that so many turn into gee how many ways can we torture folk. Some attractive nymph will be in peril and somehow survive. Sometimes more than once.

Angel Heart has the horror element but there's a message there rather than simple wanton murder.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 03:29 pm:   

The message being, Robert De Niro sucks! :-) I remember that horrible horseshit with the egg. The novel, Falling Angel, by Willaim Hjortsberg, was pretty good, but I thought the movie flat sucked -- Eva Bonet, yow....what a lame actor.


Out for Justice is the peak of Seagall's career, but Fire Down Below had Harry Dean Stanton and Marg Helgenberg, and the first film he did with black rappers, the one with Tom Arnold, was decent.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 04:54 pm:   

Of course, you refer to EXIT WOUNDS!

Seagal seems to have a way of always surrounding himself with good supporting players. Levon Helm, Gina Gershon, Forsythe, Michael Caine, Kris Kristofferson, Stanton, Jerry Orbach...

The problem with horror, I'm guessing, is that studios will only greenlight "bankable" scripts that work all the cliches. Yeah, the damsel in distress who witnesses unspeakable acts, then outsmarts (but doesn't kill) the fiend! Yawn.

I'll bet you that we couldn't come up with a dozen original, stylish American horror movies made during the last twenty years. Anybody else enjoy CANDYMAN?
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 04:56 pm:   

Hmmm...issues with DeNiro and praisin' Seagal.

Perhaps if you hadn't read the novel you might have enjoyed Angel Heart more. It was one of Rourke's better roles.

Speakin' of Seagal ever notice how in several of his films his final confrontation is with some helpless fellow. Might as well throw him in a retirement community and let him do his bone crushing there.

It is ever so non-exciting to see him pitted against someone who is physically unable to defend themselves. As for Bonet at least she can simmer, Segal has bloated perhaps to match his ego...
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 04:59 pm:   

Candyman was okay....

Virginia Madsen
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:03 pm:   

I'm not so big on horror but Millenium did the genre proud.

Granted it's just tv.

Silence of the Lambs would stand high in the heap...

Don't know if Shakespeare would have considered himself in appropriate company but Titus certainly had horrific elements.
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Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:19 pm:   

Seagal's singular triumph was sticking that kitchen utensil in William Forsythe's forehead. What the hell was that thing, anyway?
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:26 pm:   

Certainly wasn't art...
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:35 pm:   

I think some of Shakspeare's tragedies are horror. Othello, which I think is a horror story, features mostly Iago -- one of his best villians and arguably the star of that play. A complete psychopath or the Devil incarnate or both? You decide. Although he clearly is the former, Shakspeare's audience was probably inclined to see the later.
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:43 pm:   

Good points Stephen... Texas Chainsaw Shakespeare...

I'll ask Lucius as he obviously has some special regard for Seagal what's going on...

Did Seagal save your kitten or rescue you in Central America?
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:47 pm:   

Shakespeare.

And isn't a clever, subtle and unseeming sociopath like Iago, more scary than a redneck who runs around with a chainsaw? Closer to the truth?

Part of the point in Othello is that things aren't always as they seem. Something which is big aspect or theme in horror lit. Something which is true...

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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:56 pm:   

I'd much rather watch Iago but that's not likely to sell hundreds of millions unless Mel returns...
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 05:59 pm:   

Didn't even see your post, PM, and I referenced Texas Chainsaw..:-)

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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:10 pm:   

It's really complex, man. I like martial arts. Seagall was one of the few actors, along with Jeff Speakman, Dascascos, and Tony Ja, one of the few actors who actually new how to fight. I don't have special regard. I find some of his films very watchable.


Don't be a wise-ass. Go watch some Iago.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:11 pm:   

Not to say that the schizoid, out of control psychopath, can't be scary or compelling...

But it strikes me that that type of psycho killer is actually more comforting for people. The type we could easily recognize...
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:21 pm:   

I agree that there aren't many choices to watch for Americans doing martial arts.

So much of it now is wire work and while that has it's beauty I'd much rather watch...boxing.

We could knock the remake of Get Carter all day but the fight scenes were more realistic than most.

Even the fight scenes in Angel Heart were more believable:-)

Contrast that with say the Transporter 2 which will have plenty of kick but c'mon if I punch Lucius he's not going to fly across the Internet... (just kidding.)

And Stephen your intuitions are right on the chainsaw...
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:28 pm:   

Stephen we expect our psychos to perform according to type.

Michael Keaton can play this part. Unfortunately we can't get scripts that can play to his strengths.

And that's the ongoing gripe. It's not the actors. It's the script that is filtered for what's expected to be mass appeal.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:44 pm:   

I saw tonight a Khazakastani film called Killer. Cost about three bucks to make. I've liked other russian-ex-soviet-union low-budget thrillers quite a bit, but this one, despite winning a prize at cannes, didn't do much for me. It's about a chauffuer who loses his job, gets in a fender-bender with a member of the mafiya, who gets him to kill a troublesome journalist to pay off his debt. It's interesting on the level of ethnography, anyway.

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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 06:48 pm:   

Arent many choices for Americans as to martial arts? Ever hear of the internet? Best martial arts film I've seem lately is Arahan, a Korean movie. Fighter in the Wind, an art house biopic with a martial arts backdrop, is great.
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PM
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2005 - 07:07 pm:   

I meant American actors starring in martial arts films (doing martial arts).

(You're familiar with far more films than I.)

Of course I should clarify that even more...Americans of non-Asian descent.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 05:41 am:   

Watched a rgood action movie with the unlikely title of Aussie Park Boyz, kind of a low rent Once Were Warriors, dealing with multi-ethnic gang strife, hearkening back more to the nihilism of movies like Romper Stomper and Metal Skin. Not terribly ambitious, but it did exactly what it set out to do, and did it well....
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 08:22 am:   

In coming months, I am hoping to explore some of Seagal's obscure, direct-to-DVD work. Should be amusing, particularly if it's as good as HALF PAST DEAD...:-)

Off topic, but did you know everybody's favorite Tibetan tulku has a music CD, too? You can hear samples on his website!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 08:26 am:   

The Dalai Lama.

I've seen all Seagall's movies. Watch it. There are some real dogs. You'd like Aussie Park Boyz.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 08:32 am:   

I meant, The Dalai Lama?

I prefer the Panchen Lama.... :-)
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MCisco
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 11:02 am:   

No American martial artists?

Have you forgotten the astounding high sticking in "Slap Shot"?
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Cisco
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 11:04 am:   

The days of the "Hockey Kong" movie draw nigh!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 11:11 am:   

Can't wait for that Michael Bay remake of Transformers....
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 12:13 pm:   

While we're talking about such low-rent guilty pleasures, I still say that Tsui Hark's two Van Damme movies are fun and funny. That would be DOUBLE TEAM and KNOCK OFF.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 12:39 pm:   

I prefer DOUBLE TEAM. Bolo Yeung. "Dere's two of dem!"

KNOCK OFF didn't do much for me.

And the best Van Damme, I have the directors cut of Hard Target, which is a solid John Woo picture, lacking the cheesy soundtrack of the theatrical release and having the 25 minutes that were cut by the studio, including much kick ass Wooish violence and the establisment that Vosloo and Hendricksen are gay and having a relationship, which adds a whole new thing to what, even cut, is a terrific Lance performance.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 01:07 pm:   

Double Team has the best use of product placement I can recall. At one point a bunch of Coke cans keep Van Damme from pursuing the baddies. At the climactic explosion, they take shelter behind a giant Coke vending machine. Mickey Rourke at some kind of career nadir. Some fantastic shots. Hark rules.

Yes, Knock Off is quite a bit more mundane, but how many martial arts movies ground themselves in the thrilling world of fashion bootlegging?
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 01:13 pm:   

I saw Ginger Snaps 2: Unleashed. It picks up right after the first one, with Brigitte (the younger sister) resembling a junkie because of her need to shoot monkshood to hold off her lycanthropic disease. She cuts her wrists and records how long it takes to heal after each dose of monkshood. A nozy guy who works at the library comes around -- thinking she's ODed, he takes her to the hospital. They think she's a drug addict and suicidal, so she's put in the rehab program with other troubled young addict girls. There, she must try to hold off her transformation and get her needed drug fix. The only allie she has, to help her escape, is an odd little girl named Ghost, who is orphaned at the hospital, with her grandmother in intensive care as a serious burn victim (the hospital doubles as both intesive care and drug rehab, don't ask why).

This wasn't quite as good as the original. The way it started it seemed like it could have been even better, but I found overall, the characters, plot, and suspense wasn't developed as much as the first. The actress who plays Brigitte does a good job and I liked where they were going with this one. I just think it would have been better if it was a more realistic approach to drug rehab and her struggle in the centre more the focus. The other girls in rehab are not really developed. They're all pretty much bitches except for one, which is fine, but there should be more to them and I think it'd be better if this whole part was more developed. The only other major character at the hospital, other than Ghost, is a sexual predator orderly, who provides the girls their drugs for sexual favours.

It's still pretty good and worth a watch if you liked the first one.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 01:26 pm:   

Double Team is great. I know you don't buy videos or DVDs, but Hard Target is a terrific bootleg, I believe Kim's in NY still has it for sale. It;s really the last true John Woo flick.

Yeah, a movie about exploding pants....Wow!

Stephen, I've owned the sequels for years, but haven't watched them. Someday.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 02:21 pm:   

I buy stuff eventually, if it's a movie I can't stop thinking about and need to see again. (I hardly ever watch a film more than once, so there has to be something really special about it that'd make me want to watch it again.)

Instead of listing my three favorite movies farther up this thread, I started to list the ones I actually have bought on DVD so far, but even that was/is a weirdly stunted list. A few of these I don't own yet. The bad thing is, as soon as I finally break down and buy a movie, it's pretty much a solid guarantee I'm never gonna watch it again. It sits there on the shelf and mocks me. So I've cut back on my plans to buy more of my favorite movies.

WITHNAIL AND I
FORBIDDEN PLANET
JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE EARTH
2001
THE SHINING
RAVENOUS
DEAD MAN
PSYCHO
VERTIGO
FRENZY
THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH
ERASERHEAD
LOST HIGHWAY
BLUE VELVET
MULHOLLAND DRIVE
DARK WATER
ZATOICHI (Beat Takeshi)
SONATINE
THE BIG LEBOWSKI
OH BROTHER WHERE ART THOU
MAROONED IN IRAQ
THE RETURN
HAPPINESS OF THE KATAKURIS
MEMORIES OF MURDER
CHI-HWA-SEON
NUTS IN MAY
LIFE IS SWEET
HANA BI
KIKUJIRO
A SCENE BY THE SEA
UZUMAKI
NORTH BY NORTHWEST
SHADOW OF A DOUBT
STRANGERS ON A TRAIN
SEVEN SAMURAI
GOODFELLOWS
WAGES OF FEAR and SORCERER
CITY OF LOST CHILDREN
MONA LISA

Oh hell, this is pointless. Every movie I list makes me think of three others I have loved...but do I seriously need to own them all? Thinking of SEVEN SAMURAI, I'm overwhelmed by the (in some ways even more) extraordinary HIGH AND LOW. Which makes me think of HARA KIRI and ONIBABA and FIRES ON THE PLAIN and THE THIN RED LINE...crap... It's fractal, and infinite.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 02:22 pm:   

I forgot Tsui Hark's ZU: WARRIORS OF THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN and GREEN SNAKE and and and oh forget it!
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 02:25 pm:   

Also, if I go into the list of DVDs at the library, I can find a couple dozen right off the top of my head that I really ought to watch. Of these, it's probably that at least one of them is bound to be my favorite movie of all time for a few days or weeks or maybe even actually FOR ALL TIME!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 03:01 pm:   

Mona Lisa and not the Long Good Friday?

Yeah, I buy dvds and sell off the ones I don't want. I can't take the time to do libraries.

Uzumaki ..... My favorite.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 03:14 pm:   

Oh yeah, I prefer the warm, sappy Mona Lisa to the cold, cynical Long Good Friday. Which reminds me how much I liked The Butcher Boy.

Now I find myself thinking of movies I've never seen completely--films I saw most of on TV and have never sat down to watch in their entirety: JEAN DE FLEURETTE/MANON OF THE SPRING and TREE OF WOODEN CLOGS.

Must stop!
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 03:16 pm:   

Doing the library here (King County, Washington State) is as fast as ordering something off Amazon ...it's all online. But I am depleting most of the free ore-bearing veins and I fear I must get into Netflix soon.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 03:25 pm:   

I like the Butcher Boy, too. Haven't seen that kid since his bit in the General....

Netflix and etc just don't have enough of the films I'm interested in to make it worthwhile.
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Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 03:28 pm:   

WITHNAIL AND I...Nice!

"We want the finest wines available to humanity...!" :-)
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:02 pm:   

About half the time that's my favorite movie of all time. It's the only Criterion edition I own.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:05 pm:   

Damn, Lucius. I was hoping to hear that Netflix had a whole heap of Korean, Japanese, Iranian films that I wouldn't be able to find for rent anywhere. One thing it did have is the film about Jack Nance, I DON'T KNOW JACK. That alone almost made me join.

Almost.
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Robert D
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:08 pm:   

I just canceled my Netflix membership this week. Keeping it just encouraged me to watch bad movies, just because I could. I'd run out of everything I really wanted to see, and was just watching this I was vaguely interested in. There's supposed to be a place like Netflix that is more indie, but I can't remember what it is.

I remember Netflix didn't have Uzumaki in their library, even though I could buy it easily.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:10 pm:   

I'm always looking for weird shit like Aussie Park Boyz (I say again, Great action movie), whicn they're not gonna have, and my viewing pattern are erratic. I tend to binge, and then not see anything for a month. So it's impractical for me.
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Robert D
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:15 pm:   

GreenCine was the place I was thinking of
http://www.greencine.com

They're geared towards indies and documentaries. Sadly, the search engine is really slow.
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Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:24 pm:   

www.nicheflix.com is also supposed to be good, and stocks imports and other regions as well as region 1 stuff.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:27 pm:   

I guess seeing if they have both "Razorback" and "Through the Olive Trees" might be a good test.
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 04:31 pm:   

Those both look great.
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PM
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 05:51 pm:   

Where would one find the Director's Cut of Hard Target on DVD?
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 06:16 pm:   

It's a bootleg. Maybe from Kims online. As far I know, it's only available on video.
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Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 06:39 am:   

I haven't visited in about ten years (before the advent of DVD), but in the video era, Video Vault in Alexandria, VA used to be mind-boggling. I was never able to stump them; they carried everything.

Has anyone here ever heard of a Scandanavian doc I saw back in the '80s called THE KILLING OF AMERICA? It examined America's violent culture of assassination, serial killing, etc. and had some amazing footage I've never seen anywhere else. I've only ever seen it in one Berlin video store called Videodrome and that was almost 20 years ago...

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