Good Movie 5 Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Shepard, Lucius » Good Movie 5 « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 12:14 pm:   

By Adam-Troy Castro on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 06:00 am:

Del Toro is one of those directors (there are many) who become less interesting the larger their budgets become.

Assuming Aronofsky actually succeeds in making films again, I'm assuming that he will be another.
By Dave G. on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 06:48 am:

Is Del Toro the guy who did CRONOS?

My last word on SE7EN...For some reason, I found Brad Pitt's acting very easy to overlook in that film, unlike say, KALIFORNIA, where he was overacting all over the place. To me, the star of SE7EN was the production design, the mood, the overall feeling of malaise and decay. The actors were just there to say the lines. And I thought Spacey, the one guy who really needed to be good, was. Gwyneth, love her or hate her, was hardly there at all for me.
By Lucius on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 07:40 am:

Yeah, I kind of agree, Adam.

Del Toro did Chronos, did Mimic, did Blade 2, did the Devil's Backbone, did Hellboy
By MarcL on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 09:56 pm:

"And how did you find Brad Pitt's acting, sir?"

"I looked under a potato chip and there it was."
By MarcL on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 11:00 pm:

In defense of HELLBOY, there are certain kinds of movies I sort of enjoy letting my kids watch--both because I know that, being kids, they'll like them; and because I know other kids' parents probably won't approve. These are the supposedly Christian parents who have instructed their children that they are not to play with mine because they don't accept Jesus as their Savior; and to whom the Cthulhu fish on my fender must seem eager to lay its eggs in the Jesus fish on theirs. (These are children so confused by their own mythological beliefs that they will argue with my kids that Jesus Created the Earth, which so far as I am aware is not a teaching of any Christian sect.) Along these lines, I found HELLBOY to be charming, wholesome, and life-affirming. (I am an orthodox Cthulhuvian, by the way, strict adherent to the cult of HPL. I won't tolerate the idiotic heresies of LaVey.) My daughters grew up thinking Cthulhu is cute. And now that they have those Cthulhu plush toys, I guess this is a reasonable belief.

There was a lot of lame stuff in HELLBOY involving secret agents and subway tunnels and Nazis and Rasputin, and not nearly enough cosmology. But I laughed a bunch of times at Ron Perlman's delivery. So I'm not trying to fob this off entirely on my kids. I had a good time. It's one of the few "bad movies" I could reasonably enjoy.



By Adam-Troy Castro on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 05:27 am:

Yeah, there is that.

A friend of mine on line for HELLBOY was so harassed by a church lady buying group tickets for PASSION OF THE CHRIST that he told the woman to back off or be knocked down.

Any movie, however junky, that bothers those people is not a total loss.

I remember wishing that the folks responsible for re-releasing LIFE OF BRIAN had been a little more on the ball, and seen to it that it was re-released simultaneously. I would have loved seeing some of these major church groups buying tickets to the wrong film by mistake.
By Dave G. on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 06:16 am:

Ummm, wait a minute...JESUS created the Earth??? JP, can we jot in a few revisions to the Sistine Chapel ceiling???

Who knew?

:-)
By MarcL on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 10:09 pm:

Getting back to GOOD movies, I watched the first two thirds of DANCER IN THE DARK last night. I'm really looking forward to the remainder. I haven't seen BREAKING THE WAVES yet either, among the Von Triers films that I can find locally.
By Dave G. on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 06:26 am:

The ending to DANCER IN THE DARK is pretty mind-blowing. Very powerful. I won't spoil it by saying anymore. I also dug BTW, but saw it a long time ago and forgot a lot of the detail. Again, another freaky, powerful ending, although not half as visceral as DITD.
By Lucius on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 06:26 am:

Dancer in the Dark is relentless, maybe the most depressing movie I've seen, but brilliant. Breaking the Waves...Emly Watson! Wow.
By Dave G. on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 08:52 am:

I still can't believe I missed DOGVILLE...
By MarcL on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 11:24 am:

Yeah, great ending...great throughout. The most depressing movies rarely leave me feeling anything but exhilarated. (OSAMA being a recent notable exception.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 12:24 pm:   

Old thread too long.

You can buy Dogville.

One great movie that depressed me no end was Sayajit Ray's DEVI. Man, that a solid downer, that one.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 08:38 pm:   

Hmmm. *Will* buy DOGVILLE.

Saw THE VILLAGE, against my better judgment, and mostly because I liked THE SIXTH SENSE and UNBREAKABLE. Oh, dear. Oh, seriously, dear.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 09:32 pm:   

A large number of people at my office today were joyfully spoiling THE VILLAGE for one another. I have never seen so many people so determined to spoil a movie and thereby prevent themselves from seeing it. Usually they say, "No, don't tell me!" Today it was, "Yeah, yeah...tell me! Oh god...that's terrible..."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 09:41 pm:   

I haven;t seen it yet. I mean, I may go Manchurian Candidate if this keeps up.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 10:12 pm:   

Ebert, with a zinger: "Critics were enjoined after the screening to avoid revealing the plot secrets. That is not because we would spoil the movie for you. It's because if you knew them, you wouldn't want to go."

And then a hilariously inane one from CNN:
"The Village" raises compelling questions about the lengths parents might go to shield their children from harm, and whether isolating the young ones from the phantoms in the closet might simply unleash the monsters under the bed.

Which is a bit like saying, "...whether isolating the young ones from Santa Claus might simply unleash the Easter Bunny."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Saturday, July 31, 2004 - 05:45 am:   

The problem is not so much that the ending is predictable; I mean, I predicted the ending of THE SIXTH SENSE too, and still enjoyed the journey. No, the problem is that the "quaint" dialogue consists of phrasing every sentence in the most awkward manner possible, which hobbles the actors terribly. It's faux-CRUCIBLE. None of the well known actors emerge unscathed except for Adrian Brody (whose village idiot never uses complete sentences). Bryce Howard, daughter of Ron, is alos hobbled until the latter sections of the film isolate her from the script and force her to show that she's pretty terrific. But by then the damage is done.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JV
Posted on Saturday, July 31, 2004 - 05:48 am:   

I got used to the quaint dialogue. I never got used to the twist, which was a terrible let-down compared to the kinds of twists they could have put into it. Beautifully-filmed movie with some logic problems and some good performances. Not nearly as bad as Ebert wants it to be, but just kind of mediocre in the ways that matter.

JeffV
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Saturday, July 31, 2004 - 10:22 am:   

I enjoyed reading spoiler-ridden reviews on the internet. Probably more fun than the movie. In the case of Shayamalan, spoilers may encourage me to see the movie, rather than discourage. Better for my blood pressure, anyway. Signs nearly sent me into anger management.
Saw Rock Star last night. It kinda sucked, though it had a few good moments. It was neat seeing Zakk Wylde playing himself in the background. That man's a guitar god.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 31, 2004 - 12:46 pm:   

I'm discouraged. I heard early on what the twist was going to be, and I've read enough on the net to know my source was right. Yuck. I'm giving this one a pass. UNBREAKABLE, in retrpospect, begins to seem like a high point.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 06:22 am:   

Damn! I really wanted a good scare, but all this negativity surrounding the flick is making me not want to see it. I'm guessing we're going to see a week #2 word-of-mouth fall-off of legendary proportions.

Stayed home and watched the CITY OF GOD DVD instead.

I think I will have to get my scares from OPEN WATER when it opens this month. Rex Reed gave it a real rave in the NY Observer.

Has Hollywood forgotten how to scare people? Will the new EXORCIST be horrible enough to eclipse EXORCIST II: THE HERETIC?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 07:27 am:   

Shamalyan was my last hope. It isn't that Hollywood can't scare people, they don;t bother to generate suspense ahead of it. THe Sixth Sense gave me some hope, but its been all downhill since then.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

adam-troy castro
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 07:29 am:   

The new EXORCIST by Renny Harlin will be a typical Hollywood "Roller Coaster ride," which is not a good thing; however, wait for the DVD and you will be able to see the one the studio shelved, by Paul Schrader, which might possibly be worth watching.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathy S.
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 07:55 am:   

Dave --
It's not that they've forgotten how to scare people; they just don't do it with subtlety. Yeah, if a bloddied head with gouged eyes suddenly pops up in front of me I'll probably scream and be scared.It's a physiological response. I won't lose any sleep. Now, horror that gets under your skin and makes you open your closet door ten times and sleep with the lights on, that's rare.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 08:35 am:   

Kathy, you said a mouthful. The last movie that seriously freaked me out was BLAIR WITCH. Sure, it had its flaws, but it was something a little different. And that last five minutes was, in my view, psychologically creepy in the sort of way you are talking about, and virtually unique in recent US horror cinema. Prior to that, I would have to go all the way back to the first EVIL DEAD for a movie that really rattled me. It may look quaint now, but at the time, Raimi's no-budget manipulation of horror movie cliches worked surprisingly well.

How ironic. CNN is more frightening than anything the horror experts produce these days.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 09:17 am:   

The problem is, le Budget. Now that they have all this money, why bother with generating suspense when they can have a good exploding head or giant cobra. They go for the shocks. There oughta be a limit on movie budgets--that would bring the imagination back into film.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathy S.
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 09:51 am:   

Hear hear. The best movie I saw recently was Bubba Ho-tep. Although not horror, I think it's an excellent demostration that creativity and budget are counteracting (that's true of many other things besides movies).

I have to say that Blair Witch did not work for me -- probably due to the fact that I spend a good chunk of my life in the woods, and the behavior of the protagonists generated not sympathy, but disgusted pity. But it's just me, I suppose.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 10:19 am:   

I got to go along with you on the Blair Witch. It did make me sort of nauseous with all the hand-held stuff. It was the Junior Woodchucks outing gone horribly wrong.

Good movies can be made wtth big budgets -- witness Lawrence of Arabia--but it takes a good director with a good story. Today they hand out cash to every video director with a comic book story....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 10:40 am:   

It's kind of funny, isn't it? Can you picture all these directors pleading to producers "Please, no more money...it's too much???" Or are directors like govt. bureaucrats, who take additional money first and worry about whether they can use it later, simply because more appropriations means more importance?

It astounds me that, with the success of films like Blair Witch (and the impending success of the $120,000 OPEN WATER), that no studio has created a division or subsidiary for low-budget pictures, with a mandate to create quirky, arthouse fare on a shoestring. Sort of the way record labels create (or at least used to create) small subsidiaries for niche artists.

I mean, is Troma still around? Didn't their movies make $$$?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 11:12 am:   

The trouble is, Dave, the studios are run by bean counters, and if that occured to them to do, they;d screw it up. The thing they don't understand is story--that's been the real victim here. The old studio heads had great respect for story--they understood that it was all important. The new guys, playing to the dumbed down audience, their choices backed by dvds, they know its all about hype. They don't have to run their business efficiently because by god they don't have to. They;re stars, they;ve got egos, so they blow a few million here and there. They can turn piece of shit like Von Hesilng into 150 million domestically, three hundred worldwide. They're geniuses.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 02:22 pm:   

Time was, if a business was dominated by large, bloated corporations with larded payrolls, excessive promotional budgets, poor cost controls and inferior products, one or a handful of small, leanly-staffed, efficient companies would come along, make a better product, build up a small but loyal customer base, and establish a foothold. They might be absorbed ultimately, but at least they would force the big players to check their worst tendencies.

At least, that's the way that capitalism is supposed to work. Why hasn't it worked in the movie business?

So the big studios have a cushy relationship with the major theater chains. With outlets like cable (Sundance Channel and IFC) and DVD, a maker of small films should be able to do all right without opening on 2,000 screens or selling Happy Meal toys with Burger King, shouldn't it?

Am I missing something? Is it my naivete? Or does the movie business lack the kind of entrepreneurial spirit found in, say, high-tech?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 02:39 pm:   

Yup. The entrepenurial spirit gets co-opted, just as Sudance--indeed, the whole indie thing--has been co-opted. Directors of small films get co-opted. Just watch what happens to the guys who made Open Water. Two years from now they;ll be wearing black and taking endless meetings. The art house is controlled by the Weinsteins, who;re as crass a lot as there is. They've been known to cut a film for length by removing a reel.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mastadge
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 07:16 pm:   

Has anyone seen IMMORTEL Ad Vitam, directed by Enki Bilal? I saw the preview months ago and thought it looked like a very pretty movie, but haven't heard a thing about it since. . .

The trailer can be found here: http://www.immortel-lefilm.com/immortel_ba.html
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 07:45 pm:   

Never heard of it. Looks intriguing,
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 07:06 am:   

This courtesy of Gordon Van Gelder:


MEDIA AVAILABILITY
Canine Film Star Benji and Producer Joe Camp
Stop in New York During National Tour Promoting
Benji Off the Leash

WHO: Joe Camp, the creator/producer/director of the Benji movie series, is on a national tour promoting the newest addition to the Benji film collection -- BENJI OFF THE LEASH -- opening nationwide on August 20th.


WHAT: Joe is available to talk to you about the film, as well as:

- Why the big Hollywood studios are not distributing this film

- The results of Benji's retinal reattachment surgery (performed August 3rd in Chicago)

- The importance of REAL family friendly films and how films have changed in the last 30 years

- How he found Benji in an animal shelter and the importance of adopting pets from shelters

BENJI OFF THE LEASH was written by Joe Camp especially for the new Benji after her rescue and is in effect, her very own story -- lost and alone on the streets of a small Mississippi town, struggling to save her mom from a backyard puppy mill while trying to avoid a pair of bungling dog catchers and a goofy canine sidekick.

WHEN: Monday August 16th - Friday August 20th, 2004

WHERE: New York City area - appearances and interviews by appointment only.
Joe is available for personal interviews, as well as phone-ins for printed, live & taped broadcasts.

Appearing In Theaters Nationwide on August 20, 2004
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 07:23 am:   

On the website for this movie, producer Camp posts a family-values rant about how trashy and debased movies and television have become, then claims Mel Gibson's THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST signalled a turnaround toward Christian values once again! That makes no sense! I didn't see it, but wasn't THE PASSION one of the most jarring, brutal, violent films of recent years? How do you take a whack at HBO for not producing kid-friendly entertainment, then praise a movie that made old ladies faint dead away?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathy S.
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 07:27 am:   

South Park had a great characterization of The Passion. "It wasn't a movie, it was a snuff film."

On a Benji note: I'm all for animal adoption, but why do 'family movies' have to be so shamelessly sentimental and manipulative?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 07:37 am:   

Because, Dave, it's about the Lord!

Benjt, Jesus....Hmmm. Is there a connecton?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 07:46 am:   

Kathy, I saw that South Park. Hilarious.
The charaterization of Mel Gibson was priceless.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 08:18 am:   

Wait, wait,...I'm having a brainstorm. Somebody get me Michael Eisner...

Benji, the retired movie dog in his twilight years, becomes a drag on an upwardly mobile yupster family that wants to adopt a bichon frise, so Benji is dispatched to the pound, where he awaits lethal injection...

THE PASSION OF THE BENJI

It's the greatest dog story ever told! A surefire hit!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 09:21 am:   

Oh, Dave - stop. You made me spit coffee.
Too funny......
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 10:59 am:   

Given a choice of one pet they can save, the staff of the shelter choose Barabbit, a furry bunny caught stealing carrots from a local garden, when Benji refuses to sit up and bark for his life. Eventually, the leader of the dogs, Poochius Pilate, licks his paws clean of the whole thing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathy S.
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 12:13 pm:   

Speaking of BAD movies.. this is from Onion.
http://www.theonion.com/news/index.php?issue=4031&n=3
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 12:58 pm:   

Am I the only one who was really pissed at the flood of "cat," "feline" and "purr" puns unleashed by America's oh-so-witty film critics?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 01:08 pm:   

Really pissed? Guess you;re alone on that scratching post. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Thursday, August 05, 2004 - 02:09 pm:   

I'm thinking there's a good 'litter-box/box office' pun to be made, but I'll refrain.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 04:45 pm:   

seen some movies, here goes:

SESSION 9 very good film and creepy too. watched it late at night and it made me want to sleep with the light on. i wasn't initially thrilled with the ending, i would have preferred it to be a little more open; but given the premise of the the film i can see why it went the direction it did. didn't have time to watch the dvd extras, but that'll add to the desire to purchase the movie.

CITY OF GOD i liked the cinematography a lot, this film moved. i was tired when i started it, and had a sugar buzz when it was all said and done. easily the best crime/ganster film i've seen in a very long time - it may be the best i've encountered.

AUDITION so awesome i shelled out the cash to buy it. the end was difficult to watch, but the build was so sharp and methodical my eyes didn't move from the screen. layered and surreal in a way that allowed for my imagination to decide on the ending. it'll be very hard to forget this movie.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 04:53 pm:   

Yeah, "hard to watch" is a good way to describe AUDITION. It created that "I can't believe this is really happening, but it is" effect that is so rare in movies (the psychiatrist/patient scene in Winky's in MULHOLLAND DRIVE; Ethan Hawke abandoned at the Latino gang party in TRAINING DAY)...All I can say is, GOZU had better play DC!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 05:43 pm:   

Glad you liked Session 9, Bryan. City of God struck me as more a blazploitation movie, but that's hair-splitting. Sad to say, Mirielles is attached to some piece of shit in Hollywood.

Dave, you're not comparing Training Day to Audition, are you? I mean, in any way?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 08:38 pm:   

I couldn't watch the end of the AUDITION. Literally. I had to turn it off, and then come back a few days later and watch more. HAPPINESS OF THE KATAKURIS remains my favorite Miike film; given my reaction to AUDITION, I'm a bit wary of the others (although I hear that BIRD PEOPLE OF CHINA is great).

I see there's a trailer on the net (at Ain't It Cool) for a double-feature called J-HORROR, which does a riff on the Audition-image of the bound torso slowly wriggling across the floor. This must be a specifically Japanese image of horror, like long black hair across the face (Kwaidan, Ringu), or worse, long black WET hair (Dark Water).

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 09:30 pm:   

Happiness of the Kakaturis...my favorite Miike, too.

I just got back from a screening of Open Water. Very disappointing. Sort like if the opening scene of Jaws was puffed out to an hour and twenty minutes. Lots of stilted yuppie dialogue ("Are you trying to say this is MY fault?"). It kind of feels like a reality show with sharks. The scenes at night are effective and there are some genuinely scary moments, but I got sick of the yuppies and tired of the hand held shit. It's a great gimmick, but a lousy movie.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 12:19 am:   

My kids are taking SCUBA lessons at the local pool this week, so I thought about that movie myself while they were learning to tell their regulator from their BCD this afternoon. Sorry to hear it's weak; great premise. Why are so many of the filmic tour de forces (tours des force?) based on essentially boring premises? ... like Van Sant's "Gerry [Manders]"? Why not an exciting tour de force? Is it too much to ask?

My favorite unmade cinematic tour de force is the description Hitchcock supposedly gave of the movie he would make if they forced him to make a movie set aboard the Queen Mary: He would start close on a single rivet at one end of the ship, and slowly, slowly, slowly pull back, until at the end of two hours the entire ship would fill the frame. Roll credits. Now that's a tour de force!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 06:16 am:   

The wriggling bound torso can, I think, be traced all the way back to TV commercials for a cheesy 1972 horror exploitation flick called ASYLUM, which featured a body wrapped in butcher's paper wriggling around.

(I didn't get out much as a kid.)

L, I am comparing Aud and TD in only the most indirect way imaginable. Both scenes left me with creepy feelings in the pit of my stomach.

Sorry to hear the review on OW is bad. But I've overcome my aversion to the UMC over the years, so I may risk it...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 07:18 am:   

Open Water''s the kind of movie to which reactions will vary. I felt drained when I exited the theater, but it was the kind of feeling one gets after being harangued from a pulpit.

Dave, I always root for the villains when Ethan Hawke is involved. Thus, I found the scene heartwarming.

Mark, did you see Gerry? Couldn;tt bring myself, much as I wanted to see Matt Damon's dessicated body.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 01:03 pm:   

No, I didn't see Gerry. I didn't know Matt Damon became dehydrated! That's awesome! Maybe now I'll seek it out.

A long time ago I drew a little cartoon of a depressed guy wandering across the desert, thinking to himself, "They'll all be sorry when I'm dead!" Overhead in the sky, a circling vulture is thinking, "Not me!"

Maybe Van Sant could take that little bit and turn it into a tour de force!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 01:11 pm:   

Yeah, I was invited to a screening, but had to decline. The two guys, Casey Affleck and Damon, both die. Yee haa! But I hear it;s a long wait til they do.

Van Zant;s really in a weird place, what with Gerry, Elephant. and his commercial stuff...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JV
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 01:24 pm:   

Session 9 was great.

I liked the remake of The Manchurian Candidate. Not a classic, but very good. Usually, I hate it when they do a remake.

JeffV
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 01:32 pm:   

Yeah, i didn;t hate it. Denzel was actually pretty good, but I didn't much care for Streep. And I thought they tried to get too clever with the ending..but I didn't hate it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 02:31 pm:   

Those will make great blurbs for the DVD case:

"I didn't hate it."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 02:41 pm:   

Well, it's an upset! :-)

They set a pretty good mood and Denzel was actually all right. Liev Schrieber was kind of like Liev Schrieber doing Lawrence Harvey. I'm not sure how I felt about him.

Kind of a B....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathy S.
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 07:38 pm:   

Kind of a B? Are you grading on the curve?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 07:44 pm:   

OK, it;s like a B -....on the curve. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 04:11 am:   

I get the "I can't believe this is happening" vibe from the coming attraction(s) of SAW.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 06:29 am:   

I gotta see it then!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 06:59 am:   

I hear from someone who saw it at Sundance it that it;s pretty pedesttian....

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StephenB
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 11:48 am:   

I saw Intacto based on this threads recommendation and liked it. I liked the style, almost an older style of movie making; very atmospheric. I like your taste in movies Lucius. I'm wondering, what are your favorite movie directors and movies? I know you've mentioned Cronenberg, who I like. Who else?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 11:58 am:   

I'm adding this link because I know Lucius is a HUGE fan of Shawshank Redemption, which features prominently after several pages of this. Also, it's funny:

http://www.pointlesswasteoftime.com/nscomics.html
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 12:24 pm:   

Stephen B,.

Lars Von Trier, Kaurismaki, Tsiao Ming-Liang, i guess they;re my favorite among modern guys. Farther back, Kurosawa, John Huston, Sayajit Ray, Kobyashi,King Hu, Bunuel...those are a few atop an almost endless list. I like the new Vietnamese and Thai cinemas quite a bit.

Marc,

That;s fucking hilarious.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 05:17 pm:   

Stephen B,

I forgot a list of movies, but once started, I find it hard to stop...

Here's a few...
Breaking the Wave--von Trier
The River -- Tsai Ming Liang
The Match Factory Girl -- Kaurismakl
A Touch of Zen -- King Hu
Hara Kiri -- Kobyashi
Derzu Ezala -- Kurosawa'
Devi - Sayakot Ray
Fat City -- Huston
The Wages of Fear
Himalaya
Chopper
Osama
The Hole
Last Tango In Paris
Night of the Hunter
Onibaba
Fireworks
Last Life in the Universe


Ask me tomorrow, an entirely different list

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Joseph Adams
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 01:10 pm:   

Marc Laidlaw said:

I'm adding this link because I know Lucius is a HUGE fan of Shawshank Redemption, which features prominently after several pages of this. Also, it's funny:

http://www.pointlesswasteoftime.com/nscomics.html


Marc, thanks so much for posting that! That's some funny shit!

-JJA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StephenB
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 03:44 pm:   

Interesting list, I havn't seen almost all of those movies. I'll have to try some of them if they are available at the local video store. I'm not very familiar with asian cinema. Do you like any Anime?


"Ask me tomorrow, an entirely different list"

Carefull I just might. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 04:18 pm:   

I'm not that fond of anime--of any cartoon form, actually. I guess missing the gene.

Ask away...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StephenB
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 07:38 pm:   

Well You've mentioned some of the great directors like Kurosawa and Huston. You havn't mentioned Kubrick or Wells, considered two of the greatest American directors. What do you think of those guys? My favorite Kubrick movies for example are: "Clock Work Orange", "Barry Lyndon" and "Full Metal Jacket", whats your opinion on those movies? Kubrick may be hollywood, but at least he's one of the few who had complete creative control and can be considered a concious artist. Whether you like his movies or not.

By the way, looking forward to "Trujillo". I also have "Jaguar Hunters" comming, so I'll be able to read your early work as well. I have started writing seriously this year as it's something I'd love to be able to do down the road as a career. Who knows where it could go? I really admire your writing. As well as your politics and personality :-), which I guess can effect your writing.

I also play drums and would be interested in playing with a band. I heard you've played in a rock band. What band did you play for, and what instrument did you play? I've kind of fallen out with the boy's I played with in high-school. Well, this is very off topic, I hope you don't mind.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 08:25 pm:   

I sang and played various percusion (bass marimba, steel drums, rhythm guitar, etc.) I played in a lot of bands that almost made it. :-)

I like A Clockwork Orange and the first half of Full Metal. The Vietnam stuff left me cold. The reason I mentioned Fat City, that's an overlooked film, the best boxing ever made,

Thanks for the kind words about my work. I;m quite pleased with Trujillo--I hope you like it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 01:12 am:   

Watched about half of BREAKING THE WAVES tonight before waves of exhaustion claimed me. So far, wow. I hadn't realized that one of my favorite actors was in it: Katrin Cartlidge (Naked, Career Girls, Topsy-Turvy (to name only her Mike Leigh roles)). And this would appear to be one of her best performances, too. Von Triers is unbelievable.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 07:29 am:   

It;s funny about Von Trier and actresses. He gets amazing performances out of them and they never want to work with him again. They;re aggressive about it. Bjork said he nade her not want to do any more movies,

Anyway, Breaking the Waves is spectacular.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 08:29 am:   

watched HAPPINESS OF THE KATAKURIS last night and... wow; what a great film. for a movie with claymation, musical numbers, and zombies to be so human and life affirming really is a testament to how good a director miike really is. thanks for the recommendation.

lucius, what are your favorite horror films of all time?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 09:40 am:   

Uzumaki is my favorite horror film at the moment. I like the Japanese stuff---Ju On, Dark Water... I like Korean Thrillers, which approach horror movies for intensity. Old Boy springs immediately to mind. Spain;s Jaime Balagueros' the Nameless and Dark are very effective. As to the rest of a list, let me think about it...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mastadge
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 09:46 am:   

"He gets amazing performances out of them and they never want to work with him again."

Bryce Howard has said that she *does* want to work with him again.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 10:00 am:   

Well, that;s one. None of his leading ladies, at any rate, have expressed that sentiment.

Which film was Bryce Howard in?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mastadge
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 10:09 am:   

She's the star of the upcoming one, Manderlay, I think.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 10:40 am:   

Oh, okay. Thanks.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StephenB
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 04:33 pm:   

Right on Lucius, a utility rhythm/percusion player. I'm more at home on the kit myself, although I can play various percusion intruments as well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 08:36 pm:   

Yeah! Well, kit drummers are known to be pyscho--it's all that repression that comes from drumming on a practice pad. :-) Stick with utility percussion.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StephenB
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 11:03 pm:   

LOL, the same stereotype could apply to writers of dark fantasy and horror ;), hopefully I'll fit in around here at least :-).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

S. Hamm
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 11:11 pm:   

Marc,

You know poor K. Cartlidge kicked the bucket a couple of years ago, right? I always liked her too.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Night Shade Books
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 11:15 pm:   

Saw Zatoichi today. Best film I've seen in the theater all year. Almost made up for seeing Alien vs Predator on Friday, which was Lake Placid/Anaconda/The Core bad.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 06:46 am:   

Yeah, Zatoichi...goooood!

Stephen...Touche!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 07:15 am:   

Just caught Alien Versus Predator yesterday. It has the ubiquitos Lance Hendrickson. That guy is rotting from the inside out. His skin hangs on him like drapery. The alien/predator fights were cool. The rip-off of some of that Colin Wilson pyramids beneath the ice of Antarctica left over from the true Atlantis stuff was imaginative, but it was, you know... Alien Versus Predator. What can I say, even the kids I took were somewhat cynical about it. By the way, has anyone ever seen Hendrickson (sp?) in Sasquatch?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 07:41 am:   

Nope. Hendrickson's been a solid B-picture actor (Near Dark, the uncut version of Hard Target, et al) with some cool moment in better flicks like Dead Man. He;s close to achieving John Carridine status (the original skin-hanging-off-him-like-drapery guy.

So how was Sasquatch?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 08:26 am:   

Sasquatch was one of those flicks (like The Devil's Rain) that when I was much younger I'd go to with a bunch of friends high and we'd laugh till we drooled. But my son rented it and we watched it at home, and, man, perhaps the lamest film of all time -- and that's saying something. For this reason alone, pot should be legalized. Lots of Hendrickson close-ups -- him making a face like he was trying to crap the Hope Diamond. And Sasquatch is bald. The pace is remarkably slow, so slow, almost in reverse. The other characters are just as badly drawn, over the top stereotypes. A drunk, a letcherous nerd, a good looking woman,an earnest Alaskan hunter. Sasquatch didn't do near enough killing when you considered the grim quality of the acting. At the end Hendrickson makes his peace with Sasquatch. I doubt Lance puts this one on his resume. Check it out if you dare.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 08:54 am:   

Sounds like a hoot.

Speaking of the lamest film of all time, have you seen Manos, Hands of Fate? It was featured on Mystery Science Theater. That's my nominee.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JV
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 09:05 am:   

Alien versus Predator was the best movie I've seen this year. It had aliens in it and it had predators in it. And it had a pyramid with iconography stolen not just from the Aztecs, but also from the Cambodians and the Egyptians. 'Cause all of them cultures used to live in Antarctica and hang out and play poker together, you know.

So, like, those dumb-ass aliens are only around to be a big game species for the predators, who are suddenly the heroes of the movie. That was really cool!

The director said he'd wanted to make this movie since he was a kid. Instead, before this, he made astoundingly good movies like Event Horizon. But you could really sense his childhood intent in this movie--like, you could see him on the sandlot with his alien and predator dolls. Take that alien! Predator teach you lesson.

It was almost as good as the Village, but not quite...

Jeff the glue sniffer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 09:19 am:   

Yeah, Paul Anderson's not known for quality. though he did make a decent 90 million B picture, Soldier. He also made Mortal Conbat...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bob K.
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 12:46 pm:   

>Almost made up for seeing Alien vs Predator on Friday, which was Lake Placid/Anaconda/The Core bad.

That's the kind of bad I occasionally have an appetite for, like dollar tacos.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 01:00 pm:   

Anaconda is one of my favorite guilty pleasures. The Core....what;s not to like? Stanley Tucci, Aaron Eckhardt, and Hillary Swank travel to the center of the earth in a giant coke can...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JV
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 01:09 pm:   

Lucius:

Anaconda is one of my guilty pleasures, too!!!

Also, Congo.

Jeff
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 01:27 pm:   

My favorite part about anaconda is John Voigt's accent. Actually, everything about him in that movie bespeaks greatness. Also the fact that Eric Stoltz's whole role in the movie is to lie in bed with a bandage around his head and then die. Excellent.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 01:33 pm:   

Exactly! What better than an Eric Stolz vehicle (he;s top-billed) without Eric Stolz? And how can you forget Voight saying, "Little baby bird." Plus Ice Cube and pre-Ben Jennifer. Im going to the sequel!!!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 01:39 pm:   

Anacondas: Hunt for the Blood Orchid.

:-)


Sounds like something out of AMAZING.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 01:50 pm:   

I want to see Herzog's "Incident at Loch Ness". I don't think it's going to get wide release, though. Anyone hear any buzz about it? I heard 'Blair Witch on water'. Hmmm...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mahesh
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 02:16 pm:   

Hey, any of youse guys seen "Maria Full of Grace?" It had a nice write-up in the New Yorker. I also want to see "Zatoichi," and I really want to see "The Corporation" before it leaves Portland!

That's cool about the rhythm guitar, Lucius, I didn't know that. I basically play what amounts to rhythm guitar, though I am slowly teaching myself to do lead.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 02:17 pm:   

Sam, I knew that about Cartlidge, it was really depressing. I seem to recall Mike Leigh saying he got word when he was about to receive an award for something. She was so great in BREAKING THE WAVES.

That new Herzog sounds great to me as well. I recently watched MY BEST FIEND, which was about Herzog's relationship with Kinski: a very entertaining autobio documentary.

I feel certain I will enjoy Anaconda, based on the posts above. Jeff, in discussing Sasquatch and Lance Henrikson's career, you somehow failed to discuss the seminal PUMPKINHEAD, which was like a Manly Wade Wellman story gone to seed.

I really enjoyed Lance as Frank Black in MILLENNIUM. It took me a long time to get into that show, but I don't think there's ever been much on TV as relentlessly dark as the second season, which ended with ... well, I'll refrain from spoilers, since I think the whole show's coming out on DVD.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 02:37 pm:   

Ditto on Millennium. The Patti Snith episode alone....

Pumpkinhead was OK, but lost consciousness during all the teen angst.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 02:46 pm:   

Blair Witch on Water? I hope not. They;re calling OPEN WATER the Blair Fish Project. But I want to see the Herzog.

I hear tell the Corporation's great. I missed it at the Seattle Film Festival. Maria Full of Grace, the plot turned me off, seemed like an episode of the Practise; but maybe I rushed to judgment.

Rock on, Mahesh. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 03:39 pm:   

Marc: I could not ever forget Pumpkinhead -- "The evil must run its course, Harley." And I was an avid watcher of Millenium, although I couldn't tell what the fuck was going on some times. Frank Black used that same technique that Poe's August Dupin used. He wasn't psychic, but he'd get into the head of the killer, be the killer for a few flashes. Only thing is, Poe was funnier, most of the time. Hendrickson staggered through with his trademark look of earnest constipation, as if he'd been sniffing farts since '57.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 03:58 pm:   

In the first episode of Millennium, they had two or three plots, which usually ended with the killer getting shot by a police sniper while Frank empathized. I couldn't watch. It perked up for one show when Brad Douriff played an occult conspiracy fanboy, who turned out not to be a continuing character for some reason. But the second season sucked me in.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 04:01 pm:   

As long about Lance Hendricken's ouvre, my favorte role of his is as Devlin (bad cop) in Thomas Ian Griffith flick, Excessive Force, an ultraviolent little picture notable for its tag line, Die with a little dignity Say what you will about him, the man works all the time. Nobody else does constipation as well. He;s got five movies coming out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 04:03 pm:   

Marc, but the third season...Yow. Somehow the decided that the second season didn't happen...or something.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 05:09 pm:   

Does anyone remember a scene from Millenium where there were Devils, like devils from the Red Devil paint logo sitting around playing cards. I have this as a recurrent memory of the show, but can't really remember if it was something that actually aired.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 07:27 pm:   

Hmmm...Seems to ring a bell, but that might just be cause you said it.. Sorry, I don't know.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 12:17 am:   

Yeah, the third season was just odd...pretty hard to follow up the end of the second, I guess. I liked that show most when it was about the overall arc of the Millennium conspirators, rather than when it was a one-shot about an unrelated horror or another serial killer hunt.

This was pretty much the opposite of my reaction to X-Files. The overall multi-season arc of the series, relating to UFOs and clones, bored me to death. But in between all that, they got off some pretty good one-shots (such as the one with the rusting stranded freighter, and the one with Peter Boyle as the psychic insurance salesman).

Chris Carter should spearhead a release of the full Kolchak: The Night Stalker on DVD.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lawrence A
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 02:32 am:   

The very title Alien vs Predator shows how unashamedly cynical and beyond crass Hollywood is, but then we did have Freddie vs Jason. What I mean is they're not even ashamed, you know? I mean it's not like it's a minor B release, straight to video. The fact that these kind of projects are even considered as major releases, never mind they get uh "writers" ok hacks to uh "develop" these cinematic fiascos, never mind they get the green light to be made - this is real horror. But of course tis a business and as long as they bring in profits they don't feel there is anything to be ashamed of.

Whatever next, Chucky vs Godzilla? If it can do the numbers, why not? I don't even blame the studio goons, I don't even blame the studio system, they're the symptoms of the problem, not the underlying cause. Nobody's holding a gun to anybody's head and saying you had better see this pile of crud or else. The problem lies with the public the world over, not the studios. As Jefferson would put it were he alive today, they get the films they deserve.

On the subject of horror, somebody mentioned THE EXORCIST - that was a pretty terrible film, unintentionally comical and yeah I do mean the first one. Who has seen or remembers even those weird, original and even subversive Larry Cohen horror flicks from the 70s and early 80s like Q -WINGED SERPENT and IT'S ALIVE! I know he's still getting his screenplays produced, he wrote PHONE BOOTH and the new one CELLULAR.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 02:50 am:   

Or for that fact, who remembers Marjoe Gortner in Food of the Gods, in which Ida Lupino had this shit bubbling up in her yard that she would bottle and put a piece of masking tape on, holding the initials F.O.T.G.? It turned things big. Regular rats became fake giant rat heads that ate people.

My favorite part of It's Alive is after the mutant baby is born and tears its way out of the mother, kills all of the doctors in the delivery room and knocks over a milk truck, it's father tells the police, showing an expression of real anguish, "It's no relation to me."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 06:01 am:   

hey, i'd go see chucky vs godzilla, but only if chucky and 'zilla got it on in the flick, like in that last chucky film...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Matthew
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 06:08 am:   

I'd imagined chucky vs godzilla would be quite similar to Godzilla vs Bambi.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 06:19 am:   

Mark, I think they chickened out -- I think the plan was to go with the plague scenario, but the studio said, Too dark!!!

I couldn;t watch the X-files by the middle of the second season. The "acting" had become so self-referential, it bit. But the first season was great.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathy S.
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 06:20 am:   

Matthew -- now, Bambi Meets Godzilla was a great cartoon! Haven't seen it in ages.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 06:35 am:   

Um, Lawrence, everything's a B-picture in Hollywood, or hadn't you noticed?

Larry Cohen awesome, at least his old work...His new work is awful. Phone Booth was a complete rip-off of a Lena Olin-Wesley Snipes movie called Liberty Stands Still.

Jeff, did you see IT'S AlIVE 5 with Karen Black and Michael Moriarty? The Ulitimate in cheese. I remember Food Of The Gods and the entire Marjoe phenomenon with delight. He got his big break on Kojak....A two-parter.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 07:21 am:   

Lucius: I remember reading something way back about Marjoe that he was a child evangelist or some kind of prodigy or something. Does that ring a bell? He also has a turn in one of those disaster movies as a psycho National Guardsman. Somewhere around here I have an LP of his greatest hits. Don't remember It's Alive 5, but I bet it's good with moriarity and Karen Black. Will be looking for it on HBO. All the dead wood surfaces there eventually. Like the other night I think it was them running something called Snake Head Terror, about some what looked like giant snapping turds pestering a family.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 07:40 am:   

Yep, he was a child evangelist. The Christians were peeved at him, because he used to do talk shows and give away their preaching secrets, showed people how best to extort money.

Snake Head Terror -- saw it. Great name for a band.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Minz
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 08:52 am:   

Hey Lucius, I'm with you on the X-Files. I struggled into the third season before I couldn't take it anymore, but the one-offs from the first two seasons were good stuff. Sounds like I bailed too soon on Millenium--watched season 1 but didn't see enough to stick it out. I'll have to borrow somebody's DVDs at some point.

For some reason, I've got a hankering for some Hammer films . . .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 09:28 am:   

Season two is awesome, Minz. You need it bad.

Hammer Films...yeah. They don't make em like that anymore, sad to say. Wish they would.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 10:24 am:   

Best bad film of all time, for my money, is the Ed Wood-penned Orgy of the Dead. It's basically a 50s stag film masquerading as a no-budget horror movie. It starts unbelievably ineptly and refuses to get better. Watching it is like playing the world's funniest prank on yourself.

How can anyone talk about Anaconda and not concede the best part is watching JLo and Kari "Remote Control" Wuhrer roll around with a giant phallic symbol?

On the subject of Larry Cohen, as good as It's Alive was, I highly recommend God Told Me To, which I just recently watched again. A great cast (Tony LoBianco, Deborah Raffin, Sandy Dennis), an interesting premise and a decent script. A B movie that cracks the A ranks...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 10:34 am:   

God told me too also features Andy Kaufman.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 02:37 pm:   

Lucius: Meant to tell you this a few days ago. IFC is running a documentary (you most likely are aware of it) centered around Von Trier and his compatriots called "The Name of This Film is Dogme 95."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 02:43 pm:   

Thanks, Jeff. I will check it out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Night Shade Books
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 02:45 pm:   

I'm a Hammer freak. Got about 50 of the damn things on DVD.

In interesting news, a film company has been started in the UK, founded by Ingrid Pitt, Caroline Munro and some other Hammer actress. The company is apparently called Hammer Glamour. Direct to video low budget stuff, and I'll most likely be checking them out.

Cohen is good stuff. Gold Told Me To is great, and if you haven't seen his first film, Bone, I recommend it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 02:58 pm:   

The old Amicus stuff is great too. Bought The House that Dripped Blood and would buy Tales From the Crypt, if only I could find it!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 03:21 pm:   

That is interesting, Jason. It would be great to see that old sensibility back in evidence. Too bad they can't bring back Cushing and Wolfitt back...Hey! Maybe they can.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

S. Hamm
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 04:00 pm:   

Hey Jeffski,

That MILLENIUM ep with the horned devils hanging out in the diner was written and directed by my good buddy and collaborator Darin Morgan, who was also responsible for the Peter Boyle and Charles Nelson-Reilly episodes of X-FILES.

You can learn about Marjoe Gortner's career as an evangelist in the 1972 MARJOE. The critical and financial success of that documentary allowed its subject to make the lateral move from faith healing into low-budget horror.

Lucius,

IT'S ALIVE 5 is in fact IT'S ALIVE 3: ISLAND OF THE ALIVE, which is fun but a big step down from #2 in the series, IT LIVES AGAIN. If you ask me, not that you did, ILA and GOD TOLD ME TO are the two most audacious items in the Cohen oeuvre, although I never get tired of Q, and I'm awfully fond of Sam Fuller's turn as a vampire hunter in RETURN TO SALEM'S LOT. (I think Jeff might go for the moment late in ILA when Freddy Forrest finally acknowledges the mutant baby as His Boy.)

And by the way, cut poor Larry C. some slack on PHONE BOOTH -- that script was kicking around for years before Liberty stood still.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 04:34 pm:   

Well, I did not know that, Sammy. Slack cut, but the script still sucks. At least the script the great Shumacher shot from sucks...which may or may not be Cohen's script. Okay?

Thank for clearing up the number thing. Oh, yeah. It's down more than a notch, it's down a chunk and a half. And if you ask me, God Told Me To is the cherry on the Cohen sundae.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 05:10 pm:   

Sam: Thanks for the info on the millenium episode and those two X-files were two of my favorites.


Best,


Jeff
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 11:08 pm:   

Hammer Film fans should also check out THE LEAGUE OF GENTLEMEN, at least the first season thereof, which is available on DVD. I hesitate to describe it, but it is...sort of...no...I will not even try. The village where it's set is pure Hammer. But the sensibility...don't even try, man!

I have a friend who, when we slaved side by side at the law firm, supplied me with Hammer videos and Beat Takeshi in equal measure.

He also introduced me to another great movie I must point out on this thread: "Dr. Petiot." A French film about the notorious Dr. Petiot who pretended to help Jews flee the Nazis during WW2, but actually spirited them away to his own private gas chamber and ovens, after taking everything they owned in payment for their "rescue."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 05:18 am:   

I looked up this movie on IMDB, and they compared it to another movie by Claude Chabrol, L;affaire du femmes, starring Isabel Huppert, about another war profiteer. Both sound good to me, particularly since Huppert;s one of my favorite actresses.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mastadge
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 07:41 am:   

As I've mentioned before, I'm a Paul Verhoeven fan. I really like his Dutch movies: Katie Tippel, Soldier of Orange and The Fourth Man especially. Once he got to America his films were much more hit-or-miss: Flesh+Blood wasn't very good, but I love it for its unrelenting grimness. RoboCop is still one of my favorite action movies, and funny. Starship Troopers is a guilty pleasure of mine. The rest of his American ouevre doesn't do anything for me. But now he's back in Europe working on his next film; seems to be sick of Hollywood, so I hope he turns out something good. Anyway, I've known for years that he's wanted to do a Jesus biopic, but finally he's talked more about it. Translated from a Dutch interview:

[Since 1982 I'm working on a historical film about Jesus, called "The Adventurous Life of Jesus the Exorcist", which is going to be a VERY different film than "the passion of the Christ"]: "That's his [Gibson] vision, and I respect that. But it's not true of course. All made up. The gospels are not true. I'm almost finished now with an outline, which took me 20 years of study. There aren't a lot of directors who take 20 years to study their subject, but a project about Jesus is not like one about the butcher in your street. After all he IS the founder of Western civilization! So you have to be serious about it. I studied Old-Greek, because the Gospels are written in that language and you have to read the original versions to know what's in them. And they're written, not by God as Mel Gibson wrongly assumes, but by four individuals who used them as propaganda for their own theological ideas. So it takes an enormous effort to find out what REALLY happened, and what Jesus actually could have said and done. Since 1986 I also go to seminars "the search for historal Jesus", and I also write papers for these seminars, who are then analyzed, attacked, praised or corrected by professors. There are 40-50 American theologians actively researchin Jesus and I have intensive contact with them. Everyone constructs his/her own Jesus: the absolute truth we can never find, the sources are too vague for that. But I will try to make a reconstruction that is as faithfull to the historical facts as possible."

I don't know where he's ever going to find someone to pay for this thing, but I'd love to see what he could do if he got the chance to make it!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 07:57 am:   

Thanks for posting this. I;d be interested in seeing this myself.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Minz
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 09:29 am:   

Um, wow.
I'll be keeping my fingers crossed on TALoJtE. Heck, if it gets to the point of being shopped around and is not finding any takers, maybe we can start a pass-the-hat campaign and help produce the thing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 09:44 am:   

Hey, pass the hat your way, Moneybags!!! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 10:31 am:   

How much you want to bet it comes out as a Pixar animation with Will Smith as the voice of Christ, Mike Myers as Saint Pete and Dave Thomas and Rick Moranis as two of the Wise Men's camels? :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Parks
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 11:46 am:   

Jeff, that "devils sitting around playing poker" episode was one of the few MILLENIUMS I ever saw. The framing premise was that they were all there to make life worse for humans and help bring despair into the world (we need help for this?) and ever so often they got together to compare notes. Anyway, each devil had a story to tell, including one who was depressed because he was afraid he was losing his touch, but felt much better after he prodded a lonely exotic dancer into killing herself. The only real tie to the series was that, in one of these vignettes, Hendrickson's character was able to see the demon, who should have only been visible to the person he was "devilling."

It was an interesting bit of television.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 04:28 pm:   

Yeah, I remember that now. The diner...right, When's this coming out on DVD? Anyone know?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Night Shade Books
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 05:40 pm:   

Seasons One of Millenium came out on dvd a week or two ago.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 11:38 pm:   

Richard: Thanks! I remember it now that you've given a synopsis. And I remember the devil makeup as being really effective.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 11:57 pm:   

Surely there's a Millennium worship site somewhere on the net...with all the pix and gory details about each episode...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Pratt
Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2004 - 01:28 pm:   

I was a big fan of Millennnium (first two seasons, anyway), and am watching the first season on DVD now. The horrible third season is easily explained: the show wasn't expected to _have_ a third season. The writers and producers decided to end the second season with as much drama as possible, since they didn't anticipate being renewed. When, much to everyone's surprise, the show was picked up for another season, the new production team had to pretend some events from season 2 hadn't happened (or hadn't been as bad as initially described). The later efforts to tie-up the truncated Millennium storyline by incorporating it into an episode of the X-Files was painful to watch. But I do love those first unrelentingly dark seasons.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2004 - 02:01 pm:   


R?
7? have to pick that first season DVD up, It;s interesting that the writers didn't try to expand on the end of the second season -- they must have known they wouldn;t get a fourth, and it would have been cool to see where the that would have led.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, August 19, 2004 - 02:39 pm:   

The opening titles for Deadwood always reminds me of the opening for Millennium. Wonder if any of the same people worked on both.

In much the same way, I believe the Desilu Studios orchestra did both the Star Trek theme and the theme for I Love Lucy, and in my mind they flow together.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Andrew F
Posted on Friday, August 20, 2004 - 01:00 am:   

Mmmmm... Millenium is one of my favorite shows ever. For the first season, I would look forward to a gritty, depressing friday evening. The opening credits set the mood, and it spiraled deeper from there. I can't tell you how many years I've been searching the Web for some sign that DVDs would be released, I feared it would be lost forever.

Remember the episode where Lance played the fictional hard-boiled detective character? There was a funny opener to that ep, a Scientology documentary parody...

And the episode where he meets the kid in the parking lot, who shoots the lawyer (but Frank sees he doesn't have a gun)... remember? I KNEW what Frank saw, I was so into the show.

And the episode where his copy buddy goes into his yellow house during the blackout... that gave me sharper chills than I've felt with a movie in a looooooong time.

There was some great dry humor as well. Hearing Frank suddenly say things like, "Doesn't everybody know the Squirrel Nut Zippers?" and my favorite line of his that was so out of-, but so perfectly in-character... which I'll let you re/discover yourself.

Lance Henriksen has many great B roles, and I admire the man -- this is some of his best ever.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, August 20, 2004 - 06:24 am:   

One of the true test of a great actor is: can he enliven a truly lousy movie and make it watchable (cf. Lance in Stone Cold w/Brian Bosworth, William Forsythe in Out For Justice)?

Lance gets a big thumbs up on that score. And he was really good in one of my favorite horror pix, Katherine Bigelow's NEAR DARK. Very underrated.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, August 20, 2004 - 08:15 am:   

"I'll never forget the last words my father said to me. 'Careful with that thing, son. I think it's loaded.''"

Lance, Stone Cold
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, August 20, 2004 - 10:05 am:   

Although I have to give a tip o' the fedora to any scenarist who liquidates an entire state supreme court. Kudos!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Friday, August 20, 2004 - 02:52 pm:   

Lance slipped down a notch for me after Sasquatch. One of those root for the bad guy movies.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 12:14 am:   

Ah, Zatoichi, finally saw it tonight! Even better than I'd hoped. Nice recovery from DOLLS!
Probably the best movie I've seen this year. I should think a while before making statements like that, so let's qualify it with best movie I've seen in a theater this year.

Catch it while you can.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 06:11 am:   

Finally saw Andrew Repasky McIlhenny's A CHRONICLE OF CORPSES (low-budget, indie art-flick, costume drama, slasher picture). After reading the "fat bastard" comment on this thread, I nearly broke out laughing when the old gardener made his appearance! On the one hand, you've got to hand it to indie directors who try to do something a bit artistic and different with the shopworn and utterly neglected horror genre. On the other hand, big huge chunks of this film were almost inert, full of precious monologues and artsy visual conceits. The static camera work didn't help. One thing a horror picture can't ever do is bore...And the plot didn't make much sense, particularly the ending. (Loved the woman who played the old matriarch, though.) Overall, I would give it two-and-a-half stars and tab this guy as someone to watch in the future.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 06:17 am:   

MANOS, THE HANDS OF FATE is *much* harder to take than ORGY OF THE DEAD.

MARIA FULL OF GRACE is much better than you imagine...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 06:51 am:   

Adam: ORGY OF THE DEAD pins the meter on the Boring and Pointless scale. At least MANOS has a plot! And isn't there that big catfight between all those undead zombie babes? That's more interesting than OTD right there! And it's got a guy named "Torgo"! Torgo!

I saw the trailer for MARIA and, yes, it looked really good. No excuse for me not seeing it, since it's playing just a few blocks from my office.

Had a chance to see OPEN WATER this wknd also and was a bit let down by it. It's one of those movies whose concept (real people in the water with real sharks!) is more interesting than the finished product, I'm afraid. It had some genuinely creepy moments, particularly near the end, but how can we care about these two when we don't get to know them? The relationship-crumbles-as-tension-builds aquatic spat scene, including the immortal "I wanted to go skiing!" line, just had people laughing. This comes off as the same kind of "let's kill off the yuppies" wish fulfillment scenario we see in the average slasher flick. And I mean, hell, what tour operator wouldn't make a final headcount before heading back to the dock? And what happened to the search parties? Did they get lost, too? Wouldn't they know where the divers had gone into the water and in which direction the current was moving?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 07:03 am:   

Manos has a plot? All I remember is the couple driving around endlessly.

You caveats about Open Water notwithstanding, it's based on a true story. But despite a couple of good moments, the movie sucks...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 07:09 am:   

Zatoichi IS definitely the best movie I;ve seen in a theater this year!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 07:53 am:   

Lucius, you can't dismiss that catfight...:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 08:02 am:   

Nothing was exposed -- I can dismiss it,
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 08:23 am:   

Have we so easily forgotten the power of the imagination? :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 08:56 am:   

Imagination is not a word that should be used in conjunction with MANOS, HANDS OF FATE.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 08:57 am:   

Lets take this to a new thread

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register