Good Movies 4 Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Shepard, Lucius » Good Movies 4 « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 08:25 am:   

Old thread too long...

Dave, hence a lot worse than Buffy, including a nuymber of straight to video projects....

Yeah, Minz, I think that's a good characterization of Von Sydow's career in Hollywood, but a couple of years ago he played an excellent role in the wonderful Spanish film, Intacto...so it's not all bad. If y'all haven't seen Intacto, it's one of the better recent johnra films....
   By Bruce on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 08:47 am:

I'm still finding it hard to forgive von Sydow for working on 'What Dreams May Come'. Gaaah!
   By Lucius on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 09:01 am:

What about the director, the New Zealand guy who did the Navigator? What the fuck happened to him on that flick? He was a wierd guy. According to people I trust, while shooting What Dreams...he lived in his car, bathed in service station bathrooms, and so on.
   By Minz on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 09:14 am:

I thought What Dreams was visually stunning, even if it failed as a film, including mediocre performances from actors i usually like.

That's the second recommendation for Intacto, so it's officially on the list. Thanks.
   By Lucius on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 09:23 am:

Oh, yeah. Intacto's good. Very cool premise.
Dreams...visually stunning, but then there was Robin Williams....
   By Dave G. on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 11:06 am:

Would you recommend CITY OF GOD as a good purchase?
   By Lucius on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 11:13 am:

Oh yeah! Myself, I prefer the more humanist Brazillian films, like Carandiru, but Mirielles is a player and CoG is so flashy in its technique, it really sets a standard. Kind of a super dooper blaxploitation flick...
   By MarcL on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 11:29 am:

Divorcing Jack was a very good low-key comic thriller...had the right buzz. I was trying to remember the name of it--the title put me off for a long time, and I promptly forgot it. It doesn't mean what it seems to mean. I believe there's a Dvorak pun in there somewhere. Sort of a Handmade Films type of thriller...I will almost always watch one of those.
   By Lucius on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 11:55 am:

Gonna be checking that one out, too... Lotta movies out there...
   By Dave G. on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 01:42 pm:

I've got to register a "DOH" here. CARANDIRU played DC recently and I missed it.
   By Lucius on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 01:53 pm:

Oh, you need to see CARANDIRU. That's some serious shit. Hector Babenco (PIXOTE, IRONWEED, etc.). One of the two or three best this year, IMO....
   By MarcL on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 02:10 am:

I just finished watching City of God...I kept thinking of your blaxploitation remark, Lucius. Very apt, and what a stunningly flashy and ceaselessly entertaining film. Pulp Fiction, Goodfellas, with a bunch of Lock Stock & Two Smoking Trainspotters thrown in there somehow, and holy crap what a great movie. Must lend to friends. Must watch again.
   By Lucius on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 06:00 am:

Yeah, ees good...the sad thing is that that's probably it for the director, Mirielles -- Hollywood's already picked him up and he'll be doing superhero flicks ere long. I kind of wish the mammoth book from which the film derived had gotten an English translation...
   By Dave G. on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 06:22 am:

I have nothing against superhero flicks. Some are mighty entertaining. But what riles me is that Hollywood, in its infinite wisdom, has drained the well and is not doing whole movies on minor characters nobody could care less about (ELEKTRA? Who the f*** is Elektra?) or just making stuff up out of whole cloth as an excuse to showcase "hot" performers (CATWOMAN). I mean, aren't there any limits anymore?
   By Lucius on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 06:47 am:

Mighty Entertaining? Man, I can't think of one that's been mighty entertaining in this decade...I haven't seen Spidey 2, but those I trust say it's just more the SOS (same old shit)...So what if they're well done. That's like saying that flat tire's real pretty. I'd rather eat cat dander than sit through another one.
   By Lucius on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 06:49 am:

What is cat dander? Maybe I shouldn't be so rash...
   By Dave G. on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 07:38 am:

Ok, well, maybe not "mighty entertaining." I thought the first Batman, the Superman films, Spidey 1 and the first X-Men were acceptable popcorn entertainments. What I mean is that I wouldn't straggle out onto the moors and rail against the very existence of those flicks. But I would not give that benefit of the doubt to movies about obscure bit-player superheros that some studio ground out just to squeeze some TV hottie into a form-fitting costume.

Imagine the Doomsday Scenario: Amanda Peet as Mantis! Nikki Cox as the Scarlet Witch! Jaime Pressly as Sue Storm the Invisible Girl! Each with a Maxim layout, a Burger King value menu action figure and a sensitive "making of the film" cable special. Too much! Too much!
   By Dave G. on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 07:41 am:

OK, so Sue Storm isn't a bit player. I should have said "Mischa Barton as the Black Widow"!
   By Lucius on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 07:52 am:

My point is, Dave, these are all the same fucking movie, and while I enjoyed the first Batman, the first couple of Superman flicks, maybe some of the X-men, I'm at the point where I've seen enough of this shit to last--Superhero flicks are the MacDonald's of moviemaking. They all taste the same and have no nutritional quality. I'm sick of 'em....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Minz
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 09:29 am:   

Oops. Posted on the old thread. Now don't get your dander up, Lucius. (Or at least don't get it on my shoes.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 09:46 am:   

"   By Minz on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 09:22 am:

Lest we forget, Lucius certainly seems to have a penchant for getting his dander up . . . and seems to enjoy it."

I've been very restrained of late. Mike Bishop's Abu Ghraib thread offered me the chance to really get a groove on, thanks to a witling post of two by a certain party, but did I respond in deserved fashion? Nope. I am a new Lucius, a better Lucius, a really mild Lucius....No more Mr. Mean Guy....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 10:08 am:   

Sorry, I posted on the wrong thread, also. As I said, I always enjoy a scintillating debate and am willing to do my part to keep same going. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bill reynolds
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 10:20 am:   

Being new here, have we gone Cronos and the entire ouvre of Federico Luppi as an actor in Spain after a distinguished career as a director in Argentina?
PS Loved Divorcing Jack but the book was better, as usual. (Except for LoTR which I really liked and which almost forced a revisionist thinking on my part about Tolkein. Fortunately I'm back to my original opinion which is pretty much summed up by Moorcock's "Epic Pooh.")
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bill reynolds
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 10:25 am:   

Reading thread 3:
Three Colors strongly suggested, but Decalogue is utterly utterly the best thing ever on TV except The Prisoner and possibly Riget 1 and 2.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 10:53 am:   

Don't know much about Luppi, except he was in my favorite Sayles movie and also his work with del Toro...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 05:28 pm:   

I can't wait to see what Mirielles does with Bewitched!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 05:43 pm:   

You're kidding, right?
'
Just checked IMDB. You were kidding. Jesus, that would be gross.

Hey, Dave...did you know your boy Michael Cain is playing Nigel and Shirley McClaine is Endora?

I can't fucking wait....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 11:15 pm:   

Heh! Can you really trust IMDB! Who'd ever have thought Aronofsky would spend any time at all on a Batman movie? What ever happened to those Blair Witch Guys--remember how they got snapped up by the studios? Paul Verhoeven's first few movies were good. Do good foreign directors think they're going to come to the U.S. and suddenly find themselves empowered to make great movies...or just lots of bucks? Is that enough for them? I don't get it. I guess one reason I really dig Tsui Hark is because he somehow managed to make the same kinds of movies in the U.S. that he was making in Hong Kong...and yet he remembers to go back to China and continue making the stuff there that he can't make here. (Legend of Zu, anyone?) It's a conundrum. Meanwhile, I've got The Man Without A Past to watch tonight. Maybe they'll lure that Finn in here with promises of Superman now that McG is off the project.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 06:29 am:   

Michael Caine would be good...Shirley McClaine? I just wonder if she has the imperial, dismissive quality that made Agnes Moorehead so good in the role. McClaine may just not be...regal enough.

As for the BW guys, I think they had one good idea and shot their wads, didn't they? I didn't see BOOK OF SHADOWS, but it was supposedly pretty awful.

Anyone seen Verhoeven's THE FOURTH MAN? Don't remember much, but I recall it being pretty darned good back in 1983.

I've seen posters up recently for the new Miike movie GOZU. Anybody seen it? I've only seen AUDITION, but that film makes me want to run right out and see this one, too!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 07:11 am:   

Yeah, Gozu is very fucking weird. Well ,worth it....I mean, cow-heade demons, mad Tokyo suburbanites, missing bodies...what's not to like?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 07:28 am:   

Marc, actually I kind of liked Verhoeven's Heinlein movie. I thought it was hilarious.

The whole thing about recruiting foreign directors is something I've dealt with in various reviews. They come over here and lose all their battles with the initial flick they're brought in to direct and decide either to go back and make movies, or sell out. Some of 'em, like Jeunet can't handle it. Some like Tamahori (Once Were Warriors) and Weir just whore out. Some, like Noyce, whore out and then go back to making good movies after a long hiatus. The thing with Aronofsky, I wonder if he'll ever make anything. Dreamworks essentially put him on the shelf -- one of those deals where they didn't want anyone else to have him. They had him attached to Ronin (the graphic novel) and never intended to make it. I haven't been keeping up with the Batman thing, but I wonder if that'll ever happen.

I hope you liked the Kaurismaki. He's one of my favorite directors. The Match Factory Girl is, if you can find it, amazing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 08:46 am:   

How about those previews for the new Manchurian Candidate? Don't they look swell? Ack!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 08:54 am:   

Hmmmmm, big mega-corporation installing in the White House a well-scrubbed caucasian cipher who is programmed to do precisely as he is told?

What tommyrot! Could never happen! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 09:18 am:   

I don't care if it could happen...or not. MC was a perfect little thrller. Why pollute it with Meryl Street and Dweezil Washington?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kathy S.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 09:31 am:   

I'm somewhat stunned with persistent attempts to take movies out of their context. Manchurian Candidate was great at the time it was first made. Now? I don't care if they pretend to update it to fit the current political climate, it's still out of context. And a remake, which is a dubious concept to begin with. How about making a NEW movie? And make it a good one?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 10:00 am:   

You're preaching to the choir, Kathy. Of course the reason they do this is that the level of intellect and imagination in Hollywood has lapsed to animal levels. As to good movies...what can I say? You're an optomist.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 10:03 am:   

I'm a fan of Verhoeven's early films--especially Spetters and Soldier of Orange--and he's got the right nasty edge of science fiction satire, which is the main reason Starship Troopers worked; even the corporate satire in Robocop seemed like it was lifted right out of written SF. His grim medieval movie with Rutger Hauer and Jennifer Jason Leigh is so relentlessly grim that I have to like it. And there's flashes of stuff I like in almost all his other movies. But I heard he was thinking of going back to make some more movies outside the Hollywood system...I think he badly needs to. His people have always had a weird plastic gloss to them, but it's accentuated in his American movies, which seem to be all about plastic dolls (deliberate?)...the stiff way they walk and pose, the clunky way they talk... Hey, maybe he really is the most brilliant director of our time!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 10:10 am:   

A case can be made for Verhoeven being a sort of sly mega-performance artist who's run a subversive game on Hollywood. I think the plastic quality you mention is absolutely deliberate -- the casting choices speak to that.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 10:56 am:   

As for Verhoeven as performance artist, I have to say that midway through SHOWGIRLS, I turned around and started watching the facial expressions and body language of the walkouts instead of the movie onscreen. If that ain't Hollywood performance art, what is?

As for MC, I understood the big to-do they made about its re-release as a kitsch thing. I almost got tossed out of the Nickelodeon in Boston for laughing out loud during Laurence Harvey's blubbery "I used to be LOVABLE" speech. Funny stuff. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 11:01 am:   

Hey, man. "Twelve days of Christmas. Surely one day is loathesome enough." That covers every flaw.

And yet SHOWGIRLS became a cult film....apparently it found its audience.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 11:29 am:   

Yeah, that's a good line, all right. But I don't know if it covers that woman (Angela Lansbury?) prancing around dressed as a playing card...:-)

One of the regrets of my life is that I never made it to one of the Sunset Strip midnight "Rocky Horror" style screenings of SHOWGIRLS with audience participation!

"Where you from?" "Places..." Priceless. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 11:36 am:   

The woman dressed as a playing card was LH's girlfriend, the senator's daughter. I like that movie. Angela was awesome...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JV
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 11:37 am:   

"A case can be made for Verhoeven being a sort of sly mega-performance artist who's run a subversive game on Hollywood."

Well, maybe so, but if so, he's fooling himself. His early movies before he came to Hollywood were really good, I thought. To do a parody, in essence, of stuff that's already crap is like doing Space Balls II to parody the new Star Wars movies.

Although the guy who really went in the toilet was John Woo. All of his flaws became bloated once he moved to Hollywood, all his strengths muted.

I have to admit--I enjoyed Spiderman II, and I think it's a superior example of the genre. And I usually hate superhero movies. While some of us have tired of the genre, think of the next generation, who need to have time to sink into that kind of jadedness. :-) At least now, they can watch Spidey II rather than, say, Daredevil.

JeffV
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 12:12 pm:   

Actually I enjoyed Robocop and Starship Troopers....and I don't think V is parodying Hollywood, I think he's parodying American fascism, and, sure, it's not as good as his Dutch stuff, but he can't make that here, so, maybe as Mark says, that's where he's headed again...Surely you can relate to a little nose-thumbing?

As far as going in the toilet, John Woo made one good John Woo movie in America, Hard Target, though you need to see the screener in order to realize it so you can see the 24 minutes and all the good stuff cut by the studio. And even if you discount that, Woo had less far to fall than other directors who went Hollywood, guys like Peter Weir (Green Card, for god's sakes) and Lee Tamahori, who after making Mulholland Falls, turned to TV gigs, and any number of others. Woo's whoring out was predictable, because he was an action director, not an art house guy. Or you want to talk about the latest in homegrown in the toilet, Alex Proya of Dark City making I, Robot....

As for Spiderman 2, I need to be paid to see that one. Spiderman 1 nearly cut off my circulation at the neck and I'd rather not watch Toby McGuire any more, thanks, I get more out of drawing zeros and humming single note melodies. And I'm really getting ODed on CGI.

But hey, too each his own...My next self-punishment will be the Village, and I'm sure that will hurt good...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   

Hard Target was worth it, just to hear Van Damme mispronounce his line "You should be more carefull with you wal-lette..." :-) Hey, I'm easily amused.

Anyone hear about that controversy with M. Night Shyamalan? Apparently, he was doing a "making of" doc for the Sci-Fi channel and suddenly pulled his cooperation because the filmmakers were asking nosy questions about his past. So now, apparently, they recast the doc as some kind of expose...Sounds a bit contrived, the kind of "controversy" folks stir up for publicity at crucial junctures, like, say, the opening of a new film...

Has anyone heard about a Johnny Cash biopic in production with Reese Witherspoon as June Carter and -- gulp -- Joaquin Phoenix as the Man in Black???
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 12:46 pm:   

I heard about the Cash picture. I'm trying not to think about it.

The uncut Hard Target is good.

Don't know a thing about Night;s past, but I'm afraid I can smell his future....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 01:43 pm:   

From Emperor Commodus to Johnny Cash. You can't say the man doesn't have range...:-) Me, I would have cast Dwight Yoakam, a guy who can act and knows his way around a stage for the concert scenes...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 01:49 pm:   

I think the absolute absence of physical resemblance on the part of Yoakum to Cash may have factored in -- we're past the day when you can get away with George Hamilton playing Hank Williams. I have to say that Phoenix's face has some structural similarity to that of JC.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 04:56 pm:   

Oh, I forgot the other best thing about Manchurian Candidate...Khigh Deigh (Wo Fat, from Hawaii Five-0) as the lead brainwasher. Yeah!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bill reynolds
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 06:05 pm:   

Luppi: (Jeez - how do you people keep up? Are you on line all day???)
Extasis - great
Martin (Hache) - ok, a little maudlin
both earlier the same year as Men with Guns
Invocation
Divertimento
Espinazo del Diablo (also del Toro, were you referring to this or Cronos?)
Lisboa - savage role as a crime boss - overpowers the screen, film also has Carmen Maura and introduced me to Laia Marull who is a great Spanish actress. In this role she is Phil Dick's Dark Haired Girl, although I have no reason to think this is intentional or that the director was even aware of it. In Julio Medem's Tierra, on the other hand, I am quite convinced that Silke Kleine was specifically and deliberately cast to be the Dark Haired Girl. There is far too much evidence that both Medem and Almenabar are quite conversant with English language SF.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 06:20 pm:   

Thanks, Bill...

I know both Cronos and Backbone.

Can't speak for anyone else, but I am on line all day--I'm finishing something, working 14, 15 hour days, and this is my entertainment.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 06:32 pm:   

some of my favorite movies:

the wicker man

holy mountain

night of the hunter
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 06:47 pm:   

Is this the astral plane? Gee, I hope not.

Well, those are all good movies.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 06:59 pm:   

astral plane = your fiction

i'll be the first to admit that things got out of hand on that thread.

i'm not trying to fight, troll, or anything. i'm merely unemployed and bored.

i'm not a big film guy. is there anything you'd recommend based on the movies i mentioned in my post? i'm asking because i know thay you see a lot of films. i read your reviews in the m of sf and f.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 08:42 pm:   

Those movies are kind of inimitable. So i don't know. Myself I'm very much into Asian cinema lately, Takeshi Miike's stuff (The Happiness of the Kakutanis, Audition, Ichi the Killer), Nagata (The Ring, Dark Water), the new Kurosawa (Cure, Seance, Charisma), and Korean thrillers like Nowhere to Hide and the newish Memories of Murder....so I don't know. If you want a cool little horror movie, try Session 9. If you can find a directors cut off Dust Devil bt Richard Stanley, that's a cool one. The regular version is less good. You want another cool Robert Mitchum bad guy, check out the original Cape Fear. Weird. Have you Von Treir's Zentropa? Tough little Brit gangster movie...Gangster No. 1 with Paul Bettany and Malcolm MacDowell. One movie I truly think is neat, Chopper with Eric Bana. A great classic Japanese film, try Onibaba and Hara Kiri. That's a few. Bound to be one of those that hits home. If I think of something else, I'll let you know.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 09:07 pm:   

looks like i'll have to take a trip to the video shop. i haven't seen any of those films (except for the japanese 'ring'), thanks.

have you seen the 'saragossa manuscript'? it's another strange film worth checking out.

http://www.allmovie.com/cg/avg.dll?p=avg&sql=1:108871

the last modern film that i really liked was 'donnie darko'. not so much for the plot as the sentimental quality it generates.

i pretty much watch trash television and buy 'farscape' dvds as they come out. i've been trying to get a local video store to order 'the prisoner' television series, but the girl who works the counter says she hasn't heard of it, so i'll probably have to buy the box set when i get the cash. i haven't seen it, but my friends tell me i'll love it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 09:45 pm:   

The Prisoner may feel a bit dated, but it is cool. One other really nice recent gangster Brit offering, SEXY BEAST. Very cool.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 10:02 pm:   

The Prisoner may feel a bit dated, but it is cool. One other really nice recent gangster Brit offering, SEXY BEAST. Very cool.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 11:11 pm:   

Ah, Zentropa. What an excellent flick. I have a vast repository of Von Triers to catch up on. And Happiness of the Katakuris is almost enough movie to last me for a good long time. I still haven't managed to see Gozu. Also have all those new-Kurosawa movies to catch up on.

I liked Arismaki's Man Without A Past, although I was mildly restless throughout. Seems like one of those things that grows on you; I find myself thinking about it a lot, and I'll bet having had this little exposure, I'll be able to appreciate the next one I see a bit more immediately. I loved the actors, though. The main guy was sort of a Finnish Gary Cooper in looks. I'll definitely watch more of these when I can find them. The funniest image was right at the beginning, when he was lying there with his welding mask on and the suitcase thrown over him. It was just surreally hilarious, in spite of what had just happened. I didn't really laugh as hard through the rest of the movie. I can see why Jarmusch gave him a blurb though.

I tried to watch Saragossa Manuscript years ago, but I think it was after sitting through the endless Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors, and I just wasn't up for another murky marathon. I read a lot of the book, not all of it, at one point; but it was tangled like that very Sea.

As I've said before...the only Woo that I really like is the lean, mean "Bullet in the Head." He was a bit of gasbag waiting to happen; all he needed was an infusion of American cash to overripen and explode. But somehow it never went to Tsui Hark's head...maybe because he manages to not be pretentious about his work. You never hear about Hark growing faint on the set with the intensity of his work--how the exploding bloodsacks and flying doves express the deep resonance of Xian piety...phew!

...Showgirls was made to be seen in a theater with the right crowd. I always regretted not seeing it at the Castro Theater in San Francisco. Bet that would have been a hoot.

The Village looks hilarious. Perhaps a cross between Signs, Sleepy Hollow, and Children of the Corn? I can't wait to see how M.N.S. manages his cameo in this one!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

M. Night. Sham.
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 11:18 pm:   

In much the same way I have managed my cameo in this discussion area, I would imagine! Cheerio!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 11:35 pm:   

I hear that in Denmark they are airing a TV miniseries called "Lars Von Trier's SALEM'S LOT."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 06:38 am:   

Marc, yeah. I'm with you on Woo, especially about Bullet in the Head and "gasbag waiting to happen." There were a lot of guys in HK I found more watchable, even some --like Johnny To--who were considered more-or-less hacks.

Actually, I could wait for the cameo -- I'm not looking forward to this...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 07:46 am:   

Lucius, I am assuming you get sent lots of screeners. Any hints on where a commoner stuck in an American cultural backwater might find some of these? Can you say a little more re: this "Session 9"? I am intrigued.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 07:52 am:   

Session 9's a little horror movie about a group of guys removing asbestos from an old asylum...David Caruso, who I usually don't like, is pretty good in it. As to screeners, Jims in the East Village usually has a nice bootleg supply and there are addresses one can obtain to feed one's bootleg jones.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 08:14 am:   

midtown comics (times square and grand central locations) also has the ability to get in a lot of "unofficial" underground dvds. if you don't see it on the shelf, have them ask their video guys. that's where i got my unedited copies of 'holy mountain' and 'el topo'. i used to work there so i know how good the video resources actually are if you're willing wait a little bit.

'kim's video' on st. marks place has a great selection of hard to find dvds, but some of the employees are real assholes. great store though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 08:34 am:   

That was Kims, I meant. Not Jims....Can't type this morning. Bad for a writer...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 08:53 am:   

are 'pistol opera' and 'branded to kill' worth seeing? is there one you'd recommend over the other?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ml
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 09:08 am:   

I really liked Tokyo Drifter; it has a little tune in it that has run thru my head ever since I saw it (years ago). I watched Branded to Kill about halfway, got interrupted, went back a few days later, was totally lost, haven't tried again; quite stylish though. I have talked to a few people who gave up on Pistol Opera...these were not reviewers, but people with taste similar to mine. Put the fear in me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 09:18 am:   

Yeah, whenever I'm in NYC, I try to make a Kim's run. (Still kicking myself for not picking up that SHORT FILMS OF DAVID LYNCH box they had.) Last time there, I was able to find Larry Cohen's GOD TOLD ME TO, which was a real plum. Unfortunately, here in DC, you are left with Barnes and Noble and Borders and f***-all else. You can make an offbeat find every now and then, but it's rare. I guess the staff at Kim's has a little 'tude, but no more so than at any # of book/DVD/CD joints I've visited there. Goes with the turf, it seems.

Has anyone heard whether Vincent Gallo's BROWN BUNNY is coming out on DVD?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 09:21 am:   

I own Tokyo Drifter, watch it now and again. Branded to Kill was, I thought, pretty darn good. Haven't seen Pistol Opera. If anyone gets a shot at seeing Memories of Murder, new Korean flick...take the shot.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 09:51 am:   

After seeing Buffalo 66, perhaps the most embarrassingly bad indie film ever made, I have no desire to get close to BROWN BUNNY....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 10:15 am:   

I just had to write a 900-word review on an upcoming theatrical film, WHAT THE #$*! DO
WE KNOW, starring Marlee Matlin; strange puppy mixing drama of Matlin as clinically depressed woman, a gallery of talking heads discussing the sciences of Quantum Physics, and CGI animation of little gummy creatures running amuck at a polish wedding.

A little black boy is the voice of quantum mechanics.

Something for y'all to look forward to.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 10:33 am:   

Yeah, that's playing here now. I'm not too sure...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 10:45 am:   

Session 9 was good. Didn't get too over-the-top.
Sexy Beast was soooo much fun to watch. Kingsley is fantastic, of course, and the rest of the cast was excellent, too. Especially the fellow who plays opposite Kingsley. Can't recall his name.
Oh yes, The Wicker Man!! A classic.

Even if Village turned out to be okay, I'm still never watching another Shyamalan movie again. Signs was stupid. Stupid characters doing things that their stupid characters wouldn't have been that stupid to do. Rarely have I been so disappointed in a movie. The aliens were more believable than the humans.

There was a really cheesy crop circle movie that I watched with Billy Zane in it. The title escapes me. Waaaay better than Signs.

whew. Thanks. I feel better now.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 04:40 pm:   

okay, i'm back from the video store. picked up...

'the man without a past'

'bad santa'

'cape fear (1961)'

and 'spider'

more later...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 05:12 pm:   

T, the Billy Zane movie played recently on scifi. As for Sexy Beast, the guy whose film it was, who played opposite Kingsley, is Ray Winstone, one of the best actors going right now. Check him out in Nil by Mouth, Last Orders, The War Room, among others. Also terrfific in Beast was Ian McShane, who played Teddy, the uber-villain and is currently doing his damndest in HBO's Deadwood.

Enjoy the cinema, Brian...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 06:02 pm:   

Ray Winstone...thanks. I'll definately check out those movies.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 06:13 pm:   

Okay. My favorite movie this year, Last Life in the Universe, a Thai black comedy/thriler directed by Pen-ek Ratanaruang, and featuring Takashi Miike in a small role as a Yakuza, is getting a September release. Cinematography by the fantastic Chris Doyle. This a strange fucking movie. People need to see it.

Other stuff that sounds interesting this fall: Walter Salas (Central Station) directing the story of a young Che Guevara, The Motorcycle Diaries. Criminal, a remake of the cool Argentine thriller, Nine Queens -- usually I hate remakes, but with John C Reilley and Maggie Gyllenhall in it, I'll take a shot. The John Sayles anti-Dubya political comedy, Silver City; Subject Zero, a thriller with Ben Kingsley, Carrie Anne Moss and Aaron Eckhardt that's supposed to have a great script. Stander, a movie about a South African cop with blood on his hands...it should be out soon. And of course Wes Anderson and Bill Murray teaming up again in The Life Aquatic.

But Last Life in the Universe...that's the real deal.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 06:53 pm:   

just watched 'man without a past', it has a hermann hesse/gene wolfe fable quality to it that i really liked. some of the images conveyed in the conversations were really surreal. also, the train acting as a sort of time machine... lots of loops... moving forward - good film. the soundtrack was a lot of fun too.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 06:57 pm:   

You need to see some more Kaurismaki. He has a great version of Hamlet called Hamlet Goes Business. Then there's The Match Factory Girl. And then there's the fantastic rock and roll movie, Leningrad Cowboys Go America...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 07:17 pm:   

yeah i'd really like to. are any of his other movies available on region 1 dvds? the video stores out here aren't that great. so maybe if i start getting into movies again, i'll just get a muli-region dvd player and start ordering the films online. does anyone know if netflix offers a good selection of hard to find movies?

also, can you think of any films with a surreal fairy tale quality that are worth renting. 'heavenly creatures' is a movie i really liked in that vein. 'night of the hunter' occupies that territory too.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 07:45 pm:   

I doubt much of his stuff's out there -- it's hard to find. I have Leningrad Cowboys on VHS, and three others on VHS -- you can find them, but their expensive.

As for fairy tales, I can't wrap my head around that one right now. Too wasted. The Ogre, with John Malkovich, based on a Michael Tournier novel, has something of that quality in a very strange way. Great movie, too. But right offhand...I'll have to think about it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 08:29 pm:   

Dave G: You can get that Lynch short-film boxed set from the store at www.davidlynch.com, I believe. Not sure if it has the one minute long film he did from Lumiere & Co., which is a minuscule masterpiece. Anyway...I'm not gonna get all Lynchy on Lucius site.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 08:40 pm:   

Hey, man...it's not like I think DL is the anti-Christ. Bad analogy. If he were the anti-Christ, I'd probably be a big fan...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 08:52 pm:   

BTW, Brian...if you have cable, the Prisoner plays on BBC America every Friday at 10 PM.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan scott cederberg
Posted on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 09:09 pm:   

thanks, good looking out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Saturday, July 17, 2004 - 01:06 am:   

My relationship with Lynch stuff started when Eraserhead was making the NYC arthouse circuit, I guess. T.E.D. Klein told me it was this great odd thing; like a Ramsey Campbell story put on film. I finally saw it in an off campus theater about a year later and I felt this incredible sense of recognition and familiarity, as if he'd managed to film some of my own nightmares. I wrote to the distributor, trying to find out anything I could about him, and they sent me some promotional material, an early Eraserhead poster, not much to go on. I always harken back to that early response; I didn't think it was a pretentious thing in him; I thought it came out of a genuine impulse to try to convey something very hard to explain, which was why I felt such a deep recognition. Later, well, I think it's amazing he has managed to survive with so much of that initial impulse intact, because I still recognize it in his work. The luminous trailer in Fire Walk with Me...why is that so fucking scary? How many directors in the studio system can switch protagonists mid-picture, and then never even bother to offer a pat explanation? How did he get Lost Highway funded? The other thing is that at the core of even the weirdest pieces, there is often a huge hunk of emotion which is almost radioactive. Fire Walk with Me, which could be appreciated only by the dwindling audience that had followed the entire run of Twin Peaks, is a devastating movie. Pulling off a prequel whose inevitable end is already known to its target audience...an amazing gambit. The long shadows of the conclusion throw themselves backwards through time, over the whole length of the movie. The games Twin Peaks played with time, dancing dwarves aside, were structurally cool as hell. And the climactic Bob/Leland/Laura sequence in TP, nothing I've seen on TV has ever affected me like that. I was freaked out for days. I think he has gone off track from time to time. I think the theatrical Mulholland Drive was an extremely clever fix-up of his screwed up TV pilot, but the seams are so obvious...I love the pieces, but it's still an incomplete project cleverly framed by an afterthought. Straight Story...well, the kids liked it. Blue Velvet is going down in cinematic history because it's just a perfect example of whatever the hell it is; but it's not something I necessarily return to the way I return to Lost Highway. Soooo...a little bit of a Lynch rant... I don't think the "real" Surrealists were any less poseurs...posing was part of it, but so was technical excellence. Of all the Surreal movies I have seen, only "Exterminating Angel" has come as close as Lynch to evoking the actual quality of a nightmare.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 17, 2004 - 06:54 am:   

Well, I liked Erasherhead. And I stayed with TP a while, but eventually found the mannerisms boring...I guess with Lynch, if you don't enjoy the mannerisms, then it's not worth piercing the veil. That's sort of my feeling. In Blue Velvet, which I enjoyed, albeit I found it redundant of itself, I never could get used to Kyle Mclaghlen playing a 19, 20 year old... That;s a quibble, but significant to me.

I notice no mention of elephant man.

How do you feel about Guy Maddin.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Saturday, July 17, 2004 - 11:12 pm:   

I guess I just have as much of a personal relationship with Lynch's movies as one can have with a bunch of films; no explaining that part of it.

I don't really think of Elephant Man as a Lynch movie. I liked it well enough; Hurt was wonderful, the sound design and sets and black and white photography were awesome. I've always wished Lynch would do a Dickens adaptation; maybe something American of that period.

I do know what you mean about the mannerisms. They are distilled to self-parody in Lynch's commercials.

I haven't seen anything by Maddin (yet).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 18, 2004 - 06:58 am:   

Well, you should see Maddin. He's a special case. I reccomend Careful as a place to start.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Sunday, July 18, 2004 - 08:56 pm:   

The library has only his "Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary," so I ordered it. I'll keep my eyes open for the other stuff as well.

"Pages from a Virgin's Diary"...I wonder if there is any relation at all to Robert Aickman's classic "Pages From A Young Girl's Journal," which is also a vampire tale.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 19, 2004 - 08:24 am:   

I had just picked up Maddin's DRACULA the other day in my local bookstore and thought about getting it. Maybe I should give it a spin after all. Watched TWILIGHT OF THE ICE NYMPHS and enjoyed it. How can anything with Frank Gorshin possibly be bad? (My DVD also has ARCHANGEL on it, which I haven't watched yet.) Did anyone like THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD? How can anything with Mark McKinney in it possibly be bad?

Just to shift gears a little, finally went to see ANCHORMAN: THE LEGEND OF RON BURGUNDY the other night, and, while I definitely laughed and the movie definitely had its moments, I was a little disappointed. Ferrell is such a funny guy, shaping up to be the dominant funnyman of the decade, that you really feel he has more in him than this SNL-skit stuff. The movie just felt like a "bit" with one of his SNL characters, expanded to 90 minutes. You figure: hokey, puffed-up TV newsman and his "team"? How can you go wrong? Simple. By making the sportscaster, a loud, brash, ultra-macho, slang-spoutin' closet case and the twitchy, freakish weatherman retarded. Both of those stereotypes were ripe for clever skewering, and Ferrell and Adam McKay just went for cheap, one-note laughs. That having been said, Ferrell's "jazz flute" performance had me practically in tears. There ought to be a law against SNL comics working in film with SNL writers. The results are too homogenous.

Anybody see that DF is playing the Kenneth Mars part in the remake of THE PRODUCERS?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan
Posted on Monday, July 19, 2004 - 05:18 pm:   

watched 'cape fear' (1962). decent film, but i couldn't stand gregory peck. i just couldn't bring myself to care about his character. robert mitchum, on the other hand, was awesome.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, July 19, 2004 - 05:38 pm:   

If you couldn't stand Gregory Peck, try watching the Scorsese remake with Nick Nolte in that role. Talk about insufferable! Of course, that's a movie where you hope that everyone in it will just die a slow and painful death...and an early one as well. I just learned that movie was a remake of a John D. MacDonald novel called "The Executioners." I have a feeling the novel is probably kick-ass.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

S. Hamm
Posted on Monday, July 19, 2004 - 09:35 pm:   

Sad to see Martin Scorsese trying to keep himself awake by doing a Phil Joanou imitation. But I have to say, as bad as Nick Nolte may be, Robert de Niro is worse. If you ever find yourself wondering why he switched over to comedy, just watch the glossolalia scene. All will become clear. (And how about the bit where he hangs onto the undercarriage of the car all the way to the Carolina coast? That piece of schtick would have strained my credulity if I'd seen Wile E. Coyote doing it in a Road Runner cartoon.)

Peck is a stiff in the '62 version, but it doesn't hurt the simple, clean concept of the movie, which is: psychopath decides to show pillar of society just how little it will take to make him abandon all the hifalutin' principles he professes to live by. The remake doesn't have a simple, clean concept that I can locate, unless it's: watch me lick my own balls.

As I remember, the John D. is pretty kick-ass, but that's a twenty-year-old impression . . . .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Also S. Hamm
Posted on Monday, July 19, 2004 - 09:39 pm:   

Dept. of It's a Small World After All: Maddin's regular writing collaborator is my old college mentor George Toles, brother of the Washington Post editorial cartoonist Tom Toles.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 20, 2004 - 07:13 am:   

There is nothing in the CF remake to equate with the scene of Robert Mitchum picking up the woman in the bar near the beginning. I wish I could remember the exact lines he uses.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan
Posted on Tuesday, July 20, 2004 - 10:24 am:   

it's something like...

"i'll give you one hour to ditch your friends."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Andrew F
Posted on Tuesday, July 20, 2004 - 11:46 pm:   

Coming in late here...

Session 9: small, good stuff, came out of nowhere, underrated in my opinion, worth checking out -- and i can't believe how many of my friends don't get it.

Lucius, do you know where to find a director's cut/screener of Hard Target? Always been one of my favorites.

While I have a secret love for the simplicity of Unbreakable as a successful shot in the dark, I see M. Night declining in originality and substance. Signs felt like a rehashed bad exercise in Brian DePalma complex slo-mo endings, and Sixth Sense proved that no one reads any more, and is vulnerable to the cheapeast of twist endings. (Any of Robert Bloch's weakest short stories is better on paper than what Hollywood thinks is a surprise these days.) Perhaps a brew&view screening of Village might be okay, with the right pitcher of stout in-hand.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 21, 2004 - 05:48 am:   

Kim;s on St Marks Place is where I got mine.,

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, July 21, 2004 - 11:50 pm:   

What I liked most about Session 9 was how unremittingly grim it was. It was all men. At their worst. No relief anywhere. Cool flick.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lawrence A
Posted on Thursday, July 22, 2004 - 02:46 am:   

An excellent and strange French film that I saw about a year back, thanks to Lucius's review at ES, is that THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF. Like Lucius says, great kung-fu fight scenes, genuine scary beast horror, great historical period detail, good swipes at European colonialism and a lot more - and yet nothing jars, it all melds together seamlessly. An incredible film. A really intelligent thriller, and in Hollywood, the concept of an intelligent thoughtful thriller has long ago become oxymoronic. I hope it made a profit, it must have cost a lot to make.

Does anyone know if the director of that is working on something new? Don't know anything about him or what else he's done.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, July 22, 2004 - 04:49 am:   

BotW was one of the most popular films in French cimena history. I don;t know what the directors doing, but am sure he's doing something.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bill reynolds
Posted on Thursday, July 22, 2004 - 08:41 am:   

Ok. Here I go again, only 6 days late from the orignal posting. (Par for the course.)
Hi Bryan. Nice to see you over here.
The Good News:
Amazon.com.jp has a boxed set of Kaurismaki with everything he did except Man Without a Past which is out in the US by itself anyway. Of course I ordered the box from Japan.
The Bad News:
No English subtitles. This matters more with some films than others.
Leningrad Cowboys go America - it doesn't really matter since after the first few lines it is all in English.
Match Factory Girl (my favorite Kaurismaki and the performance of Kati Outinen was the performance of that year. I saw it w/subtitles at The Walter Reade) the lack of subtitles doesn't really matter since there is VERY little dialogue and it is pretty clear what is going on.
La Vie de la Boheme is in French, albeit by actors who didn't know any. I managed to understand most of it. (I had also seen it at the Walter Reede with subtitles AND, of course, know the story which helped bunches.)
Total Balalaika Show - Concert film with no dialogue. The Leningrad Cowboys and the Alexandrov Red Army Choir live in the center of Helsinki. GLORIOUSLY silly. I have all of the Cowboys' CDs and I love 'em.
I Married a Contract Killer - in English to begin with.
I haven't tried to watch the others yet, although I really want to see Hamlet I suspect lack of subtitles will really be a problem.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bryan
Posted on Thursday, July 22, 2004 - 09:26 am:   

thank you mr. reynolds. i loved 'man without a past' so it's good to know there is a way to get his other stuff.

other topics:

i really liked 'spider'. good characters. subtle. some of the conversations were really memorable (especially with the old man in the house).

just watched 'lone wolf and cub: sword of vengeance'. it kept my attention well enough to get all the way through it. not a big fan of the action scenes. i did like the bit with the prostitute. the love scene was well shot with overlapping images. i think i'd like the series a bit better if the director went wild. i've heard that the later installments become a bit more experimental.

next up: 'branded to kill'

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bill reynolds
Posted on Friday, July 23, 2004 - 12:33 pm:   

Of course, it was I HIRED a Contract Killer (starring, BTW Jean Pierre Leaud.)
I'm SUCH a maroon.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 23, 2004 - 01:10 pm:   

What;s the kaurismaki film where 17 guys nmaed Frank are trying to get across town.

I has the first appearance by the lenningrad cowboys.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 23, 2004 - 04:45 pm:   

I went to see the Bourne Supermacy because it was 103 on Portland. Once you get past the notion of Matt Damon being the world's most dangerous man, its not so bad for a beat the heat movie, good work by old pros Karen Allen and the giy who played Lecter in Manhunter, Bryan whatshisname. What can I tell you? It beat being outside.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Andrew F
Posted on Friday, July 23, 2004 - 05:08 pm:   

there was mention of a few directors, and what they might be up to these days...

Hollywood Report says that Darren Aronofsky has made further headway in securing the job to direct the Alan Moore's comic Watchmen over at Paramount Studios. David Hayter (X-men, X2) penned the latest script. story at http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr/film/brief_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=10005 84187

John Woo is in talks to director a Spy Hunter (video game) movie with The Rock (wrestler).

Guillermo del Toro has been saying he's going to Spain for a short time to direct a small movie called Pan's Labyrinth. More in the spirit of Devil's Backbone than his big budget flicks for Hollywood. He's still trying to find a studio & budget for a major adaptation of Lovecraft's At the Mountains of Madness.

Session 9 director Brad Anderson has finished his next movie The Machinist, starring Christian Bale. Comes out Oct 15. Site is here http://machinistmovie.com/

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 23, 2004 - 05:43 pm:   

I don;t think that Aronofsky will direct Watchmen, and further I don't think Watchnem will ever get made. Aronofsky must have shot somebody, hes got such bad luck, and Watchmen, well...if by some chance it does get made, the real victim in all this will be Alan Moore, cause they;re gonna be adding in a whole lot of blow-up.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lawrence A
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 04:10 am:   

Yeah I'm actually hoping Watchmen doesn't get made either, for the same reasons that Lucius fears.
While we're on the subject of Alan Moore, I've always thought that "A Small Killing" would make a really good film. Perhaps Aranovsky at the helm of that would actually suit his directorial style far better than a Watchmen film would anyhow.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 05:51 am:   

??
¼Killing would be a better fit and Aronofsky would be giood6 -- I just seems his name gets attached to every high end conics project there is and that having his name attached is tje kiss iof death, like someone;s trying ti keep him on the shelf.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 06:01 am:   

I kinda wish Darren Aronofsky would deliver on the promise he showed with REQUIEM FOR A DREAM instead of selling out with a superhero adaptation, but hey, that's just me...


In terms of GREAT movies -- I mean, sheer, authentic, cinematic genius -- the wife and I just saw the restored 4-hour cut of Erich Von Stroheim's GREED. The version available for 75 years was only 90 minutes long, and is basically the music video...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bill reynolds
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 06:48 am:   

Lucius - are you sure? That is not ringing a bell and the only two Kaurismaki I have not yet seen (DVDs have too much Finnish w/o subtitles) are Hamlet and Leningrad Cowboys Go Moses and I doubt it is that because that followed Go America.
It pretty much appeared as if the Cowboys were created for Go America (players selected for their dour look et al) and pulled together as a band afterwards with the key members from the film. (One of whom, BTW, was the founder of Nokia and in a weird piece of serendipity I finally found the soundtrack to Go America in a store in Bondi near Sydney NSW. The clerk informed me after we had chatted about the Cowboys for a while - he loved the film, that the store was in the Nokia building which leads me to...)
Comparing the soundtrack to the later "Leningrad Cowboys" CDs reads like I'm right. The soundtrack credits, even for band performances, and the songwriting credits don't read like this was a band then.
Nevertheless, I'll watch Go Moses and see if I can make out "Frank" amidst the Finnish.
They did a few music videos, directed by Aki, but all after Go America. "Those Were the Days My Friend" being the best.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 08:05 am:   

Did you guys see that one movie about those four kids that go lookin for the body of a dead kid? I think it's called Stand By Me....

Great Stuff!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 10:01 am:   

Bill,

Kaurismaki retrospective --Kaurismaki mentiioned this. That's all I know.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 12:50 pm:   

GREED (1924) directed by Erich Von Stroheim, is one of the great tragedies
of American film, and I'm not just talking about the storyline, but about
its fate. The original cut was nine hours long, which Von Stroheim hoped
to exhibit in two parts. When the studio refused, he tormented himself by
cutting it to six hours, and then to four, and then to three; the studio
took it out of his hands and reduced it to a little over 2 hours, turning
a multi-levelled character-based melodrama into a shell of its previous
self. The trauma basically ruined Von Stroheim's directorial career and
reduced him to an actor playing a caricature of himself in other movies,
notably as the washed-up great director in Billy Wilder's SUNSET BOULEVARD.

Most horrifically, the studio melted down the raw footage for its silver
content, destroying any chance of the film ever being exhibited in its entirety.

The missing footage, long rumored to exist somewhere, is one of the holy
grails of film preservationists; indeed, I put fully restored copies in
the hands of the villains Kang the Conqueror, and Mysterio, in my various
Marvel Universe novels.

The ninety minute version, as crippled as it is, is already one of the classic
films. It was the only version available for more than seventy-five years.

The story, based on the novel McTEAGUE by Frank Norris, is about a simple-minded
coal miner, son of an alcoholic, who learns dentistry from a travelling
quack and sets up his own practice in San Francisco. His friend Marcus plans
to marry his own cousin, Trina, but relinquishes claim to her out of friendship
when McTeague expresses his own love for her. But when Trina wins five thousand
dollars (at that point, a small fortune) in a lottery, Marcus feels that
he's been robbed of both the girl and the money. The two men become enemies.
And Trina develops an obsession with the money that extends to not spending
a cent of it, even though the interest on it would be capable of supporting
the couple in comfort when financial reversals reduce them to penury.

Judi and I just watched a version restored to Stroheim's four hour cut.

Details in my topic, but wow...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

bill reynolds
Posted on Saturday, July 24, 2004 - 01:26 pm:   

Lucius - I'll look into this. Sounds like something I would want to see. And, of course, I meant synchronicity not serendipity. I'm such a malaproprietor. (Like my new word?) There aren't any shorts other than music videos in the box set.

Cornelius (any relation to Jerry???) - Stand By Me was directed by Rob Reiner a couple of years after Spinal Tap. I only saw it when it came out and I don't remember having liked it, but I'll watch it again. I've always heard positive things about it. I think I was going through one of my stupid aggressively urban phases and had no patience with anything rural.

Speaking of Spinal Tap (which we weren't) I finally got to watch Slade in Flame. (I bought the DVD from Amazon.uk.) I strongly recommend it. Slade play a mythical band like Spinal Tap but it is a much, much darker film with a very negative view of the recording industry.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 07:31 am:   

Bill, '

If you;re looking for a good documentary in the rock and roll, let me recommend Benjanen Smoke. Truly remarkable.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bob K.
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 02:36 pm:   

Thanks for the recommendation on "Go." Just what I was looking for. Funny and not too stupid. I especially liked the telepathic cat and the girl with the flaming Kleenex up her nostrils.

Bob
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 03:29 pm:   

Yeah., the cat was great. Pretty good little movie.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 07:26 am:   

It's Bryan Cox, btw. Was anyone else as blown away as I was by his perfomance in L.I.E.?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 07:54 am:   

Yup. He did good.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 07:59 am:   

Yup. He did good.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 08:34 am:   

Best rendition of "Danny Boy" on celluloid...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 08:37 am:   

Has anyone heard any advance buzz/seen M. Night Shyamalan's THE VILLAGE? I'm a sucker for a good horror film, and it seems that fewer and fewer of these things (I'm not including the FREDDY and JASON messes) get released every year. Hell, I'm so desperate for a scare I would even consider checking out ALIEN VS. PREDATOR, which could set new records for celluloid silliness.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 10:25 am:   

I havn't heard anything so far, but I think i know the ending, and, if so, it sucks...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 10:36 am:   

Aww, man...Is OPEN WATER going to be the closest thing to a good fright flick this summer???

Whither the horror movie? The last half-decent one (and it was only HALF-decent) I remember seeing was the first JEEPERS CREEPERS...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 11:18 am:   

The Spanish are making good horror movies. LOS SIN NOMBRE (The Nameless) is a good one, as is THE DARK, as is THE DEVIL'S BACKBONE.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 11:29 am:   

Haven't seen L.I.E. yet (but I've driven it...so I already understand the insinuation of bottomless dread). Didn't know Cox was in it. Good movie, then?

I also haven't yet laid hands on copies of THE NAMELESS (which Ramsey Campbell said was a fine adaptation of his book) or THE DARK, which looked excellent. DEVIL'S BACKBONE was a fine, fine film...one reason I still have hopes for Del Toro's ability to pull off something good with AT THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS...not to mention THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS.

I thought THE OTHERS was also good, although the simple surgical removal of several very brief scenes would have made it far better. I felt that every scene that wasn't in the Nicole Kidman's POV should have been cut; then it would have been a perfect story. The scenes that weren't in her POV not only tipped off the ending way too early, they raised a bunch of logic problems that undermined the whole story's integrity. Unfortunate. Her performance as a person completely frozen in a neurotic state was perfect.

I've got INTACTO on top of my stack right now.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 11:36 am:   

Yes, THE OTHERS was pretty decent and eerie. My local vid store has INTACTO. Worth buying with my Christmas gift card? If you had to choose between THE DEVIL'S BACKBONE and INTACTO, which would you take?

During a forced convalescence this week, I bided my time by rewatching one of my favorite thrillers, SE7EN, and the adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, for which I have a newfound admiration. I am really becoming a Fincher fan...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 12:40 pm:   

Intacto.

A non-fincher fan.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 08:15 pm:   

i'm sure THE VILLAGE will end with a twist in the last five minutes, just like the other films that guy has done.

i like some of fincher's films, but PANIC ROOM was just boring.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 08:21 pm:   

Yeah, and if its what I think...eeeeh!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 06:19 am:   

Re: Fincher. I should rephrase. I'm a SE7EN and FIGHT CLUB fan. Didn't love THE GAME that much and never saw PANIC ROOM.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 07:07 am:   

I find both Seven and Fight CIub heavy on the techno-mannerism, rife with Pitt, who can;t act, and, hamfisted in their delivery of so-called surprises. I did love the opening titles for Seven.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 07:40 am:   

Subtlety is neither film's strong suit, but I did find them both effective. The power-lines scene with Kevin Spacey in SE7EN drove me nuts with suspense, which isn't easy to do. And I dearly loved the climax of FIGHT CLUB. Ham-fisted, yeah, but I've always loved ham...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 08:07 am:   

To each his own...

I quibble over the use of the word suspense, because there was never any diubt in my mind he was gonna shoot...but never mind
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

T Andrews
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 08:38 am:   

I liked the fact that Seven didn't have a 'happy' ending. Pitt sucks most of the time but I thought he was really good in Kalifornia. (Though, in hindsight,he may have looked good merely because he was playing opposite Duchovny. Compared to him, just about anyone can look good.)

Dave, re horror movies, The Eye is a Japanese ghost movie that wasn't that bad. The story is fairly standard, but since it's not a North American product, it seemed kinda fresh. (For me, anyways-I don't see a lot of indie movies.) It had some nice moments of tension.
Brotherhood of the Wolf was great.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 08:59 am:   

Watched INTACTO last night. Excellent! If you don't want to see a really awful movie about players caught in a game, then avoid Fincher's abysmal THE GAME. I'm sorry for even mentioning it in the same paragraph with INTACTO, which really is a fine fine.

I remember being at a checkout counter a few years ago, and there was a picture of Brad Pitt and Gwyneth Paltrow on the cover of the newspaper I was buying. The girl behind the counter started making disgusted faces about how she loathed Brad Pitt, and Gwyneth Paltrow was even worse; how they were the most horrible "celebrities" she could imagine. I told her she should definitely see SE7EN, because she would thoroughly enjoy what happens to each of them in the same movie.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 09:39 am:   

Marc, I;m really glad you liked it. And that, in my view, is the only reason to watch Seven.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 10:31 am:   

I actually went out and bought THE EYE, which I dug quite intensely. Although the ending was wrapped up in a somewhat superficial fashion (what horror movie's ending isn't?), I enjoyed 96% of it. I'm a newcomer to Asian horror; for what it's worth, I thought Ringu had it all over The Ring.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 01:24 pm:   

If you liked The Eye and Ringu, then get DARK WATER.

As I've said in a couple other Ringu discussions on Lucius's board, I was impressed with The Ring because of the way it seemed to bring the fragments and strands of the Japanese versions to completion. It added new material in a way that flowed logically from its source, and didn't feel forced. I saw it before watching the others, and I assumed a lot of the best stuff in it was simply borrowed; it turned out to be new. I like Ringu and Ringu 2, but I think The Ring was an honorable effort. Can't say I have high hopes for The Ring 2, however.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 02:01 pm:   

Dave, try UZUMAKI, one of the weirdest movies, Japanese Lovecraft.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 09:19 pm:   

Hey...I just saw UZUMAKI. Very strange stuff.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 10:33 pm:   

If I were to start a band, I think I might consider "Japanese Lovecraft" for the name.

HELLBOY is on the stack for tonight. My expectations are very middling. I'm expecting something between THE DEVIL'S BACKBONE and BLADE 2.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 10:46 pm:   

actually, you know, in a disturbing trend, i've found brad pitt to be enjoyable on screen of late. i didn't think much of him in SE7EN, but i quite liked him FIGHT CLUB, and after that, there were these films i'd see, like SNATCH, which weren't so good, but i'd always think that brad pitt was kinda good in it. i worry about it at times ;)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 01:04 am:   

I was surprised how pedestrian HELLBOY turned out to be. Let's forget the cosmic allure of Elder Gods and other dimensions and concentrate on CG-monsters that actually look sort of like actors in bad rubber suits. Lots of them. On the other hand, you can't have too many Lovecraftian tentacle creatures in a movie (I mean the big ones), and Ron Perlman was way better than I expected. There were a few nice moments. Still...pedestrian. Maybe that's partly due to the source material, though. I still prefer the Lovecraftian set-up to most superhero cosmologies, but that's just me.

The one little glimpse of wintry Moldavian mountains did give me a premonitory thrill thinking of AT THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS, but...who am I kidding? How can anyone make a movie out of that without it turning into...HELLBOY?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 04:23 am:   

I actually would rate HELLBOY as worse than pedestrian--but then I don;t have as much love for tentacle creatures as you. I don;t think much of del Toro. The Devil;s Backbone would be, in another cinematic climate, viewed as a pedestrian film.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 04:25 am:   

I would worry about that, Ben. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 06:00 am:   

Del Toro is one of those directors (there are many) who become less interesting the larger their budgets become.

Assuming Aronofsky actually succeeds in making films again, I'm assuming that he will be another.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 06:48 am:   

Is Del Toro the guy who did CRONOS?

My last word on SE7EN...For some reason, I found Brad Pitt's acting very easy to overlook in that film, unlike say, KALIFORNIA, where he was overacting all over the place. To me, the star of SE7EN was the production design, the mood, the overall feeling of malaise and decay. The actors were just there to say the lines. And I thought Spacey, the one guy who really needed to be good, was. Gwyneth, love her or hate her, was hardly there at all for me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 07:40 am:   

Yeah, I kind of agree, Adam.

Del Toro did Chronos, did Mimic, did Blade 2, did the Devil's Backbone, did Hellboy
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 09:56 pm:   

"And how did you find Brad Pitt's acting, sir?"

"I looked under a potato chip and there it was."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 11:00 pm:   

In defense of HELLBOY, there are certain kinds of movies I sort of enjoy letting my kids watch--both because I know that, being kids, they'll like them; and because I know other kids' parents probably won't approve. These are the supposedly Christian parents who have instructed their children that they are not to play with mine because they don't accept Jesus as their Savior; and to whom the Cthulhu fish on my fender must seem eager to lay its eggs in the Jesus fish on theirs. (These are children so confused by their own mythological beliefs that they will argue with my kids that Jesus Created the Earth, which so far as I am aware is not a teaching of any Christian sect.) Along these lines, I found HELLBOY to be charming, wholesome, and life-affirming. (I am an orthodox Cthulhuvian, by the way, strict adherent to the cult of HPL. I won't tolerate the idiotic heresies of LaVey.) My daughters grew up thinking Cthulhu is cute. And now that they have those Cthulhu plush toys, I guess this is a reasonable belief.

There was a lot of lame stuff in HELLBOY involving secret agents and subway tunnels and Nazis and Rasputin, and not nearly enough cosmology. But I laughed a bunch of times at Ron Perlman's delivery. So I'm not trying to fob this off entirely on my kids. I had a good time. It's one of the few "bad movies" I could reasonably enjoy.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 05:27 am:   

Yeah, there is that.

A friend of mine on line for HELLBOY was so harassed by a church lady buying group tickets for PASSION OF THE CHRIST that he told the woman to back off or be knocked down.

Any movie, however junky, that bothers those people is not a total loss.

I remember wishing that the folks responsible for re-releasing LIFE OF BRIAN had been a little more on the ball, and seen to it that it was re-released simultaneously. I would have loved seeing some of these major church groups buying tickets to the wrong film by mistake.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 06:16 am:   

Ummm, wait a minute...JESUS created the Earth??? JP, can we jot in a few revisions to the Sistine Chapel ceiling???

Who knew?

:-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 10:09 pm:   

Getting back to GOOD movies, I watched the first two thirds of DANCER IN THE DARK last night. I'm really looking forward to the remainder. I haven't seen BREAKING THE WAVES yet either, among the Von Triers films that I can find locally.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 06:26 am:   

The ending to DANCER IN THE DARK is pretty mind-blowing. Very powerful. I won't spoil it by saying anymore. I also dug BTW, but saw it a long time ago and forgot a lot of the detail. Again, another freaky, powerful ending, although not half as visceral as DITD.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 06:26 am:   

Dancer in the Dark is relentless, maybe the most depressing movie I've seen, but brilliant. Breaking the Waves...Emly Watson! Wow.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 08:52 am:   

I still can't believe I missed DOGVILLE...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 11:24 am:   

Yeah, great ending...great throughout. The most depressing movies rarely leave me feeling anything but exhilarated. (OSAMA being a recent notable exception.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Magische online Kasinos
Posted on Sunday, November 14, 2004 - 05:11 pm:   

Excellent, that was really well explained and helpful

<p>Magische online Kasinos</p>

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register