Rock and roll life.... Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Shepard, Lucius » Rock and roll life.... « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - 07:57 pm:   

I promised Rich Patterson a Dylan story on another thread and forgot to tell it. Here's one that's not real dynamic, but I thought it cast Dylan's eccentricity in an interesting light...

I had a friend who toured with Dylan a couple of times. Played guitar. They rehearsed from the tour out in CA and my friend, Steve, said that every day Dylan would walk in and pass everybody on his way to his dressing room and say to everyone How your family, how's your kids. Fine, everyone would say. So one day, here comes Dylan and as he's passing by he asks Steve how're the wife and kids. Fine, Steve says, and then adds, How's your family doing? Dylan was flabbergasted -- everyone was so reticent about talking to him, no one had ever asked him this. So he fills Steve in and thereafter takes a shine to Steve. One day right before the tour began, Dylan asks Steve to go shopping with him. They go to the Gap and Dylan explains to Steve that he needs to find something comfortable because he doesn't like to change clothes during a tour. Steve doesn't really hear this, he just goes uh-huh. Anyway, Dylan buys a vest and a shirt and jeans, and a couple of days later they go on a massive world tour. Three plus months. True to his word, Dylan wears the same outfit every night, unwashed, and by the time their a few weeks into the tour, you do not want to be downwind of him. Dylan himself apparent showers, but each night he works himself into this vile encrusted stiffening outfit he bought at the Gap and goes out on stage.
Steve finally figures, hey, he and Dylan have established a relationship, so it'd be okay if he asked Bob what was up with all this. He asks him and Bob looks at him coldly and walks off and never says another word to him the rest of the tour.

Fucking rock stars. You gotta love 'em. I think my favorite personal story involves watching a stage worker beat the crap out of Greg Dulli, the singer for the Afghan Whigs....but I can think of a hundred that come close.

Anybody out there got any rock star stories? I'm kind of a collector.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

paulw
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 04:01 am:   

My friend Andy plays guitar for John Mellancamp (or John Military Camp, as he calls him), and also in a bunch of other bands. Once he, too, was touring with Dylan, and after one gig, he ran into Dylan backstage, who proceeded to compliment him on the show and his playing, all very normal, for about five minutes before heading back to his dressing room . . . wearing nothing but a baggy and well-worn pair of underpants.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

R.Wilder
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 07:07 am:   

Last June Guided By Voices played a show in my home town. A woman I know went backstage to have the leader Robert Pollard sign a leather jacket that she has had other musicians autograph. When she got to the "green room" it was apparent to all that the singer was in the bathroom fornicating with his girlfriend.

Now, during the show I noticed the incredibly large presence of security at this relatively mid-sized venue for a good-natured mid-sized crowd (which meant that I couldn't toke down inside the club).

Well, one of the huge security guys passed through the backstage area and heard the music of love emanating from the bathroom and proceeded to pound on the door until Pollard emerged, tucking his shirt in. Being a physical guy he apparently got into a face to face with the bouncer, nose to nose, until some sort of intervention occurred by management (who rumor has it was more mad at the security guy than the band).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 07:33 am:   

Paul, yeah, that seems to support Steve's story to a degree. Pretty funny. Guess he's a skanky little guy/

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 07:44 am:   

RW, Hmmm, I never thought of Pollard as a badass -- but then often musician's make this mistake. My experience withGreg Dulli was at a club in Ohio -- the Afghan Whigs had asked for alterations to the stage and a carpenter was finishing up while they did their sound check. For some reason, Dulli chose to ridicule the carpenter as to his intelligence, his appearance, etc. You could see the guy was pissed off, but he kept working. Dulli was amusing himself no end -- he was pretty stoned and thought he was the soul of wit. Anyway, the sound check finished and as Dulli stepped down from the stage, he said something off-mike to the carpenter. The guy stood up and proceed to beat the crap of Dulli. He wasn't that big a guy, but Dulli wasn't really much of a fighter. The interesting thing was, the rest of the band just stood around and watched and it took the manager of the club and the bartender to pull the carpenter off Dulli...which leads one to suspect that Gregg is generally perceived as an asshole. Dulli was pretty lumped up, but I'll give him this much -- the show went on that night.

I have a nice Hope Sandoval story I'll post later...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

R.Wilder
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 08:49 am:   

Lucius: I don't think Pollard's necessarily a badass, it's just that he doesn't take any shit. He was a pretty respected athelete in High School.
A friend of mine who's followed GBV for a decade referred to him as a guy who is "riding the crest of the wave."

Looking forward to the Sandoval story.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Minz
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 11:36 am:   

Lucius:

That's not the first time I've heard that Dulli v. the Carpenter story. . . and I'm pretty certain it wasn't from you. Weird.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Picacio
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 03:05 pm:   

Hey, Lucius --

The following doesn't qualify as a rock star story by any stretch....more like a brush with "mediocrity"...let me explain...

I pretty much appreciate all forms of music, but if at all possible, I try to avoid country music in general. I'm just not a fan.

So back in college in Austin during the early 90's, I was in a service organization that helped out charities and the disadvantaged and such, and every once in a while, we'd get to volunteer as ushers or helpers for touring shows. So there was this cute chick that I kinda dug and she was going to usher at a country music concert and so I signed up on the same signup sheet and just decided to bite the bullet and see if I could get some face time with the object of my affection.

I report to the venue of the concert a few days later and it turns out that they need an extra hand unloading equipment backstage and they send me back there. So I start unloading stuff off this truck and carrying it to the stage. There's another guy there helping me out. He's kinda paunchy and wears a ratty, red baseball cap. After several trips, I picked up this one crate that all but bent me in half because it was so freaking heavy. I was losing my balance and about to drop it when the guy with the baseball cap runs over to help me carry it. We set the thing down on stage and he shakes my hand and says, "I think that's the last one. I really appreciate you helping me out to set up my show." I ask him, "Are you playing tonight?" He says, "Yeah. This is gonna be a big show for me tonight. What's your name?" I said, "I'm John. John Picacio." He said, "Good to meet you, John. I'm Garth. Garth Brooks." I wished him good luck and walked away. I'd never heard of him before.

One month later, he was the biggest thing in music and his first single was freaking everywhere. I couldn't escape it no matter where I went. Looking back, I gotta respect a performer who carries his own gear, but at the time, he was just on the verge of being famous.

And in closing....yeah, I ended up getting the girl and we dated seriously for about two years, but I still don't like country music.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 03:27 pm:   

Minz, really...It was at a club called the Agora some years ago, I guess that shit gets around. The Whigs were pretty big stuff at the time. I also imagine the carpenter got bought a few drinks by folks afterward, cause Dulli's a notorious asshole....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 03:31 pm:   

John, yeah, I agree that Garth is mediocre, but he's always had t hat common man touch. Now if only you'd had a deadly weapon.... :-) you coulda spared the world some seriously vapid music. 'Least you got the girl, huh?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 05:33 am:   

Gee, I don't know any rock or country music stars. But I could tell an anecdote about a female Ray Stevens impersonator. . .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 07:24 am:   

Hey, Go for it, Mike....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Deborah
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 09:40 am:   

Yeah -- I want to hear this -- I love Ray Stevens and had no idea there any Ray Stevens impersonators, let alone female ones.

I have an uncle who loves RS and was once on his roof making repairs wearing headphones and listening to RS and singing along so loudly (and well) that the neighbors called my aunt and told her that Fred was on th roof screaming and must be seriously injured and she better get out in the yard and find out what happened to him...

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Deborah
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 09:42 am:   

Indeed, "Santy Clause is Watchin' You" may be my favorite Christmas song.

:-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 10:38 am:   

You;re a sentimental softie, ain'tcha, D? :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Patterson
Posted on Saturday, December 13, 2003 - 08:58 am:   

Thanks for the Dylan story Lucius… I’d heard he was real eccentric. A friend of a friend of mine once played accordion on a Dylan session. I forget the guy’s name, but he was the accordion player in Kracker. Same thing you say… Bob had very little to say to anyone during the sessions. At some point Bob approached the accordion player and asked him if he knew the name of this cool accordion shop he’d once visited in New York City. Bob says he can’t remember the name of the place but it was real catchy. “Accordion-O-Rama?”, the guy offers… Bob wandered around for the rest of the session going, “huh-huh, Accordion-O-Rama, huh-huh”.

Sorry, no first hand stories.

Uh, I do have a cousin who met Iggy Pop once… This was in the summer of ‘78 or ‘79 on the Canadian side of Lake Erie at Long Beach - a stretch of expensive summer places.
Cousin Rob was about 15 years old at the time. Spending the summer at the lake, the usual… when one day the word comes around that a weird bunch of guys have rented a cottage just a few doors down. Rob, being an curious kid, decides to walk down the beach to check it out… Iggy, looking real bored, immediately spots Rob and waves him up to the house. Claims he’s a rock star. A close personal friend of David Bowie. Shows Rob album covers to prove it. Scratches his crotch a lot. Rob has no clue who the guy is but invites him down to the fire later.
Iggy shows up that evening and the kids on the beach pummel him with questions all night about the rock stars he says he knows. The kids are impressed but none of them have heard of Iggy. At the end of the night, as the fire is dying down for the last time, Iggy jumps up and tries to get everybody to throw their chairs on the fire... The kids say, “No Iggy, that’s not a cool thing to do.” A dejected Iggy walks home up the beach. Strange guy, everybody thinks, but he knows Peter Frampton!





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Saturday, December 13, 2003 - 09:19 am:   

Iggy was a friend of the bass player in one of my old bands, Rich. Went to HS with him. He used to come over to the practise room, purportedly to listen to us, and then would nod out. His performances back in the day were pretty astonishing. I recall one in which, after beating himself bloody with the mike, he urinated off the stage, dove onto the stone floor, rolled around in his urine and then grabbed some college girl out of the audience and rubbing all over her. thus transferring his various essences to her nice white sweater. I never exchanged many words with him.

That bass player was our celebrity guy. His sister was Laurette Spang, who played Cassiopeia on Battlestar Galactica....:-) She used to come to our shows when she was in town. An early girlfriend of Steven Spielberg....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Patterson
Posted on Monday, December 15, 2003 - 07:32 pm:   

Hey Lucius, I'm impressed. Cassiopeia was a babe!

I've got a bootleg video of Iggy playing an outdoor gig in Detroit from 1970. I figure it's 1970 anyway, because Grand Funk, Mountain and pre-fame Cooper are on the same bill. During one song, Iggy is perched on top of the crowd with a jar of peanut butter, spreading it over his chest and then rolling around on the fans. Ah, the good old days...

Did you ever get a chance to see the MC5? They were my other favorite Detroit band of the era.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, December 15, 2003 - 08:08 pm:   

I played with the 5 on a couple of bills, when I was a little rock and roller, the most interesting gig at the Grande Ballroom in Detroit -- Johnny Winter headlined. They used to make me sick...literally. They'd turn their bass up really high, and it would hit you in the pit of your stomach. Then they had this horrid Jackson Pollackesque light show -- those two elements together would make you queasy. I never thought they were very good live. Though Fred Smith could play, the singer, Rob, kinda sucked -- he seemed to want to be James Brown and he really wasn't. But they had good energy -- and people liked to hear them say, Motherfucker.... :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Patterson
Posted on Monday, December 15, 2003 - 08:54 pm:   

The first time I bought a book of yours was because of a one or two sentence recommendation I read in the liner notes to Peter Stampfel's (Holy Modal Rounders, DAW) 1994 "You Must Remember This". It went something like... "buy anything by Lucius Shepard. He was playing "world music" in Detroit during the 70's!" (Way ahead of his time, that is). How would you describe the music you played in your various bands?

Is there a record available somewhere with Lucius Shepard on it? If there is send me an e-mail OK? I want to hit Ebay before anybody else here!

My evidence of the 5's greatness is all recorded. The "Babes in Arms" comp is pretty solid. I love the heavy metal vs. Sun Ra vibe of "Skunk (Sonically Speaking)". The "High Time" lp sounded the best.

Have you heard Wayne Kramer's solo stuff? "Citizen Wayne" is a corker.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, December 15, 2003 - 10:04 pm:   

Yeah, I like WK's stuff...But Rob Tyner was an asshole... :-)

There are a bunch of tapes of my bands, but nothing on EBay...We had an unlucky history. But yeah, we were doing pretty strange stuff back then and it was getting over. I used to listen to field recordins, mostly African stuff, on the Ocora label -- I wanted to make a band that had the sonic power of a Pink Floyd but that could get polyrhytmic. Rock and roll with African rhythms and a potential to make your eardrums bleed. When Arp started making computers, I snagged one and started working on imitating African sounds -- the one I began with were these buzzy xylophones with holes in the resonaters covered with spiderwebs. I got my computers to sound like African jungle instruments, added in instruments like an electric bass marimba, steel drums, all kinds of weird percussion. I lifted breaks and melodies -- I was very pleased one day to recognize that Herbie Hancock had stolen a riff from the same record I had. I wouldn't say we were doing world music before anyone, but maybe before any rock bands. Don Cherry was my hero in all this. Anyway, the resultant music was all over the place, but was essentially like a rock band in a nest of heavy and exotic percussion. Pretty mind altering sruff. Good lyrics, too. We met with some resistance early on, but people started liking it and we made a living for quite a while.

Before that, I was in a bluesy rock band with a heavy gospel/Ennio Morricone influence, the Cathouse Band, that was pretty great, and a few others that were okay. But the music I worked toward was this weird hybrid stuff. Very much a groove thing, but with a kind of primitive edge and scary guitars. I'm not sure how to describe it. World metal. Something like that, I guess. It was fun.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Patterson
Posted on Monday, December 15, 2003 - 11:25 pm:   

Cool... Did you market yourselves as a rock band? An African-prog hybrid must have seemed near confrontational to beer drinkers. Was there a pretty healthy "experimental" circuit?

Re MC5: Ahh... Detroit metal just seemed so "exotic" on this side of the border :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, December 16, 2003 - 01:33 pm:   

You know, this was at a time when FM radio was playing Mies Davis next to King Crimson, Muddy Waters justaposed with Roxy Music, so there was a good bit of acceptance out there. We could drop into bar band mode -- hell, I remember playing a club in Sandusky Ohio where the patrons were so luded out they were bumping and missing. They couldn't dance to what we played, so we did an all Led Zepellin night. But in Detroit, Clevend, Chicago, Ann Arbor, and other places, you could pull in a following if he music was good, even if it was unusual.....

So i guess the answer's yes....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Patterson
Posted on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 - 07:13 am:   

I've heard it said that the reason there are so few successful rock 'n roll/life on the road novels is because real life situations in the music biz are weirder than anything that could be invented. Phil Spector, Michael Jackson, etc...

Have you ever written anything with a musician as the main character?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 - 07:20 am:   

I tried early on to write a rock novel, but I knew too much about the subject -- I kept cluttering the story with too much information. I've done a few stories under a pen name, but nothing under my own. I think it's possible to write a good rock novel, focusing on low-level bands, but I'm not sure it;'s worth the effot.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David G.
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 11:50 am:   

Lucius:

What's the Hope Sandoval story? Is it something that will sully my pristine image of her? If so, let's have it! :-)

I don't have any good rock and roll stories that I can think of, but I did have the distinction of being called a "motherf***er" (in absentia) from the stage by Greg Dulli from the 930 Club in Washington, DC because of some (regrettably lost) negative reviews of "1965" I sent around on the band's listserv. Of all the shows to miss...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

R.Wilder
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 11:58 am:   

Yah! Hope Sandoval story!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 12:13 pm:   

Shit, I forgot. Later tonight after work, I swear.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 02:11 pm:   

Jeez, Lucius, are we ever gonna get that Hope story?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

R.Wilder
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 02:55 pm:   

Hope story... (Homer Simpson voiceover).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rich Patterson
Posted on Friday, February 06, 2004 - 01:59 am:   

An explorer goes up the Amazon in a boat with a local guide
After a few hours some drums start......
"Whats that?" asks the explorer
"Drums ok" says the guide, "but when drums stop, very bad"

After 2 weeks of the expedition, they are canoeing back to base camp,
when suddenly the drums stop
In a panic the explorer turns to the guide and asks "shit what
happens now?"

"Very bad" says the guide "now, bass solo"

-G.D. discussion group
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 02:30 pm:   

Say, are we ever going to get that Hope story?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Friday, February 20, 2004 - 05:40 pm:   

Nice joke, Rich.

Hope Sandoval must wait til I come up from under this work load -- it's a story needs to be told with some delicacy and style, and I'm using all that in my work....But eventually. I'm sure by that point it'll be a letdown.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 01:07 am:   

Just read this thread Lucius, I noticed you said that you didn't see the point of writing a rock novel. Well I can give you a reason, I'd love to read it. It's something I would love to see in your career, a rock and roll novel or novella or anything; I'm sure I'm not alone. Although if you don't, I can't complain as long as you keep writing what you want to write and you keep writing great shit. Still Lucius if you did write something with a musical theme, Lucius styles, that would rock.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 - 09:15 am:   

R.I.P. John Peel (1939-2004). Damn...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Minz
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 - 09:46 am:   

First time I heard the Pixies was on my local NPR station's rebroadcast of Peel's annual Top 50 (Festive Fifty?).

He will be missed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Friday, October 29, 2004 - 10:47 am:   

Didnt know where else to put this, but someone had to comment on it. Wasnt John "No Nukes" Hall one of the guiding forces behind the liberal musicians political movement of the late 70s? Anyone notice what the new Bush campaign song is? "Still the One" by Orleans! Did he think nobody was going to notice that he was cashing checks from the GOP now?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 10:31 am:   

Anybody see the Dylan interview on "60 Minutes" Sunday? I don't recall ever seeing such a cheerless individual. He looked like he had just lost his best friend.

I just finished the Dylan memoir, though. Aside from certain passages of almost transcendent and impenetrable weirdness, it's very well written. Dylan has a literary voice as good as a lot of current literary fiction, IMHO.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 10:50 am:   

Dylan is a weird guy, for sure. I haven't read and don;t intend to read Chronicles. LIfe's too short.. But I'm close to a number of people who've had extensive dealings with them and have heard stories that give credence to the interview, to his dour pose. I found it interesting what he said about his creativity. That was depressing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dave G.
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 11:00 am:   

I didn't catch that part. What did he say about his creativity?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mike McLatchey
Posted on Monday, July 17, 2006 - 10:35 am:   

Maybe the only good thing about spam attacks, is I get to see some of these old threads. :-) Lucius, the descriptions of your rock/world band remind me of some of those early 70s expatriate British bands like Osibisa, Cymande and the like. Close?

And while I'm here, I managed to find some DVD+Rs my burner liked (after a false start) so it won't be long before I can start making you some copies of the DVDs we've discussed elsewhere. Feel free to send address or contact info to mike(at)gnosis2000.net

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register