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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7648
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 07:02 pm:   

Let's put the new stuff here....
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 149
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 01:22 pm:   

Crap crap crap. I was supposed to be getting the last disc of the final season of The Wire in the mail on Saturday, but forgot to adjust my Netflix que, so I'm getting Doomsday instead. You guys jinxed me, man. And I have to wait until next week to see how the Wire ends now.

In other news, I'm trying...trying so damn hard to finish Pontypool Changes Everything, but it sucks so much that I might just not have it in me. I suppose it oculd be that it's actually really good, but just over my head...I think not though. It's a crap book and I hope the movie is a lot better.

By the way, the Wire is so good it's not right. Makes every other show in the history of television look like Weak Sauce. It's kind of an insult to call it a TV show. Seriously.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7652
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 01:59 pm:   

I thought Pontpool Changes everything was supposed to be cool. What's wrong with it? Bruce MacDonald's filming the movie, no.

Doomsday...doesn't anyone ever listen to me? :-)
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 150
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 03:47 pm:   

Yep, that's the Pontypool book, Lucius...the one that's being made into a movie. I bought it after you posted about the upcoming films (riding high on your Let the Right One In rec no less), but, Jesus, this book is a pretentious pile of dog shit. Right up there with the chewing sawdust sensation I got when trying to read The New York Trilogy.

It's one of those MFA in wankery type of deals. All about language. Apparently you become a zombie by talking. Or something. I don't know. As best as I can gather with my tiny little mind, the book is partially autobiographical. I suspect that the author is schizophrenic and is basically writing parts of his psychotic break. Could have been interesting. But it blows. Just doesn't hang together cohesively at all. And I'm a sucker for zombie stuff, so you know it has to be bad.

I'm just too much of a Karl Popper guy to go for this "language is everything" type of thing. I mean, seriously, only authors and two-bit philosophers indulge in that kind of thinking about their respective trades. Can you imagine a carpenter that thought that hammer and nails and wood were everything?

As I understand it, the movie bears little to no resemblance to the book, so there's still hope.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7653
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 04:16 pm:   

Highway 61 was a cool movie, Satan in a Bingo parlor, a BTO tribute band...

As for language, I'm a carpenter not a deep thinker. Matter of fact I loathe deep thinking....
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1145
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 06:23 pm:   

I've listened about Doomsday - it's nowhere near my rental queue. Neither is Redbelt (which was I was vaguely interested in due to Chiwetel Ejiofor).

My latest viewing has been the Nickelodeon series Avatar: The Last Airbender. It's a nice cartoon inspired by Miyazaki. It's gotten me thinking that Hollywood only seems to do kids stuff well. The best Hollywood movie last year was Wall-E. Pretty much everything else I saw was crap. I need to start adding more Asian films to my rental queue.

On that topic, what's the opinion on Battle Royale 2?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7655
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2009 - 09:03 pm:   

Never saw BR2

Actually, I've been doing a lot of European films lately, Some pretty great stuff out there. Alexandra dir by Alexander Sokurov, and Garrone's Gommorah, which gets a US release in Feb, and so on. Also some US indie stuff. Wendy and Lucy, Ballast, Frozen River (not a great movie, but great acting by Melissa Leo ex of Homicide), etc. Weridest film I've seen of late is Surfwise, a documentary about a family of itinerant Jewish health nut surfer dudes...

Glad you avoided Doomsday...
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 405
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 11:22 am:   

I watched Doomsday just to see how bad it was. Ugh. An unwitting parody of post-apocalypse road warrior dreck. With 80's made-for-tv punk rock hairdos and awful 80's new wave music to match. And this is the same director who did The Descent and Dog Soldiers? Scary.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7656
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2009 - 01:26 pm:   

And now doing the Descent 2 based on the American ending of Descent 1...

I'd say Neil Marshall's over.
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Andres
New member
Username: Andres

Post Number: 34
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 08:39 pm:   

Your opinion on the Golden Globe Awards winners?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7657
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, January 11, 2009 - 10:36 pm:   

Predictable, for the most part. I was pleased for Waltz with Bachir and Rourke. Most of the films i liked weren't even nominated/
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 151
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 06:37 am:   

Doomsday was fantastically stupid, but I think I went easier on it than you guys. I mean, it made no pretense of taking itself seriously. It's just that it was sooooo much worse than either Dog Soldiers or The Descent.

Neil Marshall strikes me as a fan boy who happens to be proficient in using his directorial toys. But he is odd in that he seems to actually accomplish more with less. The budget for Doomsday must have vastly exceeded both his previous films' budgets put together. With Doomsday, he was given too much money, too much equipment, and all of a sudden he went retarded. Essentially the movie is just a plotless mash up of ideas he cribbed from the movies that get him off.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1535
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 07:45 am:   

Aside from Rhona Mitra's body and the Irish thug from The Departed, I would have tossed the whole of Doomsday into the bin.

Spent the weekend catching up on a lot of de rigeur stuff I missed the first time around:

Control: great. Really moving performances by
Sam Riley and the great Samantha Morton. Really captures the ramshackle, tawdry glory of punk just like 24 Hour Party People did. Good turn by Alexandra Maria Lara, so awesome in Downfall.

I'm Not There: You've got to give Haynes credit. Nobody puts together pastiches as rich, eye-catching and varied as him. Unfocused, yeah. Not sure what this "says" about Dylan, but as through an examination of his chameleonhood as we are likely to get. Haynes' movies, when he lets himself go, are more fun to roll around in than just about anyone's.

Hard Eight: Good performances. Love Philip Baker Hall (the library detective from "Seinfeld"), but at the end I felt like more should have been going on. A terrific first film, though.

Gummo: I dunno...I want Korine to show more compassion. Seems like he's just making fun of white trash.

Bug: A lot of fun. Nice to see Ashley Judd flexing in something a bit off-kilter. First thing I've ever liked Harry Connick in. Maybe should have gotten more attention the first go round.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7658
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 08:46 am:   

I liked Gummo. White trash don't need no stinking compassion.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1536
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 09:49 am:   

I liked Kids and Julien Donkey-Boy, but I just couldn't figure out what he was up to in Gummo...It was like walking through some kind of post-apocalyptic funhouse. Enjoyed the Linda Manz tap dance routine though...
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7659
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 11:45 am:   

Kind of a ghost story, I think...
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1146
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 04:41 pm:   

I started Southland Tales. Wow, incomprehensible is the first word that comes to mind. Way too much narration. Hard to keep interest when it's barely making any sense. I gave up.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7660
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 05:40 pm:   

It works a little better in the theater, I believe....
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7662
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 09:12 am:   

In what is a pretty fair predictor for the Oscars, Kate Winslet won two, Best Actress in a motion Picture--Drama and Best Supporting Actress, Mickey Rourke won for the Wrestler, Slumdog Millionaire won Best Picture, and Heath :Ledger won for being dead. Otherwise, things I learned: Robert Downey Jr is disturbingly beginning to resemble Dennis Miller. The new Captain Kirk looks like a Sears catalog model and the new Mr. Spock is incredibly short and looks like a second rate standup comic. The Jonas Brothers are extremely annoying--one hopes that they will be placed in a box and shipped to Angola Prison where they will entertain the population with song and dance and etc. for a term not to exceed, say, five or six years, long enough to give them a brand new perspective. Johnny Depp was either high or is the most affected human being on the planet or both. The Heath Ledger ovation was something to behold as five hundred or so of the most self-absorbed people on the planet tried to look reverent. Really hilarious. Chris Nolan said that Heath would be remembered forever. Somehow I doubt that. Strangely enough, Sting (whose hair grows darker with the passing years) is also coming to resemble Dennis Miller. Then there was the tribute to Steven Spielberg....Gack! The Berg rambled on about wrecking his electric train over and over, as boring a personal remiiniscence as I have ever heard, as were his other reminiscences about Syd Scheinberg and so forth. His urging to the industry that "in these hard economic times" we not make movies that are more accessible to wider audiences, but continue Hollywood's indie idiosyncratic spirit...It was too much to bear, so I left for s bit and returned to watch Mickey Rourke, with hair by Rapunzel, looking like someone's nightmare of a white African pimp, win his little gold doohickey and give a thrice-blipped acceptance in which he thanked his dogs, because "sometimes when a man is alone, his dogs are all he's got..." I guess. What a night. It's enough to throw the country into a recession.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1147
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 09:30 am:   

"Hollywood's indie idiosyncratic spirit," was that part of a comedy routine, or was he serious?
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1537
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 01:42 pm:   

In Gervais' not-entirely-funny HBO standup special, he goes for a lot of "edgy" stuff on cancer, sick children, the Holocaust, etc. Yawn. Gervais is untouchable in scripted stuff, but he seems very uncomfortable with just a mic.

Anybody see Ghost Town? I thought he was hilarious in that.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7664
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 02:43 pm:   

Huh. I didn't think he was uncomfy, just that was his manner...
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 406
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 09:16 pm:   

The Golden Globes are a big joke anyway. Most of the Hollywood Foreign Press is made up of eight-balls who aren't even real full-time writers, like the car mechanic who gets to vote because he used to write. Remember when Pia Zadora won?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7665
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 10:05 pm:   

Yeah, they're a total joke. That's what made Kate Winslet's emotional blithering so false. It was hilarious.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7666
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 13, 2009 - 10:06 pm:   

Dave, saw and liked Ghost Town. A good romantic comedy.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1538
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 07:06 am:   

Yes, it was pretty good. I would not recommend Ricky's HBO special, though...IMHO, second half of season two of "Extras" was some of the funniest stuff ever on television.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7667
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 08:35 am:   

I saw the special--I liked the low key trip, but that's just me.
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 43
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, January 14, 2009 - 11:28 pm:   

Regarding the GOLDEN GLOBE show: Don't have my TV hooked up, so I don't get all that anymore, but...between the two shows (and in the past four years, I've watched -- or tried to watch -- most of three or four Oscar Award shows and Golden Globe shows. And if someone has to watch them (or, like Lucius just did, watches them cause they are bored...or smokin a doob), I GOTTA say that the Golden Globes are MUCH more entertaining (even when they are being serious, as noted here). LOTS of funny crap is said and done -- just reading about the Rourke-cum-pimp stance as he stood on the stage, new head and all, was funny(chihuahuas....man, oh, man).

And the hair is a _statement_, Lucius, so don't go dissin' my homeboy (okay we're not from the same state, but it sounds cool). What's that? What statement is he trying to make? Um...I gotta call the Mick. I'll get back to you.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7668
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 10:03 am:   

True, The Globes are a lot more OVERTLY entertaining than the Oscars, but the Oscars are comedic for their level of pretension and the absolute banality of he red carpet show. The SAG awards, om TNT on the 25th, are also very entertaining.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 152
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 08:00 pm:   

Benjamin Gump:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bh3fdylgU2w
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7669
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 07:51 am:   

Yeah, right on. I had a moment of deja vu and threw up in my mouth a little...
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1148
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 20, 2009 - 01:26 pm:   

The Youtube link is gone, but I found it here
http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/1d76506803/the-curious-case-of-forrest-gump-fro m-fgump44

Watching that sounds better than watching the movie
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1539
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 10:01 am:   

http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/21/razzie.awards/index.html

Life Achievement Razzie for Uwe Boll!
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1540
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 10:08 am:   

I went youtube and looked at Mick's GG speech. I spent the 80s hating the guy, but I've had kind of a soft spot for him ever since THE PLEDGE, in which he was totally believable and almost unrecognizable. It felt like he was really restarting his career from the ground up.

Maybe it's all bs, but I'm kind of hoping that the matinee=idol-dick-chastened-and-reborn-as-nice-guy is for real...
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1149
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 - 11:33 am:   

Salon has some of the best lines about the Oscars I've seen in a while:
* we're supposed to pretend that the Academy's choices are "interesting," even when they're not
* being deserving or not is beside the point with the Oscars
* The Academy Awards have almost nothing to do with movie art, or even, most of the time, with movie fun...The Academy Awards are almost purely about publicity.
http://www.salon.com/ent/movies/feature/2009/01/22/oscars/

The rest of the article is OK, but those lines seem very appropriate.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7670
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 - 02:07 am:   

Benjamin Button wins---it's fucking ridiculous!
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1150
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 07:16 am:   

I joined "pop culture" and finally watched Juno. I didn't loathe it, but I didn't find it very funny or entertaining. If that can win an Oscar for screenwriting, I have no interest in seeing other winners in that category.


I also watched Posse, Mario Van Peebles' black western. The movie tried to be too much: a western, a chase movie, a romance, a history lesson, a movie about traumas in the past. It went everywhere, so no aspect got covered well. The final battle at the end was just too ridiculous.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1541
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 08:01 am:   

This was my anti-social impulse weekend...

Captivity was very disappointing, an exploitation film that turned into a standard-issue ankle-breaking actioner. I was shocked and surprised at the end to see the usually-quirky and interesting Larry Cohen's name on the script.

Also underwhelming, although better acted, was the freighted-with-arthouse-pretensions Funny Games, a shot-for-shot remake of director Michael Haneke's German original. When art film directors dip a toe in shock cinema, they always seem to want to glaze it with philosphical balderdash.

Saw Cronenberg's Crash the day it came out and then not again until Sunday. I must say, I enjoyed it a lot more. I think it has aged well, is a brave attempt to tackle impossible subject matter and, viewed through the prism of disability, reveals new layers.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7671
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 08:23 am:   

I wondered if Crash had aged well--I didn't much like it when it cane out.

I had the misfortune of seeing Possee, which I thought awful. One of the early candidates for Worst Movie Ever...

As for Juno, if you didn't hate it you weren't trying hard enough.:-)

You're right, it wasn't funny. By movie's end, I was rooting for Page to die in childbirth, because a) she was so annoying and b) it would have wiped the dopey smiles off the faces of the other characters. It was bs. The boy shirking responisbility...they wind up together. yeah, right. A flesh-and-blood girl would have hated him.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1542
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 09:42 am:   

I was disappointed in Crash when it came out, also. Probably because I liked the book so much my expectations were too high.

I still thought Elias Koteas' Vaughan was a bit over the top. The sex, esp. between Spader and the gorgeous and never-as-good-again Deborah Unger, was quite beautiful, I thought, and I don't usually say that. I think the problem I had was trying to empathise and imagine the sexual thrill the characters felt at car crashes. Couldn't do it. If you just surrender and let Cronenberg tell the story, you'll find it much more enjoyable.

The obvious change in me was that I first saw the movie as an able-bodied person and secondly with a disability. I understood bits like Rosanna Arquette trying to fit into a car "built for normal people," where I hadn't before and this made me more receptive to themes like handicapped people owning their sexuality and feeling free to express it.

Any film of Ballard's book is going to be flawed, but I can't imagine anyone doing it better.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7672
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 26, 2009 - 10:21 am:   

I'll have to check it out. Maybe I'll pick up a cheap copy.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7673
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 09:15 am:   

Saw Fear X, Nicholas Winding Refn of the Pusher trilogy's 2003 film. Starring Jon Turturro, Deborah Kara Unger (Crash) and James Remar. About a security guard in a Wisconsin shopping mall who's wife is murdered under mysterious circumstances. Prompted by visions, he goes in search of the killer. The scriot was co-written with Hubert Selby Jr, the novelist who gave us Last Exit To Brooklyn and Requeim for a Dream. It's Lynchian in a good way and, though not great, an interesting experience.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 407
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 10:14 am:   

How are those Pusher movies? I was going to check them out, but didn't think much of Fear X.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 408
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 10:24 am:   

Watched Boy Meets Girl directed by Leos Carax. A great movie...to cure insomnia with.
Also saw Wild Camp, a French film starring Denis Savant from Boy Meets Girl. Made in 2005. Boy, he sure looks worked over. Wild Camp wasn't very good either. Denis's craggy sailing instructor loser gets job at French campsite and makes time with the local loud-mouth lolita. For some reason I thought it was going to turn into a Noe-styled fest of unpleasantness, but never did. Not that that would have been great either.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7674
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 - 10:44 am:   

I liked them. Pusher and Bleeder especially. Check em out. for sure, you've seen worse. :-)
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 44
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 08:27 pm:   

LUCIUS: Okay, I KNOW I get zero brownie points from you regarding at least half (or two-thirds) of what I find entertaining on film or CD. But...you LIKED the first Star Trek Film!!!?
You _must_ now go sit in the corner and not berate anybody's choice -- or any goofy popular movie --for the next 24 hours. I've been known (when tired, and sitting in a comfy seat) to fall asleep during a movie (my daughter tries to ignore me): it happened in the last three Star Wars flicks I saw with her...and a few scattered others. "Star Trek (the Motionless picture)" put me into a functioning coma from which I didn't awaken until reading your comments regarding how much you liked it.

Like you, I've only seen the trailer for JJ Abrahams's reboot of Star Trek, but I've enjoyed large parts of his "Lost" series (haven't watched TV in over two years, so I haven't kept up), a goodly portion of the "Alias" stuff and most of his "Felicity" TV series (which I caught on DVD). And I even enjoyed "Mission Impossible 3" (cause, as I've admitted, I enjoy the ocassional no-brainer). So while I'm willing to wait and see before making a final judgement, I'll bet dollars to donuts (or doughnuts) that Abrahams's (and Orci's, since he is the writer) new version of "Star Trek" will be far more entertaining than that first horrible, snooze-inducing film (the one moment when I DID jump up in my seat was when Shatner came on screen with that tribble-cum-toupee on his head).

Much love,
DTS (p.s. I would've written all of this on your blog, but I admit, I'm not very internet savvy -- and when I went to post a reply, a pop-up appeared with a bunch of hieroglyphics that looked like they had been designed for "Star Gate" -- I ran screaming and posted here, instead).
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7677
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 08:54 pm:   

Yeah, I liked the first TRek movie. For one thing, I thought it looked like a movie, whereas the others were filmed so as to kindle nostalgia for the small screen. TO say I liked it better than the others, which were all simed at the cultish audience, means I prefer movies to fannish crap.

Abrams is perhaps the most loathesome, exploitative entity to enter Hollywood since Steven Spielberg cast off his youthful mein and exposed the crass toadlike creature beneath. . Given your affection for his loathesome product, I have no doubt you will greet the new Star Trek with glee.

Can't help you...only God can step in andheal. :-)
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 409
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 09:13 pm:   

Lucius, have you seen The Hourglass Sanatorium, directed by Wojciech Has, who did Saragossa Manuscript? Pre-WWII a man travels by train to visit his father in a sanatorium, and his memories mix with fantasy on the way there. Looks interesting.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7681
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2009 - 09:50 pm:   

No. I looked at it and decided not to go for it after reading a handful of tepid reviews.
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 45
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 04:59 am:   

"Abrams is perhaps the most loathesome, exploitative entity to enter Hollywood since Steven Spielberg cast off his youthful mein and exposed the crass toadlike creature beneath.."

Straight from Spielbert to Abrahams.
What, my man Fresh Prince doesn't rate? (Don't be dissin' ol Will). And all o' that crap produced (I use the term loosely) by the Olsen twins and marketed to the tots N Tweens crowd doesn't rate either?

The hyperbole's so thick in here you could cut it with a knife (or at least take a chunk out with a soup spoon). :-)
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7682
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 06:40 am:   

It's not hyperbole. Abrams and Spielberg occupy a different niche than that offered by the Olson Twins. As for Simth, did you see Hancock or Seven Pounds? He's getting to the level that his Scientology buddy Tom Cruise has sunk.
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1543
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 10:51 am:   

Besides, New York Minute had Eugene Levy...
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7683
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 11:09 am:   

You saw NYM? Ack!
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 46
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 02:14 pm:   

Lucius: Dave _only_ saw the trailer parts where the twins were running around in towels (right Dave...right?)
:-)
(Yes, like all the rest of us older guys, Dave_g has his Olsen twin fantasies -- mine involve cream of wheat, two cartons of melba toast, various massage oils and two pairs of handcuffs).
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7684
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 02:20 pm:   

I'm an older guy, and I have no such fantasies, none whatsoever concerning bulemic chicklets. My fantasies involve no movie stars--I like real women.
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 47
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 11:08 pm:   

Lucius: Why so serious? (Heath made me ask).
:-)

As for real women: who _doesn't_ dig 'em? (All shapes, sizes, colors and...we can omit any fundamentalist creeds)

Hey! Found a DVD copy of THE BIG HEAT a couple of days ago at "Big W" (sort of an Australian Wallmart/Kmart -- except they don't stiff their employees over here): Damn great movie, indeed. And even though I could see it coming early in the movie, it's interesting to know where so many later movies got the idea of how to unexpectedly knock-off a loved one. The DVD was in the discount section, sold as a double along with another great oldie: IN A LONELY PLACE (featuring Bogie).

Thanks again for the tip on that flick, and the other old Glen Ford flicks (I found JUBAL, which I'd seen a while back, on discount rack in the same store that I picked up THE MAN FROM COLORADO -- gotta love the Aussies's devotion to older American flicks). If I don't find EXPERIMENT IN TERROR over here (as well as the others you recommended) real soon, I'm ordering from Amazon.
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Rich_p
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Username: Rich_p

Post Number: 116
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2009 - 10:44 pm:   

Have been working my way through your 'Best of 2008' and, so far, 'Edge of Heaven' has been a fave. Lots to go though. Thanks for the list.

Looking forward to 'Up the Yangzte', which I own but haven't watched yet. Speaking of Jia, I notice that he has postponed filming of his gangster flick 'The Age of Tattoo' because Jay Chou (the Chinese teeny-bopper heartthrob he had cast as the lead) backed out of the project. I bet Chou's agent convinced him that Jia was too controversial a director for a guy who is the Chinese face of Pepsi and Lay's Potato Chips to associate himself with. Oh well, Chou always seemed like an odd choice anyway. :-)
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 412
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2009 - 10:45 pm:   

Watched a pretty great movie called Far North. A cursed native woman and a child she rescued from soldiers, living rough in the Arctic, come upon a wounded white man who said he was running from soldiers who took him captive. There's some amazing cinematography, and the sound design is cool. The ending was pretty shocking and violent, and unexpected. I'm not sure if it worked for me, but it's well-worth watching. Pretty impressive.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 153
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 03, 2009 - 07:09 am:   

I watched Herzog's Encounters at the End of the World and Deliverance recently. Both were excellent.

I also saw Taken (my dad pirated it and wanted to watch it last time I visited) which was about what you'd expect. Bad and dumb. Why does Neeson not do better stuff? I loved the end though: his daughter has been kidnapped, raped, sold into prostitution, and witnessed her father kill people...but is unphased and unchanged by any of this and still wants to be a pop diva like she did at the film's opening. The film definitely had a mocking, anti-American subtext (intentional or not) that I found amusing.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7686
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 03, 2009 - 11:07 am:   

Far north sound cool, JK

H, Rich...long time no everything, glad you enjoyed Akin's new one. I hope Jia gets his new one off the ground.

Dave....I don't think I can do Taken, I just did Push and that was plenty bad.

Dorman, I'm never serious.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 154
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 07:42 am:   

Did you guys know that George RR Martin's big fantasy series is going to be an HBO series?

I gues that means that Martin better put down his fried chicken and write the rest of the series!

I liked the first book when it came out...like, 20 years ago. But couldn't finish the most recent one. My tastes have matured a bit I guess. I no longer like anything written by dudes with two Rs for middle initials.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1151
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 07:57 am:   

The last I heard, HBO was going to film the pilot, and they'd make a decision about the whole series based on that. I hope it's decent, most fantasy adaptations haven't been.

Martin's work is the last epic fantasy series that I am willing to read. But I don't think I'd start it now if I hadn't already read the books.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 155
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 09:07 am:   

>>Martin's work is the last epic fantasy series that I am willing to read. But I don't think I'd start it now if I hadn't already read the books.

The psychology of gambling: Good money on top of bad money will pay off!

Stop, Rob! Read no more and take back your life!

Actually, while I can't be bothered to read RR anymore, I did notice that there are unabridged audiobooks to be pirated. I might download one and listen to it on the long drive to the Adirondacks this weekend...see if I still have a taste for worldbuildy melodrama.

Then again I might switch that shit off and listen to Bob Dylan etc.

Seriously though, I'll never read a 700 page piece of fiction again. Dude needs an editor.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1152
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 09:47 am:   

I just looked and there's still 3 books in the works for Martin. Maybe I should just wait and read the Wikipedia summaries after they're done.

Why is it that this type of medieval fantasy is always multi-volume? Doesn't anyone read single volume stories?
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 156
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 10:24 am:   

>>Why is it that this type of medieval fantasy is always multi-volume? Doesn't anyone read single volume stories?

Because fantasy publishers have learned to create a product that precisely masturbates their readers in such a way as to ensure that they come back for more. Cha-ching!

It's okay to read that stuff as long as you know you're being jerked off by trash when you're doing so.

There are certainly more dignified and grown-up options though.

I was 16 in 1996 when the first book came out. Didn't know any better.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7687
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 10:28 am:   

Never read then books myself. Nothing to add. Saw Coraline last night and liked it about as much as it's possible to like animation based in a YA novel....which is like Enh. It's nicely creepy,I guess. Just nicely creepy doesn't do it for me.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1153
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 11:41 am:   

The book Corline was OK. I'm up for seeing the film.

I doubt I'll end up reading more epic fantasy series, unless I expand on the definition to include something like "Journey to the West" (still on my to-read list sometime).
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 157
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 11:54 am:   

http://mightygodking.com/index.php/2008/10/20/mgk-versus-his-adolescent-reading- habits/
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1154
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 12:24 pm:   

Thanks Dave. Much more entertaining than reading the books.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 413
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, February 06, 2009 - 11:52 pm:   

Read that Spielberg is considering remaking the Korean film Oldboy with Will Smith. PUKE.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7689
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 07, 2009 - 04:52 am:   

Yeah, I heaed that,too. Absurd.

Dave, I read an intervirew with Snyder where he talks about how faithful he was to the graphic novel. Pretty funny
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 414
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 08, 2009 - 12:56 pm:   

Lucius, have you seen Bela Tarr's latest, The Man from London? Supposed to be a noir of sorts, with Tilda Swinton.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7690
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, February 08, 2009 - 05:14 pm:   

I gave up on him. I watched four or five and they seemed very pretentious, somewhat amateurish in their pretension, and were boring as hell. Anyone have any BT recs?
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 415
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 08, 2009 - 08:18 pm:   

I've only seen Werkmeister Harmonies, which was pretty boring. There was a version of Man from London filmed in 40s France and I think there was an American noir, with a different title, not long after. Tarr probably fills his version with the Tarr trudge, 10 minute shots of people walking.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 416
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 08, 2009 - 08:30 pm:   

Michael Winterbottom is doing a version of Jim Thompson's The Killer Inside Me, with Casey Affleck, Jessica Alba, and Kate Hudson. WTF?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7691
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 09, 2009 - 06:51 am:   

I can relate to Casey A, and Jessica Alba makea good noir eye candy, but Kate Hudson? She and Kristen Dunst make my skaniest actress list. Well, I'd rather see that than another Bella Tarr flick. If i ever have the urge to see Tarr, I watch Atonionini instead. Now that's some seriously good pretension. :-)
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1156
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, February 09, 2009 - 07:13 am:   

I had insomnia last night and tried Alien vs. Predator Requiem, hoping it would put me to sleep. Sadly, the insomnia was too strong. I think I'd rather watch another Uwe Boll film than re-watching AVPR.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7692
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 09, 2009 - 08:10 am:   

Yeah, I wayched about a 15 minutes of that when I had pnuemonia--I got up to the time pizza boy reconnects with his brother. Wow, did it suck.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 159
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, February 09, 2009 - 08:17 am:   

http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/20090209_what_price_hollywood/

Chris Hedges has been on fire lately.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7693
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 09, 2009 - 02:11 pm:   

That's what I've been preaching for a while, the distraction thing It's so obviously by design....
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7694
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 09, 2009 - 03:40 pm:   

That's what I've been preaching for a while, the distraction thing It's so obviously by design....
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 417
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, February 09, 2009 - 09:19 pm:   

Well there's a prostitute in The Killer Inside Me, maybe Hudson got that role.
In other news, Ridley Scott is set to direct a movie based on the Monopoly board game.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7695
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 04:40 am:   

:-)

Have you heard aout Scorsese remaking Cache? True. We can only hope for another the Departed. ;) How about Guillermo del Toro remaking Dr Jekyll andvMr Hyde.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1157
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 07:16 am:   

I watched "The Calamari Wrestler" last night. Odd Japanese movie about a pro wrestler who happens to be a giant squid. It's not a great movie, just a fun little flick.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 418
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 10:19 am:   

Del Toro should remake Hammer's Dr. Jeckyll and Sister Hide. Scorcese should remake Bela Tarr's seven-hour long Satantango with Leo, that would ruin his career, if Cache doesn't.
I don't know what's up with the Monopoly movie, but is Ridley Scott thinking?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7697
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 10:56 am:   

Del Toro should be making muffins in a prison kitchen, As for Scorsese, he should have hung it up long ago.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1158
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 11:08 am:   

I didn't realize they were working on Monopoly. I heard about a proposed Candyland movie. I wonder when Hungry Hungry Hippos will be greenlit, or maybe Shoots & Ladders.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7698
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 04:46 pm:   

I don't know if you remember, but they already made this

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088930/
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 419
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 09:05 pm:   

Yeah, I remember that. A real classic.
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 50
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 09:25 pm:   

Ah-so, honorable Robdev: hah-reewood has already made "Monopoly"!

Personally, I enjoyed the acting talents of Seong-su Kim as (wait for it) "John" and (last but certainly not least) as "Kyung Ho," Dong-kun Yang (not to be confused with Wong-wei Wang, a mostly poronographic actor).

Really. (would this keyboard kid you?)
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1160
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2009 - 05:34 am:   

Watched Chocolate last night. Good fight scenes. I found the story a bit more compelling than Ong Bak or The Protector (both really bad in the plot department).
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7701
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2009 - 07:30 am:   

Glad someone else saw Chocolate. I liked Ong Bak despite its narrative shortcomings, but I liked Chocolate a lot--the girl can really duke.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1161
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2009 - 07:37 am:   

I like Ong Bak a lot, but the plot is bad. Protector was even worse. But it's hard not to feel sympathy for Zen, I didn't think an autistic girl would be a compelling lead character, but she did a good job.

It's out on DVD now, so hopefully more people will see it.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7702
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2009 - 08:43 am:   

The Protector was awful. Hope Og Bak 2 is good. The bits with the elephants in the trailer makes it look amazing,

I loved that fight scene in Chocolate that takes place while she's hanging from a bridge, buildings, etc....
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 420
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2009 - 01:38 am:   

Watched Viva La Muerte, a movie directed by Fernando Arrabal, who wrote the play that Jodorowsky's first movie was based on. Jodorowsky-type weirdness about a boy and his religious mother, and his "red" father who was taken away by the fascist state. Lots of Bunuel-type anti-church stuff too. Interesting soundtrack, they used some Ocora world music stuff. Pretty wacked movie. Worth watching I guess for anyone into Jodorowsky.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7703
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2009 - 08:56 am:   

I'm pretty sure I saw that back in the day but it blurs into all theh other hallucinations. :-)
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 421
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2009 - 10:05 am:   

I think the director was hallucinating during the extra interview on the disc. He sat there with a chair on his lap and said he was the boy genius of Spain who wanted to be a saint with an ass or vagina for a halo.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7704
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2009 - 11:09 am:   

I'd opt for the latter, but neither sound that appealing.
Interesting...
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7706
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, February 15, 2009 - 08:04 am:   

It should come as no surprise that there is to be another installment of the Thing, this one helmed by Norwegian director Matthijs Van Hejnngen based on Ronald Moore's (Battlestar Galactica) script. The movie will be a prequel focusing on the Norwegian camp--if you recall, the movie began with some crazed Norwegians chasing a dog across the ice and shooting at it. I'm not too unhappy with this--we can always do with another Arctic circle scifi/horror film--and this seems a pretty reasonable approach from a writer who has done some credible work. True, it doesn't show much imagination, but within the spectrum of no imagination, of lame remakes and formulaic sequels, this seems passable.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 160
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 12:10 pm:   

Christ, Moore has never had an original idea, has he? Star Trek, Battlestar, and The Thing...he just plays in other people's sandboxes. And collects a big paycheck doing so.

Battlestar had it's moments in its first season, but the guy couldn't write anything past exposition. And the characters were...

Fuck it. It's gonna suck. I'll tell you how it ends: The Norwegians all die.

I started watching Generation Kill recently. That doesn't suck. In fact, it's excellent so far.

I also Netflixed Spirit of the Beehive, Lucius, based on the posts here circa the Pan's Labyrinth days, but I've been too busy climbing mountains to watch it yet. Maybe tonight.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7708
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 12:42 pm:   

Yeah, it'll probably suck. But not so much as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.. ;)

Skip a mountain and watch Spirit.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7709
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 02:37 pm:   

If anyone has inn mind to see Friday the Thirteenth, stick a lit cigarette in your eye--the pain would be preferable. I won't go into detail.
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 21
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 04:40 pm:   

Just got a new Samsung HDTV, just an amazing machine. But as I consider grabbing a Blu Ray player, if only to be able to convert old DVDs, I went through what was available on Blu Ray and realized: not much, or at least not much that's not an HDTV remaster from older film. Any suggestions worth keeping rather than renting? About the only thing I have my eye on is John Adams and it's not out yet.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7710
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 05:30 pm:   

I have no idea what's on Blu ray or HD, but I kinda think there aren't many movies I'd care for. Sorry. I don't watch much aside from foreign fllms on DVD any more.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1162
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 06:57 pm:   

Why did you subject yourself to Friday the 13th? Do you have to review it, or were you just feeling masochistic? I often go for the latter and watch sci-fi channel original movies.

The only Blu Ray thing that I can think of is Planet Earth. That will be my first purchase if I ever get an HDTV and Blu Ray player.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7712
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 07:41 pm:   

I was in the mutiplex, and suddenly the movie I bought a ticket for looked bad, and so I went in to Friday. Machochistic? Yeah, probably.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1163
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 05:32 am:   

Wow, what looked worse than Friday?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7713
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 07:04 am:   

Not worse, just ho hum....but maybe worse. The Pink Panther 2. What can I say, I was bored.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1164
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 07:28 am:   

That would be a tough call. Neither looks to be worth watching. I just checked what's playing locally and aside from Corline, it doesn't look any more appealing: Gran Torino, Confessions of a Shopaholic, Push, Benjamin Button, Taken, Underworld Rise of the Lichens... or Lycans, I think I'd rather watch a movie about Old-Man's Beard or Reindeer Moss.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1165
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 10:58 am:   

Werewolves are normally more interesting than lichen, but I watched the first two Underworld movies. I think a documentary about lichen would be much more interesting.

We are getting good movies here, just not in the multiplexes (well, The Wrestler and Slumdog are still playing, but the rest looks awful). PHG Filmmakers is still getting worthwhile films. Wendy and Lucy starts on Friday, and Gomorrah is coming in April.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7715
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 11:42 am:   

understood. I saw the first U-world. That did it for me, tho I am a big Bill Nighy fan.
I liked Wendy and Lucy. Glad to hear Gomorrah's coming,
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 22
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 11:48 am:   

Planet Earth definitely gets raves around here as well, sounds like a must. Shame Blu Ray only seems to be worth it for documentaries though.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7717
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 07:04 am:   

Mickey Rourke got jobbed. Penn was good, but Rourke got jobbed.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1166
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 07:17 am:   

A comedian friend did some pre-Oscar blogging and had a line that I kept on thinking about through the Oscars, "it's about the viewer (usually an upper-middle-class white person) feeling proud of themselves for having watched it." He was specifically talking about Slumdog, but it seemed to apply to many other things about the night. Academy members feel better about themselves for voting for a guy playing a gay man ("See, we're open minded") rather than a washed up wrestler.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7718
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 09:35 am:   

Yeah, Robert. I agree, but I think it might have a lot to do with Mickey rourke not being Hollywood enough for the academy. II watched the Spirit awards the night before, and rourke's acceptance speech was three minutes of F-bombs and straight from the shoulder talking--it was hilarious, among te best speeches I've ever hear, but it would not have gone over in prime time...
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 161
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 10:32 am:   

Didn't even know the Oscars were on last night until I showed up at a bar and they were on TV. Thankfully the sound was turned off.

Has anybody been watching Joss Whedon's new show, Dollhouse? I watched the first two episodes on Hulu recently. I can hardly believe this show is being done by the guy who did Firefly. Really, really bad. There are good ideas in there, but they're being blotted out by formulaic stupid shit like CSI-style kidnapping plots etc.

And why the hell does Whedon keep working with Fox?

Also, I listened to about the first 6 hours of the audio book of A Game of Thrones on a long drive recently. Pretty entertaining. Not nearly as bad as I feared. Worth pirating for long drives, for sure.

Planning to watch Spirit of the Beehive tonight if I have time...

Lastly, just learned that Frozen River was filmed in the Adirondacks. Makes me want to see it even more. I did some great snowshoeing and climbing there last weekend. Even got chased by coyotes.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7719
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 10:51 am:   

Dave, you got to chase the coyote, not the other way around, And if you do let em chase you, take a long a couple of cats to drop in your wake. Feeding on the cats will slow em down.

Saw one episode of Dollhouse--I agree, Unwatchable.

The answer to your question, and to all Hollywood questions, is Money....
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Dave_g
Intermediate Member
Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1544
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 - 09:27 am:   

Saw Fear X this weekend and really dug it. Factoid I found interesting...soundtrack by percussionist and Eno collaborator J. Peter Schwalm.

Could you figure out the ending?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7720
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 - 11:23 am:   

Cool. Glad someone else saw it and liked it. I'm not sure I figured out the ending, but I didn't care....
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1167
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 11:51 am:   

What's the worst movie sequel? A friend and I were discussing it last night. His vote was Chronicles of Riddick. Besides being awful, he felt Judy Dench and Thandie Newton were really slumming in it. I found it more entertaining to watch than Highlander 2, so that got my vote. But I feel like I'm overlooking something really terrible.

I think we're both skipping slasher movies because we don't expect anything out of them, but we expected to be entertained by Dench or swordfights.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7724
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 08:07 am:   

What's the worst remake you've seen?

Death Race, for me, has to be mentioned. 3:10 to Yuma. But those ae ones I've seen recently. Get Carter and the remake of Point Blank with Mel Gibson.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1169
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 08:47 am:   

Would we consider Fantastic Four a remake of the Roger Corman one? :-) If so, that easily wins.

This is hard because I try to avoid remakes. I didn't see Psycho, Pink Panther, Swept Away, or Stepford Wives. Didn't see Death Race either. Maybe Poseidon, Dawn of the Dead, or The Fog
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 425
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 10:47 am:   

Spielberg's remake of Oldboy with Will Smith will probably top the list, whenever it comes out. I'd add practically every American remake of an Asian horror film.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7725
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 10:49 am:   

Poseidon is certainly up there, as is Stepford and Swept Away. The COrman FF was so bad, i don't know--it kind of blurs the issue.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1170
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 11:14 am:   

I never saw the Corman FF, but the new one was terrible. I think I saw some of Stepford and turned it off. Although it's hard to remember which movies I've seen with Kidman acting like a robot.

I also had the idea of Battle Beyond the Stars, which was a remake of Magnificent Seven, which was a remake of Seven Samurai. It's not technically a remake, but it's the same story dressed up in space suits.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7726
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 12:48 pm:   

The corman was horrid--the fx were fucking primitive. To show Mr. Fantastic's stretching abilities, at one point they used a fake wooden arm and suck it out a door.

Speilturd's Oldbioy promises great woe.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1171
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 06:40 am:   

I saw a few films over the weekend. Legend of the Shadowless Sword was a decent Korean martial arts film. Not spectacular, but a solid movie. I started a Thai movie, Dynamite Warrior, but it was just way too silly. A villain who's goal is selling tractors and a hero who fights with dynamite powered rockets and chakrams. I couldn't make it through the movie. Finally, the worst movie of the weekend was 10000 BC. It's sad that bad movies now aren't even entertainingly bad, they're just boring.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7727
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 07:56 am:   

Thai movies are sort of hit and miss with me, but they're starting to produce a worthwhile cinema.

10000 BC was the poor man's STARGATE without the cool gizmo.
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 23
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 04:05 pm:   

I've watched the first 3 Dollhouses, but wow I have do have to agree it's quite poor. The one with the diva group was almost excruciating. It's supposed to get a lot better in a couple more so I may hang with it until then, but I'm not sure Dushku can carry a show. Best thing on TV right now IMO is Damages on FX. Stacked with HBO actors (at least two from The Wire, one from Deadwood) and lots of great plotting at work.

10000 BC looked pretty awesome on HD but I swear I've seen that movie before 1000 times. Beast Master? Krull? Quest for Fire? Still, wouldn't it be awesome for someone to finally wield all these special effects for something really good?

Worst sequel ever will be Transformers 2. Or at least it will have to be given sequels are always worse than the original movie and nothing is worse than that first Transformers. :D
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7729
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 08:58 pm:   

So did I enjoy Firefly, but Dollhouse reeks...

I saw a lot of foreign and indie films, and I like Slumdog well enough, but there is a whole bunch better out there...
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 162
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 10:03 pm:   

Dollhouse is awful. Awful awful awful.

I liked Firefly a lot. But Dollhouse is kind of the worst thing ever. When retards make stuff, you expect it to be bad. But with Whedon, I had expectations. Maybe he just lost it. Or needed a recession paycheck. Or just wanted to screw with Fox.

Anyway:

http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2009/2/27/

Oh, and I watched Spirit of the Beehive finally. Very nice. Liked it a lot. Very pretty movie.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1172
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 05:34 am:   

I never bothered with Dollhouse, Whedon doesn't do a lot for me. It is interesting that I know some complete Whedon fanboys, and they love the show. I wonder if there's a cognitive dissonance effect.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7730
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 06:40 am:   

Cignitive dissonance is doubtless at work, but I know a lot of people who loved Buffy and/or Firefly who detest Dollhouse. I liked Firefly, too. It wasn't deep, but it was pleasantly shallow. Never could get into Buffy's take on adolesence.

Saw Watchmen--it's better and worse than I expected Basically, it fell flat. Review coming this weekend,
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1173
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 06:57 am:   

A friend tried to get me to go to a midnight showing for Watchmen on Thursday. I don't get the point of these. I'd rather not discomfort myself and pay more just to see a movie a few hours or days before others. I can wait for a matinee or for it to make it to the dollar theater.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1174
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 10:36 am:   

I often go to movies with friends. It's a chance to socialize before the movie, and then discuss it after.

Still, it's not a great system. It's harder to walk out when you're with friends. I watched the remake of The Haunting because I didn't want to leave him there by himself. By the way, I think that may be the worst remake I've seen, it slipped my mind earlier.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7732
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 11:12 am:   

The Haunting was abysmal. I tend to agree,
But yeah, I like to go to movies alone because of the walk-out thing and because also I want to focus on it and not field a bunch of comments and questions. Discussing movies is fun but has a big downside for someone who reviews...so do a lot more pre-viewing discussion than post.
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 24
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 11:56 am:   

"Dollhouse doesn't deserve anyone hanging in. I mean,how much do you think it CAN improve? "

Well personally I think the idea of judging a series by the pilot is usually a really bad idea, pilots are almost always among the worst episodes of any series. I've really liked most of Joss Whedon's work (pilots aside) so I think I'm hanging in longer than I might normally based on that and also because I've read Dollhouse gets a lot better in the second half. I'm still really baffled after Firefly why Whedon would want to back to Fox though, as they seem to be jerking the show around even worse this time.

Hating Glenn Close would make Damages pretty difficult, yes. I think she's damn good in it but the big surprises are Rose Byrne and, amazingly, Ted Danson.

Some review mentioned that Watchmen the movie wasn't particularly good because it stuck too closely to the comic. I'm just finishing up the comic now and can hardly believe anyone could make a film out of it.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7733
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 12:38 pm:   

The pilot? There've been three hour-long episodes. For once, I agree with Fox. :-)

Rose Byrne's no surprise to me--I know she's a good actress. I never lay eyes on Ted Danson again.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7734
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 12:41 pm:   

I hope I never lay eyes on TD again....
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 25
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 01:12 pm:   

Fox made them refilm the original pilot so it was the one you saw. Apparently they wanted fast action right away and less continuity. Not a good move in my book to make Whedon more procedural-ish. Apparently the original was rewritten to be shown somewhere in the middle.

Hey I thought the same way about Danson until this. Even in Curb Your Enthusiasm I could barely stand it.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7735
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 03:40 pm:   

So the third episode was the pilot? What about the other two--they were lame.

You watch so much more TV than I do... :-) Never saw Curb Your Enthusiasm.
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Sigil23
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Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 26
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 04:00 pm:   

From what I've read, Whedon came up with a pilot that wasn't action oriented enough for Fox. Talks were had and he stopped production and rewrote the pilot to be more self contained and to have more action. The original pilot was rewritten, refilmed and placed around #5 or 6, so it hasn't aired yet. Apparently some of the cast feel the show doesn't really find its feet until about half way through the 12 or 13 episode order, so I'm willing to wait that long. Some of Whedon's original ideas of what he wanted to explore in the show are interesting to me, it's just too bad I haven't seen any of them so far.

I don't think any of Whedon's other series were any good until at least that many eps. Firefly might be the exception, but it aired differently on TV than it does on the DVD (the intended order).

You've got me outwatched on movies by a looong way too. :-)
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7736
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 04:08 pm:   

Episode 6 is the original, then. Let me know if it's any good. :-)

Movies are better.
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 27
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 04:39 pm:   

"Movies are better."

LOL. This really is the interwebs. :D
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7737
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 - 05:33 pm:   

Movies aren't better?
You coulda fooled me.
TV is a very limited medium---even the good series are soap opera-ish and melodramatic.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 163
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 07:20 am:   

The original Dollhouse pilot was entirely scrapped. Never to be seen again. Fox said it was too dark. Whedon tried to chop it up to use as reheats, but couldn't pull it off. Then he started filming the retarded episodes we've been shown thus far. Somewhere in there Fox halted production of the show.

Apparently, you can find the script for the original pilot online. Hell if I have time to waste reading it though.

In Wikipedia I trust.

Episode 6 is just the next one that is written by Whedon is all. Was it made without Fox intereference? Only if the fanboys like it. If it sucks too, Fox definitely made it suck.
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Sigil23
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Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 28
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 12:36 pm:   

I mean some movies are great some are bad, some TV is great some is bad. That is it's not the format, it's what is done with the format. TV's strengths in my eyes are the chance to let long arcs and characters develop over time and to view aspects of the subject from all sides. The Wire's a perfect example of how successful something running five seasons can be. To me debating whether a format is better than another is like debating whether heavy metal is better than jazz or fruit are better than vegetables.

If you're right Dave, I suppose it's difficult to trust anything the fanboys say. My whole point is basically that Buffy Season 1 and Angel were both pretty terrible, but it would have sucked if I had stopped watching either one then. Of course Dollhouse is definitely worse than either of those two seasons so who knows. Whether or not it's Fox's fault or not, the aired episodes aren't funny in any way and pretty much all of Whedon's best stuff is. That could either mean interference or Whedon's just finally lost it.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7738
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 12:48 pm:   

No, movies are better. you can argue that some TV is better than some movies, but there has never been a TV L'aventura or fill in the name of your favorite masterpiece and there never will be. The bar for movie greatness is set highter than that for tv. TV is fine for vulgarizations, ten pt dickens things and so forth, but it has not evinced the creativity and poetry of the cinema. I can name hundreds of movies that are superior in all ways to anything that has ever been on tv.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1175
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 12:53 pm:   

In general I find the signal to noise ration to be marginally higher with film than with TV. TV is still too episodic, things get wrapped up within 20 or 45 minutes. Except for rare exceptions like Lost or 24 which have their own structural problems.

But I'd rather debate whether jazz is better than vegetables. Perhaps jazz played on vegetables would be better than either separately.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 164
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 01:12 pm:   

TV just plain sucks. That there are a few exceptions to this (The Wire, Farscape, whatever you happen to like a lot) doesn't change the fact that TV exists to fill the spaces in between comercials. You can argue that HBO serials are different and formatted like a novel I guess, but...to what end?

To the extent that movies, especially Hollywood, movies, are now just excuses for product placement, movies are the same as TV: crap. It's just easier to be the exception to the rule and honor that raised bar when you only need to pay for filming two hours.

Plus, it takes a friggin' genius to come up with an idea that really warrants more than two hours.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7739
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 01:31 pm:   

Jazz is definitely better than vegetables. I mean come on, Coleman versus okra, Miles vs Turnip greens...ain't no contest.

And what you said,Dave...Yeah!
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 29
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 01:53 pm:   

"fill in the name of your favorite masterpiece"

Isn't this really the extent of it though?

"To the extent that movies, especially Hollywood, movies, are now just excuses for product placement, movies are the same as TV: crap. It's just easier to be the exception to the rule and honor that raised bar when you only need to pay for filming two hours. "

I can dig that last statement, but that was kind of my point about all of this, you can find tons of crap in any format. Whether Sturgeon's law operates at 85% in movies rather than 95% in TV seems to be one of those points barely worth a fuss. And these days it pratically takes a genius to do anything since it's just about all reinvention. Sure, movies are better outside the dictates of Hollywood, but I'm not exactly announcing mainstream commercial TV being on the same plane as a good HBO series. But nor am I saying populism is akin to shite either.

But in the spirit of things, celery rocks Spirogyra like nothing else. Although like a tomato maybe we can argue whether Spirogyra is really jazz or not. And hell I'll take Rhapsody over brussel sprouts for that matter. These certainly seem like more important issues than TV vs movies anyway.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7740
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 02:31 pm:   

Populism Is Shite is tattooed on my right cheek (not my face).

equating Hollywood movies with movies is like saying God is Republican.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1176
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 02:46 pm:   

Miles vs Turnip greens is easy, but what about Kenny G vs onions? I can get by just fine without KG, but cooking without onions would be a challenge. Garlic can repel vampires, but the best I've ever done with jazz is just repelling non-blood sucking roommates. :-)

Perhaps the superiority of TV vs film depends on the genre. TV has been better for comedy. Hollywood has fallen down on making intentionally funny movies, while TV has limited success. The Simpsons at it's worst is still better than comedy movies. Tropic Thunder was hailed as a great comedy, but that's largely because it's watchable. Unlike Epic/Scary/Date/Colonoscopy Movie.
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 30
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 03:01 pm:   

God's not only a Republican, but a Calvinist Southern Baptist too. Which means he doesn't like jazz or vegetables.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7741
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 04:39 pm:   

well, fuck him then. New God...
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7742
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 05:01 pm:   

Rob, no one's mentioned soft jazz, which is not jazz at all.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7743
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 05:03 pm:   

PLus I think there are still good comedies, esp romantic comedies.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1177
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 06:33 pm:   

I recall you saying Ghost Town was a good romantic comedy. What others?
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7744
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 06:47 pm:   

Ghost Town's decent because of Leoni and Gervais.

Others--Off the top of my head, High Fidelity comes to mind. Grosse Point Blank. Flirting with Disaster. Bridget Jones. I could think of others and will if you'd like, but it's a genre Hwood still does well on occasion.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 426
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 09:26 pm:   

Spirogyra was a good folk-rock band. St. Radiguns and Bells, Boots, and Shambles. As opposed to Spirogyra the shitty fusion-lite jazz band.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1178
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 06:41 am:   

I like High Fidelity and Grosse Point Blank. Haven't seen Flirting with Disaster.

In general, if I want to laugh, I can find funnier material on TV: Simspons, Venture Brothers, Big Bang Theory, My Name is Earl, South Park, Daily Show, Colbert Report. And that's just shows that are still being made.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7745
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 08:04 am:   

I like Big Bang Theory and South Park pretty much, but overall when I look at the history of movie comedy, films like the original Producers and Planes and Trains and Automobiles and etc, I gotta lean toward the movies....
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 165
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 08:24 am:   

We don't have a jaguar thread, so:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/03/090303-jaguar-update.html

That must have been one badass cat to live that long.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7746
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 08:50 am:   

Yeah, read about the cat. Bad ass, indeed.
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Sigil23
New member
Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 31
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 09:48 am:   

I like SP, Earl, Daily Show and Colbert but they're all good examples of shows that can be brilliant at times but can go episodes that just aren't funny at all (only 1 in 5 SPs are really any good now but that 1 is usually worth hanging in there for). Will have to check out Big Bang though, always hear good things about it. Simpsons I stopped watching around the third or fourth year. Still watch Family Guy but it's been a lot weaker of late.

Like the folk rock Spirogyra myself, although nothing beats that first Comus in that area.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1179
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 09:59 am:   

I've seen that jaguar stuff. I hope he won't be the last jaguar to been seen in the US.

I looked at IMDB's list of the 50 highest rated comedies and the list itself is a joke. Forrest Gump appears, but Office Space does not. But aside from Gump and Wall-E, the only post-1985 films on the list are foreign.
http://www.imdb.com/chart/comedy

Since the list is flawed, I can't use it to support my theory that Hollywood hasn't done a good job on comedies since the 80s.
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Jwk
Junior Member
Username: Jwk

Post Number: 427
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 10:12 am:   

Yeah, Comus-First Utterance is a good one.
The only tv comedy I've watched, and liked, in the last 5 years or so is the British version of The Office. Never saw the American version.
Wasn't too imnpressed with Extras.
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Sigil23
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Post Number: 32
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 10:26 am:   

I like both Offices, although think it took a while for the US version to hit its stride (I think it's in its best season now). It's definitely more populist and not nearly as sublime as the British version, two very different shows. I agree on Extras, I can barely stand Gervais now. 30 Rock has its moments as well, but far too few for its accolades.
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Sigil23
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Post Number: 33
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 10:29 am:   

Speaking of British shows that succeeded the changeover, I really thought the US Life on Mars was really good, so it's too bad it's being cancelled. I think a good reason for it is they stick to the British scripts more often than not and have quite a bit of talent involved. Although as much as I like Keitel, he's no Phil Glenister.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7747
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 12:37 pm:   

That IMDb list is ridiculous. ANy list that diesn't have the Producers on it, or some of the great Brit comdies with Terry Thomas and Peter Sellers and etc, is totally lame.

I don't like any series comedies much--every now and then I watch the Office and find it amusing....but it's nothing I make appointments for. sane for the BigBang and South Park. I enjoyed watching SPaced on DVD, so I reckon I preferred that above the rest. My problem with TV is that it;s chewing gum for the mind. even the best of it deosn't really challenge or provoke.
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1180
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 12:51 pm:   

Spaced was good. Sometimes I think British TV is funnier than American, but then I think that perhaps we're just seeing the good stuff, that the awful doesn't make it over.

South Park is the only really provocative TV series that I can think of (well, the fake news shows are to an extent, but they largely just showcase how pathetic the regular news is). Boondocks had some provocative episodes, but went downhill pretty quickly.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7748
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 01:23 pm:   

I gotta admit, I hate Steven Colbert. I appreciate that he w as a thorn in W's side, for which I give him props, but he just annoys me.

You can get most Brit stuff on dvd, and some is not very good, But I loved the Steve Coogan stuff....
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Sigil23
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Post Number: 34
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Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 02:08 pm:   

Perhaps the real issue is that TV in general doesn't live up to providing literature-quality, groundbreaking or paradigm-shifting work as often as film does. Perhaps the same argument can be made for books over film. But if it was a matter for me of maximizing what I get out of any media to make sure most of what I was absorbing was lit-quality and challenging then it would be imperative to avoid big studio shlock pretty much at all costs. But I'm also fairly convinced after reading big threads on American Idol here and lots of comments on big Hollywood movies, discussions of Lost etc etc, that even here there isn't a complete aversion to populism going on either, ass tattoos aside. :-) Even Spaced, as good as it is, is concerned with a geekish sort of populism. I guess, considerations of paid reviews aside, the question is, when one pays $10 to walk into Iron Man or The Dark Knight or even Watchmen or even watching Dollhouse for free based on Firefly with a history of scads of failed Hollywood movies and TV programs, isn't expecting something particularly challenging or thought provoking just a set up for disappointment?
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Dave_g
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Post Number: 1545
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 02:16 pm:   

Show that started out feh but has gotten really hysterical: Flight of the Conchords. Worst debut episode: Eastbound and Down. I still make time in my week for Swayze's The Beast, but the writing is a big letdown. Pretty impressive that a guy who had pancreatic cancer can do some of the physical stuff.

Liked what I saw of The Wrestler, but, unfortunately, dozed through about half of it.

Saw and liked Gamorrah...
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Dave_g
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Post Number: 1546
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 02:23 pm:   

Have not seen Dollhouse and am frankly amazed at how much interest it generated. A friend of mine described the plot and it sounded like a refried Alias. I really tried to like Fringe, also, but it just bored me. At the end of the day, America wants to see Anna Torv wet, in her underwear, in the isolation tank. Don't make us wait 45 minutes listening to a lot of conspiracy theory yappin'.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7749
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 02:30 pm:   

I like reality shows because I can work while I watch them. Can't do that with other shows, even rotten ones, because they demand you pay attention to them. Why watch anything then, if that's your criteria, you might ask. Because it gets spooky working alone in a silent house for 12-14 hours and when I get tired I turn on the tv to give my head somewhere to go, and reality shows are the least invasive. I watch stuff like Spaced when I'm ill. I'm not adverse to populism, I just don't enjoy it in steady doses. I thought Lost might be good--wrong--so I stopped watching. I have guilty pleasures like everyone else, but I work such long hours I don't really have a chance to watch that much. One show I am going to watch is Breaking Bad, whose second season starts on AMC this Sunday. I dig that show. About a high school teacher who learns hes terminal and
starts making drugs so he can leave his family well off. It's really cool.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7750
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Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 02:31 pm:   

Dave g, glad you dug Gomorrah!
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Sigil23
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Post Number: 35
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 02:47 pm:   

Fringe has gotten a bit better since the Christmas break, but you may be right, I'm still watching Leverage cuz of Gina Bellman after all.

Breaking Bad's one of the best shows on TV. Cranston's job was one of the first times I actually agreed with an Emmy award. Have to wait until Monday though for the opener.

Anyway your explanations make sense to me, but I think that is part of TV's job to offer something senseless and escapist and I'd agree I wouldn't want that 24/7 either. But I mentally file stuff like BB and the Wire in an entirely different category than the escapist watching. And I don't watch reality TV at all except for the occasional Dirty Jobs.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7751
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 03:30 pm:   

Well, reality TV isn't something you really watch. :-)
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1181
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 04:01 pm:   

Reality TV is easy to tune out. I'm trying to reduce my TV viewing to only things that I actually want to watch, reality is the first thing chopped.

I'm not opposed to populism, I just wish there was more mindful entertainment rather than mindless.
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Robdev
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Post Number: 1182
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 04:08 pm:   

Oh, and like Dave G, I've had no interest in Dollhouse. No interest in Fringe either. I think Lost killed a lot of my interest in serialized stories. It started so well and then went downhill. That made me think that if something with so much potential couldn't pull it off, stuff with less potential won't be able to pull it off.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7752
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 06:27 pm:   

I've already explained my reliance on reality shows--they're perfect for me.

Fringe and Dollhouse are both horrible. but you might want to check out breaking bad. It's pretty cool.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7753
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 06:55 pm:   

Oh, yeah...I've got nothing against populism either. I have my guilty pleasures. But mostly I can't stand serial shows.
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 199
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 05, 2009 - 07:45 pm:   

The recent UK television show Apparitions wasn't bad, I thought. Martin Shaw played an exorcist, and it was directed by the guy who made Ultraviolet (not the movie!).
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Seppo13
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Post Number: 52
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 01:00 am:   

Hey Lucius. Got NOTHING to add to the reality TV show debate. I'm gonna pretend I never heard you mention them -- I'm still getting over the shock that a former, very smart, blonde-haired and blue-eyed (hot-bodied) doctor (who treated my daughter back in the states) enjoyed American Idol and Survivor and alla those shows in which people humliated themselves for a shot at "fame."

Just wanted to tell you about a local film, "The Square," which is worth seeing. I caught it at the local cinema last year, but because Aussies are still entranced by American cinema, it didn't do well. Maybe it will do better on DVD. Great noirish type crime flick. I'm not well-versed in the ways of the web, so I don't know where you guys in the states can go on the web to buy a copy (if it interests), but you can get a peek at it at www dot squarethemovie dot com

I liked it well enough to pick up a copy today.

Also: We're behind, Down Under, but I just caught "Trumbo" on DVD, too. Damn good documentary -- and all of the suspense and dramatic tension comes about strictly via words (from Trumbo's letters) that are read by various actors in between clips and interviews.

If you get a chance to see it, and dig it, consider it payback for your recommendation of "Let the Right One In." (Great flick).

By the way: I rented "Deathrace." I did so knowing it was, at best, a B-movie remake of, well, a B-movie. But nothing -- I mean, NOTHING -- shocked me as much as the way Joan Allen looked in that flick. NOW I know why I haven't seen her in a movie since the "Bourne" films.

You may not agree with me (I find a _wide_ variety of female types -- color, size, height, etc -- attractive -- just depends on the total package)...you may not agree with me, but I always thought Joan Allen was a very sexy lady. The lines (cigarette smoker lines included) just made her that much more hot -- in a colleg professor, upper echelon executive-type kinda way. Then I saw her in "Death Race": fuck! Why the hell do so many women in Hollywood fall prey to the notion that they HAVE to go under the knife. She looks damn scary now! (Her right eye seems to tilt up towards the sky at the corner...and the rest of her face just looks...wrong. She has surpassed Nicole Kidman for looking unnatural, but she's not far behind).

What a drag.
Joan Allen. And Madeline Stowe. And...well, I could probably go on for pages. But you get the idea. Why do so many naturally beautiful women let someone cut into them and turn them into something so unnatural looking?!

I miss Audrey Hepburn.
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Seppo13
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Post Number: 53
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 01:04 am:   

P.S.
On Serial shows: I'm one of those who is guilty of getting hooked -- but usually I do it after they've been out on DVD for a while. I just discovered the five year run of "the Wire" (written by so many crackerjack mystery novelists). Watched those shows -- all five seasons -- back to back to back, not stopping (except for sleep) until I finished them all.
Don't know if you've ever seen the show, Lucius -- it wasn't a ratings winner; it did win a Peabody -- but that is one serial show I'd recommend checking out, solely on the basis of the writing and the, surprisingly good, acting (some of the parts -- mostly the criminals, of course -- were played by ex-criminals from the Baltiomore area -- the show's creators worked for the police department, and reported on the same, in that city).
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7754
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 06:33 am:   

I've got Apparitions, HUW, but haven't yet watched it/ Glad to hear it's good.

Dorman, I saw a couple pf eps of the Wire and liked it. Just don't know when I'd have the time to sit down and watch five years of a series.

Thanks for telling me about the Square. Sounds like something I'd like. Did you see Noise....another cool Aussie film.

Joan Allen...enh. But I get your point.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 166
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 08:14 am:   

>>Just don't know when I'd have the time to sit down and watch five years of a series.

Make the time, dude. Make the time. It is such a good show.

Besides, the seasons are short.
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Dave_g
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Username: Dave_g

Post Number: 1547
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 09:41 am:   

I've always had a thing for Emma Thompson. Guess she's my Joan Allen...

I totally understand Lucius' point re reality TV. I work at home a lot so I know where he's coming from, although my solution is to play a familiar movie I've seen a dozen or more times. For ambient headnoise, that works best for me.

I am totally on board for Breaking Bad. One of the best shows on television. Great cast, great writing.

Never saw Leverage but I used to sneak peeks at Gina Bellman on Coupling. Sex on the hoof, no doubt.

The Wash City Paper didn't like Gamorrah; it's writers' "if only I had made that film" mindset was in effect. They criticized it for not having a narrative spine, which bothered me at first also, but upon reflection I think it was subtly effective to have no overt connection between the stories. It creates a mood of pervasive, inchoate corruption that is doubly effective.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7755
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 10:04 am:   

I loved Gommorah's structure. It was fucking different and like you said it assisted the mood.

My hot chick not is Olivia Williams, the forty something star of Rushnore and the Sixth Sense and now in Dollhouse (not for long). She totally does it for me.

Yeah, re the reality shows, it's just some place to put your head when you're tired.

Dave, okay, okay, I'll do the Wire...sometime soon.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 428
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 10:48 am:   

It seems the actresses are having face work done at younger ages now too. Everytime I see an actress on Letterman lately, I look at her face and think something looks weird about it. You can tell around the upper lip area, it looks all tight and unnatural.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7756
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 11:16 am:   

Yeah, I saw Cameron Diaz the other day and thought she'd had some work done. Eerie.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 167
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 11:46 am:   

I've noticed a lot of young actresses who, while giving a look of surprise or confusion in scene, raise their eyebrows but only produce wrinkles on the top half of their head.

Botox, man...freaks me out.

I say looking lived in is hot. Vacant but youthful expresionlessness is just not appealing.
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Seppo13
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Post Number: 54
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 04:31 pm:   

LUCIUS: re. finding the time to watch five years of "The Wire." Like the Dave said, the seasons are short -- between 11 and 13 shows (only one or two season are that long) -- and I watched the shows instead of movies at night (often _well_ into the wee hours, but a lost hour of sleep here and there wasn't too bad). 'Course, since you _have_ to watch movies for your column, I can see how time to watch would be hard to come by.

On the otherhand, if you have a laptop and you DO end up traveling to OZ -- to check out the rollclouds, amongst other items -- you could watch _at least_ three seasons of the show in the time it takes you to fly back and forth (and wait at airports) between here and the USA. That'd save you from having to watch movies you'll probably hate on the flights back and forth (even in economy, Quantas does a good job of keeping everyone entertained -- and reasonably comfortable and well-fed -- on their flights (movies, TV shows, the who shebang, all on a screen on the seat in front of you).

As for "Noise," I actually _hadn't_ heard about it. It came out the same year I was on the way over here. I've been catching up on my Aussie cinema, though ("Romulus, My Father," "Little Fish," etc) so I'll put it on the to watch list (I'd never seen "Ned Kelly," the version starring Heath Ledger, till just last year -- very good flick -- I think the Aussie audiences underrate their homegrown flims).


DAVE: Looking lived in was the phrase I most needed: a young, nublie woman can be appealling, no doubt. But a well-maintained bod and lived in, beautiful face on an older woman -- or, I should say, woman my age or slightly older or younger -- always trumps. Patricia Clarkson has done well, too -- as long as she hasn't hit a botox/cosmetic knife wall since the last film I saw her in. Same for Catherine McCormack (and Zeta-Jones goes without saying). Julia Ormond, Kirsten Scott-Thomas and Juliette Binoche. And even though I've read internet stuff about cosmetic surgery, I still think Michelle Pfieffer is a hot mama. (She can lay her duck lips -- she called 'em that -- on me anytime! Quack!)

Cheers!
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7757
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 04:56 pm:   

Only rarely do I get into movie stars. Olivia Williams is the exception, I like waitresses. There was a song about waitresses by the Five Chinese Brothers that begins--She remind you of your mother/in a dirty kind of way. Yep.

I'll try to find time to watch the Wire...
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Minz
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Username: Minz

Post Number: 260
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, March 06, 2009 - 08:49 pm:   

Hey Lucius, thought I'd poke my head in to see what the buzz was about Watchmen.

But now I've got to talk a bit of TV: for comedy, Arrested Development was terrific. And the chem teacher from Breaking Bad was the dad in Malcolm in the Middle, which I loved (I'll admit that as the youngest of six kids, w/ 3 older brothers, I was the fish in the barrel that Fox was shooting at with this series, but I really enjoyed it). I also absolutely adored Boston Legal--I never really cared for Jim Spader, ever, until this show. He and Shatner had great chemistry, and when the two of them would start chewing up the scenery, it really made me laugh in a way that only the best of South Park could match--it was even better than the best of early Simpsons. great tv.

As for Watchmen--I really liked it. It has its flaws, no doubt, but it is unflinching and there are some really good performances (okay, and some mediocre ones). But it's definitely worth a trip to the theatre. In fact, it has me considering trying to get to IMAX to see it one more time--I'm really on the fence for that, but I'm tempted.

Oh, and it's almost tourney time, baby.
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 55
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 12:40 am:   

Lucius: Waitreses are definitely sexy. Then again, I find checkout girls/ladies, my female dentist (an Asian lady), this Indian girl at the pharmacy and...well, every fourth or fifth female I pass by on the sidewalk (while walking the dog, riding the bike, driving the car) very comely. I thought this sexual obsession/drive was supposed to slow down as I enter my dotage!

Hey: Been watching some old Noir flicks: "The Glass Key," "The Big Clock," "The Blue Dahlia," "This Gun For Hire" (and of course, "The Big Heat" and others a few weeks ago). And I just watched "M" (Fritz Lang, again) for the first time. Helluva flick!
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Seppo13
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Post Number: 56
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 12:42 am:   

P.S. # 2: Looked up Olvia Williams. NOW I know who you're talking about, Lucius. She don't remind me of _my_ mama, though (thank god -- otherwise I'd need therapy due to the fantasies that immediately sprint to mind). :-)
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7758
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 04:12 am:   

OW is an aberration--I dig classy, quiet English chicks. I would have been happy in Jane Austenland....
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 200
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 07:19 am:   

She was in the haunted submarine flick Below, if I'm not misremembering. She's nice.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7759
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 10:40 am:   

Yup, that's her. Nice. :-)
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Seppo13
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Post Number: 57
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 06:03 pm:   

LUCIUS: I like ANY woman that finds me intellectually stimulating, knee-slappingly funny and unbelievably attractive (in an aging old guy sort of way). Now if I could just find her...and install a GPS tracking device inside of her in case she runs away.

If you rent/buy a copy of "The Square," remember: it's the first film by a new director. That said, it's a very good flick.

Another, newer, Aussie flick that I've read about (but not yet seen myself, but plan to) -- and which might be of interest -- is "The Combination." You can find out more about it at
www dot thecombination dot com dot au
(I've refrained from typing out the addresses on this board because so many posting areas are set up to reject that sort of thing).

It's another urban crime-drama, this time involving criminals, younger gangs/cliques, a Lebanese family and some boxing stuff as well.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7760
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 09:43 pm:   

It sounds more interesting than the square, which has a less than 6 rating on IMDB.

I thought you were married....
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1183
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 08, 2009 - 03:16 pm:   

Just got back from Wachmen. It's been a few years since I read the comic, but it struck me as being very faithful. But faithful doesn't mean enjoyable. I had forgotten how depressing the overall story is, how unlikable the characters are. I don't regret watching it, but I won't go out of my way to watch it again. I also had the desire to sell my copy of the comic, realizing I'm not going to read it again. It seems like my comic collection shrinks each year as I get rid of stuff that I won't read again.


I like Olivia Williams too. But not enough to watch Dollhouse.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7761
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 08:15 am:   

No, no...Not even the sight of Olivia Williams could induce me to watch Dollhouse anymore.

I'll post my watchmen review today or tomorrow....
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Sigil23
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Post Number: 36
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 10:52 am:   

Glad you're thinking about going for The Wire in full Lucius, it's well worth it. Hoping last night's Breaking Bad is up on HD when I get home. Was it good?
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7762
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 09, 2009 - 01:03 pm:   

Yeah, it had some cool moments. This guy Tuco (Good Bad, and the Ugly reference?) is a trip,
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Huw
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Username: Huw

Post Number: 201
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 07:19 am:   

I'd recommend The Wire too. I know little of the world it portrays, but it feels authentic, and has some terrific performances.
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Sigil23
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Post Number: 37
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 10:06 am:   

Watched BB, was quite good. Liked the fact it just continued directly from last season and doesn't back down. Speaking of trips, the guy who plays his brother in law/DEA agent wanting to take a photo with the corpse could be the creepiest in the whole cast.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7763
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2009 - 12:18 pm:   

I know cops like that guy, but they are all big city cops. Yeah, he's spooky all right,
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 58
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 08:31 pm:   

Lucius: yeah, "The Combination" _does_ sound a bit more interesting. I still enjoyed "the Square" for what it was: a new director's homage to noir crime films (as for Imdb ratings and such: eh. Considering how many "bad" films I found palatable -- or very good -- and how many great films made my gorge bouyant, I prefer to rely mostly on my own judgement. Although at least one critic on this here board has some influence).

Married, yes.
Dead...not yet. :-)
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7764
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 05:20 am:   

I generally find that films with a less that 6 rating on IMDB don't appeal, tho there are exceotions....

Married may not be dead, bu it's moribund... :-)
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 168
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 07:21 am:   

I went to the Banff Fillm Festival last night. One of the films shown, Patagonian Winter, was really quite good. It documented Andy Kirkpatrick and Ian Parnell's attempt to climb Torre Egger in winter. It was by far the best film of the night. If you get a chance, check it out.

Here's a clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTTRNsyRUso
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Robdev
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Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1184
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 07:40 am:   

I went to Banff last year, there was some interesting stuff (like the guys who invented mountain unicycling). The brief write ups I saw for this year's films didn't sound as interesting to me, but I might try to see the film about Kirkpatrick. I've been reading his blog for a while and his thoughts on outdoor clothing have been a big influence on what I get (basically don't dress to stay dry since it will fail at some point, dress to be more comfortable when you get wet).
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7765
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 07:50 am:   

Is this like a mountain climbing film festival?
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1185
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 08:03 am:   

It's outdoor sports oriented. Mountain climbing, ice climbing, mountain biking, skiing, that kind of stuff.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7766
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 08:50 am:   

Okay, thanks. I almost wrote an ice-climbing story once.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 169
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 09:05 am:   

Yeah, it's just outdoor films in general Lucius. the festival tours around, stopping for two nights in each city on the tour. Each night has one long film and several shorts.

The long film last night, Red Gold. was actually pretty disappointing. It about the salmon runs in Alaska taht are being threatened. Seems multi billion deposit of copper and gold was discovered near by. Film;s just a clumsy sledge hammer of anti-mining rhetoric. It contrasted the pro-mining corporates with the down home Alaska boys and made great efforts to portray the Alaskans as a community of earth friendly subsistance fisherman. Really both groups are best characterized by ideologies of use. The corporados are just better funded and more efficient, therefore more rapacious. But...the fishing industry isn't exactly benevolent either.

If You're Not Falling the other good film of the night. Wish it had been longer. The dude in it climbed a 5.14d in Scottland. The crux moves were just incredibly tough. Tiny flakes for handholds on an overhanging slab.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7767
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 10:36 am:   

No, the fishing industry is not benevolent. The fishermen I hug with in Alaska were all drug abuisng alkies.

Thanks, I was trying to figure out how Banff was near both Pittsburgh and New York.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 170
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 11:40 am:   

>>The fishermen I hug with in Alaska were all drug abuisng alkies.

Exactly.

For anyone interested in the gibberish I was speaking earlier, here's a clip of a climber onsighting (as in showing up, having a look, and climbing the route in one try) a 5.14a route. It's not as cool as the route in If You're Not Falling though: that one was trad (you have to place your gear as you go) and there was no protection on the last third of the climb, so a fall at the crux meant you whipped 50' into the air.

Still, 5.15 is the hardest anyone can climb right now. So it's pretty badass.

Besides, I'm still working at 5.10.

http://vodpod.com/watch/756141-rock-climbing-chris-sharma-biotop-5-14a
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1186
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 12:18 pm:   

I'm still just working on getting all the way up an indoor climbing wall. Damn acrophobia.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7768
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 12:37 pm:   

I climbed a 6.12 in my dream of Tycho.

I wanted to write a story about climbing a huge frozen waterfall on an alien planet. Still do.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7769
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 12:40 pm:   

Did you ever see National Lampoon's Vacation? Remember theh scene at the Grand Canyon? Chevy Chase get sort of near the edge and peek and goes, uh huh, yeah, cool, and leaves. In my world, Chevy Chase got way too close. Speed, height, and shit like that don't do it for me. I figure people are dangerous enough, so why try that shit.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 171
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 01:07 pm:   

>>I figure people are dangerous enough, so why try that shit.

I'm not big on people either, but I like a higher proportion of climbers than I do "normal" folks.

And besides, despite being terrifying, it's pretty safe. What I like most about it is that it's like enforced mindfullness. It slows me down, focuses me.

Ice climbing though...not sure about that. Ice seems harder to trust than rock.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1187
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 01:22 pm:   

The climbing wall is my attempt to confront acrophobia. I just try to make it a little higher each time.

I get forced mindfulness from SCUBA. You can't do anything fast without risk of injury and you have to think about breathing constantly. Learning was a really calming experience. But I'm happy just doing shallow dives to see colorful fish and turtles, no deep/wreck/shark dives for me.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 172
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 01:38 pm:   

Yeah, I've never dived, but it looks pretty great.

One thing I never want to do: caving. No, no, no. Never. Dark holes and cramped quarters. Freaks me out. It's my acrophobia.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1188
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 03:12 pm:   

I really enjoyed my caving trip. There weren't any really cramped spaces, it was a pretty big cave.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7770
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 05:13 pm:   

Enforced mindfulness,huh? Try walking around in Liberia, say in the early 90s. That'll enforce some fucking mindfulness, lemme tell ya. :-) Everybody's got their thing. I took people, so no high rocks covered with ice for me.

Scuba diving is just a gas, Only time I couldn't dig it was right after I saw Jaws. I was down in Roatan and all I did underwater was spin.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 432
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 11:07 am:   

Watched Chemical Wedding, renamed Crowley for U.S. release. It's pretty crappy. Simon Callow did a pretty good job as the professor who's taken over by Crowley, considering the stupid script. They have him murdering people and turn it into a dumb horror movie. They try to mix in some science with the magic to make it interesting, but it's just a mess. I blame it on Bruce Dickinson. He said in an interview on the disc that there hasn't yet been a movie made about Crowley. Well, there still hasn't. Chemical Wedding is more like a 21st century version of Hammer's The Devil Rides Out than anything having to do with Crowley.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7778
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 11:48 am:   

Yeah, that CW sucked. Saw it at a festival last year.

Just came back from Knowing, and despite the weak script and the horror that is Cage, and despite tossing around every cliche known to fans, it's still the closest Alex Proyas has come to doing another Dark City. I'm sorta surprised to see how much other people hate it. It looks spectacular, for one thing, and that's almost enough.
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Jwk
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Username: Jwk

Post Number: 433
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 12:10 pm:   

Didn't know the Dark City director did it. Looks like a typical Hollywood "high concept" piece of crap, from the commercials. Add Cage to the equation and it looks like something to avoid like the plague.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7779
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 12:24 pm:   

well if you can pardon the script and overlook cage, it's got some twisty ideas and some stunning visuals, and actually put me in mind of those 50's Hollywood classics (only in color) like the Day the Earth Stood Still. Not saying it's a good movie, just that it's the best Hollywood scifi movie in some years. But I would see it on the big screen or not at all--it's cool to look at and pretty fucking dark. Don't know if that'll translate to video. Gives me hope for Proyas, anyway.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1193
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 04:12 pm:   

I watched what is probably the best Sci-Fi channel original movie: I Am Omega. Yet another changed version of I Am Legend, starring Mark Dacascos. I wouldn't call it a good movie, but it was better than average for Sci-Fi. Rather than seeming lonely due to lack of human contact, Mark seemed unhinged. They gave it a happy ending, so rather different from the book.

As for Knowing, no more Cage for me, not even with Proyas directing. Every time I break that rule, I suffer.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7780
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 04:50 pm:   

It's not as bad this time, but I'm trying to convince you. I just found i soothing to sit in the dark and let the cool apocalyptic inagery float past....

I am Omega sound ok...
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 60
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 09:57 pm:   

LUCIUS: Mr. Ebert gave "Knowing" four stars, and he's one of the guys who championed "Dark City" early-on. When you see it again, watch for me (and my kid) running past the driver's side of Cage's blue truck as he slowly drives down a street full of rioters (or on the steps of an official Boston government building -- actually Melbourne's Parliment house -- going crazy as looters -- I wrapped an American flag around my daughter). I'm pretty sure our cameos are what put the flick over the top this weekend and made it number one. :-)
(Of course, since I haven't seen it -- doesn't debut here till the 26th -- they may have left our essential acting bits on the cutting room floor).
Remember LUCIUS: when/if you see me running past Cage's truck -- as the camera swoops down from behind, in a long shot -- pushing my daughter in front of me, yell out: I KNOW THAT GUY! (And don't let the fact that you and I have never met face-to-face deter you). :-)

Cheers!
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 61
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 05:32 am:   

LUCIUS: regarding your views on "Changeling," etc. Duly noted. Then again...you're apparently in the minority regarding "Knowing," too. :-)
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 173
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 07:56 am:   

Hey Lucius. Welcome back.

I wonder about Proyas. Dark City was great (how's the director's cut by the way?) and, to a lesser extent, so was The Crow. But, I, Robot and Knowing? These films just don't seem like they should follow his earlier work.

Anyway...

I was pleasantly surprised by the last Dollhouse episode. It was much improved, but still kinda just sucks. I think I felt about it like you did with knowing: "Oh, this is the show that Whedon wants to do...".

Also, watched the last episode of BS Galactica. Holy shit, what a pretnesious pile of vomit. I'm glad I stopped watching that show years ago. Just so you know, the show - which always prided itself on its political relevance - went out like this: they landed on Earth 150,000 years ago, gave up all their technology, flew all their space ships into the sun, and started primitive, bushcrafty lives complete with caveman orgies.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7783
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 08:22 am:   

wow. That's fucking awful. They should have flown into the sun themselves. As for Proyas, it's the Hollywood factor.

Dorman, I'll watch for you...
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 174
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 08:35 am:   

>>As for Proyas, it's the Hollywood factor.

Wasn't Dark City a Hollywood film? I can't remember right now...
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Sigil23
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Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 38
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 08:40 am:   

"Watched Chemical Wedding, renamed Crowley for U.S. release. It's pretty crappy. Simon Callow did a pretty good job as the professor who's taken over by Crowley, considering the stupid script."

It seems to me that Crowley has basically been written as some pastiche of Anton Lavey in just about every movie or documentary I've seen of him. The British in particular love to dress him up as the "most evil man who ever lived" which is sensationalist up to the point you get to the credits and see the documentary was done by some Christian group and then it just seems completely stupid. Crowley's no hero, but a lot more fascinating than some goateed villain mwahahaing while calling up demons.

Thought Dollhouse #6 was good and, finally, promising.

I liked the BSG finale, but it's a show that hasn't been great since the first season or two, so I mostly enjoyed it for the HDTV spectacle that it was. Planet of the Apes ending and "angels" aside. It does unravel if you look too closely at it, so I don't.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 175
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 09:14 am:   

>>It does unravel if you look too closely at it, so I don't.

It unravels if you look at it at all. And it's a TV show so you kind of have to look at it. Consequently, it follows that BSG is a total waste of time and life.

Dollhouse is going to go back to the "engagement of the week" format though, so the promise is really just a tease. I just had it on in the background while I was planning a backpacking trip.
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Sigil23
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Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 39
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 09:39 am:   

There are some honest bios of Crowley's work: Perdurabo by Richard Kaczynski and Eye of the Triangle by Israel Regardie to name a couple.

Dave, if I found a TV show a waste of time and life, I sure as hell wouldn't be watching the season finale. :-) And the jury's still out on whether I'll last til Dollhouse's. At least that script sounded like Whedon, although something of a tired, perhaps over the hill Whedon.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 176
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 09:56 am:   

>>if I found a TV show a waste of time and life, I sure as hell wouldn't be watching the season finale.

Yeah, yeah. I know. I visited my parents over the weekend and my dad wanted to watch it with me. Given that the breadth of societally acceptable behvaiors in suburban America consists of shopping or watching TV, I caved. I stopped watching in season two when things just fell apart.

I can't imagine watching BSG or Dollhouse willingly on a regular basis. Life's too short man. I'd rather knit.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7784
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 09:57 am:   

Dave, Dark City was partly a hollywood production, part an aussie production, which kept it from being pure Hwood. So is knowing, I believe, but Proyas is older, more cynical, more worn down than he was ten years ago.
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Dave
Junior Member
Username: Dave

Post Number: 177
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 10:06 am:   

>>Proyas is older, more cynical, more worn down than he was ten years ago.

Him too, eh? Must be going around.

Lucius, this is pretty off topic, but I was wondering how & why you like living in Portland. Especially compared to living outside of the US. Once my girlfriend finishes school, we're looking to relocate. I like NYC about as much as you do.

Portland seems to have potential, but I'd like your perspective (you lived there previously, right?) if you don't mind. No rush to reply, I'm sure you're super busy with work and the move.

Also, if you'd prefer to reply via email so as not to clutter up the board: dhorton79 ~AT~ gmail ~DOT~ com.
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Sigil23
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Username: Sigil23

Post Number: 40
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 10:09 am:   

Ha, fair enough Dave. On the better side of TV, I have to say that HBO's Big Love has been a strong performer, particularly to the end of this season. I'm liking Kings on NBC as well, despite it taking a 2 hour premiere to really get underway. But a lot of that is Ian McShane.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1194
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 10:33 am:   

I've been enjoying Kings as well. McShane really makes the show.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7785
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 11:13 am:   

Dave, you and your dad could have sat around and whittled. Or maybe caught a rabbit and taught it the alphabet, The thing is, you may think TV watching is a waste of time and spiritually or mentally inferior to backpacking, but it's not really. It's the audience that's either inferior or superior. There have always been pretty much the same percentage of morons to intelligent people, and back in the day, when whittling and knitting and jug bands stood in for tv, there were about the same percentage of idiots engaged in those pursuits as now there are tv watchers. Same with backpacking. Now this comes from a serious non-backpacker. As I've mentioned I've spent a lot of time in the great outdoors, but I would have lot rather been able to get where I wanted to go by air conditioned vehicle. Shitting off a log is just shitting off a log, It does not necessarily produce satori. Now I'm with you in that I think technology has assisted in the dumbing down of the culture and making us into meat puppets, but there's nothing intrinsically uplifting about slogging through a wilderness area. If you dig that, cool. But don't be dissing TV on the grounds that your thing is innately superior, because it's not, man. I go for six or seven months at a time without TV, sometimes longer, because there's nothing on the tube I understand--i find someplace else to put my head-but then I come back home and switch on the tube. After staring at a lot of clouds and leaves, I'm convinced that one can arrive at interesting observations as easily from watching TV as one can from staring at leaves and clouds. Different ones, but still interesting. So why not do both? I'm reminded of the yuppie train riders I met when I was researching an article on hobos-they swore that riding was the only way to enlightenment and waxed rhapsodic about the joys of dumpster diving et al, yet spent most of their time in urban centers. I'm sure you find great experiences while backpacking--I have as well. But watching TV has it's own spectrum of experiences and some of them inspire me, odd as thati may seem. Speaking for myself, I see no reason to object to either pursuit.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7786
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 11:30 am:   

Dave, I think Portland is the best city for me in America. It's close to water, lots of outdoor stuff (I indulge from time to time), a great music scene, and it doesn't really feel like a city, more like a big town. Some funky old CD stores. It's the only city I know that has a active volcano within the city limits. Culturally less diverse than NY, but there are still opportunities for multiculti interaction, lots of Mexicans. Samoans, Vietnamese. A nice mix of art house and multiplexes. How does it compare to llving abroad? Well, that's hard to say. When abroad, I feel so pleasantly disconnected from American concerns, I naturally prefer that to domestic residence. But if you have to live in America, I'd say you can't go wrong with here. It rains a lot, but not as much as people make out, and the skies are often gray, but we don't get much snow (though you can see it on the mountains) and it's rare it gets really cold.
BUt you can ascend a thousand feet or so and find the cold. It'sreally a lot like where I was living in Switzerland, only no French to speak of. Does that say anything to you? If you want more, just ask.
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1195
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 12:13 pm:   

I remember talking to some aging hippies who thought TV was evil, but respected oral storytellers. To me, TV is storytelling, just through an electronic means. A lot of the stories are crap, but there's crap in other forms of storytelling too.


I considered moving to Portland a little over 4 years ago (when I got back from Australia). What kept me from doing it was work. I had run out of money from backpacking, so I needed immediate work. I had that in Pittsburgh, but not Portland.

I still occasionally want to leave Pittsburgh, but I don't think there's much chance of going to Portland. My wife wants a decent sized African American community, and I got the impression there wasn't much of a community in Portland.
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Dave
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Username: Dave

Post Number: 178
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 01:09 pm:   

Whoa. I think there was a miscommunication about my feelings about TV. I don't think all TV is bad. In fact, I think BSG's first season and a half was great TV. I think there are a lot of crappy TV shows, yes, but there are also plenty of wilderness areas I think I'd be happy to avoid.

I didn't mean that backpacking is superior to TV. I just mean that the series finale was a horrible conclusion to a once promising show. That's all.

I probably shouldn't post so quickly from work with such a sarcastic tone. Didn't mean to offend anyone's sensibilities. Mostly I just wish there was more of the inspiring sort of TV.

If only my dad watched The Wire... ;)
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7787
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 01:11 pm:   

Well, TV Is evil, but so what? :-) In my first book i had a line, something about tv being like the moon used to be for Indians. I kinda go for that.

There are African Americans here, but not like in Pittsburgh. But I will say that all the African Americans I know who live love the hell out of Portland. For the record, I love Pittsburgh, but the winters there are just too much for this southern boy.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7788
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 01:13 pm:   

Dave, I was just busting your balls, man... ;)
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 62
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 01:30 pm:   

Hey LUCIUS: you've just described what I tell everyone is _very_ palatable about Melbourne: 4 million strong, here, but the place feels like a big "town" -- the sort I used to love in America.
No one is in a hurry _all_ of the time (as in most American cities, or Sydney), and while violence is a (mostly male-driven) part of the human experience, it is less frequent here (I used to pick up the paper in Kansas City -- or turn on the news, because I had the cable and/or rabbit ears hooked up while living there) -- and learn about some sort of gun-related, violent act(s) nearly every day. The population in K.C. was just hitting _one_ million when we left, but the place felt more like a big city -- and DEFINITELY more filled with concrete than greenery (cause it was) -- than Melbourne.

The sheer numbers of guns in America is a big problem (one that may never be solved, now that Ms. P's box has been opened), but I still wonder about the root of all the sheer hatred/envy/etc. that drives so many Americans to shoot and kill each other on a regular basis. A lady from Norway that I met on a hike yesterday -- on Mt. Dandenong -- said that they carry weapons left and right in public (not even concealed, as we do in America) but they don't have as many shooting problems. She speculated -- as have I -- that the root of the problem is fear in America. Fear of the unknown: of death (thus man-made religions and all of their intolerance and centuries old, backwards-style thoughts, including homophobia); fear of anyone who looks different (racism, etc.); fear of what the media tells us to fear (thus shedding light, in my opinion, on why too much TV is bad for ya -- especially when one considers how many people believe Fox News and other conservative-leaning networks are the gospel); color-coded fear (brought to you by little criminals like Bush and Cheney and Co.); fear of being lone, fear of ridcule (explaining, perhaps, why so many guys are fucked up enough to hunt down and kill ex-lovers/ex-wives); etc., etc.
Fear. It's what's for dinner.

And just so I can end on a movie-related note: Not only was the Proyas production filmed in Melbourne, Cage's Marvel comics spectacular --:-) -- "Ghost Rider" was filmed here, too.
And I just read a note that the director for "Green Lantern" was recently scouting Sydney and Melbourne for locations. If they film here, I'm gonna try to find someone to cast me as an extra. I wanna AT LEAST be the celery-looking Green Lantern character! :-)
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Robdev
Intermediate Member
Username: Robdev

Post Number: 1196
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 01:35 pm:   

Winter's one of the reasons I want to get out. Cool weather is nice, snow and ice aren't. But at least it's an improvement over Maine. Maybe I can convince Sarah to visit Portland at some point.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7789
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 01:52 pm:   

Yeah, Robert...once you visit, it's tough to leave, I tell ya.


"while violence is a (mostly male-driven) part of the human experience"

Dorman, this is BS. Women are every bit as violent as men when given the opportunity. For instance, the Russian has this huge canning vessels that often stay at sea for a year or so, When they went out with all-male crews there was a high incidence of violence and murder, so they tried all female crews--same result, same incidences of violence and murder. Only when the tried co-ed crews did the statistics dwindle.

As far as fear being the culprit, well, duh! Just because a bunch of Swedes are too stupid to be afraid doesn't make them morally superiot. Tell the lady to come over. We'll put some fear in her ass, nio doubt. ;)
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Seppo13
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Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 63
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 07:12 pm:   

LUCIUS: I'm tempted to say, "Spoken like a true, insecure male", but that would only be pointing out the obvious. :-) (We're _all_ insecure to one degree or another).

As for women being every bit as violent as men, not in my experience. And using something like a canning vessel -- stuck out in the middle of the, ocean, crammed in together in a confined space, seems like a desperate attempt to prove your point. I know women _can_ be as violent as men; and certainly women leaders have proven that they can be every bit as hardline, hard-headed and violent (Maggie Thatcher, for instance). And certainly there are plenty of instances in which women rulers/queens (usually schooled and advised by men), act just like the other gender. But I haven't yet run across any evidence of women cobbling up religions (and guidebooks thereof) wherein men are forced to be subservient (sometimes to the point of losing their lives if they disobey), of persistent (meaning over years and years) spouse abuse (women beating men) on the level that one finds with husbands/boyfriends beating their wives, of rape (women raping men in the numbers that men rape women) or inventing "sports" purely for the "pleasure" violence or sadism (boxing, dogfighting), etc., etc., etc.

If you can find evidence of those sorts of things started and fueled by the constant, misplaced anger of women over the years -- the sort of things _our_ gender has done for centuries -- I'll be willing to admit my comments are bullshit. Till then, me thinks the smell you noticed is coming from your own line of virtual b.s. (check the bottom of your shoes, mate). :-)
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Lucius
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Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 07:46 pm:   

It's hardly a desperate attempt-it demonstrates that when removed from a male context the female is as deadly and violent as the male. I don't think you could ask for a clearer demonstration. And in the male dominated world, as women have come to be more aggressive, this tendency has increasingly made itself known. I commend to your attention an essay by Katherine Dunn entitled Just as Fierce in her collection, One Ring Circus. Then get back to me.
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Seppo13
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Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 08:59 pm:   

LUCIUS: I'll check out the essay. In the meantime, consider the setting of your experiment: a boat from which no one could get off, on which they were all trapped with one another. Cabin fever can set in on board a ship, as well as in a house wherein a group of humans is trapped. Not only that, but the women who were "removed from male context" carried with them -- in their psyches, their experiencs -- _everything_ that had happened to them at the hands of some violent and/or controlling male (I somehow don't think that are lots of sensitive, open-minded, non-conrolling men in Russia).

Besides, I'm not saying that women are completely immune to violent behavior: just that the _majority_ of them don't act in such a manner. The same cannot be said for men.

As for some women becoming more aggressive in a male-dominated world, no argument. And your point helps prove my point about "male-driven" violence and aggressive behavior used to control others. If men teach their daughters (or subservients) to get what they want via violent, demeaning, controlling (or otherwise negative/harmful behavior), then men are, in fact, responsible for the violence that continues to spread under their tutelage.
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Seppo13
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Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 09:02 pm:   

LUCIUS:make that "are" trapped -- typing too fast! Gotta go walk the dog, so you've earned a reprieve. Interesting discussion. And I find it fascinating that you seem to truly believe women (as a whole) are equal to men when it comes to a desire (and sometimes pathological need) for violence.

Cheers
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Seppo13
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Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 09:04 pm:   

P.S. I'm an avid fan of Katherine Dunn's novels -- read GEEK LOVE back when few people knew of it.
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7791
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Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 10:00 pm:   

Man, you're just not getting it. Simply because one group is suppressed by another, more powerful group does not mean that they are not innately as violent as their oppressors.

There's a thread on this board on my topic about the fierceness of women whereI posted the essay and generated a lot of interesting conversation, most in agreement with the essay and most of the comments made by women.
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Rich_p
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Username: Rich_p

Post Number: 117
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Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 02:03 am:   

Hey Lucius,
How are things? In the end, I decided on Libya instead of Saudi. Iíll say Hi to the Colonel for you!

Interesting discussion above. Iím teaching right now with an all-male (ex-pat) crew and Iíd say the atmosphere around the villa is more one of indifference and/or boredom than aggression,,, although, Iím sure that could all change with introduction of alcohol.

Meanwhile, my partner is teaching with an all-female crew in Saudi. She describes an atmosphere that is far more outwardly aggressive. Regular infighting and general bitchiness. Now, you could point out that Saudi is a male dominated society etc., but itís the ex-pats (on the whole) who are the aggressive ones, not the local teachers or students.

Regarding the Ďisolatedí situation. Isnít that the real test? How we react in unusual circumstances?

Cheers,
Rich
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Seppo13
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Post Number: 67
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Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 04:30 am:   

Hey, LUCIUS: Last comment on this, promise. I do actually get what you're saying. Perhaps you're missing my point: Man (mankind) is inherently (inately) violent. Man (our gender) has failed to control his violent outbursts more often than woman (their gender).

RICH: You're falling into the same trap Lucius did. You've got two groups of people that are not only in unique situations, they may be (I don't know enough about them) unique, or at least different enough from the average person, in their intellectual capacity. In my experience, _most_ smarter people (not necessarily people with more education or degrees -- had to say that before the idiotic college-fratboy types were introduced as examples) -- don't turn to violence as quickly as the average joe, or the below-average joe (when alcohol is introduced, that's a whole 'nother subject). Since I know only the bare minimum about your groups, first blush tells me _that_ is the reason for no aggressiveness in your class. As for your girlfriend's group: again, I don't know much about them, but "infighting and bitchiness" doesn't necessarily mean they are beating on each other with sticks. (As for the edginess: when in the military, I often witnessed guys getting shit-faced and depressed and, yes bitchy (to the point of fisticuffs, often) because they were homesick. They weren't worldly enough to enjoy the new experience and try something different: they wanted mom, apple pie, starbucks, mcDonalds, malls and alla the b.s. they believed makes America a mecca. Since they couldn't have it -- and didn't want to learn more about the country they were in (mingle with the locals) -- they acted like juveniles and got into trouble (some of them going out of their way to look for situations that would lead to fights). That dynamic, in my experience, can be found when someone is even on the other side of the country in America. Just depends on how provincial they are.

Yeah, the ladies on the ship Luicius mentioned went bugfuck after being cooped up together for so long. No surprise. Yeah, the guys in Rich's goup haven't been fighting (I didn't claim _every_ male is itching for a fight, or even that those who have a violent nature display it every minute of the day -- personally, I'd rather have a laugh or a fuck than a fight). And yeah, the girls in Rich's partner's group got bitchy with each other. That ISN'T violence, that's human nature, especially if the girl's group is more isolated -- less able to wander around freely, as are the men (it IS, after all, Saudi, where women can't be seen without being covered head-to-toe -- and both groups are in countries that, I think, are probably deemed risky (so the people in each group are probably fearful -- and that fear affects their day-to-day attitude).
(By the way, Rich: While the way we react in unusual circumstances is a test of character -- one worth paying attention to, especially if those paying attention take ALL of the circumstances and all of the subjects, and their histories, into consideration -- I believe the way we act from day-to-day -- when going to our jobs, dealing with coworkers, family members, spouses, children -- is the real test. It's what the majority of us have to endure, after all).

Bottom line: these examples of particular groups brought up by Lucius and Rich are examples of missing the forest for the trees. Humankind will always have primitive, violent desires and urges. It's in our DNA, in the way our brains are wired; even after thousands of years of evolution. But no amount of selective viewing of a group here or two groups over there will disguise the sheer tidal wave of historical information, news reports, etc., etc., etc, that have recorded so many acts of violence -- wars, crusades, jihads, ethnic cleansings, final solutions, rapes, murders, abuses, and on and on -- that were either started, enacted, committed or dreamed up by men.

I don't think women are angels. But I still see no evidence (historical or present-day; statisical or anecdotal) that they have come anywhere _near_ equaling, much less surpassing, the violence visited on others by men. And they have had _plenty_ of opportunities to be violenct (especially in America, where it's still easy to get a gun and take out your ex-lover, spouse, kids, relatives, work buddies, you name it). Women have (thus far) proven themselves better at controlling their innate, violent tendencies. Hence, "mostly male-driven" violence.

But I sense (I catch on, sometimes) that even when I bring up the subject of control groups versus sheer numbers of satistics, volumes of history recording violent acts, etc., that I will always be on one side of this divide while you, Lucius, and Rich (perhaps), will be on the other.

We'll agree to disagree.
Cheers,
DTS
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Lucius
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Post Number: 7792
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 08:31 am:   

Hey, Rich...Lybia? Wow. I was there an age ago, pre Kadafy. Weird place at the time. Yeah, say hi to Momar.

I'm kind of in Limbo--waiting to hear if I'm going to be in Australia at year's end.

Take care of yourself, man.

Lucius
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7793
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 08:32 am:   

Just as Fierce

by Katherine Dunn


The girl wanted to fight. She was young and blonde and
she spoke good English and at first the guys in the
boxing gym laughed.

But when Dallas Malloy stepped into an amateur boxing
ring in Lynnwood, Wash., last year, she broached a
barrier far more imposing than the crusty male bastion
of the sport. She challenged an ancient and still
powerful tradition of what it is to be female. She
defied what may be our most pervasive notion of gender
difference--the idea that men are physically
aggressive and women are not.

Malloy was 16 years old, the youngest daughter of
college professors. She was already an accomplished
pianist, writer, and athlete when she drew
international attention by suing U.S. Amateur Boxing
for gender discrimination and won the right for
American women to compete as amateur boxers. Reporters
and television news crews from three continents
jostled for space at ringside to watch Malloy outpoint
Heather Poyner in the first sanctioned women's match.

Asked why they wanted to fight, the young women said
they enjoyed it, just as some men and boys do.

The more potent, unasked question is how society at
large reacts to eager, voluntary violence by females,
and to the growing evidence that women can be just as
aggressive as men. A small part of that question was
answered in the bleachers that October fight night, as
packs of rowdy women lawyers waved manicured fists and
cheered with tears streaming down their cheeks.


After 13 years as a boxing reporter, I was a little
misty myself on that historic night. Much about Dallas
Malloy seemed familiar. A certain steadiness in her
eyes reminded me of the woman who raised me.

My mother, still a witty and gifted artist in her hale
80s, got a rifle a few years ago. I pity the burglar
who gives her a chance to use it. When we kids were
small, she never had a formal weapon but made do with
whatever came to hand. Her broom, skillet, spoon, or
shovel served to rein in pesky bill collectors,
hostile relatives, rats, rattlesnakes, rambunctious
drunks, or any other threat to the peace of her
regime. Mom came from a line of frontier females who
could drive four horses and the school bus, plow and
shoot straight, slaughter beeves and negotiate a sale,
reroof the barn, and then go home to embroider flowers
on pillowcases while supervising the kids' math
homework.

One of Mom's favorite relatives was her Aunt Myrtle, a
gentle woman, revered by her farming clan. A classic
Myrtle tale describes how she dashed into the subzero
cold one winter night, clad only in boots and a
nightie, to battle a pack of prairie wolves who were
killing her prize turkeys. My mother, a child then,
watched amazed from the kitchen window as Myrtle the
dainty, the kind, danced with her kindling hatchet
flashing into the skulls and spines of fanged and
flickering beasts. Blood exploded in black sprays
across the snow. "And that Christmas," the story
always ends, "she gave us kids wolfskin mittens, with
the fur side in, and stitched snowflakes on the
cuffs."


More than 70 years have passed since Myrtle swung her
hatchet. Our current era is downwind from the social
upheaval of the Vietnam War, the pacifism of the civil
rights movement, and the determined progress of
feminism. American culture is torn between our long
romance with violence and our terror of the
devastation wrought by war and crime and environmental
havoc. In our struggle to restrain the violence and
contain the damage, we tend to forget that the human
capacity for aggression is more than a monstrous
defect, that it is also a crucial survival tool. The
delicate task is to understand the nature, uses, and
hazards of the tool. The first step is to recognize
that it exists, and that we all possess it to one
degree or another--even us women.

This is difficult because so many of us are convinced
that women are incapable of aggression on the same
scale as men--that women are physically too weak, or
are inherently, biologically different in aggressive
capacity, or are spiritually superior to the whole
concept of violence. These beliefs are the legacy of
ancient, traditional definitions of the female role,
inadvertently augmented by some recent efforts to
combat the oppressive social factors that still assail
women.

But most of us would not be here without a generous
sprinkling of physically aggressive women in our
bloodlines. Throughout most of human history, long
before antibiotics and prepackaged foods, many women
had to be strong or they didn't survive. They had to
be fierce or their young did not survive. And these
gifts have not declined in this upholstered age of air
conditioning.


The regular cop on the night beat in my neighborhood
is alone in her patrol car because of budget cuts.
Some midnights I can see her parked across the street,
doing paperwork by the dash lights. The clerks at the
local 24-hour market say our cop calmly interrupted a
mugging in the parking lot last week. The bad guy was
big and wild, but she grabbed him and held him
facedown on the pavement until her backup arrived. A
thumbhold of some kind, the clerks think.

During the last few decades, American women have
proven their efficacy in every law enforcement agency,
earned the trust of those who fight forest fires
beside them, and struggled for the right to
demonstrate brains, resourcefulness, courage, and
strength in a thousand venues from sports to the space
shuttle. But the idea that women can't take care of
themselves still permeates our culture.

The bouncer at many a college tavern will let a
scrawny, pencil-necked male wander home alone at 2
a.m., but will insist on an escort for the captain of
the women's soccer team. This kind of protectionist
attitude, however grounded in good intentions, defines
women as less than equal to men. It also reinforces
the stereotype of the helpless female for both victim
and assailant: Women believe they are helpless against
male aggression; criminals see women as vulnerable.

The fact that women are subject to rape (and men, for
the most part, aren't) is often used as the reason why
females warrant special protection. While this
distinction is not to be dismissed, the fact remains
that the majority of rapes in the United States are
committed behind closed doors by people known to the
victims. Rape by strangers on the street is
dramatically less frequent than muggings and assaults.
Advocating protectionism for women based solely on
their vulnerability to rape further reinforces their
victimization, and discounts other vicious acts as
serious crimes. Women's "rapability" seems small
justification for the uncategorical separation of the
sexes.

There is no denying that some women could use the
protection of a stronger person--but so could some
men. And when the soccer captain, a fit, fleet expert
in the elbow, kick, and headbutt believes she needs a
bodyguard to get to her dorm room, she has been robbed
of part of her own identity.

Ironically, some of the most dedicated defenders of
women have enhanced this mythology of weakness, rather
than worked to combat it. The intense campaigns
against domestic violence, rape, sexual harassment,
and inequity in the schools all too often depend on an
image of women as weak and victimized. A few
well-known feminist leaders, including Andrea Dworkin,
Catherine MacKinnon, and Patricia Ireland, regularly
portray women as helpless targets of male violence.

This idea that males are physically aggressive and
females are not has distinct drawbacks for both sexes.
Defining men as the perpetrators of all violence is a
viciously immoral judgment of an entire gender. And
defining women as inherently nonviolent condemns us to
the equally restrictive role of sweet, meek, and weak.



Most arguments for a difference in aggression between
the sexes fluctuate somewhere between nature and
nurture. But hard as it may be to believe, there is no
known biological reason that women cannot be as
physically aggressive as men. Geneticist Anne
Fausto-Sterling and biologist Ruth Hubbard are two of
the many women scholars who are critical of research
that postulates a variety of biologically determined
gender differences beyond the reproductive functions.
Both scholars argue that the innumerable factors of
nature and nurture affect each other in highly complex
ways.

Anne Fausto-Sterling has examined many familiar
theories of biological difference. Her work debunks
claims that physiological differences exist in male
and female brains, and that females have better verbal
abilities, worse visual-spatial abilities, and less
capacity for mathematics than males.

Fausto-Sterling also attacks the central idea that
males are inherently, biologically more aggressive
than females. She specifically deflates the myth of
testosterone--often named as the root cause of war,
riots, murder, bar brawls, corporate takeovers, wife
beating, clear-cutting, and other forms of "male"
aggression--demonstrating that no credible evidence
indicates that testosterone causes aggression. In
fact, studies of soldiers preparing for battle in
Vietnam suggest that testosterone levels actually drop
severely in anticipation of stressful situations.

Gender differences in the form and context in which
aggression is expressed, concludes Fausto-Sterling,
are more likely to be caused by learned and cultural
factors than by biology. The broad spectrum of
aggressive behavior in humans is far more complex than
the mere squirting of a gland. Science is only
beginning to grapple with the jungle of questions and
concerns that surround it.

Even our understanding of physical differences between
women and men is changing. In "The Politics of Women's
Biology," Ruth Hubbard points out that many physical
characteristics are extremely variable, depending on
environmental and behavioral factors. We tend to
assume, for example, that men are genetically endowed
with greater upper-body strength. But this disparity
(and others of size and strength) between the sexes is
inflated by cultural strictures on exercise,
variations in diet, and other factors.

Training of female athletes is so new that the limits
of female possibility are still unknown. In 1963 the
first female marathon runners were almost an hour and
a half slower than the best male runners. Twenty years
later the fastest women were within 15 minutes of the
winning male speed. Female sprinters are now within a
fraction of a second of the top male speeds, and some
experts predict that early in the next century women
will match male runners.

Perhaps the strongest evidence that women have as
broad and deep a capacity for physical aggression as
men is anecdotal. And as with men, this capacity has
expressed itself in acts from the brave to the brutal,
the selfless to the senseless.

Historical examples of female aptitude for the
organized violence of warfare, for instance, include
the 19th-century tradition of African women warriors
who formed the core legions of the kingdom of Dahomey
and the 800,000 Russian women who fought in every
combat position and flew as fighter pilots during
World War II. The gradual movement of women into
combat positions in the military forces of Canada,
Britain, the Netherlands, Norway, the United States,
and other nations is evidence of a growing
contemporary understanding that women can be as
dangerous as men.

And while national military forces have historically
resisted the full participation of women soldiers,
female talent has found plenty of scope in
revolutionary and terrorist groups around the planet.
According to criminologists Harold J. Vetter and Gary
R. Perlstein, nearly a quarter of the original Russian
revolutionary terrorists were women--mostly from the
educated middle class. More recently, Ulrike Meinhof
and the other women of the nihilist Baader-Meinhof
Gang were only the most publicized of many female
terrorists in Europe. There is also substantial female
revolutionary involvement in the Irish Republican
Army, the Basque Separatists, the Italian Red
Brigades, and the Palestinian Intifada, as well as in
revolutionary groups throughout Asia, Africa, and
Central and South America.

In "Shoot the Women First," British journalist Eileen
MacDonald published remarkable interviews with 20
female terrorists, including Leila Khalid, leader of
the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine in
the '70s. The book's title is taken from advice
reportedly given by Interpol to anti-terrorist squads.
Many experts, it seems, consider female terrorists
more dangerous than males. They are reputed to endure
more pain and to stay cooler in a crisis. The Basque
women interviewed by MacDonald gleefully admitted to
escaping severe punishment when caught by claiming
that a boyfriend had fooled or forced them into
robbing the bank, firing the gun, or planting the
bomb. The women saw this as outwitting the authorities
by turning their own antiquated macho mind-set against
them.

Nonetheless, it is still popular to assert that all
female criminals are driven by male threat or
patriarchal pressure. (The characters in "Thelma &
Louise" and the defense of serial killer Aileen
Wuornos are good examples of this stereotype.)
Although on the surface this presumption of female
innocence corrupted by male aggression seems
complimentary, in fact it is deeply patronizing.
Columnist Amy Pagnozzi, writing for the New York Daily
News on the trial of Lorena Bobbitt, said, "A baby.
That's what an American jury decided Lorena Bobbitt
was yesterday, in deciding she was not responsible for
her actions. It is a decision that infantilizes and
imperils all women."

On the rare occasion when a woman has been held
responsible for her actions, she's been branded a
monster far more frightening than a male perpetrating
the same acts. For years scholars believed female
criminals were hormonally abnormal, with more body
hair, low intelligence, even an identifiable bone
structure. Freud thought all female criminals wanted
to be men. The female criminal violates two laws--the
legal and cultural stricture against crime and the
equally profound taboo against violent females.


As in the public sphere, there is ample evidence that
women can be as physically aggressive behind closed
doors as men. Here, too, a failure to acknowledge the
bad that women can do is a failure to take women
seriously.

We should not be surprised when women's aggression is
expressed in the one place where they have
traditionally held equal or superior status, the home.
And it is in the home where that most frightening of
crimes, child abuse, most often occurs. Studies of
family violence and reports from state and national
agencies are consistent in finding that while males
commit the majority of sexual molestations of
children, women commit more physical abuse of children
than men. A Justice Department study released this
July found that a full 55 percent of offspring murders
are committed by women.

Considering how much more time women spend caring for
children than men do, these figures shouldn't be
surprising. Unless, of course, we fail to recognize
that women are capable of violent reactions to stress
just as men are. Yet female involvement is scarcely
visible in the media's coverage of child abuse.

Spousal abuse is an area where research is questioning
still more closely held beliefs about sex roles and
violence. Historically, the campaign against wife
battering has been a primary vehicle for the "men
violent, women nonviolent" message. There is no
question that a terrible number of women are
brutalized, and even killed, by their male partners.
Every effort should be made to punish the
perpetrators, help the victims, and, most of all,
prevent such crimes in the future. But this reality is
only part of the complex and ugly domestic violence
picture.

An increasing amount of research suggests that women
are violent in domestic situations just as often as
men. Studies based on large, random samples from the
whole population have found domestic violence to be
distributed more or less equally between the sexes.
These include studies conducted by Dr. Suzanne
Steinmetz, director of the Family Research Institute
at Indiana University-Purdue University at
Indianapolis, and by Murray Straus and Richard Gelles,
who have conducted the large-scale National Family
Violence Survey over a period of 17 years; and
research by Anson Shupe, William A. Stacey, and Lonnie
R. Hazlewood.

The overall pattern depicted by Straus and Gelles is
that spousal violence falls into four categories of
essentially equal size: male battery of an unresisting
female partner; female battery of an unresisting male
partner; mutual battery usually initiated by the male;
and mutual battery usually initiated by the female.

They found that when only the women's version of
events was analyzed (that is, the men's version of
events was omitted), the results were the same. When
only the most severe forms of violence were analyzed,
the results were the same. (In a fist-to-fist row, a
bigger, stronger man is obviously far more likely to
injure a smaller woman than the reverse. But a man's
superior strength is often neutralized by a woman's
use of weapons.)

The public has received a dramatically different
picture of domestic violence. Other, more widely
publicized studies do suggest that women assault their
spouses much less frequently than men and rarely or
never initiate mutual assaults. But these studies are
based on small, self-selected "treatment group"
samples or police records and are statistically less
likely to measure accurately the overall rate and form
of domestic violence.

The rhetoric and reality clash: Our mythic fantasies
of a female ideal contradict and undermine the actual
strength and multidimensionality of women. In cases
where female aggression is destructive, our denial
compounds the problem.

In boxing, they say it's the punch you don't see
coming that knocks you out. In the wider world, the
reality we ignore or deny is the one that weakens our
most impassioned efforts toward improvement.


We live with a distinct double standard about male and
female aggression. Women's aggression isn't considered
real. It isn't dangerous, it's only cute. Or it's
always self-defense or otherwise inspired by a man. In
the rare case where a woman is seen as genuinely
responsible, she is branded a monster--an "unnatural"
woman.

But slowly these stereotypes are crumbling. We are
starting to realize that, in the words of columnist
Linda Ellerbee, "The truth is that women, like it or
not, can be brutal, too. Brutality's not sexist."

I suspect that the mythology of females as essentially
non-violent grew out of a profound impulse to give
special protection to the bearers of future
generations--a sort of gender version of the
non-combatant status of medics and Red Cross workers.
But the problem is the same for all non-combatants,
whether in wartime or danger-ridden peace: You can
still get hurt, but you're not allowed to fight back.

Then, too, we humans don't respect victims, and the
disrespect in the language of the nonviolent female
nature is too familiar. It echoes the chauvinist
romances of past male authorities who explained why
women needed to be banned from vast sections of the
workplace, prevented from learning to read, excluded
from doing business or owning property, and relieved
of the onerous responsibility of making fundamental
decisions about their own lives.

Such rhetoric is absurd in a time when millions of
American women are shoulder to shoulder with male
colleagues in every field of human endeavor. Women
have fought for their achievements over decades,
battling in courtrooms, classrooms, legislatures,
workshops, and the streets of the nation. It took the
ferocious, unconquerable will of a great many women to
win recognition for equal intelligence, invention,
organization, and stamina.

In the boxing world, that kind of courage is known as
heart. Now, with the possibility of genuine equality
visible in the distance, it is self-destructive lunacy
to deny the existence of women's enormous fighting
heart.

It is time to recognize the variability of females,
just as we do males. Women are real. Our reality
covers the whole human megillah, from feeble to
fierce, from bad to good, from endangered to
dangerous. We don't just deserve power, we have it.
And power in this and every other society is not just
the capacity to benefit those around us. It includes,
absolutely and necessarily, the ability to inflict
damage and the willingness to accept responsibility.
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 68
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 09:33 pm:   

LUCIUS: Thanks for the essay: fascinating read. And if you bump into K. Dunn anytime soon, I'd be interested in learning what _she_ thinks of my idea that violence (in America and around the globe) is "mostly male-driven". (Remember, I'm including wars, riots, rapes, muggings etc. -- not just domestic battery).

And I still think that many women's perceptions -- and behaviors -- are directly affected by the male authority figures in their lives (which, I think, explains how so many women can accept the subservient role in organized religions, and sometimes be used by those professing to be the right hand of whatever god). When I first got back to America, while living in Massachusetts, and working in the Boston area, I fell into a discussion with an older, white, woman while working the nightshift at the communications center for the Bank of New England. We were discussing the Jodie Foster movie, "The Accused," and the real crime that inspired that movie. The woman insisted that the real life victim (who, for those that don't remember, was gang raped in the back room of a pool hall, with several men standing around cheerin the perps on) deserved what she got. The older lady at the Bank of New England said that the woman who was raped was asking for it: because she was dressed provacatively, and drinking and dancing flirtateously. In the mind of that older, white woman, any female who acted and dressed in a provacative way was _asking_ to be raped.

Somehow, I don't think this line of thought originated with a woman. I think, if one were able to follow it back and trace it to the mouth (or mouths) of those who passed on this judgement, this warped way of thinking, one would find that it was male in origin.

But, hey: I could be wrong.
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Lucius
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Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7796
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 10:07 pm:   

Oh, but women traditionally have much less sympathy for victims. so I think you may be wrong there.
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 71
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 - 06:20 am:   

Lucius: I find that interesting as well. And I'd love to dig up more history/statistics on that belief. I would have said women are traditionally more apt to remain silent, or stoic -- to the point of encouraging other victims to "suck it up." Not because they are unsympathethic: but because they have learned to shrug such things off (via watching mom deal with things dad did); and also because they are more apt to forgive physical violence, so they often (at least according to statistics and reports I've read on Australian _and_ American domestic violence) classify a beating as "something that just happened" (a once in decade misunderstanding, perhaps) or a serious offense that doesn't deserve criminal charges (because she can work it out with her spouse/lover), or (worst of all) something that happened because of her own failings or behavior.
(Could the above be where the idea that women are less sympathetic stems from?)

It's odd, too, that I know so many women -- of various economic and ethnic backgrounds -- who have experienced some sort of sex crime at the hands of a male (be it date rape or rape of a more violent sort, or molestation at a young age, etc.), but know of very few male friends (only one -- a famous author) who have experienced anything like that.
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Seppo13
New member
Username: Seppo13

Post Number: 72
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 - 06:27 am:   

Forgot to add: fear or reprisal (or humliation and the casting of doubt) often keep women victims from saying things, and, I believe, have them passing on such attitudes to daughters, peers, sisters, etc.

I don't anything for a 100 percent certainty, because I'm not a woman -- only what I've learned from my friends (most of whom have been women) in life.
This board _defintely_ could use a few more female posters -- just to get the other gender's thoughts and opinions now and then. :-)

Cheers and good night!
(And good luck in trying to land the Aussie assignment/trip/vacation/whathaveyou.
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Lucius
Moderator
Username: Lucius

Post Number: 7798
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 - 07:34 am:   

Why don't you check out the old thread "The Fierceness of Women..." You'll find women commenting there.

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