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richard
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 06:33 pm:   

Hi Steph - how long exactly have you known Jant? Did he spring into your head fully fledged (ha, pun) or did it take a while for him to evolve?
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Bob Urell
Posted on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 06:26 am:   

Ah. The one everyone's been talking about lately. I'm looking forward to reading your book, ma'am. Welcome to the Shade.
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MJH
Posted on Tuesday, August 24, 2004 - 03:45 am:   

Hi Steph. Nice to find you here. Can you tell us anything about the new book ? How it relates to the world of The Castle ?
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Steph
Posted on Tuesday, September 07, 2004 - 03:23 am:   

Hi all, good to be here. I'll chat in a couple of days so watch this space. Unfortunately I'm not very well right now -- still have back pain from a car crash. See you asap.
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myca
Posted on Wednesday, September 08, 2004 - 05:48 pm:   

Hi Steph, U may not remember me but I was a friend of Angela, I'm looking forward to reading your biik, Carl and rachel told me about it a couple of weeks ago, I'd actually like to thank you for introducing me to sandman. I always enjoyed reading them in your dusty old attic surrounded by, as i recall, smarties lids! anyhoo gotta go, my mixing desk awaits cya
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fur
Posted on Friday, October 22, 2004 - 01:25 am:   

Hi Steph,

Which period are you looking at, and does your book cover armour design as well? In theory, the design of the breast and backplate should have carried the force of impact around the body rather than through it, which protects the neck and spine and stops you from twisting and damaging yourself if you get hit in the shoulder (not much use if you get hit in the head; but you'd more or less be dead anyway). In practice, if it's done right, it also makes the force push you into the saddle through the hips/pelvic bone (one of the reasons the cantles were so high at the time) so the impact is split between you, armour and horse - which is why the lance breaks. If the people took the full force the lances would have gone straight through them rather more often. The combination of a high cantle, solid backplate and a high neckguard/low backed helmet *should* all have minimised whiplash - something I don't think car designers really consider...

(sorry - *big* digression which probably isn't relevant if you're looking at an earlier period)
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Al Robertson
Posted on Friday, October 22, 2004 - 06:57 am:   

Hi Steph, all -

I used to have an Art History lecturer who was also an Iaido (art of drawing your sword and killing somebody in a single blow) Master. I went through various oriental things of respectfully getting a deeply oblique request for tuition to him, but sadly it turned out that a) I should have just asked him directly and b) he had hung up his sword and was but a simple farmer (or rather lecturer) now.

Anyway, returning to the point - he always reckoned that you should have been able to turn somersaults in full plate mail armour, but I've never been too convinced by that. How easy was it to move around in that stuff?
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Steph
Posted on Friday, October 22, 2004 - 11:26 am:   

Al -

Yes it was possible. I have a photograph of a re-enactor doing a handstand in full c15 plate.

Froissart mentions Sir John Assueton leaping fully armed onto his warhorse; and Olivier de la March describes Galliot de Balthasin leaping fully armed out of the saddle 'as though he had on a pourpoint only' in 1446. The chronicler Schilling even recorded that a 'man at arms in full armour was thrown off the bridge into the Moselle. This same man called on St Nicholas for aid, and with the help of the saint managed to climb out of the river and survive.'

Four typical late 15th Century armours average 52 lbs total weight. Examples of individual parts are: armet (close helmet) 6-7 lbs, gorget 9 oz, two-part breastplate 12 lbs 8 oz, right arm 2 lbs 14 oz, left arm 12 lbs 9 oz, legs 6 lbs 1 oz each; mail shirts with short and long sleeves, 15 lbs and 7 oz and 20 lbs 11 oz; a typical sword 2 lbs 8 oz.

An infantry soldier in everyday marching equipment from the Napoleonic period to the present day, typically carried between 60 and 70 lbs (27-32 kg), much less evenly distributed than the weight of an armour.

Jant rarely wears full plate and when I asked the other characters they just gave me odd looks.
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Al Robertson
Posted on Monday, October 25, 2004 - 05:52 am:   

*impressed*

Although presumably the C15 person would wear / carry armour plus weapons / provisions / etc, so coming in round about the same as or a bit more than the Napoleonic person? And would you wear your armour full time, come to think of it? I imagine it would be pretty cumbersome to carry around just as unworn bits and pieces.
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myca
Posted on Tuesday, November 02, 2004 - 06:45 am:   

Sorry for the delay steph, laptop troubles so I lost the bookmark. I'll tell carl and rachel you said hi when I see them. I ain't in london, still living in Shipley, but in Jan off to brighton I move, Should be fun. Ain't seen a copy of your book around so It'd be cool if you sent one to Angie for moi, she knows where i live (I Think) moved into my old house after the last one blew up, dark days indeed, but at least the police let me off thank god!
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myca
Posted on Tuesday, November 02, 2004 - 06:56 am:   

Sorry Steph, sometimes forget how rude I can be, asked a question and I ignore! Bands going fine, Check out bviolet(dot)com Should be finished sometime this year when I can get my web programming head on, all that HTML and JAVA does my nut though, & still trying to learn Flash. Anyhoo nice hearing from you and good luck.
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Mastadge
Posted on Friday, November 05, 2004 - 04:46 pm:   

So, is this the final cover for NO PRESENT LIKE TIME?

cover
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richard
Posted on Wednesday, November 10, 2004 - 05:58 am:   

Getting back to plate and the Fourlands, the question is, I guess, whether it would serve any purpose against the insects. If an insect mandible will slice through metal, then all the armour can do is slow you down which is why your characters all gave you funny looks, Steph. Better to go light and swift.

This would also, I guess, be an issue in any fantasy novel that invokes sorcery. If people are going to be flinging sorcerous mists and firebolts around, armour's just a complicated cooking pot you're trapped in. As armour in this world faded out with the arrival of effective firearms, so sorcery (or sorcerous creatures) would likely have the same effect.
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fur
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 12:05 pm:   

but then the near-universal presence of effective firearms has provoked the re-emergence of body armour in all it's snazzy matte black glory. Six of one, half a dozen of the other.
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Steph
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 01:03 pm:   

Richard -

An Insect mandible can't slice through metal. Plate armour is a good protection against Insects but they will try to bite in at the gaps, so Fourlands armour is very well articulated; it also has chain mail to prevent gaps and padding underneath for the lancers.

Since armour was invented in the Fourlands in 415 and plate armour in about the year 800, in Morenzia, it has developed lots of cool adapatations against Insects. It is ridged, with the ridges running vertically for strength. It is garniture - i.e. you can exchange pieces of a kit for use in different situations like jousting or pitched battles. It is very high quality steel and lighter than you would expect. Many specialists have been working on the problem for a long time so the innovations seem modern - e.g. shoulder hooks on shields like UK police shields.

Not everybody uses armour, it depends on your role in battle. Jant goes light and swift. Archers don't wear armour. The lancers do, most of them are Select or nobility and they can afford good kit; and the horses can carry the weight. General fyrd don't wear full suits of armour. Sheild wall fighters don't, nor do pike men or spear men of course - it would be exhausting.

It also depends on where you're from. Morenzians invented plate and a lot of it is made in Hacilith as well as the Castle's foundries in Wrought. Awians don't use it as much - it's a cultural difference. They use brigandines or scale armour, and resort to plate only in dire conditions. Plainslanders like cuirasses or brigandines too.

One c15 illustration exists of a knight doing a handstand in armour. There isn't much evidence because it's a completely pointless thing to do.

The Castle's Swordsman says he can do it. Not to be outdone, Jant dashes off to find some. What a pair.
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Steph
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 01:08 pm:   

Fur - agreed, apart from the word snazzy. I think that cuirasses became thicker before they fell out of use. I think they were tested to stop a musket ball.
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Steph
Posted on Thursday, November 11, 2004 - 01:12 pm:   

Richard - btw, I hate magic or sorcery. I avoid books that include magic (magic realism is different).

Mastage - yes, that is the cover. What do you think? I prefer it to the Miller covers because it doesn't interfere with your imagination.
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richard
Posted on Friday, November 12, 2004 - 04:45 am:   

Steph - well magic realism is far more dangerous, corrosive stuff, certainly.

But you should try the Broken Sword or the Merman's Children for a blend of quite outrageously trad. sorcery with hyper-realistic historical sociology - it can be done!

Question - have the insects evolved at all to meet the challenges of fighting armoured humans? If their life-spans are relatively short, they probably would have had the time generationally speaking, no?

fur - yeah, take your point about the resurgence of armour - makes you wonder what the next cycle of firearm development is going to look like...
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Steph
Posted on Wednesday, November 24, 2004 - 07:42 am:   

Fur is wrong because the reappearance of armour is really to do with advances in materials science.

Insects haven't evolved behaviourally to deal with armoured people because the Fourlands is a tiny, tiny extent of their range. They have only been in the Fourlands since about YOOW 400 so that isn't very long. By now they are so tough they don't need to adapt much to new environments (like ants). Of course there are places they can't live at all, and if they appear there, they die.

The reason why Insects are so formidable is because they've undergone evolutionary pressure in hundreds of worlds, adapted to many conditions, from their original, over-run, oxygen-rich world.
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Jonathan Stephens
Posted on Monday, November 29, 2004 - 03:11 pm:   

Hi Steph,

I could go into a lenghty rhapsody of how much I loved 'In the Year of Our War', but suffice to say that my autographed Hardcover arrived today (from Hawaii of all places). It cost me a pretty penny, but I figger it's worth it to get it now before the price goes up after all the awards it will win!

Quick question for you: Have you published anything else I can get my hot little hands on to tide me over until 'No Present Like Time' is published?

Warmest regards,

Jonathan
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Steph
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 04:16 am:   

Hi Jonathan - I've only just seen your post. Thanks very much! Check your inbox, I've sent you a mail.
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Bill Reynolds
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 09:08 am:   

Just finished it. You are one twisted buckarette. This is one of the highest compliments I can give.

Jant is a great character. He must listen to the Velvet Underground (or Ziggy Stardust) when he can settle down. This proably starts fights with Tern who wants to listen to Richard Thompson. I don't think she's the Sandy Denny type and all those years with Jant would have made her a sucker for Richard's lyrics. (I hope that if I'm wrong then, god forbid, at least she wouldn't listen to Heart.) Lightning is into Peter-Gabriel-era Genesis (not Lamb Lies Down...) or, when he is particularly morose, he obsesses with the allegretto of Beethoven's 7th. Thunderbolt is into Motorhead. I thought at first of Norwegian Death Metal for him but he grieved over his wife too much. Ata likes Ani DiFranco. (She liked Alanis Morrisette's first album, but nothing after that.) I see Felicita as a Pet Shop Boys fan. The Equinnes all listen, for reasons to long-winded to get into here, to the late, sadly lamented John Cipollina from Quicksilver Messenger Service, Copperhead, Terry and the Pirates, The Dinosaurs, Problem Child - basically more bands than there were nights to play in his brief life. The Vermiforms to a worm must prefer serial music, Schoenberg et al, but they dislike Pierrot Lunaire. They find the rest of the serial canon to be therapeutical. The Tines are tough. I was torn between Steve Reich and the Ramones but I'm leaning more towards the former, the longer I spend typing this sentence. You see Swallow as an Opera diva. I see her as the great Tracy Nelson. I can't figure Mist and I refuse to be arch and suggest Jimmy Buffett.

No, of course, I wasn't thinking these up when I was reading the novel. Your book was much too facinating and I was totally absorbed in the text. Now that I have to wait for a while before the next one, this sort of exercise keeps the book WITH me and so the musical connections started popping into my head as I began composing a message that was simply going to be a plug and a thank you for the book. Neither do I usually "soundtrack" books, but something about Jant and the Velvets really appealed to me and that's what set me off.

BTW, having finished my UK hardcover edition and not brought it here to Hizhou on this business trip (I left it in Qingdao with my wife and my other books) I can't look up the cover artist. Were we at some point doing a US/UK comparison? Hands down, the UK HC is the better cover. I can think of very few books where this is NOT the case, especially when the UK publisher is Gollancz - the 21st Century's response to all those great surreal 1950s Ballentine paperbacks.

The location of my only copy ("But it's my only line!!!!!) is also a flimsy excuse misspelling the names of certain of your characters or giving them the wrong names entirely.

We won't be real-home (as opposed to Qingdao temp-home) until some time in June so even though I'll order the new one when it hits Amazon UK, it'll be some time before I get to read it. Alas.

After starting off at Liz' place, I've been spending a lot of time at Lucius' due to the higher activity level and breadth of topic. (I hate US football and wrestling so I just skip those threads.) Now Lucius is going on a well-deserved sabatical so I'll be bouncing around writing my overly long posts that I'm sure irritate everyone (although no one has been cruel enough to point this out.) Wanted to tell you that this was a Fab book. I may bounce in again one day like Tigger on Crystal Meth and pen another diatribe. Regarding the Crystal Meth: When I swipe, I swipe from the best and give credit. Better to be thought a pedantic bore (guilty as charged) than a plagerist.

Exceptional book. Anxiously await the follow up. Know there is much behind the scenes with Fourworlds that I will want to know. Give us more but never give us everything. A few mysteries are better left unresolved. Don't you hate movies that end with a (boring) clearly spelled out resolution when they could have flipped to black-screen at a highly ambiguous moment. The Lady and the Tiger. Schroedinger's Cat.
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Mastadge
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 08:55 am:   

I noticed that the UK paperback has a new cover that matches the cover for NPLT.
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Bill Reynolds/Socrates17
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 09:38 pm:   

Yeah. I noticed that too and felt it was a bad decision.
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Steph
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 09:05 am:   

Hi Bill,

Re: the music. You’re spot on! You really made me laugh: you couldn’t be more right. Let me have a go now:

Jant certainly likes Velvet Underground best. And Hendrix, and the Prodigy. He bought the first two offerings from Tori Amos but found the rest disappointing.

The Ata you know from YOOW likes the first albums of Alanis Morisette and Catatonia. But she’s changed a lot since then.

Felicitia likes My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult, likes the Scissor Sisters and thinks that Madonna is an icon.

Eleonora has a soft spot for Gershwin, especially Rhapsody in Blue and any 1920’s jazz.

Wrenn the Swordsman from NPLT likes hip-hop and R&B, ‘whatever’s in the charts really’ (if they had charts).

Mist never used to listen to music when he was a Zascai. It’s the last thing you need when you’re concentrating on sailing a ship. He prefers to hear the sound of the sail and the water on the hull.

Lightning likes Scarlatti, Handel and Mozart, thinks Vivaldi is ‘interesting’ and hates Orff. I don’t know his opinion on any modern music, but he might have a secret appreciation of Wagnerian valkryies.

Swallow could well be Goldfrapp.
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Steph
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 09:09 am:   

The Castle mythos is crying out for a good soundtrack, isn’t it? Here goes:

The Year of Our War:

Nick Cave – Ship Song
Jimi Hendrix – All Along the Watchtower
Primal Scream – Higher than the Sun
St Etienne – Pale Movie (for Tern)
Jefferson Airplane – White Rabbit
Moist – Resurrection
Sisters of Mercy – Nine While Nine
Belly – Stay
Garbage – Not My Idea (for Ata)
Dawn Chorus – Toyah (from The Changeling) (for Felicitia)
Suede – So Young (for Felicitia too)
Scarlatti – Sonata in G (for Swallow)
Intrada – Thomas Simpson (the Royal Brass music of King James I)
The Castle – Love
King of the Fairies – Alan Stivell
Church of Anthrax – John Cale and Terry Riley (for Hacilith)
Kak – Trieulogy
Amon Duul – Archangel Thunderbird (end credits)
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Steph
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 09:19 am:   

No Present Like Time:

Philip Glass – Violin Concerto (for the sea crossing)
Robbie Williams – The Road to Mandalay
Pink Floyd – Comfortably Numb
Velvet Underground – Waiting for the Man
Depeche Mode – In My Shoes
Dead Can Dance – Avatar (arrival at Capharnaum harbour)
Nirvana – Lithium
Pixies – Debaser
PJ Harvey – Big Exit (for Cyan)
Drugstore – Superglider
Dubstar – Stars (for Swallow)
House of the King – Focus
Wild Hunt – Inner City Unit
Hall of the Mountain Grill – Hawkwind
Green Day – Holiday (end credits)


Many thanks to Dave T who got excited about YOOW and worked out the soundtrack way back in 1999. It’s been an inspiration ever since; Cheers, Dave; for good rum and the games of ‘wari’ in the van.

Bill, the artist for the UK hardcover of YOOW is Edward Miller. Now stay off the methcathinone.
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belisarius
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 10:13 am:   

Of course Edward Miller is a pseduonym of Les Edwards.

I've admired Les Edwards' work for a number of years, particularly his almost photographic style, but have reservations about the Edward Miller look. It works well for cityscapes (and clouds I suppose) but much less so for figures. The YOOW cover makes Jant looks like a featureless artist's mannequin - apparently naked and hairless - and, in the first draft, he appears to have a feeble pair of moth wings sprouting from his shoulders. Not impressed.

I much prefer the clear, bold design of the new Gollancz covers although they could perhaps have been even more striking (black on white or vice-versa).
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Steph
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 01:25 pm:   

belisarius, Mastage: you're right that the cover art is different for the paperback. I like it, myself. But you know, I have no final say in the covers. They’re not my decision. No, not for all the pizza in Awia. I'm just doing the words.

I'm going to try to open a messageboard at TTApress.com and move over there. I can open a thread about cover art there, if you want to join me. You should see the French edition, it's brilliant. It looks like a graphic novel cover.

About soundtracks which is far more interesting. Bill you should see Lightning play the piano. He’s very good. I mean, he’s technically very good but doesn’t put enough emotion in. That’s a problem with the artwork of immortals generally.

I think the Tine would mainly sing hymns (to whatever body parts their cult worships). They watch films like Tetsuo, and Peter Jackson's 'Bad Taste'. Watching and chuckling. Cronenberg would be their favourite: I’d like to see what they could do to two Jeremy Irons's in 'Dead Ringers'.
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Louise
Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 07:02 am:   

Hi. I was wondering whether there was a UK (or US - wherever it comes out first) release date yet for book number three?
Thanks,
Louise
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Louise
Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 07:13 am:   

P.s I love the fact that these books make everyone think of music.
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Kieran L
Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 01:03 pm:   

Hi Steph,

Just wanted to say how much I've enjoyed both your books. Just finished 'No Present Like Time', and thought it was excellent.
I've done a picture of how I imagine Jant to look. You can see it at:

http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/30592532/

Hope you like it!

yours,
Kieran
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Steph
Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 10:13 am:   

Hey, Louise

There isn't a release date for the third Castle book yet. It will probably be next year - in spring or summer. I'm calling it 'The Modern World'.

It's a long wait, yes, but I wanted to get everything right. Writing it has taught me a hell of a lot, and you will never have to wait so long for a Castle book again, that's for sure.
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Steph
Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 10:20 am:   

Kieran

Like it? I love it.

You've got a great eye for detail, and a really good Jamie Hewlett-type style, I think. I like the clothes (my t-shirts flake out like that after 10 years as well) and at last we have an ice axe, not a sword. Thanks for showing us!
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Roman Tilcer
Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 07:02 am:   

Hi, Steph and all you taffers!
I just want to ask if you're thinking about some collection of your poems, or a website-section dedicated to them? - Because I think some people like them very much ;).
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Steph Swainston
Posted on Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 09:31 am:   

Hi, Roman

Yes, at the moment I'm working on a section of my website for my poems. It will also have some scenes cut from the Castle books, and various other Castle scenes. I have about half a million words of such scenes… but because my writing was developing all that time, and I was working out different points of view, I won't put everything on the web. I think Brett Easton Ellis said that a writer has to get through 250,000 words of self-indulgence before he starts writing seriously. (Shame that Ellis' self-indulgence was better than his later work, ha ha. Maybe he should have concentrated on the process of *continual* development.)

As for the poetry, yes – I have more poems too and if anybody wanted to publish an anthology of poetry I would jump at the chance. Poetry publishers seem few and far between, though, and are very oversubscribed. I have had a few published in the past – but if I gradually add them to my website, you can read them for free!

There are even some poems from the Castle mythos, but I have baulked at showing them to people because obviously my writing 'in character' is different from me writing as Steph Swainston. For example, remember the Awian poet King Staniel Rachiswater, now exiled in Summerday? If I write an excruciating romantic ballad or a warrior's song by Staniel, it would be in his style, but some people might think it's 'me'. This is a distinction that seems particularly difficult to convey on the web.

So, anyway – yes, there will be more poems and Castle scenes on a new section of the website soon. I'll let you know when they're available.
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Roman Tilcer
Posted on Sunday, April 08, 2007 - 12:42 am:   

Great. I am looking forward to see it all!
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Chris Bailey
Posted on Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - 10:24 pm:   

When i was reading NPLT, i was listened to the following.

John Frusciante- Carvel
The entirety of the Super Ae album by The Boredoms
Johnny Cash
Beach Boys - I wanna go home ( jant on the ship heh heh)
some Wagner
John Frusciante- Song to sing when i'm lonely - ( when Tern and Jant have the massive arguement)


I could go on for hours, but the librarian is trying to kick me off.
I do agree though that this series is very unique in its ability to remind me of music and songs.

Hypothetical Question- Steph, if you could would you want this series to become films?
and if yes, who would you cast as Jant?

anyways bye for now...
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Steph Swainston
Posted on Friday, July 20, 2007 - 03:20 pm:   

Hi, Chris

Good taste. That’s a cool soundtrack. I’m glad NPLT sparked such associations – and it’s true, music is a big part of the Castle mythos for me, because music helps me imagine scenes vividly. I’ll open a new thread for music and answer your post there.

Yes, I would jump at the chance of having Castle made into a film. If a movie company offered me a big wodge of cash it would be immoral not to take it. I’d like to think Castle will be made into a film one day. But it’s not on the cards at all…. yet. I also know that if Hollywood did it they would fuck it right up because it is too complicated for them.

But a film wouldn’t damage or change the books themselves. So let’s do it! I would invite you all to a massive gorgeous party and then to the premiere, pack the cinema full to bursting and I’d throw handfuls of popcorn in the air whenever there was a good bit.

Dream cast (in order of appearance):

Jant.........................Cilian Murphy *
Lightning......................Vincent Perez - or Ralph Fiennes (??)
Tornado......................Ray Stevenson crossed with Brian Blessed
Ata...........................Fanny Ardant
Tern.........................Helena Bonham-Carter
Felicitia.......................Billy Joe Armstrong (Green Day)
Cyan.........................someone who looks like Avril Lavigne


* I haven’t forgiven Johnny Depp for Pirates II. Plus, he’s aging like a daddy.


In reality one would have to spend a lot of time on selecting a set of talented unknowns who fitted the characters well. As in Star Wars I, new actors would have no previous associations and they’d have to prove themselves.

Fanny Ardant as Mary of Guise in ‘Elizabeth’ was gob-smackingly like Ata.

If Richard Griffiths was twenty years younger as in ‘Withnail and I’ he would be perfect for Cinna Bawtere.

And if Anthony Hopkins was twenty years younger and had longish hair he would be rather sexy and would therefore be allowed to play Shearwater Mist.

Even hiring these actors would blow the budget but the screen tests would be lovely.
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Filtr
New member
Username: Filtr

Post Number: 3
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 04:26 pm:   

Hi, everyone!

I have done the picture of Jant some time ago. You could find it here:

http://filtr.deviantart.com/art/Jant-75286061
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Steph_swainston
New member
Username: Steph_swainston

Post Number: 54
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 08, 2008 - 12:26 pm:   

Hi, Filtr,

Really good picture! I love the floating hair and scarves. It's a good angle, too. There are a few other great pictures of Jant on deviantart, why not take a look at some? This one by curua is fantastic, I particularly like the clothes.

I like Wolfbird's drawing of Jant very much as well, she's done a good job with the hair and wings - very realistic wings - and the colours are as striking as I imagine them. She's picked up all the details too, Jant's even got the wheel scar on his arm, and the eyeliner. Looks like he did in NPLT.

There's a very effective pencil drawing by KeezRha which I like because the artistic style in Awia at the moment is Art Nouveau, and it looks like a sketch for one of their stained glass windows, again, really good wings.

Weird how Jant is rarely wearing a top, but I think he'd like it that way.

There's also a cracking Genya by the-queen-of-spades which I love, she's really close to the Genya in my mind, good musculature and clothes... as sexy as she should be, and better than my sketches (grrr!)

I wrote a description of Jant for the cover artists a while ago, I will put it on my blog so people can see the sort of portrayal the artists work from... but don't let it influence your drawing too much, I don't want to tie people to a single description. Nobody looks the same every day anyway - you should draw the characters as you imagine them. That's the joy of reading!

Here's one of mine, Jant and Cyan:Jant and Cyan
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Filtr
New member
Username: Filtr

Post Number: 4
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 15, 2008 - 06:39 am:   

Hi!
Thanks for a comment, Steph.

...and I really like you own sketch of Genya!
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Steph_swainston
New member
Username: Steph_swainston

Post Number: 57
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2008 - 08:42 am:   

Filtr, m'dear,

This is Genya:
Genya Dara

I've uploaded a few more doodles to my Facebook album. The album is open to all, so to see them click here.
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Filtr
New member
Username: Filtr

Post Number: 5
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Friday, January 02, 2009 - 06:14 am:   

Hi, everybody!
I have drawn another picture of Jant some time ago, so... here it is, if you are interested:

http://filtr.deviantart.com/art/jant-oh-jant-108163902

Have an ice days!
filtr
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Steph_swainston
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Username: Steph_swainston

Post Number: 61
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 12:03 pm:   

Filtr, I love the picture. It's great! When will Jant ever learn, hey? Never, no matter how often people tell him.

I like your other art too, particularly The Raven -- and you draw beautiful trees, love the branching boughs.
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Filtr
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Username: Filtr

Post Number: 6
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 05, 2009 - 12:47 pm:   

Hi, Steph, and thanks. I'm glad you like it.
At first I've wanted to draw Jant more realistic, but the I thought: "ooh, that's Jant, man! You just can't!"
So it's mad a little bit...
Yeah, and The Raven is crazy too.
Thanks for the comment... I'm sure I'll draw more Fourland-things one day.
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Keezrha
New member
Username: Keezrha

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Saturday, February 07, 2009 - 09:20 am:   

Hi there, I'm the one who's drawn the Art Noveau-Jant.
Thank you Steph for your encouraging words :D
Your own drawings are wonderful, they fit exactly to your writing style :-)

So this is shameless self promotion: I just made another picture of Jant, perhaps you're interested too ;-) :

http://keezrha.deviantart.com/art/Flying-On-High-Wings-110532141

Greetings from the Swabian Mountains in S-Germany
Kerstin aka KeezRha :-)
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Steph_swainston
New member
Username: Steph_swainston

Post Number: 63
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2009 - 06:35 am:   

Hey, Keezrha,

That is such a powerful image, it blew me away! Now I feel a bit unsteady, as if I'm the one taking the hit.

I can see you've looked carefully at buzzard wings, you have the feather notches and dishevelled ends just right. The way he's holding out the wing and the texture of his hair... it's beautiful.

You certainly have taste, I love Burne-Jones too. He is an influence on my next book: his huge 'Briar Rose' paintings are in a stately home near where I live. They take up four walls of the same room. Sometimes I go and stare at the languid knights ;-)

http://www.berkshirehistory.com/odds/briar_rose.html
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Keezrha
New member
Username: Keezrha

Post Number: 2
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2009 - 04:29 am:   

Hi Steph,

glad you like it - it was a pain for myself too to draw it, I hate injections.

Lucky you for seeing these great paintings in "real life".
I have to wait until 24th October. Then the gallery Stuttgart shows an extra exhibition with Burne-Jones' works. Seems like the Briar Rose will come to Stuttgart then.
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Steph_swainston
New member
Username: Steph_swainston

Post Number: 64
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 07, 2009 - 01:11 pm:   

Yes, the squeamishness is part of the thrill.

That's good because Stuttgart already has Burne-Jones's Perseus. Isn't he gorgeous??

About your post on the other thread: sorry, but I have no idea what happened to the German edition.

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