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Andrew Fox
Posted on Thursday, July 20, 2006 - 09:48 am:   

That old Chinese curse, "May you live in interesting times"? My family and I are living it. After almost fifteen years, I'm stepping away (mostly) from my day job as State Manager of the Louisiana Commodity Supplemental Food Program (I say "mostly" because it looks like I'll be staying on one day a week to provide reporting, bridging, and training services until my replacement is up to speed). With all the increased costs of living in New Orleans after Katrina, Dara having been out of work ten months following the storm, and her taking a part-time job recently rather than a full-time one (necessitated by our boys' needs), I'm finding myself needing to bring in much more income than I'm able to do working for the State. So, starting this Monday, I'm making a big career change -- I'll be selling Saturn cars for Saturn of New Orleans, adding sales experience to my previously government-service-only resume.

It's not a sure thing, financially, as once I'm past my first three months with the dealership, I'll be surfing on commissions only. However, based on other salespeople's past and current experiences with this dealership, I'm confident that I'll do better than I'm doing now. How much better remains to be seen. What attracted me to a Saturn dealership as opposed to, say, a Toyota or Chevy dealership, is the Saturn sales philosophy of no-haggle, one price for everybody, low-pressure, high-satisfaction sales. I just don't have it in me to try to wring the last fifty bucks out of every customer who walks through the door. This is a small, family-owned dealership on the West Bank in Harvey. I like the other salesmen I've met there, as well as the sales manager, and I think I'll fit in there just fine.

I'd been sending out resumes and letters within my field of government and non-profit management for several months and experiencing a very demoralizing lack of replies. A great majority of our local hospitals and clinics were flooded during Katrina and have remained shuttered since; I'm pretty sure there are an awful lot of health administrators and public health types out there looking for a vastly decreased number of jobs. But I wanted to make the best effort I could to keep my family in the New Orleans area and be a part of the community's recovery. So I find myself making what some people think is a pretty weird career change. I'm looking forward to it, though; I'd gotten pretty stale in my current job, and I'm excited by the thought that I'll get to exercise some different muscles at work and pick up some fresh skills.

I'll be done with my training by early August and selling new Saturns (and various makes of used cars, too) at Saturn of New Orleans, located at 3621 Lapalco Boulevard in Harvey, Louisiana (504-341-1500; www.saturnofneworleans.com ). If anybody perusing these boards is in the market for a Saturn (or a recent-year used car) in South Louisiana or has a friend that will be in the market, please get in touch or drop by the dealership. And if you're out of town, why not combine a vacation in New Orleans with buying a new car? Heck, even after the storm, I can recommend dozens of great restaurants! And more are reopening or opening for the first time every day.
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Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Thursday, July 20, 2006 - 07:07 pm:   

Good luck, Andy. I'm glad Saturn has a low-pressure, no-haggle sales style; I have to admit my first thought was that you're far too nice a guy to be a successful car salesman. :-)
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Sunday, July 23, 2006 - 07:16 pm:   

Thanks for the good wishes, Nathan. I'll let you know how my first few weeks go. By the way, Barry Malzberg told me he'd be seeing our mutual friend Dale Bailey at a North Carolina SF con this weekend. I asked Barry to pass along my best wishes to Dale. Didn't realize that one of Dale's award-winning stories had recently been turned into a segment of the "Masters of Horror" series of films on cable. Good for him!
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Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 11:45 am:   

Yeah, I was there too. Dale was plugging his new book, co-written with Jack Slay, called SLEEPING POLICEMEN. It's a violent crime novel. The con was very sparsely attended. We were far outnumbered by stormtroopers and live-action role players.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 06:53 pm:   

Oh, that's a bummer. I hope Barry wasn't too miserable. Did you get a chance to talk with him at all? He's wonderfully fascinating to talk with, a walking encyclopedia of SF, fantasy, and mystery genre knowledge.
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Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 09:58 pm:   

I didn't speak with him. He and Dale are pretty close, though, so they talked for a bit. I did see him on a slipstream panel, where he politely dismissed the whole idea. He showed off some of his encyclopedic knowledge there. As he supported his argument with titles of short stories, the magazines that published them, and the months and years they did it, the other writers on the panel could only smile and shake their heads. It was uncanny.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, July 25, 2006 - 04:46 pm:   

Barry knows the date and title and author of every sf story ever published ;-). Test him!
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Tuesday, July 25, 2006 - 08:41 pm:   

Barry is a savant. I doubt there'll ever be another like him. And given the warm, heartfelt, amazingly generous support he has given to so many younger writers in the field over many years, I'd nominate him to be the first science fiction saint, too.
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Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Tuesday, July 25, 2006 - 09:44 pm:   

It'd be close between him and Michael Bishop.
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Lori Smith
Posted on Wednesday, July 26, 2006 - 06:20 am:   

Wow! That will be a big change. Maybe on your first few sales you can throw in a couple free cans of corn just to help ease yourself through the transition.

I think my boss bought his current Saturn at your new dealership. I'll let him know he should ask for you when he's ready to buy his next.

May Henry, the god of car sales, smile upon your new endeavor.

Lori
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Wednesday, July 26, 2006 - 06:44 pm:   

Thanks so much, Lori. So far, the sales training has been fascinating. When I'm all the way through it, I'll share some of what I've gleaned. The Saturn sales philosophy/strategy is much closer to basic social work technique than it is to traditional car sales methods. Actually, I'm learning both, because I'm spending most of these first two weeks in general sales training, which primarily covers new sales people for the Toyota, Ford, Lincoln-Mercury, Dodge, and Pontiac-Buick-GMC stores.

Please, please, please send me referrals!!!! I need to begin the process of building my potential clients base. Also, I'm keeping my toe in the CSFP world for at least another year, working for them part-time, about ten hours per week, providing bridging, reporting, and training services. The writing may suffer some (I'll try to make sure the fall-off is minimal), but I really need to bring more income into the household. You gotta do what you gotta do!
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Lori Smith
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 02:21 pm:   

If they give you business cards, send me a little stack and I'll be happy to pass them out to anyone who mentions they might be shopping for a car. My neighbor is a real estate agent and I've passed out a small rainforest's worth of business cards for him.

You can send them to my work address, which is at the bottom of this page: http://www.selu.edu/library/directory/govdoc/index.html.

And as I believe I've suggested before, you might want to create a MySpace page for yourself. It could lead to both book sales and car sales. It doesn't really take that long to create a profile. Here's mine: http://www.myspace.com/govdocs. I suspect you would find that you have a lot of fans in the area who would jump at the chance to buy a Saturn from you. (If only to joke with you about how Jules would never fit into one.)
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 07:39 pm:   

Super ideas, Lori! I'll definitely take you up on that offer of distributing my business cards. I should get a box of them from the Saturn dealership soon. And I'll also look into setting up a MySpace site. . . once I find the time! Between a 50 hour a week regular job, a 10 hour a week part-time job, my writing, and helping to take care of the boys, I barely have time to use the bathroom nowadays. And since I won't get any vacation time for the next year and will have to forego my convention travels for the nonce, probably the only place I'll be able to chat with readers and fans (except for online) will be at the Saturn dealership, so send them all over!
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Marty Halpern
Posted on Monday, July 31, 2006 - 11:35 am:   

Andrew --
Sorry to bug you this way but I need to chat re: the Effinger collection, and email to you at andrewfoxbooks.com is bouncing due to "quota exceeded."
Cheers,
- marty
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 - 07:09 pm:   

Dear Friends,

After three weeks of sales training, I've now been on the showroom floor at Saturn of New Orleans since Friday, or four selling days. It's been tough. . . automotive sales is a whole different universe from what I've been used to doing. My supervisor wants me to firmly but politely guide all customers through the approved Saturn evaluation, presentation, and sales process. I haven't had any problem with the "polite" part of the job, but the "firm" part is giving me some troubles. So many customers have had such sour experiences at car dealerships previously that they tend to arrive with their defenses up and on guard. Experienced sales people know instinctively how to set them at ease and guide them through the process, but I'm still pretty clumsy at it. I've spoken with about fifteen sets of customers so far, and I haven't yet closed a deal or delivered a vehicle; my boss tells me the average is one delivery per three contacts, so thus far I'm stinking up the joint. Plus, spending so much time outside in the heat and humidity, even in the shade, has taken some getting used to. I think I'm beginning to acclimate. . . after all, people somehow managed to live in South Louisiana for hundreds of years before the invention of air conditioning.

I'll occassionally post on my progress in the sales world (for sure when I finally make my first sale!). If anyone in the region is looking for a 2006 or 2007 Saturn (special rebates or low financing on the remaining 2006 models), is interested in the new Vue Green Line Hybrid Sport Utility Vehicle (arriving at our dealership sometime in September), or is looking for a good pre-owned vehicle, please stop by Saturn of New Orleans and ask for me. I'm at the dealership Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday through Saturday.

Saturn of New Orleans
3621 Lapalco Blvd.
Harvey, LA 79958
504-341-6942
800-348-8180
www.saturnofneworleans.com

I'll sure appreciate the visits!
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 - 08:26 pm:   

Good luck Andy!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 - 08:53 pm:   

Ditto, Andy!
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Lori Smith
Posted on Wednesday, August 16, 2006 - 07:12 am:   

Since you come from a public service background, it might help if you don't think of it as selling cars so much as helping people find the car they want. (That probably contradicts what they told you in training.)

In library school they taught me how to do a "reference interview" to pry out of my patrons/customers what it is exactly that they're trying to find. Once I know what they're looking for, it's just a matter of being familiar with my collection and recommending the right resource. Your situation is very much the same. Get to know the cars as well as you can, then find out what the customer is looking for and show them what you have that's closest to what they want. Once they find what they want, the rest is just paperwork. :-)

Hang in there!
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Wednesday, August 16, 2006 - 07:37 am:   

Guys, thanks so much for the encouragement. Lori, actually you've just described perfectly the Saturn selling system. The heart of the system is what they call the consultative interview, wherein the salesperson spends ten or fifteen minutes (or longer) interviewing the guest about their wants and needs in a vehicle, what they've liked about their current and past vehicles, how their needs have changed since they've bought their current vehicle, etc. The problem I've been encountering is that most customers are used to immediately walking around the lot and looking at cars -- they don't want to come inside and be interviewed, even though it makes the whole process more time efficient, less stressful, and more comfortable. More experienced salespeople have their techniques down cold for getting guests to come inside and sitting down for the consultative interview. I'm still working on my technique, and may be working on it for weeks to come. But some of the other salespeople have given me some helpful hints on how to best steer guests into the interview.

Some folks can sure be super-duper defensive when they arrive on the lot. I had one elderly lady who simply would not tell me her name, as if she were afraid I'd put a hex on her or something. When I said, "I'm sorry, ma'am, I don't believe I got your name," she replied, "And I don't believe you're going to get it, young man." Another gentleman was afraid if he gave me his name I'd look up his telephone number; he said, "If you manage to call me, I will refuse to buy from you." I assured him that I just needed his name for my records so that if he came back in and I wasn't at the dealership, the other salespeople could look up what we'd previously discussed in the computer.

I guess I'm also collecting material for future stories. I'll have to figure out some kind of a supernatural angle to selling cars. At least my writing time hasn't been suffering much, even with my continuing to put in 8-12 hours working for the Office of Public Health. I'm able to fit in a couple of nice writing sessions on the mornings of my late shifts at the dealership, and once I'm past my rookie season, I should be able to do at least a little writing during slow days while I'm waiting for customers to show up.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Wednesday, August 16, 2006 - 07:40 am:   

Oh, Lori, I got in my business cards, so I'll send you a little stack of them, as you'd requested. Thanks so much for the help with referrals!
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Lori Smith
Posted on Wednesday, August 23, 2006 - 12:22 pm:   

Got 'em! Thanks. I'll do my best to send you some business.

Passing out cards for a car salesman is a rather unusual way to be a patron of the arts, but hey, whatever it takes. :-)
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Thursday, August 24, 2006 - 08:03 pm:   

Please, please send me some customers, Lori! I'm dying out here. Still haven't sold one frickin' car. Thank the good Lord I'm on guaranteed draw for my first three months. Today I had to humiliate myself in front of an Office of Public Health co-worker due to an error the used cars manager had made and my own boss's obstinacy and two-facedness. It's been a lousy sales month for everybody, despite our clearance deals on the 2006 models. And it's been especially tough for a neophyte like me.

On the good side of the ledger, somehow I've been squirreling away time to be very productive on The Bad Luck Spirits' Social Aid and Pleasure Club. My agent is at WorldCon in L.A. this weekend and will be discussing my proposal package with at least two editors, so please keep your fingers crossed for me. I've damned well overdue for some good news.
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Lucius
Posted on Thursday, August 24, 2006 - 08:49 pm:   

maybe you should steal the cars, Andy.... ;--)

Hang in there, man....
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Sunday, August 27, 2006 - 09:06 am:   

Finally sold one yesterday. After two weeks, I managed to luck into an easy customer. Very nice older lady who knew exactly what she wanted. Nothing shook her from her mission of buying a car. Didn't have exactly the color she wanted -- no problem, blue was patriotic enough. Raining cats and dogs -- no problem, she didn't really want to test drive the car anyway (my grandmother was like that, too; she never bothered to test drive a car before buying it). Wasn't pleased with the trade assessment we gave her on her 2000 Pontiac Sunfire with only 22,000 miles -- no problem, she'd rather lose some money than have to go through the hassle of selling it herself. Wanted to finance most of the purchase -- no problem, she had terrific credit and qualified for our best special promotional rate. She also insisted on getting the extended warranty. . . no pushing or selling required.

So I sold my first one. Hurrah! That's one mean monkey off my back.
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Lori Smith
Posted on Tuesday, August 29, 2006 - 02:08 pm:   

Congratulations and yaaaayyyy!

I hope that will be the first sale of many.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 08:42 am:   

I've put off writing the following for a long time, which is why this board has remained mostly silent.

"Operation: Stick It Out in New Orleans" is officially over. As of yesterday, I finally made a firm decision regarding my family's future in this city. We don't have one, not here. As much as I love New Orleans, my friends here, the people who have built this place up and who have added to its fabulous culture, I love my family much, much more. And in the past year, this city has gone from being inconvenient, expensive, and somewhat ominous for families to being explicitly anti-family.

The schools? All is in chaos. My boys both need special education services from their pre-school. Before Katrina, these services were available from our local neighborhood elementary school. Now the closest place to acquire such services is an elementary school adjacent to the Fisher Housing Projects. No thanks, New Orleans. And the only affordable private alternative for Jewish families in the area, the Jewish Day School? Their enrollment plummeted from 120 before Katrina to 22 currently. That school isn't long for this world. The State-run schools, taken over last year from the New Orleans School Board, aren't organized enough to unbox the hundreds of cartons of supplies which have been delivered to the few dozen schools which have reopened. Kids who lived in different neighborhoods prior to the storm are now jammed into surviving schools and are acting out territorial violence on each other. No thanks, New Orleans.

The crime? It's 1994 all over again, with between two and six shootings occurring in the metro area every single day. I lived through those terrible years of the mid-1990s here and came extremely close to leaving New Orleans after my cousin Amy was killed in the French Quarter. I ultimately chose to stick it out and try to make a difference with the New Year Coalition. But I didn't have kids back then. And the city is in a much, much weaker position now than it was in 1994. Back then, a newly elected mayor, Marc Morial, could realistically expect to make a difference by appointing a new police chief with fresh crime-fighting strategies. Now, not only is the NOPD broken and bleeding officers, but the entire justice system, from the judges to the courts to the District Attorney's office, is in a complete shambles. And we're stuck with elected leaders who aren't willing or able to make dramatic course changes, from Mayor Roy C. Nagin (more on this scoundrel below) to District Attorney Eddie Jordan (whose department is saddled with a nearly $2 million court judgement due to his racially motivated firing of close to fifty white employees right after he took office, replacing them with black appointees and flushing all institutional memory out of his office in one fell swoop) to Criminal Court Judge Charles Ellois (who has served as a one-man crime wave, being indirectly responsible for multiple murders over the past five years due to his repeated and indiscrimate lowering of bonds for violent arrestees, who then go out to finish the jobs they'd started). And every day, more and more thugs return to New Orleans from Houston, drawn back here by a demoralized, shrinking, and ineffectual police department, the utter lack of a working court system, and a fresh market for drug sales among the burgeoning population of illegal aliens. No thanks, New Orleans.

Political leadership? Here's where we're killing ourselves. We can't blame this mess on FEMA and President Bush. We've done this to ourselves. Just when I thought my respect and regard for Mayor Roy C. Nagin couldn't sink any lower, he proves me wrong last Friday by giving his "enthusiastic endorsement" to Representative William Ninety-Thou-in-the-Freezer Jefferson's reelection campaign. He says he did so because Jefferson was one of the few local elected officials to support Nagin during his reelection campaign. So for the sake a political quid-pro-quo, Nagin has yet again given his city a black eye on the national stage. I used to think Nagin was a tragic figure, a well-meaning, talented man thrown by a monster storm into water far above his head. Now, after observing his pitiful antics over the past year, I think he's just a head case. My read on him is that, much like O.J. Simpson, he was a black man who accomplished substantial things by working with mostly white colleagues and who lacked much emotional identification with the black community. But once he found himself in a crisis -- the criticism that dogged him during the aftermath of Katrina and the sense that he was losing much of his prior white support -- he recast himself as an African-American race martyr in order to bask in the warm embrace of the most hysterical and paranoid elements of the black community. Here is a man, a former Republican, who will praise President Bush to his face and brag about his friendship with the president but then, when speaking to an auditorium filled with black journalists, will blame the slow Federal response to Katrina on racism and a Republican desire to depopulate a black metropolis. Here is a man who was first elected in 2002 as a candidate who explicitly rejected the racially polarized politics of the past but who campaigned -- and won -- in 2006 based on an appeal that New Orleans remain "a chocolate city, that way God wants it to be." Here is a man who, days before flying to New York City to beg the corporate leaders there to invest heavily in the rebuilding of New Orleans, inexplicably insults the inhabitants of that city during an appearance on Sixty Minutes by referring to the World Trade Center site as a "hole in the ground" that New Yorkers haven't managed to fill in during the past five years. Here is a man who glories in being a loose cannon, who loves his reputation as a man who "shoots from the hip" and who loves to build upon that reputation. Here is a man who has apparently found a kindred spirit in William Jefferson, a fellow "race martyr" who is basing his reelection campaign on a risible claim that the Republicans are persecuting him. This is the man we're stuck with as mayor for the critical next three-and-a-half years. And now even the newly elected City Council is splitting into hostile racial blocks.

No thanks, New Orleans.

I love you, but I love my family more.

I've sacrificed for you, but I won't sacrifice my family's future.

I don't know where we'll end up next, but I do know it'll be somewhere outside Louisiana (as a state employee of fifteen years, I'm intimately aware that political and managerial dysfunction isn't limited in this state to the parish of Orleans). It'll be somewhere with a reasonable cost of living and housing, decent public schools, streets that are drivable, a working criminal justice system, and parks and entertainment districts that aren't regularly shot to pieces by rampaging gunmen. Most likely, it'll be less passionate, less sensual, less thrilling, less intimate, and less of a literary muse than New Orleans has been during my twenty years here, but I can live with that. I'll have to.

I'm back with the Louisiana Office of Public Health now, hating every minute of it. I came back for the health insurance. I couldn't abide the extra $4000 in out-of-pocket costs having the next baby would cost us under the Saturn dealership's piss-poor health insurance coverage. So I'm stuck here for a few months, but a few months only. Every day, I'll be searching for jobs outside Louisiana with the Federal government or with more progressive state governments. Austin, Texas looks good, but I'm not writing off anywhere (well, maybe the Dakotas. . . our next home has to have some kind of a Jewish community and an average annual snowfall of less than twenty feet).

So, if anyone hears of any jobs that might sound appealing, please pass the word along. It would be great to move somewhere where we already have some friends.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 08:54 am:   

Andrew,
I'm so sorry to hear all this. For you and your family's sake, and for New Orleans. It sounds pretty awful.

Good luck finding the right place to move.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 09:25 am:   

Thanks so much, Ellen. Your friendship over this past year has been a wonderful morale-booster. If Dara and the kids and I could find a workable situation somewhere in the Northeast, we'd jump on it. . . we've got so many terrific friends up there.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 09:29 am:   

I was going to say, hey move here but I suspect it would be hard to find a job --and more importantly a reasonably priced place to live in NYC these days.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 10:21 am:   

Yeah, I'm afraid NYC is out of the question. Maybe Upstate New York (the Albany area) would be a possibility, though. Back in the late 1980s, I worked for the New York State Office of Mental Health, out on Long Island (which is also presently unaffordable).
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Lori Smith
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 01:39 pm:   

Drat! I'm so sorry to hear that things just aren't going to work out for you in New Orleans.

I hate to see you leave, but I always like to be helpful, so here's some information to keep in mind as you're searching for a new job/home:

States with the Largest % Jewish Populations (From the 2002 Statistical Abstract of the United States)
IL 2.2%
PA 2.3%
CA 2.9%
CT 3.2%
NV 3.8%
FL 3.9%
MD 4.0%
MA 4.3%
DC 4.5%
NY 8.7%

If it weren't for your requirement of average snowfall below 20 feet, I'd almost recommend Toronto. More and more often these days I'm thinking it's time to get out of this country entirely. (But that's a different story.)
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Thursday, October 12, 2006 - 02:59 pm:   

No Canada for me. Despite my current frustrations and disappointments, I'm still a red-blooded AH-MUR-ICAN.

Thanks for the info. I'll keep everybody updated on my job hunt and relocation plans. Maybe, wherever we land next, we'll be in closer proximity to a greater number of SF cons than we have been living on the Gulf Coast. The whole family enjoys going to those.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 - 01:54 pm:   

Andrew, if there's anything we can do to help you out in this area, let us know.

In fact, do give us a call. We know of some possibilities.
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Friday, October 20, 2006 - 10:07 am:   

Our latest crime wave in the New Orleans metro area shows no sign of abating, with the latest, most spectacular murder-suicide involving a pair of Quarter "characters" (from California and North Carolina) who had a falling out over an apartment lease. This led to the boyfriend strangling the girlfriend, then cutting up her body, placing the torso in his fridge, broiling her legs and arms in the oven, and cooking her head, hands and feet in pots on the stovetop. Then he went out and blew all his money on a week's worth of bar-hopping and taking friends to expensive restaurants before jumping off the roof of a French Quarter hotel. He stuck a five-page suicide note which described the whole deal in his pocket before jumping. Oh, and the apartment which was the source of the domestic turmoil? It was located on North Rampart Street, directly above the local vodoo temple. Our local Times-Picayune reporters have been falling all over themselves for this story, each seeking to channel his or her own inner Robert Bloch, Jim Thompson, or (for the real locals) Poppy Z. Brite. The local film people, apparently, are already talking about turning it into a movie. The only thing, though, that would make the story stand out from dozens of cinematic precursors would be its bizarre triteness and the way that the local talking heads are eating this all up. Bon appetite. Here's a sample of the stories the T-P editors are hoping will earn them another Pulitzer:

http://updates.blogs.nola.com/default.asp?item=238200

Poppy Z. Brite passed along a couple of tasty nuggets in her recent blog entries. Conversation overheard between two NOPD cops: this case gives a whole new meaning to the term "pot head." And, given the post-Katrina dearth of affordable apartments, would-be Quarterites are knocking down the landlord's door to see if they can get a murder-suicide discount on rent for the suddenly available North Rampart Street apartment.
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Adam-Troy Castro
Posted on Sunday, October 22, 2006 - 05:05 pm:   

Hey, Andrew: do call us. (My phone for you ain't working).
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Andrew Fox
Posted on Monday, October 23, 2006 - 07:51 am:   

Will do, Adam. I meant to call this past week, but other things (children, absent-mindedness) kept getting in the way. My apologies.

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