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RobertW
Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2003 - 01:58 pm:   

New review is up at Electric Story:

http://www.electricstory.com/reviews/ddevil.asp

In which Lucius examines the thrilling new motion picture, Daredevil.

In case anyone is interested.

Robert
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jeff ford
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 06:36 pm:   

Lucius: Two movies I wanted to ask you what you thought of. One I saw and the other one not yet but I have the DVD in hand. The first is American Movie, a documentary of Mark Borchardt, independent film maker and creator of COVEN. I liked this one a lot, found it funny as hell in some parts and commiserated with this hapless goofballs attempts to persevere with his art. The second is Gummo. Any thoughts on these.

PS: Finally was able to download the novella the other day at work. I'm in deep. So far so great.

Best,

Jeff
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Lucius Shepard
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 08:09 pm:   

Hey, Jeff...

You're talking about two movies I like a lot. American Movie was astonishing. Frankly I'd like to see the movie Borchardt was making that he'll probably never finish. As for Gummo, wow. It;ll be interesting to see what you think. Written by an 18 year old. I was amazed. It's a strange movie...I don't want to say much about it if you haven't seen it. It's way better'n Daredevil. :-) My favorite movies at the moment are the beautifully made Brazilian blaxploitation flick, City of God, and The Quiet American (awesome cinematography and a great Michael Caine performance) and Creepers, this weird maybe-a-horror movie about meth addicts in a haunted house...or are they just tweaking? The Quiet American pulls a few punches, but nonetheless it's still the best recent English language film about American foreign policy.

Glad you don't mind Floater.

Take care,

Lucius
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benpeek
Posted on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 09:46 pm:   

hi lucius--

i've enjoyed your movie reviews that have appeared on electricstory. cool stuff, which switched me onto BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF when it first arrived as part of a french festival. (festivals are odd things to pick films from, because it can sometimes feel like you're staring at a wall, and it's blind luck to find something of worth. i found two, so i was happy.)

i agree with you on THE QUIET AMERICAN. it's a fine film, and looks beautiful.
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Lucius Shepard
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2003 - 06:32 am:   

Hi, Ben...
I'm a fool for really good Martial Arts stuff, and for Mark Dascascos especially. I can't understand why he's not a big action star, and I'm even going to hit the new Jet li, which I'm sure sucks, just because Dascascos plays the villain. As for Quet American, Chris Doyle, the cinematographer, is my hero. He is so good! The best cypberpunk film I ever saw, Wang Kar Wai's Fallen Angels, isn't really a cyberpunk film, it has no scifi element, but Doyle's camera makes it feel more weird and futuristic that the actual scifi films.

Take Care,

Lucius
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2003 - 08:07 pm:   

Lucius: Gummo -- yikes! When it was over I wanted to clean my house. That was really something else.

Best,

Jeff
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benpeek
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2003 - 08:34 pm:   

hi lucius--

i like FALLEN ANGELS. i never really thought of it as cyberpunk, but then to be fair, i've never liked the term or sub genre that much. so that's just me. but i agree that the film is good, and looks beautiful.

as for dacascos, i think he might pick bad films more often than not. he was in THE CROW: STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN and that was just painful. so i won't be touching the new jet li film, especially since the same director (with li) was responsible for the awful ROMEO MUST DIE. (he also made a steven seagal film, which i think is enough of a warning.)

ben.
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Lucius Shepard
Posted on Sunday, March 02, 2003 - 06:57 am:   

Ben: Fallen Angels wasn't cyberpunk, obviously--I just thought the cinematography grabbed a feeling, an emotional context, that I associate with cyberpunk better than any ostnsibly cyberpunk movie has.

And Cradle 2 The Grave did, indeed, suck. But Dacascos dd some good fightin'...:-)

Jeff: I think Gummo's maybe the most interesting ghost story I've ever seen. It's totally original in its approach to the subject. Not a film for cat lovers to watch, huh?

BTW, I watched Roy Jones become the first ex-middleweight champ since Tommy Loughran in 1897 to win a heavyweight belt. I once asked Budd Schulberg what he thought of Jones and he thought for a couple of seconds and said, "I think he may be just a little bit better than Sugar Ray Robinson." You oughta check this guy out.
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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 12:47 pm:   

Well, I just browsed through those movie reviews, and I can quite honestly say that most of them were more entertaining than the movies themselves. If I were the sort to laugh out loud at such things, I'm sure I would have come close to pissing myself laughing. As it is, I did get out a few chuckles.

I'm not a movie buff by any stretch of the imagination, but I must say that, at the moment, my two favorite movies are Lawrence of Arabia and RoboCop. And people never, ever fail to laugh at me (or just give me a pitying stare) when I admit that.
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 03:57 pm:   

>>Frankly I'd like to see the movie Borchardt was making that he'll probably never finish.

COVEN is available on video, I've seen it in stores here in NY (my local video place even carried a copy). I was curious to rent it, but then decided against it, fearful that it might turn out to be a complete turd....
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Lucius Shepard
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 - 03:21 pm:   

Gabe -- Actually the movie I was interested in was not COVEN, which I have seen and isn't so hot, but the full-length feature he was doing--he showed some footage of it during AMERICAN MOVIE, and as I recall it was not a genre piece.

Mastadge -- glad you enjoyed the reviews. I see nothing inappropriate with your choice of favorite movies. Verhoeven's a funny guy and LAWRENCE is, in my view, the greatest of all the epic films.
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PeterW
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 12:04 pm:   

Mr Shepard,

Since this is my first time "meeting you" (outside of your books, anyway), I'd like to mention that I'm a huge fan of your writing. There's few books that I re-read as much as I do your short story collections.

On cyberpunk movies: the movie I consider the most "cyberpunk" would be Iron Man, a live animation thing done by a Japanese director. It really makes explicit the fusion of human and technology as no others -- that I'm aware of -- have. Will never be classified "the feel-good movie of the year", however. Best served with a side order of Pepto Bismol.

And I too would agree that Lawrence of Arabia is the best of the epics.

Eagerly awaiting Aztechs and Louisiana Breakdown...
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Lucius Shepard
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 12:52 pm:   

Hi, Peter...

Glad you like the short stories. I just got my copies of Louisiana Breakdown, so it should be in the stores soon, if it's not already.

I've seen Iron Man, and I guess I think of it as sort of beyond cyberpunk, but I get your point. I've also seen another movie by the same director--blanking on his name for the moment--and I also agree that his work is not for those who get queasy easily.

Thanks for the good words,

Lucius
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John Klima
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 01:00 pm:   

Are you thinking of Shinya Tsukamoto, the guy who directed Tetsuo/Ironman?

(also eagerly awaiting AZTECHS)
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PeterW
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 01:48 pm:   

Yes, Tsukamoto's the one. Another one he directed was Tetsuo II: Body Hammer, which might be the one you're referring to.
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Lucius Shepard
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 03:02 pm:   

John and Peter,

Yep. Tsukamoto's the guy, and Body Hammer is the other movie I saw.

I don't know if I'd hold my breath waiting for Aztechs -- the publisher was supposed to bring it out last year and he doesn't appear to be moving very past.

Lucius
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Luís Rodrigues
Posted on Sunday, June 01, 2003 - 01:20 am:   

Since not many people visit my board here, let me suggest this link for your idle hours:

http://www.filmwise.com/invisibles/index.shtml

Cheers,
Luís
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paulw
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 03:22 am:   

Lucius,

Have you had a peek at Underworld, by any chance? Looks like it might be interesting.

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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 04:39 am:   

I think Underworld looks pretty terrible, aside from the appeal of a couple hours of Kate Beckinsale posing in skintight leather.

Also, I've always wanted to shoot through the floor like she does in the preview, but having neither the guns nor the floors to waste, I've never gotten around to it.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 04:53 am:   

UNDERWORLD looks like a movie concocted by feeding all recent visual cliches into a meat grinder and filming what comes out.

Kate Beckinsale does look good in black leather (actually, it looks more like rubber).

The shooting throgh the floor bit is a good way to a) waste ammo and b) descend exactly one story.

However, I will wait to hear the consensus...

Will note, btw, my increasing lack of interest in wire-fu. The fights that used to thrill me in movies were not these martial-arts extravaganzas, but what I would more accurately call "brawls" -- fights between folks who were more tough than trained, who actually seemed to be affected by the blows directed against them. Two guys throwing punches, and shattering furniture, have an immediacy that folks spinning in mid-air just don't possess for me. It feels realer.
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paulw
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 05:51 am:   

Adam,

Remember that great bare-knuckle boxing movie starring Charles Bronson? I can't for the life of me remember the title, but some of those fights were incredible. But that art is not completely forgotten; it can even be combined with the newer styles -- I thought there were some excellent hand-to-hand, hard-as-nails fight scenes in X2, for example.

It used to be that sawing your way through the floor was a staple of comedies, from the Marx Brothers to the 3 Stooges to Bugs and Daffy. Now shooting your way through the floor makes the trailer for an action thriller. That says something, but I'm not sure what . . .
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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 11:00 am:   

"The shooting throgh the floor bit is a good way to a) waste ammo and b) descend exactly one story."

Aye, but it would be fun!
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 11:37 am:   

Paul,

no peek at UNDERWORLD. I haven't seen much I liked this year. Just DVDs. The most interesting genre film I've seen in the theater was INTACTO. There's a cool lotta-fun Japanese scifi film called RETURNER, kind of cross between the Matrix and Independence Day, but way, way better.

The Bronson-Coburn movie you speak of is Walter Hill's HARD TIMES, a great little B movie.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 11:42 am:   

Adam, I agree about wire fu, although when it's done by someone like Jet Li, as opposed to someone like Keanu Reves, I can take it.
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paulw
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 01:40 pm:   

Lucius,

Returner out on DVD?
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 01:51 pm:   

Yeah, Paul...it's available through Diabolik and Poker Industries, and I suppose your better NYC rental shops would have it.
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paulw
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 03:11 pm:   

Great! I'll check it out . . .
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 03:19 pm:   

INTACTO should be out on DVD as well, It's SPanish, with Max Von Sydow, and is a pretty cool movie...about people who can steal each other's luck.
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S. Hamm
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 06:51 pm:   

ATC,

John Huston and Sam Fuller used to direct great wince-inducing fight scenes in which the participants really looked like they were getting hurt. Huston's tended to be very, very slow, Fuller's very, very fast.

Have you ever seen the broadsword fight in Mann's EL CID? It's a gas. The lads have at it energetically for a minute or two before they start to wear out. By the end they're dragging their swordpoints along the castle floor because the damned things are just too heavy to lift.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 06:55 pm:   

Samm,

Huston also filmed the most realistic boxing match I've ever seen on film, between Stacy Keach and Sixto Rodriguez, in FAT CITY, which is, my opinion, far and away the best boxing movie ever.

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S. Hamm
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 08:52 pm:   

Lucius,

In my opinion you can remove the "my opinion" from your opinion on FAT CITY.

How did you come down on RECKLESS MOMENT v. CAUGHT? I love 'em both, but on my card CAUGHT wins on points, for its seamless blending of the weepie and the noir.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 09:04 pm:   

In DIE HARD -- which I honestly do consider one of the all-time best pure action movies, and which (alas) seems uncommonly stuffed with character development today -- there's that killer fight between Bruce Willis and the big scary terrorist fella played by whatsisname. The reason I mention it now is that it was very clearly a fight between an accomplished martial artist and a stubborn brawler, and (aided by the emotional heft of the story around it) it actually worked. I shudder to think of how ineffective it would have been if John McClain had been a wire-fu artist.

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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 09:17 pm:   

Samm,

I wrote you an email about CAUGHT and RECKLESS MOMENT. I guess you never got it or the cybergod ate it or both. Yeah, I think CAUGHT gets it by a nose -- it feels heftier or something.. The plot of MOMENT (the lack of options available) never fully persuaded me, in either version. But James Mason just is so great, I have trouble overlooking that factor. Thanks again for the duping. I'm sorry my email got toasted.
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Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 14, 2003 - 10:04 pm:   

ATC,

I guess the problem I have with DIEHARD is with the genre you call the "pure action movie," and its seminal relationship to that genre. Movies like DIEHARD and LETHAL WEAPON sort of brought on the horror that is millennial Hollywood cinema. Thus the problem of whether or not a fight was wonderful in it kind of eludes me. I guess my feeling about wire-fu is that if the movie is fantastic in nature, like HEROIC TRIO or something of the sort, I don't have a problem with it. But in a more realistic film I'd prefer a more naturalistic style of fighting. This preference would, of course, also extend to acrobatic gunshot deaths in which people are blown backward twenty feet and so forth, deaths of the sort featured much in DIEHARD and its spawn. In the Ken Loach film about the Spanish Civil War, LAND AND FREEDOM, when people are shot they simply drop, disjointed, and the effect is far more poignant than "pure action movie" death. But then neither poignancy nor realism are goals of the "pure action movie." Nor is character. I recently watched Henri-Cluzot's THE WAGES OF FEAR, one of the great adventure movies. I imagine that the pure action movie is an offspring of the adventure genre -- a devolved offspring. I think it would be a good thing if the adventure genre were revisted, but FX and CGI have pretty much stifled the concept of the great adventure script.. Who needs it when you can much more easily devise half-ass tag lines and lots of blow-up. Anyway, I basically agree with you....
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Adam-Troy
Posted on Tuesday, July 15, 2003 - 06:10 am:   

I do agree with you that the "Adventure Movie", as typified by WAGES OF FEAR and TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE and Lester's THE THREE MUSKETEERS and GUNGA DIN and THE SEVEN SAMURAI and HIGH NOON and the Flynn ROBIN HOOD and my fave THE FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX and THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY and even Rafelson's MOUNTAINS OF THE MOON, a worthy epic that in today's debased market sank without a trace, is far more satisfying than the "Action Movie", as typified by DIE HARD's spawn; the last twenty years or so have seen the story content of most films of this kind slowly diminish until all that's left is the thud and blunder.

So it can be easy to hate DIE HARD, if not for its content, which I quite enjoy as belonging to the adventure-film tradition, as for the era it initiated.

(Greg Feeley, who for all his grumbledy-grumbledy antagonism does occasionally emit a good point, goes back still further, attacking the earliest James Bond films for beginning the process. But, seriously, watch GOLDFINGER today. It's more sedate than television. It ends with a middling fight. It's an adventure film with a protagonist who survives, for the most part, by largely being cooler than anybody else. Compare it to the James Bond films of today, in which Bond himself is basically lost in an explosive landscape that stretches from horizon to horizon; and he survives by running from explosions he causes. As a preteen kid, I used to wait for Bond films. I still love those films. As an adult -- finding Pierce Brosnan himself a potentially excellent Bond who here functions as just another element of the special effects -- I find the remains of the franchise downright painful.)

What's most frightening, I think, is watching films from only a few years ago, and seeing how the storytelling skills have devolved. Even if they're not great films. Indeed, check out the mediocre ones as more instructive. Check out, for instance, SUPERMAN 2. Not a great work of art, by any means, but a reasonably effective example of its kind. And it really wasn't just about the fight scenes and its explosions. It set up a character conflict and a moral dilemma, it built tension from the start, it paused to explain who these people were and why we should care, it gave them personalities, it trusted us to stay awake while it manuevered its pieces into place. THEN it gave us the money shots. Would such a film be made today? I think not. The folks who control the purse strings would demand more, more, more, and any pretense of soul would be excised in favor of bigger and more explosive action scenes.

What's left is DAREDEVIL.

ATC




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Adam-Troy
Posted on Tuesday, July 15, 2003 - 06:39 am:   

Continuing the point (because I wandered away from it for a mite):

DIE HARD works for me because it has many of the attributes foreign to its sequels and descendants. It has a hero who is clearly in over his head, who is not an action hero by any means, who is terrified and vulnerable throughout. It requires him to figure out what the bad guys are up to, from previous clues. It keeps reminding us of his humanity. It builds tension. It gives us reasons to care for him. It provides us with little humanizing moments for supporting characters and even its legion of bad guys (every one who survives long enough gets a moment; there's a little gem involving one terrorist and a candy bar.) It provides dialogue as well as catchphrases. It has planted elements its audience is not expected to understand at first sight, and it trusts them to wait til they pay off later on. It stops, for long periods, to dramatize how all this affects its characters emotionally.

It ain't Ibsen or Arthur Miller. But for me it fulfills the requirements of drama.

And in so doing it demonstrates how many of the skills are now lost, at least on the big screen*.

* * * *

* The small screen is another matter; even in action-oriented shows, smaller budgets and cramped production times force character back into the mix, sometimes quite well. Right now, the best TV shows are far better than what usually passes for the best films. And btw, Lucius, your review of DAREDEVIL saves particular scorn for Jennifer Garner, who you call one of the most incompetent action actresses out there. I can only report that her skills suffered from the vehicle. She is very good indeed on ALIAS, in both the action and character scenes.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, July 15, 2003 - 07:24 am:   

ATC and Lucius: Interesting discussion on the difference between action and adventure. There are certain movies I go to now, like the rest of the public, because I am enticed by the promised spectacle of them. In going to see them, I don't even go with the same expectation I used to have of what a "movie" was. It's more like I am going to see a fireworks display. I'd love for the experience to have some kind of emotional or intellectual content, but I don't expect it to. I think a lot of times with action movies it depends on the certain head behind the action. In Hollywood action often means blow up. Big Explosions is at the heart of the American consciousness. You know, shock and awe. But with an action movie like Hard Boiled, the Hong Kong Fat vehicle, the action seemed to me to come more from Dance or bodily movement, although there was copious shooting. There wasn't much intellectual or emotional content, but I came out feeling like I'd seen a ballet instead of the dunderhead igniting of ordinance that is action in the US. As for adventure movies, a really great one I've seen many times and always love is Cabeza De Vaca (spelling?).

Best,


Jeff
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 15, 2003 - 07:31 am:   

Adam,

I enjoyed both DIEHARD and LETHAL WEAPON to a degree when they were out in the theaters-- I just didn't want them to parent the future --and I certainly understand that the earlier action movies were superior to the ones made now. However, I can't wax as positive as you about DIEHARD. Willis is, to my mind, never more than a tiresome actor, and his cowboy cop thing was cartoonish and, for my mind, off-putting in the extreme. I was rooting deeply for Alan Rickman. The whole thing about the hero being in over his head has been done to far better effect in films like THE THIRD MAN and JOURNEY INTO FEAR and TOPKAPI and etc, and though such films are generally explosion free, many contain action sequences that are more compelling in terms of character involvment than anything in DIEHARD. Hopeully the genre may be playing out its string. Audiences seem to be coming alert (to a degree, anyway) to the vacancy of the form, and more pertinently, the chain distributors, most of whom are in bankruptcy, are demanding films that have more than two weeks bankability before they're sunk by word of mouth.

As for Ms. Garner, I don't think I was especially scornful of her -- any review that begins with line "You can actually feel yourself getting stupider while watching DAREDEVIl" seems rather all-inclusive. As far as her work in ALIAS, I haven't seen it and wasn't reviewing it. In DAREDEVIL she was fucking awful, and unfortunately, actors--like athletes--get reviewed in terms of their recent performances and not on their body of work. I will admit that I don't watch much TV--I watch way too many movies.

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Adam-Troy
Posted on Wednesday, July 16, 2003 - 06:27 pm:   

Lucius: your review did call her incompetent.

No big deal, of course; your review can only cover the quality of a performance in a given film. (It is sometimes helpful to add context, if you have it; I wrote a review of the stinker horror film INCUBUS, for Scifiweekly, where I mentioned in passing that John Cassavetes really did have a long and distinguished career as both an actor and a director and that it may help to explain the supremely bored nature of his acting in that piece of crap. But I wasn't obligated to say so.)

In any event, the defense of Jennifer Garner is mere context. She really is quite wonderful in ALIAS, in both the emotional and action-oriented scenes; it's one reason she got the ELEKTRA assignment. But mentioning it is just a by-the-way. ATC
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 16, 2003 - 09:37 pm:   

Adam,

like I said I don't watch much TV, at least as regard prime time network -- fact is, I don't watch any. Mostly movies for me. And football. And boxing. And I thought "incompetent:" was no worse than any of the other words I used. But whatever...no biggie.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 16, 2003 - 09:47 pm:   

Jeff,

you might be interested to know I almost did a project with Nick Echevarria who directed Cabeza de Vaca. We worked on the script together. The whole thing was totally weird. The money guy was this Russian guy. Misha, who wound up with the oil leases for half the Ukraine after the break-up, and this beautful Russian woman, Natalya, who apparently dated a bunh of Hollywood people and had wonderful connections. For reasons to complex to explore here (some of them really funny in retrospect), it all fell apart, but it was fun working with Echevarria and Cabeza de Vaca's a terrific movie....
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, July 16, 2003 - 10:54 pm:   

Lucius: The experience you describe above sounds like it was worth the price of admission, even though it went south. Do you know, has Echevarria directed any other films recently?

Best,

Jeff
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 07:08 am:   

Hey, Jeff...

all I know is that he has amovie out called Vivir Mata, but it hasn't been released here yet...or if it has, I don't know about it. If you can find it -- and I know it used to exist on video, so maybe bootleg dealers would hae it -- you should try to find his movie, Nino Fidencio, Taumaturgo de Expinaza. Really amazing document..

Nick's a great guy, but not a good career manager. (I should talk!). And yeah, the whole thing was a trip. Misha was into Korean women and all he wanted to do was "go disco," and Natalya...wow, I miss her phone calls. To wit --"Oh, Lucius, I am so depressed, I cannot talk to you."

"Why are you depressed?"

"Oh, my grandmother calls from Russia. She has lost all her money. The bank has failed."

"I'm sorry."

"Yes. The bank manager has hang himself."

"Jeez, that's terrible."

"No, no, no. It's okay. They make him hang himself."

Anyway, it was weird. I may try and get in touch with Nick. Like I said, he's a great guy and I hope he's doing okay.



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jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2003 - 07:26 am:   

Lucius: You should write the experience up as a novel or novella. Bukowski did it with Hollywood and yours sounds even more interesting.

Best,

Jeff

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Adam-Troy
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 04:23 am:   

MAY: knockout performance by Angela Bettis as disturbed veterinary assistant,
weird at outset, whose social isolation ultimately drives her over the edge;
an odd film that is almost a romantic comedy at the beginning, but which
becomes grand guignol by the last half hour. The bloodshed, when it starts,
heads down an unfamiliar avenue, and the film's very last twist is not merely
gruesome, but darkly, terribly poetic. (It made me gasp.) Bettis, who played
Carrie in the TV remake, is a fine actress. Slow going, for first hour,
then watch out. MAY is a direct to video release. ATC.

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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 07:35 am:   

ATC,

Actually, May did get a limited theatrical release -- I didn't see it, but know people in LA and NYC who did. The split was about 2/3 or 3/4 saying it was great, the rest saying it blew. I've been thinking about buying it and I think I'll your recommendation push me that way.
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Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 - 07:48 am:   

Jeff,

Y'know, that sounds like a good idea. I'm gonna think about it. I certainly have enough anecdotal material about Misha and Natalya.

Thanks....
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 08:59 am:   

Lucius: Here's a couple of stinkers so bad, I can't even find the words to describe what loads they are. We do this family movie thing where one of us, of my two sons and my wife and I, gets to pick the movie we go to see. You get a turn and everybody has to sit through whatver you want to see. Last week was my son, Jack's, turn, and he picked Terminator 3. Man, need I say more? Horrid. And I loved the Republican mind set message at the end -- the idea is not to avert a nuclear war, it's merely to survive and never give up fighting. Swell. Then Lynn's sister shows up and her son wants to go see S.W.A.T.. To tell you the truth, I'd have rather have seen the droopy ass Arnold bag it around for another two hours again than to see this formulaic lame ass piece of shit.
It just amazes me how much money is being spent on this crap. Mind boggling.
My sons want me to ask you if you know anything about a movie called Underworld, where vampires fight werewolves. We saw a trailer and it looked slick, but you know how the trailer thing goes. Anyway, was wondering if either you or maybe Sam, if he's around, have heard anything good or bad about this one.
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S. Hamm
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 04:21 pm:   

Jeffski,

If you and the boys can track it down, I heartily endorse the congenial Japanese gore comedy VERSUS (d. Riyuhei Kitamura). It's a gleeful puree of yakuza, samurai, vampires, ghosts, zombies, wizards, martial artists, bald futuristic mutants, and an undead psycho-killer who crawls around on all fours like a cat, all tossed into a great big genre-blender set to "Raimify."

The story involves a gang of mostly-photogenic young criminals who have been dumping the guys they whack in a nearby forest. Unfortunately for them it turns out to be "The Forest of Resurrection," which conceals Portal to Hell #444 (out of 666) . . . .

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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 04:44 pm:   

Sam: Sounds delectable. We're on it. Thanks!
I was telling you the other day I was about to watch Ringu. No one was home, and I put the DVD in the machine and got it going. It's a good movie, pretty suspenseful, and then all of a sudden the movie craps out and just static on the TV screen. For a while I thought it was part of the movie, but then I realized something was wrong. Kind of creepy. I ran upstairs and his from the TV.

Best,

Jeff
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 05:16 pm:   

Jeff,

first, I concur with Sam about Versus. It's fun. I would also recommend Stacy, which I believe I've talked about somewhere on the board. All the girls between 15-17 begin to die. First they experience NDH, Near Death Happiness, and bliss the fuck out. Then they die and turn into flesh eating zombies. Natch, they're called Stacies. The Japanese gov traps some for study, but a crazed military officer releases them and leads them on a spree of munch munch.

All I know about Underworld is what you know. I'm suspicious. It reeks of, you know, Alien vs Predator. Dog Soldiers is a nice little B movie werewolf flick, if your sons want to check that out. It's nuttin' special, but fun. BTW, if you can't find either or these to rent, they're buyable at Diabolik, Poker Industries, HKFlix, Asiafilm, and other online sites.

I can only sympathize as to T3 and SWAT. I had the rare good sense to avoid the latter, but suffered through Arnold. I think he should run for actor. He'd lose, but it would be a tougher road and more fun to watch. These movies are like Cheese Whiz. People scarf 'em iup, don't much like 'em, then scarf 'em up some more.

I hope you got my email about Mrs. C -- These painkillers are wiping me out, and now I wonder if actually sent it, and if I did, what did I say? I did like it a lot.
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 08:22 pm:   

Lucius: Got the e-mail. Thanks. Still waiting to hear back from Gyger on the Jules Verne outing. I survived the Sobig. Virus and Blast only to have my credit card hacked. Just talked to the bank people after holding for about 45minutes. God almighty. The best thing to do today might be to write letters and stick the money under the mattress. Thanks to you and Sam for the thumbs up on Versus. We'll give Dog Soldiers a sniff. Hope you feel better. Save me some of those pain killers.

Best,


Jeff
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Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 23, 2003 - 08:51 pm:   

Hey, Jeff...

Yeah, I haven't heard from Gyger either. But I'm sure we will. He's been doing this for years, so it's not a hallucination.

Sorry about the credit cad (sic), man. What a fucking drag. And those elevator music phone waits--proof we're living in the third world. It hasn't happened to me yet, but with all the crud I buy online, it's only a matter or time.

If I got extra Vicotins, they're yours, but sounds as if you could use a bunch tonight....

Hang in there....
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, October 28, 2003 - 05:36 am:   

Lucius: Just dropping a line to say I thought your review of The Hulk was really good. Measured and fair, and pretty much what I also saw on the screen. Also was wondering if you've ever read The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror by David Skal? I'm really enjoying it. A lot about films, especially good stuff about Todd Browning and the early stuff. Skal has a good sense of humor and some interesting insights. You've probably seen it, but if not, check it out if you get a chance.

Best,


Jeff
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Pender
Posted on Sunday, March 21, 2004 - 10:26 am:   

Lucius,
Has any of your work been considered for making into a movie? There's a couple of things I'd like to see, but getting it done right might be a problem.
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Pia
Posted on Thursday, April 29, 2004 - 06:42 am:   

Lucius

I am a young independant film maker.
Your short story AYMARA is incredible!
I would love to use it as a base story for a film.
The target market would be small - I live in South Africa and would probably film it in Mozambique.
What procedure would I have to follow, if you allow it at all?

Pia
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debt
Posted on Sunday, November 14, 2004 - 05:10 pm:   

great page...im sure i'll come back...best regards

<p>debt</p>

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