Honduras Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Shepard, Lucius » Honduras « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius Shepard
Posted on Friday, February 14, 2003 - 07:12 am:   

The following is a sketchy summary of the situation existing currently in the Mosquito Coast (La Mosquitia), which occupies portions of the north coastal region of both Honduras and Nicargua, and incorporates the largest untouched stretch of rain forest in the Western hemisphere. I wrote this as a block of information for my agent preparatory to doing a film script--thus it's oddly truncated and bluntly formulated, but it serves as something of an introduction to my area of interest. The indigents of the Mosquitia belong to several Indian tribes, notably the Miskitia and the Peche, and there is also a population of blacks, the garifunas, descended from French slaves who escaped from colonies in the Antilles in the 1600s. Ninety percent of the income of these people derives from lobster diving. The alternatives are abject poverty and smuggling, which generally leads to a violent death. The lobster fleet is owned by the cocaine industry--the registered owners of the ships are generally wives or girlfriends or associates of cocaine traffickers whose criminally difficulties prevent them having legal ownership. The reason that Honduran lobster is relatively cheap is that the traffickers don't need to make a profit from it--the coke that comes into the US on lobster boats is their cash cow. Neither do they feel compelled to take care of the lobster divers. These men are forced to make up to 14 dives a day with no air gauges and shoddy equipment in depths up to 130 feet. A safe dive depth in the US is considered about 60 feet and it is recommended that one dive to this depth no more than 2 or 3 times a day. Thus it may be seen that the captains of the lobster boats are in essence committing murder. There are thousands of men on the Mosquito Coast who have been catastrophically paralyzed by the bends, and there are only two decompression chambers on the coast, one of which is often out of order. Should a diver be stricken in mid-voyage, the captains don't head back for port--they continue until the voyage ends and by the time the injured diver is brought for treatment, it's too late. Every diver suffers sat least some mild paralysis due to the bends. All over the region you encounter young men who cannot grip your hand or who limp. The catastrophically paralyzed have an average life span of about three years. They die as a result of bedsores turning septicemic--this evolves into skin breakdown, urinary tract infections, and so on. The thousands of paralyzed men in the area must have wheelchairs to get them up and give them a chance not only for life, but to earn some kind of livelihood for their families. The people of the Mosquito Coast have essentially been abandoned by the Honduran and Nicaraguan governments. Those governments are only interested in the considerable reservoirs of oil that exist there.
The Mosquito Coast is the home to a variety of interesting characters, many of them European expatriates who run trading posts and operate small placer mines along the rivers and smuggle. Colombian pirates operate along the coast and are in turn victimized by more dangerous predators. One of the people I met is an ex-member of the French Foreign Legion who owns a gunboat and makes a living by taking off drug dealers, killing them, keeping the cash and giving the drugs to the Indians to sell. Away from the coast the region is essentially an untracked wilderness populated by tapir, jaguars, crocodiles, anteaters, and et al. Even the larger towns are primitive--Palacios, for instance, consists of one dirt street lined with shanties, and that street also serves as an airstrip. Sometimes when I've landed there, I seen children driving pigs off the runaway just in advance of the plane. During the contra war in the early 80s, hundreds of tiny airstrips were built by the contras and their allies all over the region. These air strips have been appropriated by the cocaine traffickers, who funnel their product through the Mosquitia and also do some of their processing there. There is a great tradition of cocaine in the area. The contra war was partially funded by cocaine, which was flown into Lackland Air Force and other venues in the States from these very airstrips and also from Trujillo, a town that lies on a bay enclosed by the Cape of Honduras on the edge of the Mosquitia.
Trujillo, with beautiful beaches and jungled hills, was once a tourist place, but since Hurricane Mitch in 1998, tourism has died out. The hotels are almost empty--the largest are owned by traffickers who use them to launder money. Much of the business of the Mosquito Coast--legal and illegal--is conducted in Trujillo, which is only a twenty-minute plane trip from Palacios and many significant players in the region pass through the town. One such is a doctor from Georgia, a wealthy GP with a number of doctors working for him, who shortly before Mitch had a vision of the hurricane and came down to Honduras with medical supplies. He did admirable relief work during the hurricane and afterward, and stayed on in the country. Over the past four years he has become of a revolutionary, fomenting rebellion in the Mosquitia, urging a secession from Honduras and Nicaragua. His vision included, apparently, a seventeen year plan during which the freedom of the Mosquito Coast would be achieved. He's been the target of assasins and travels around with Kalashnikovs under the seat of his car, accompanied by a 19 year old devotee, kind of a weird leftist Batman and Robin. He managed to wangle three military landing craft from the US military base in Panama and has been using them to run freight into the Mosquitia and also to spread his political message. I don't believe his life expectancy is high. People who do charity in the Mosquitia, who annoy the traffickers, usually don't have much life expectancy. He's been there four years.
One of the captains of the doctor's landing craft was approached to smuggle coke by a man known as Bob Hale, a "former" CIA spook. Hale was previously known as Jack McCall. Under that name he was part of the contra war. His specialty was cocaine trafficking and he helped organize the cocaine flights from Trujillo and the Mosquitia into the States. He also was active in recruiting contra fighters. This he achieved by going into El Salvador, along with others, and kidnapping Salvadorian high school kids, bringing to Trujillo and training them to fight. If they refused they were put in tiger cages and beaten until their wills were broken. At that time, the early 80s, the Honduran drug cartel was headquartered in the hills surrounding Olanchito. For training exercises, the Salvadorian recruits were sent into Olanchito to, basically, kill off the competition to McCall's operation. McCall's brutality grew so extreme that in the late 80s he was about to prosecuted by the US government, but was saved by the intervention of congressional right wingers. He disappeared for a while and reappeared some years later in Honduras with a new identity--Bob Hale--and once again began trafficking in cocaine. As mentioned, about a year ago he attempted to coerce one of the captains of the Georgia doctor's landing craft into smuggling cocaine. When the captain refused, Hale shot his wife in both thighs, and when the captain attempted to go to the police, Hale shot him five times and chopped off the back of his head with a machete. He since has disappeared again and apparently has surfaced recently in another part of the world under yet another identity.
Also as mentioned earlier, there are large oil reservoirs beneath the Mosquitia and the oil leases are up for grabs. Once they are sold, the people of the region will be further exploited--they will receive none of the money and many will be driven off their lands. Recognizing this, the various ethnic groups of the coast have united and announced that they intend to form a provisional government in Februrary and intend to establish the nation of Mosquitia. They do not want to fight a revolution--what they're hoping for is a court case to be tried in the country who buys the oil leases, probably the USA, and win a share of the loot. Indigent peoples have a good record of winning in such trials. But the possibility of a bloody conflict is there, for certain. If a conflict results then we will have a strange alliance between the indigent people and the cocaine traffickers, who want to maintain their rights in the region. On paper, there's no contest. Nicaragua, it seems, could walk in and stamp out a revolution in a very short time. But with the cocaine traffickers and their vast armaments, their ability to shut down every airstrip in the area, it becomes an interesting contest. At the moment there is a great deal of tension and guns everywhere.
As an odd sidebar, something called the Freedomship is scheduled to begin consruction any day now in Trujillo. The Freedomship is purported to be the world's first floating city, a vessel that will house 100,000 people, be capable of accepting landings by jets, and will journey all over the world. Many, including myself, feel it is a scam, but others are believers. Either way, it's going to bring a whole new cast of characters into the place, grifters and entrepenuers and so forth; and it testifies to the fact that foreigners--mostly Americans--believe they can come to Honduras and achieve wealth and power there, that they can work their hustles with impunity. Usually they are wrong because they are ill-suited temperamentally to deal with the realities of Central American politics and life. A case in point: a man who owned some pet stores in Tennessee recently came to Trujillo and bought 14000 acres of rain forest. His goal was to breed monkeys and cockatoos, as well as iguanas and other animals, for the European pet and scientific markets. Europe does not have as severe restrictions on importing animals as does the US. It's a good plan, one with the potential for great profit. But the man from Tennessee treats his workers and his family badly. His wife is an embittered acoholic, his seventeen-year-old son hates him and will doubtless soon be doing a lot of coke (It costs about $100 an ounce in Trujillo), and if they don't do him in, some night soon one of the workers he has bullied will get coked and liquored up and come visit him with a machete. Put succinctly, there is a great deal of American folly on the Mosquito Coast.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Keith Ferrell
Posted on Friday, March 14, 2003 - 06:21 am:   

Hi Lucius --

This is stunning stuff, and good that it is in your good hands: that is, I don't know if it's just the effects of this long winter (in publishing as well as outside my windows, not even to begin to mention on the news; not even to begin) but it sure has come to seem to me that only art can approach this level of tragic folly and all the other levels of tragic folly whose arcs are on the ascendant. The news and the pundits certainly aren't even going to try.

The other side of it is the way that these tragic follies -- I'm thinking here specifically of the Freedomship -- are finding ways to approximate bad, say, John Brunner novels from a couple of decades or so ago. Like I said, stunning and in an sf-insular way as well as a human tragedy one.

Interesting that the material was put together for a film script. I've been re-reading a bit of Graham Greene lately, and have been struck by the way that nearly all of the commentary on the new version of The Quiet American, which I haven't seen, is focused on Michael Caine (and more power to him, not his fault, and in those interviews where he's been given a chance to talk he's been articulate on both Greene and on the material Greene was dealing with)-- but next to none of it has discussed the film's theme much less the film's source.

American celebrity folly, and one can only hope that your script gets, written, bought, produced, and ultimately stars someone articulate and yet celebrity-worthy; perhaps even someone with, however tangential, ties to or toward that part of the world.

John Gavin, maybe -- the publicity and resultant boxoffice would come close to rivalling the irony.

All best, and forgive the whimsy just now.

Keith
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

lucius
Posted on Saturday, March 15, 2003 - 12:57 pm:   

Hi, Keith...

Thanks for giving a damn about this. Most people don't -- the left in this country only seems to get excited when it's an occasion to party in the streets, and by then, of course, it's too late to do anything effective. All this anti-war stuff, albeit well-intended, comes way too late in the game to do anything other than make people feel good about themselves. It's kind of disgusting, actually. At least it is to me. There is plenty of reason for there to be an active left wing in this country 365 days a year every year, and quite a lot of those reasons are bred in Central America. Most people don't seem to think the problems of that region impinge on them. They may make a few noises about NAFTA or something that grabs a few headlines, but they don't bother to
explore the overall situation. The oil dispute in Honduras is going to kill a lot of people and ultimately will have a tremendous effect on our economy. Chances are the whole thing won't make a ripple up here. As you indicate, the media in this country are a sham. And they are a sham because we allow to be so. We don't care enough to force them to the fire. We need to do that, we need new leaders. When I say that people tend to roll their eyes and say How's that going to happen? How does anything happen? By concerted effort over the years. That's how anything happens.

Anyway, the film project is going forward. We'll see...

The Freedomship is, indeed, a John Brunner trip. I hadn't thought of that.

The Quiet American's worth seeing. It soft pedals the politics a bit, but still and all, it does a good job of translating the novel and Caine is terrific.

Take care,

Lucius



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Keith Ferrell
Posted on Friday, March 21, 2003 - 08:18 am:   

Hey, Lucius --

Your insight and articulation about the left is salutary. Particularly these last five days when as anodyne to what's "on" I have been thinking so much about you and your work and your words. I went back and re-read "Aymara" late last night. When I can get away to the library I am going to apply myself to learning more about Honduras.

I have been thinking, despite the coalition of distractions and disturbances, I have been thinking of the left, and the failure of the left not to withstand, much less stand up to, the right, but its failure to recognize, much less stand up to the Clinton/Blair re-packaging of corporate concerns into something palatable or at least ignorable by traditional "liberals."

Which is to say, by television. And all that it represents.

The argument -- the essential Clinton/Blair argument, I believe -- that by co-opting traditional "conservative" concerns and approaches they are better able to enact a liberal agenda is such a transparent shuck and jive for the cameras and the contributors that one could weep were it not for the fact that a generation, now, has come to think of the Clintonblairs as exemplars of the liberal spirit, the left incarnate.

That there is opposition to Blair's adhesion (sic) to the Bush Middle Eastern agenda is as you say, "too late to the party" -- but the stunning thing to me is that the opposition to the leadership (as opposed to the policy), there as here, is so wholly one of surface and presentation, not of substance and direction. A search for better packaging/re-packaging repackaging rather than re-commitment, re-invention, reinvigration, renewal.

And of course, witness John Edwards from my old home state, the "liberals" that come along after the Clintonblairs don't even have the sense of history that their predecessors co-opted. They're Clintonblair lite, packaged and perfumed and purveyed.

A generation ago we -- this profession, this calling, this now forgotten gift of words written from hearts and minds to which other hearts and minds might turn for serious engagement -- had Mailer and Roth and Vidal. Edward Abbey whom nobody seems to remember at all.

Now we get Jonathan Franzen and everybody cheers.

I go on too long, and too off-topic -- and it's your topic I'm violating here. But I think back to some of what we did in OMNI (before Bob and Kathy got abducted by UFOS: talk about co-opted!) and the stories we ran on the children of Guatemala, the extent (this in 1991) that the techno-wizards were going to put on imperial shows for the couch potatoes, the ways in which the deployment of all the tools of freedom were headed toward becoming the matrix (sic) for the marketers, and more and more.

Now the millenium is upon us and as always it rests on the backs of those below.

The clintonblairbush rising tide that will swallow the remaining boats of the left will, all too clearly, prove smooth waters for the Freedomships and the oil that drives them.

sourly but not (yet) sanguine,
Keith
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michel Bessette
Posted on Wednesday, May 12, 2004 - 12:46 pm:   

Servicios Técnicos CMB7
C. Michel Bessette, RRT (Canada)
Danli, El Paraíso, Honduras
Tel: 011-504-883-2347
email: paradisedivers@yahoo.com
or
michel@utila-net.com


ATTENTION: Shepard, Lucius

RE: Honduras (By Lucius Shepard on Friday, February 14, 2003 - 07:12 am)
FROM: Night Shade Books Discussion Area.

I was very interested to read this article, and would like to contact you for follow-up information.

Below is a brief explanation of the project that I am involved in, I have done some of the initial research during a trip to La Mosquitia at the end of April of this year.

To Whom It May Concern:

I have been invited to participate in an International Development Bank funded project to examine the scope of the health problems of the native lobster & conch divers of the Mosquitia Coast in Honduras.

I have done hours of searches for material on the treatment of “old diving” injuries without much success. In order to be most effective the material will be preferably in Spanish and directed at all levels of healthcare professionals.

More information on this area and its diving history can be found at www.suboceansafety.org

Also included in this project is a survey of the 7 chambers in operation in Honduras (La Mosquitia- 4, Roatan-2, Utila- 1)

Would you please contact me if you have any ideas of here I could find information on-line or via email, in these following areas:
§ Late treatment of decompression illness
§ Chamber inspection
§ Spanish reference materials
§ Recent information on any programs addressing the divers’ injuries, treatment and rehabilitation.
§ Any verifiable industry statistics: number of workers, number of injured divers, levels of disabilities, etc.

Any help you can provide would be most appreciated.

Sincerely,

Michel Bessette, RRT (Canada),
Medical Technician/Senior Chamber Operator

May 12, 2004

c/c: Dra. Xiomara Castro,
Rehabilitation Medicine,
Hospital Puerta Lempira.

The following is a sketchy summary of the situation existing currently in the Mosquito Coast (La Mosquitia), which occupies portions of the north coastal region of both Honduras and Nicaragua, and incorporates the largest untouched stretch of rain forest in the Western hemisphere. I wrote this as a block of information for my agent preparatory to doing a film script--thus it's oddly truncated and bluntly formulated, but it serves as something of an introduction to my area of interest.

Lucius, when were you last in La Mosquitia?

The indigents of the Mosquitia belong to several Indian tribes, notably the Miskitia and the Peche, and there is also a population of blacks, the garifunas, descended from French slaves who escaped from colonies in the Antilles in the 1600s. Ninety percent of the income of these people derives from lobster diving. The alternatives are abject poverty and smuggling, which generally leads to a violent death.

The lobster fleet is owned by the cocaine industry--the registered owners of the ships are generally wives or girlfriends or associates of cocaine traffickers whose criminally difficulties prevent them having legal ownership. The reason that Honduran lobster is relatively cheap is that the traffickers don't need to make a profit from it--the coke that comes into the US on lobster boats is their cash cow.

I have heard of this, but cannot use it in the project report, as no one will confirm the truth of this situation.

Neither do they feel compelled to take care of the lobster divers. These men are forced to make up to 14 dives a day with no air gauges and shoddy equipment in depths up to 130 feet. A safe dive depth in the US is considered about 60 feet and it is recommended that one dive to this depth no more than 2 or 3 times a day. Thus it may be seen that the captains of the lobster boats are in essence committing murder. There are thousands of men on the Mosquito Coast who have been catastrophically paralyzed by the bends, and there are only two decompression chambers on the coast, one of which is often out of order.

At the Moravian Hospital in Ahuas there is a mono-place chamber that is in questionable condition, at Kaukira there is a separate (stand alone) facility that has 3 chambers: a mono-place, a permanent multi-place and a transport chamber (Chamberlite© from MRG International)- none of which have been used for the past 2 years!

Should a diver be stricken in mid-voyage, the captains don't head back for port--they continue until the voyage ends and by the time the injured diver is brought for treatment, it's too late. Every diver suffers sat least some mild paralysis due to the bends. All over the region you encounter young men who cannot grip your hand or who limp. The catastrophically paralyzed have an average life span of about three years. They die as a result of bedsores turning (into) septicemia--this evolves into skin breakdown, urinary tract infections, and so on. The thousands of paralyzed men in the area must have wheelchairs to get them up and give them a chance not only for life, but to earn some kind of livelihood for their families. The people of the Mosquito Coast have essentially been abandoned by the Honduran and Nicaraguan governments. Those governments are only interested in the considerable reservoirs of oil that exist there.

Again, I have heard of this, but cannot use it in the project report, as no one will confirm the truth of this situation.

The Mosquito Coast is the home to a variety of interesting characters, many of them European expatriates who run trading posts and operate small placer mines along the rivers and smuggle. Colombian pirates operate along the coast and are in turn victimized by more dangerous predators. One of the people I met is an ex-member of the French Foreign Legion who owns a gunboat and makes a living by taking off drug dealers, killing them, keeping the cash and giving the drugs to the Indians to sell. Away from the coast the region is essentially an untracked wilderness populated by tapir, jaguars, crocodiles, anteaters, and et al. Even the larger towns are primitive--Palacios, for instance, consists of one dirt street lined with shanties, and that street also serves as an airstrip. Sometimes when I've landed there, I have seen children driving pigs off the runaway just in advance of the plane.

Is the situation in Palacios (I’ve not been there) similar to that in Puerta Lempira… health services overwhelmed, apathetic hospital staff, lack of effective plans, NGO Diver focus groups who have an agenda that is TOTALLY UNREALISTIC, personal agendas taking precedence over the needs of the injured divers, etc…

During the contra war in the early 80s, hundreds of tiny airstrips were built by the contras and their allies all over the region. These air strips have been appropriated by the cocaine traffickers, who funnel their product through the Mosquitia and also do some of their processing there. There is a great tradition of cocaine in the area. The contra war was partially funded by cocaine, which was flown into Lackland Air Force and other venues in the States from these very airstrips and also from Trujillo, a town that lies on a bay enclosed by the Cape of Honduras on the edge of the Mosquitia.


Trujillo, with beautiful beaches and jungle hills, was once a tourist place, but since Hurricane Mitch in 1998, tourism has died out. The hotels are almost empty--the largest are owned by traffickers who use them to launder money. Much of the business of the Mosquito Coast--legal and illegal--is conducted in Trujillo, which is only a twenty-minute plane trip from Palacios and many significant players in the region pass through the town.

One such is a doctor from Georgia, a wealthy GP with a number of doctors working for him, who shortly before Mitch had a vision of the hurricane and came down to Honduras with medical supplies. He did admirable relief work during the hurricane and afterward, and stayed on in the country. Over the past four years he has become of a revolutionary, fomenting rebellion in the Mosquitia, urging secession from Honduras and Nicaragua. His vision included, apparently, a seventeen-year plan during which the freedom of the Mosquito Coast would be achieved.

Is this individual still active in the area? Where is he located and how to contact him?

He's been the target of assassins and travels around with Kalashnikovs under the seat of his car, accompanied by a 19 year old devotee, kind of a weird leftist Batman and Robin. He managed to wangle three military landing craft from the US military base in Panama and has been using them to run freight into the Mosquitia and also to spread his political message. I don't believe his life expectancy is high. People who do charity in the Mosquitia, who annoy the traffickers, usually don't have much life expectancy. He's been there four years.

I met with the Director of The Moravian Clinic in Ahuas, Dra. N. Goff, she allowed us to see the chamber and tour the hospital… quite frankly I was expecting a cleaner and better maintained facility. My opinion is that they are SERIOUSLY overextended and need to re-examine their Clinic’s Mission Statement.

One of the captains of the doctor's landing craft was approached to smuggle coke by a man known as Bob Hale, a "former" CIA spook. Hale was previously known as Jack McCall. Under that name he was part of the contra war. His specialty was cocaine trafficking and he helped organize the cocaine flights from Trujillo and the Mosquitia into the States. He also was active in recruiting contra fighters. This he achieved by going into El Salvador, along with others, and kidnapping Salvadorian high school kids, bringing to Trujillo and training them to fight. If they refused they were put in tiger cages and beaten until their wills were broken. At that time, the early 80s, the Honduran drug cartel was headquartered in the hills surrounding Olanchito. For training exercises, the Salvadorian recruits were sent into Olanchito to, basically, kill off the competition to McCall's operation. McCall's brutality grew so extreme that in the late 80s he was about to prosecuted by the US government, but was saved by the intervention of congressional right-wingers. He disappeared for a while and reappeared some years later in Honduras with a new identity--Bob Hale--and once again began trafficking in cocaine. As mentioned, about a year ago he attempted to coerce one of the captains of the Georgia doctor's landing craft into smuggling cocaine. When the captain refused, Hale shot his wife in both thighs, and when the captain attempted to go to the police, Hale shot him five times and chopped off the back of his head with a machete. He since has disappeared again and apparently has surfaced recently in another part of the world under yet another identity.

Also as mentioned earlier, there are large oil reservoirs beneath the Mosquitia and the oil leases are up for grabs. Once they are sold, the people of the region will be further exploited--they will receive none of the money and many will be driven off their lands. Recognizing this, the various ethnic groups of the coast have united and announced that they intend to form a provisional government in February and intend to establish the nation of Mosquitia. They do not want to fight a revolution--what they're hoping for is a court case to be tried in the country that buys the oil leases, probably the USA, and win a share of the loot. Indigent peoples have a good record of winning in such trials. But the possibility of a bloody conflict is there, for certain. If a conflict results then we will have a strange alliance between the indigent people and the cocaine traffickers, who want to maintain their rights in the region. On paper, there's no contest. Nicaragua, it seems, could walk in and stamp out a revolution in a very short time. But with the cocaine traffickers and their vast armaments, their ability to shut down every airstrip in the area, it becomes an interesting contest. At the moment there is a great deal of tension and guns everywhere.


As an odd sidebar, something called the Freedomship is scheduled to begin construction any day now in Trujillo. The Freedomship is purported to be the world's first floating city, a vessel that will house 100,000 people, be capable of accepting landings by jets, and will journey all over the world. Many, including myself, feel it is a scam, but others are believers. Either way, it's going to bring a whole new cast of characters into the place, grifters and entrepreneurs and so forth; and it testifies to the fact that foreigners--mostly Americans--believe they can come to Honduras and achieve wealth and power there, that they can work their hustles with impunity. Usually they are wrong because they are ill suited temperamentally to deal with the realities of Central American politics and life. A case in point: a man who owned some pet stores in Tennessee recently came to Trujillo and bought 14000 acres of rain forest. His goal was to breed monkeys and cockatoos, as well as iguanas and other animals, for the European pet and scientific markets. Europe does not have as severe restrictions on importing animals, as does the US. It's a good plan, one with the potential for great profit. But the man from Tennessee treats his workers and his family badly. His wife is an embittered alcoholic, his seventeen-year-old son hates him and will doubtless soon be doing a lot of coke (It costs about $100 an ounce in Trujillo), and if they don't do him in, some night soon one of the workers he has bullied will get coked and liquored up and come visit him with a machete. Put succinctly, there is a great deal of American folly on the Mosquito Coast.

Lucius, any information that you can share would be most appreciated. No information will be published in any form without the author’s permission.

Regards, Michel.
May 12, 2004
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 12, 2004 - 05:59 pm:   

Michel, I emailed you a contact edress for Robert Izdepski.. Here are some answers to your questions....The doctor from Georgia I spoke of is very paranoid, rightfully so, and very erratic. You're porobably better off not dealing with him. He's hard to get in touch with and not dependable. He is, however, still active in the area.

As for decompression chambers, I didn't mention the ones on Roatan, because, from what I can tell, they're never used by the lobster fleet. The condition of the other chambers, those in Kaukira and Puerto Lempira are in flux -- I was told that they are sometime operating, sometimes not. When I was there, I was told that the one in Ahaus was the only one functioning. In fact, one of the lempira chambers, I heard, had been moved to Corn Island....

I've talked to Goff and it may well be that her chamber was malfunctioning -- I'm not qualified to determine this.

Let me know if there's anything else I can do. I have a few Honduran contacts that might be helpful.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

stawm allem
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 02:14 am:   

lucius shepard? as in the author of Aymara? if so please tell me about the book. and your style of writting compared to other science fiction authors?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Lucius
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 06:05 am:   

Yup, me. Which book do you mean?

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register