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Gary Fry
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2003 - 12:56 pm:   

Hi Elisabeth,

I noticed your name up here and was flicking through my old anthologies when I chanced upon a tale of yours called 'Prince of Flowers'. I've just read it: tremendous poetic scary stuff! I'll certainly be seeking out more of you, starting with the lengthy piece you've placed in BEST NEW HORROR 13.

ATB

Gary
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liz hand
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2003 - 03:11 pm:   

Dear Gary -- Many many thanks. Prince of Flowers is sort of a tale from the crypt -- my first published story, written way back in the day. I can't recall which story is in BNH 13 -- I think "Cleopatra Brimstome"? If so, I'll be interested in what you think. After I wrote CB I was struck by similarites between it and PoF. But won't say any more now ....

Thanks again! Liz
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Gary Fry
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2003 - 11:29 pm:   

Hey Liz, that's pretty cool! If I ever got in BNH I don't think I'd be forgetting the name of my piece! (There's a chance next year in fact; just placed a tale - 'Both And' - in GATHERING THE BONES, edited by Ramsey, Dennis E, and Jack Dann). Certainly I give you my verdict on 'Cleopatra Brimstone'...
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liz hand
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2003 - 04:55 am:   

Congrats, Gary! I hope they take your story. I only meant I can't keep up with the numbers -- is #13 for 2002? I've only had one or two others over the last fifteen years -- NOT so many I cavalierly forget them all!

Good luck!
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Gary Fry
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2003 - 10:06 am:   

Thanks Liz. Oh, and just finished 'Cleopatra Brimstone' - what can I say? Loved it: splendid, unsettling, memorable. Although I've read only two of your pieces thus far, it strikes me that the latter is more controlled, of 'cleaner' prose, than the earlier work, though no less poetic for that. You've a remarkable sense of place, and a way with your female characters that demands sympathy despite the serial-killing resolve! I was really moved by Janie Kendall, in fact attracted to her; this is dazzling surrealism. Fine, fine stuff; in a world of diluted 'fright' fiction, the genuine article.

I'm off now to read 'The Bacchae' and 'On the Town Route'. If you can stand any more praise, I'll let you know...
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Ellen
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2003 - 11:07 am:   

Gary
You must read "In the Month of Athyr" which is a brilliant, passionate, depressing sf story by Liz.
Is it in print any place currently Liz? I know I originally published it in the OMNI trade paperbacks and reprinted it in OFF LIMITS.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2003 - 11:21 am:   

Thanks Ellen. I'd certainly wish to. Just read 'The Bacchae' - another fine disturber! As a chap, Liz, I empathised with your vision of a world whose mores are tilting from the patriarch to the (um, I think) matriarch (though I'm not sure I'd like my sore knee rubbing by these particular ladies!). This possessed a kind of Heideggerian 'unready to hand'-ness - you ken? A way of illuminating almost invisible male hegemony by offering it to the female. Tremendous stuff. (At any rate, this is MY response to the piece.) Now: 'On the Town Route'...
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liz hand
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2003 - 01:59 pm:   

Wow! I'll have to put ice on my head so it doesn't swell ... but thanks. When I reread CB I was struck by how the story-arc, as well as the overheted milieu, mirrored that of PoF. I think it's a beter story; but it was strange to see how I'd unconsciously gone back to such similar themes.

Ellen, can you name ONE story of mine that ISN'T depressing???!!! "The Bacchae," now there's a knee-slapper!

As for "The Bacchae" (Euripides', not mine), I'm reading Robert Stone's new novel, BAY OF SOULS, and there is a great amount of material in it that relates to the bacchae. Without giving it away (and I haven't finished it yet, so this may just be one minor strand in Stone's book), I think M. Kakutani and some of the other reviewers may have completely mised that subtext. The Washington Post reviewer did refer to the Mysteries (as in ancient Greek mysteries) but didn't flag Euripides; maybe because he didn't want to give anything away? I'm not sure.

This may also be an instance of me seeing Dionysos everywhere, as I so often do ....
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Ellen
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2003 - 02:24 pm:   

Sure. Your Elvis Presley story! I forget the title.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 12:35 am:   

Had to sleep over here in the UK. Will read OtTR today.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 04:10 am:   

Read it! Four out of four - most enjoyable. Of all of these pieces I found this the hardest to relate to - maybe because I don't have kids myself...? - yet here there is some glorious evocative prose. Ooh, I was there. (I live in Bradford, an industrial city in decline in the North of England - not quite the place you describe in OtTR...)

That's it; haven't got anything else by you. I'll have a scout on Amazon - see what appeals.

Thanks for two days of great material; I love discovering new authors.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 04:12 am:   

BTW, Liz, who're 'your' favourites in the field?
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Mike Jasper
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 11:38 am:   

Ellen -- was the Elvis story called the "The Have-Nots"? I remember Liz reading that story to us at Schuler's Books during Clarion '96. Cool story.

Thankyouverymuch. ;)
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liz hand
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 01:50 pm:   

Yes, the Elvis story is "The Have-Nots" (Hi, Mike!). It was actually adapted into a one-act play and performed as part of London's Fringe Theater Festival, maybe six years ago. It ended up as a finalist and had a short run at the Battersea Arts Center, too. Kind of cool; then of course it disappeared, like Elvis, without a trace: The Have-Nots have left the building.

Gary, you are a wonder, digging up all that stuff! OttR was the second story I ever wrote (not counting fledgling scribblies), and most of it was true -- I really did go on the town route, with the person who was to (briefly) be my husband, and with the unforgettable Eddie Dean, the Ice Cream Man, now a journalist of some note. I've lost touch with him but he was really something. The story does not begin to do him justice. There was a real bearded lady, and her husband, and a spooky little girl, too. The whole place was incredible: like something out of "O Brother Where Art Thou." Wish I had a time machine to go back.

I love M. John Harrison's work, Lucius Shepard, Gene Wolfe though I haven't kept up with him enough. Robert Stone's an old fave too. Probably the writer I admire most is John Crowley. I'm looking forward now that my novel is done with reading some new people; I like Alex Irvine a lot, ad I'm probably forgetting many others that I'll think of and post later.


But oh, how I loved those trips in the mountains!
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Gary Fry
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 02:07 pm:   

Uh-uh, Liz, the wonder was all mine! Just wish I had more of you. Where might I find 'In the Month of Athyr'?
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Gary Fry
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 02:09 pm:   

BTW, how come Janie Kendall ate vindaloo, yet didn't take alcohol?

:<)
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liz hand
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 02:26 pm:   

In the Month of Aethyr is in Last Summer at Mars Hill and one of the Omni anthologies -- Ellen would know. Ellen? Ellen?

I love Indian food, and make a mean vindaloo when I put my mind to it. But I don't think Janie is much of a drinker -- remember, in the States these days you have to be over 21 to drink legally. Not like back when I was a kid -- then you only had to be 18.
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liz hand
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2003 - 02:27 pm:   

Omni's OFF LIMTS, that's the one. Right, Ellen? I don't think it's ever appeared anywhere else. The only short story of mine that linked, tangentially, to the Winterlong books (except for "The Boy in the Tree," which became Winterlong).
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Gary Fry
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 12:09 am:   

In my mind vindaloo and alcohol are inseparably linked. Couldn't eat a jar of lemon curd, though. Almost as disgusting as mango chutney. (Bet JK would love the latter!)

Thanks for the tip; I'll hunt for the book.
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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 01:00 am:   

What's wrong with mango chutney? Best condiment *has* to be garlic pickle though.

Yes, it's quite obvious from WTM that Liz likes the occasional Indian.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 01:08 am:   

I threw up over mango chutney last month. Haven't been able to countenance it since. It was certainly nothing to do with the vindaloo, chapattis, mushroom bhajis or the bottle of red I supped. I mean, that would be silly.

Best condiment is English mustard. Goes on everything in my house.
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 04:24 am:   

I like mango chutney but I love lime pickle, the hotter the better. Garlic pickle too. I could eat lime pickle on everything, but then I'd have to live somewhere else.

Throwing up on mango chutney? Blegh. That would put me off it for life. When I was in college, my friend Oscar (the model for Oliver in WTM) introduced the notion of a chutney party, something he used to indulge in at his boyhood private school. So we had a chutney party: Major Grey's, a baguette, and (this is the killer) PERNOD. Which I loathed (still do) but consumed anyway. Perfectly disgusing with the chutney. Oscar wanted to drink absinthe but tragically this was not available in the States. I only had it for the first time a few years ago in London. Better than Pernod, plus it had a nice ritual quality to the preparation.

Lime pickle and absinthe: breakfast of champions.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 04:38 am:   

AKA: last meal of the insane.

Fruit doesn't belong with hot food. Who ever decided to put raisons in curry? Jeez.

Do you have English mustard in the States? Kinda pivotal with regard to my ever visiting the country, see. French mustard? Don't make me laugh. Why, it barely raises a tang!

Yours saucily,

G

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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 05:11 am:   

Raisons? Are we getting into French ethics here or something, Gary?

I'm a strong advocate of French mustards - especially grainy mustards. English mustard is good but it's all heat, you don't use it for *flavour*, just for the kick. It's a bit like wasabi in that way.

Liz: Lime pickle and absinthe might be the breakfast of champions but I'm not sure those champions would last until lunchtime!

Actually I've gone off the hotter curries - vindaloos, jalfrezis, etc - in my old age. There are amazing things that can be done with a good dhal. Plenty of garlic, bit of coconut and if you've got a bit of soft goat's cheese in the fridge to hell with authenticity!

Peanut butter is also good in curries.
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 05:39 am:   

I eat peanut butter right out of the jar. Don't tell anyone.

We don't find much curry of any sort here in Maine, so I only get it when I'm in London or some other metropolis, unless I cook it myself.

I, too, confess to liking French mustard. I've had English mustard and like it, but I really love the grainy consistency of French. I made some myself years ago, from mustard seed -- incredibly hot! But I lost the recipe, which is a drag.

I thought of another interesting writer -- D.B. Weiss, whose first novel, LUCKY WANDER BOY, has just come out in the States. Very funny, a kind of subdued genre element; it's about someone obsessed with the 'classic' arcade games of his youth -- Donkey Kong et al.

All this food talk! Maybe I should start a cooking show a la Nigella?
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Gary Fry
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 05:49 am:   

'Raisin d'etre' could be a good dish: hint of protest, pinch of morality, give it a good stir and serve with a portion of humanism; dried fruit to garnish, maybe a berry...or a beret.

BTW, jalfrezi ain't hot! Phaal's the one you want for HOT.

Peanut butter is also quite revolting. Is it me?

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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 06:06 am:   

Liz: Weiss sounds fun. One of the characters in Kilburn Inreal (still being written at a snail's pace) used to code games for eight-bit computer games in the eighties. Actually that chap Travis (Who might or might not have posted on the Winterlong) seems to be into his classic arcade games.

Gary: Nothing wrong with peanut butter. Must be you! Phaals are less like a curry and more like a cold remedy.
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 06:28 am:   

Peanut butter is a guilty pleasure, I'll admit. Maybe like Marmite?

I'll hope Travis reads this & picks up on Weiss, otherwise I'll put a note on the Winterlong thread. LWB really cracked me up, though I had major problems getting into it -- almost threw it across the room about eight times. But I stuck with it and enjoyed it immensely. I played a lot of arcade games in the early-mid 80s, MISSILE CONTROL and SPACE INVADERS and the like, though I was more into classic pinball. Used to hang out after hours at a place in DC and had some wicked pinball tournies. Still enjoy doing it but I'm terrible now.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 07:38 am:   

Marmite is worst than peanut butter! Dear God, I'm ill, ill, ill I tell you...
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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 08:01 am:   

I'm actually quite indifferent about Marmite. It's supposed to be one of those things you "either love or hate" but I can't get that passionate about it: if it gets served to me on toast I won't complain, but then again if there's no Marmite in the larder I'm not likely to throw a strop either.

I bet Gary would try to bring UN sanctions against anyone who he suspected of harbouring supplies of Marmite or peanut butter!

I remember playing Space Invaders on some of the early machines - both the ones with a mirror which reflected the screen which was lying on it back, and the tabletop machines. Used to play them in a pub called the Royal Standard in North Woolwich in the early eighties. They had a sort of enclosed beer garden draped with coloured lights that looked out over the Thames. My mum and her second husband, a big ex-military country & western fan, would give up a load of loose change to play on the machines while they drank with the adults in the pub.

These days all the adults would be out playing on the machines *and* drinking.

I was never very good at computer games. It was more the look of them and the funny "other spaces" they occupied.

Enough with the nostalgia already!
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Ellen
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 08:03 am:   

Liz, you missed the post where I said "In the MOnth of Aethyr" was published in one of the OMNI trade paperbacks and Off Limits. But I forgot that it was in LAST SUMMER ON MARS HILL. If they find your collection, they'll have all your other great stories as well!

Yes, Mike. "The Have-Nots" Liz's relatively cheery story. I love when she reads it--accents and all.

I love mango chutney with Indian food but not wild about other chutneys. Got into peanut butter (crunchy only) relatively late in life and get the yen for it a few times a year.

Marmite and vegamite-Yuck!
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 02:11 pm:   

Ellen -- I'll be doing more (different) accents next month, at that NYRSF reading in NYC. It's another funny piece, a selection from Mortal Love -- not a funny book per se, but it has its moments, and I hope the reading will highlight one of them.

Zali, I was thinking of sending you some playlists of songs I've used in writing, to post on the site. I used to make tapes that went out with the bound galleys and Advanced Reading Copies; I guess I'll have to get a CD burner or something to keep pace with technology.
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Ellen
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 - 08:22 pm:   

Liz,

Do you know the date when you're reading down here yet?
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iotar
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 04:14 am:   

Liz: Cool. I could add that somewhere in The Analects.
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liz hand
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 05:36 am:   

Zali -- meant to tell you but was waiting to hear what the acctual venue will be. It's Tuesday May 13, one of the New York Review of Science Fiction Readings that my friend Paul Witcover is now the honcho of. I'm not sure wheythey hold them now; they used to be at Dixon Place down on the Bowery. I'll try to let you know later. Maybe post it on the main page as News or something.

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iotar
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 05:49 am:   

I'll fire up the website engine later today and add something to the site about that. We can always add more details as we get them.
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Ellen
Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 - 08:53 am:   

Liz, thanks. That makes more sense than what John just told me--the 11th, which would be Sunday :-)
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jeff ford
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2003 - 06:09 am:   

Liz: Didn't know where else to put this on the board here, but just wanted to alert you that there is a brief article in The New Yorker this week on the work of Wolfi, another outsider artist that you might like. My guess is you are already familiar with his work. Hope life is smooth.

Best,

Jeff
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liz hand
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 05:41 am:   

Hi Jeff --

Thanks for the heads-up on Wolfi in the NewYorker -- I get the magazine so I'll look for the piece. I've read about Wolfi's work but have never actually seen any of it. Have you? I gather this exhibit is in the city? I'll be there on a whirlwind visit next week, doing a NYRSF reading; the one thing I hope to do is see the Folk Art Museum but maybe I can squeeze in the Wolfi show as well.

We just spent the weekend with the kids visiting Paul DiFillipo and Deb Newton in Providence. A fabulous time, capped by a visit to Lovecraft's grave. Paul & Deb should do a book of photos of visiting writers giving homage to HPL!

Hope you're well & warm down there -- Liz
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 05:51 am:   

Liz: I think the Wolfi show is at the Folk Art Museum. Best of luck with the reading. Still in the throes of the end of the semester with my students otherwise I'd come and see you read. I intend to get to KGB a few times this summer.
Wolfi's stuff is very intricate drawings. I've seen pictures of some of it. I've seen photos of him too, and he looks scary nuts. If you catch his act, let me know how you liked it.

Best,


Jeff
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Ellen
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 07:20 am:   

So that's where you were. I called and emailed you about Jack Womack's new addition. It's in my topic. He sent you a photo too.
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 08:50 am:   

The Wolfi show is indeed at the American Folk Art Museum (site of the Darger collection) and I think is only on through May 18 or so. Hope to be able to see it....
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 11:04 am:   

The New Yorker Wolfli article turns out to be on the Internet (I found out courtesy of Arts and Letters Daily, which is linking to it):

http://newyorker.com/critics/art/?030505craw_artworld
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liz hand
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 11:43 am:   

Thanks everyone for the info! That's great if the show's at the FOlk Art Museum-- my only free time is Tuesday morning, I think, so I hope to get over there first thing. I get the New Yorker so will find the article and read it ASAP, just to be primed.

And thanks, too, Ellen, for the news on Jack & Valeria's baby -- we didn't get in till last night and I haven't had a chance to call them yet (and probably they're all sleeping!).

I still hope to do a KGB reading too, hopefully closer to the pub date for ML. Readings everywhere!

P.S. A lot of these guys look very scary. Have you ever read John MacGregor's THE DISCOVERY OF THE ART OF THE INSANE? One of my Ur-texts, and full of photos of people you wouldn't want to sit next to on the Greyhound.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 12:58 pm:   

Hi Liz, just bought the short story collection. Can't wait!

Gary
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liz hand
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 03:24 pm:   

Thanks, Gary! I'll be interested in what you think, since you've read some of the later stuff as well.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Monday, May 05, 2003 - 11:11 pm:   

I'll certainly let you know!
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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 03:55 am:   

Liz: You visited Lovecraft's grave? Wow! Was there any strange meeping coming from it or uncanny, outre, unmentionable awfulness? Mephitic stenches? Unwholesomeness of any kind?
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 04:44 am:   

Zali, it was unspeakable. And now no matter how much bleach I use, I just can't get my clothes really clean.

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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 05:39 am:   

Liz: I actually have a copy of The Discovery of the Art of the Insane. I bought it in a garage sale quite a while ago from a woman who seemed as if she would have been at home within its pages. Great book, and some of the theories of genius and insanity are like works of outsider art. That portrait of a preacher by Richard Dadd is one of my favorites in the color section (I like his faery ones too).

Best,


Jeff
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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 06:48 am:   

A taint! An eldritch taint horribly suggestive of ghastly otherworldly vistas? The stench of charnel black obscenities lurking awfully in the supermundane murk?

You need Elder Fresh!
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 07:10 am:   

When I visited Lovecraft's grave all I saw was Sam Neill riding a giant cockroach, though on returning to my hotel, after taking a shower, I noticed that the condensation on the mirror had arranged itself into the image of David Brin.
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 07:10 am:   

Elder Fresh! That's PERFECT!

Actually, we could use some of it around here today -- we're having our septic system replaced. WHo knows what cthonic horrors may lurk beneath the heart of Centre Lincolnville?

Jeff, I love that Dadd painting too. If it's the one I'm thinking of, I had that precise character in mind when I made up Dr. Learmont (an alienist) in MORTAL LOVE. Have I mentioned to you before how much that photo of Dadd resembles Roky Erickson? Really uncanny.


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iotar
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 07:26 am:   

I've got a photo of Kafka's grave somewhere. No dung-beetles, no reprieve, no redemption. Actually we'd just be up to the castle the day before - had no problem getting there, no obscure legalistic difficulties were being put in our way. Brilliant metro system though.

You have a septic system? I'm not sure that I do, either that or I've never had to do anything with my septic system so I don't know. Is it a rural thing? I'm always getting junk emails about septic systems so I'll forward all of them to you if you think it might help.

But then again I got a couple of emails around Xmas telling me that I'd just won forty pounds of lobster - actually I think it had expanded to sixty pounds in the second email. Lovecraft had an irrational fear of seafood so I'm sure he would have considered these emails to be awfully suggestive of some dire cthonic conspiracy.

Perhaps they are?
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 - 10:54 am:   

They have just discoverd giant lobsters buried beneath our old tank out back, all with David Brin's face. Also a taco that looks an awful lot like someone I used to date back in high school.
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iotar
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2003 - 04:57 am:   

They were obviously placed there by a creationist splinter group out to prove that David Brin pre-dates vertebrates.
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Lucius
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2003 - 07:50 am:   

Jo Walton is my hero. I'm having T-shirts made.
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liz hand
Posted on Wednesday, May 07, 2003 - 08:49 am:   

Sign me up for one, too, Lucius!
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Gary Fry
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 10:11 am:   

Liz, I'm still waiting for my copy of your short story collection from Amazon. Are they hand-made by left-handed pandas, or something?

:<)
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liz
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 12:08 pm:   

Hi Gary. You're talking about LAST SUMMER AT MARS HILL, right? (my only collection so far, though there is one forthcoming this fall.) I wonder if it's gone out of print? Or if they just have it back-ordered from the publisher?

That's weird it's taking so long. If I had any extras I'd just send you one, but I only have one copy myself. I should check if there's any out there through the Advanced Book Exchange -- you can find OP stuff there. I actually bought a copy of AESTIVAL TIDE through them: the tragedy of an author buying her own book!

In the meantime, have you read M.John Harrison's collection THINGS THAT NEVER HAPPEN (I can't remembr if we discussed this or not)? It's really brilliant -- stories I WISH I'd written.
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iotar
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 01:21 pm:   

Liz: I've been reading back and forth across my *advanced proof* copy. "The Incalling" and "Gifco" are some of the nastiest, twistedest, knotted balls of malign intelligence I've had the privilege of rereading. I guess in the States you missed out on the Travel Arrangements collection - I think most people did over here unless they were particularly on the ball.
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liz
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 04:30 pm:   

No, no! I reviewed TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS when it came out, in my FSF column I think. I loved it. I keep pushing MJH on everyone I know, and in everyplace I can. I truly think he's one of the great writers of our time; one of the few who can stand beside Paul Bowles.
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iotar
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 12:53 am:   

Why? Does Paul Bowles not use deodorant?
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liz
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 04:36 am:   

ZALI. This is a SERIOUS LITERARY DISCUSSION.

I've been rereading Bowles, and rereading about him, lately; research for my new book. Stylistically and contextually I think he has quite a bit in common with MJH. And, of course, they both use Ban.

BTW, Zali, I have a few updates to add to the site -- I'll check in with you soon. Sounds like the weather in London hsa finally improved. Here it remains endlessly grey and rainy.
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paulw
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 04:47 am:   

Roll-on or solid?
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iotar
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 05:03 am:   

We're having a mini-heatwave in London at the moment, expecting it to revert to Maine-style grey and rainy at the drop of a hat.

Re: updates - no problem, email me and I'll fire up the webpage engine.

Personally I always read MJH's narrators as if they're using Sure Intensive (Aerosol rather than roll-on in case yr interested, Paul.) but Light has seen a change towards Lynx. Bowles must use a ball deodorant of some description.
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paulw
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 05:48 am:   

This could be a whole new approach to literary criticism!
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iotar
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 07:37 am:   

I think this approach would be a little narrow, Paul. We'd really need to expand out into other areas of author's bathroom cabinets: who cares what Mervyn Peake wrote, did he use dental floss? Did Lovecraft buy extra soft toilet tissue?

Before anyone says that my method is somewhat reductive I'd have to say that this is only really relevant to writers of fiction. Journalists might be best understood in terms of their garden shed and then when we move out into the visual arts we'd be exploring the refrigerator of Rothko and Blake's preference in detergents.

Keep all of those reciepts, they might be invaluable to academics in years to come.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 01:32 pm:   

I think MJH uses one of those spray-ons that sting.

BTW, Liz, thanks for the would-have-done offer! I've checked with Amazon, and they're saying delivery next week, so we'll see. I've read half of TTNH - yes indeed, it's a fine collection.

Brian Epstein bought multiple copies of The Beatles's first single to ensure it got high in the charts. Considered that strategy?
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iotar
Posted on Friday, May 30, 2003 - 02:52 pm:   

"I think MJH uses one of those spray-ons that sting."

Gary: You mean pepper spray?
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Gary Fry
Posted on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 12:59 am:   

Phaal Freshener.
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iotar
Posted on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 01:27 am:   

Yes, the Met when considering adopting them for freshening up suspected felons.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 06:34 am:   

No answer to that.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 06:36 am:   

Hold up, your section came up blank last time. That's why I put 'no answer to that'. Having said, however, with regard to your comment: hmm, ?, ...

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iotar
Posted on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 09:05 am:   

The word "when" in my sentence was supposed to read "were" -- fast crap typing is the way to go!
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Garee Frye
Posted on Saturday, May 31, 2003 - 11:39 am:   

Habsoulutelee.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Wednesday, August 06, 2003 - 01:30 am:   

Liz, it's official: your collection of shorts is unobtainable. Amazon mailed me last week.
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 11:15 am:   

Hi Gary -- thanks for the update. That's a bummer, but I'll ask my editor if/when hey plan to bring it back into print. In the meantime, check out ABE (Advanced Book Exchange) online -- it's a huge used book site, and you might be able to find it there, cheaper than from Amazon, too. I only have one copy myself so will probably end up looking for more on ABE. Let me know if you have any luck.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Friday, August 15, 2003 - 02:24 pm:   

Okay, Liz. Cheers. And will do.
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Gary Fry
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2004 - 06:16 am:   

Hi Liz,

Interested in this?

http://www.fusinghorizons.com/poesprogeny.html
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liz
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2004 - 12:01 pm:   

Hi Gary -- hey, thanks, that looks very, very cool! Let me read it all over more carefully and I'll try to get back to you soonish ...
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Gary Fry
Posted on Thursday, May 06, 2004 - 12:40 am:   

Great, Liz.
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maxdragon
Posted on Tuesday, June 01, 2004 - 07:52 am:   

hi love your books thank you
but for some reason no one here in australia is selling the newer ones or seems willing to order them in
why?
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liz
Posted on Wednesday, June 02, 2004 - 09:57 am:   

Hi Maxdragon,

Thanks! But gee, I have no idea why you can't find them Down under. I guess I should get an Australian publisher. I order books from Amazon or ABE; they're almost always cheaper -- sometimes even when they come from Australia.
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justin headrick
Posted on Monday, August 02, 2004 - 08:35 pm:   

HPL....hmmm anyone heard the HP Lovecraft society's "A Shoggoth On The Roof"? only funny if your familiar with both Lovecraft & Fiddler On The Roof....

justin

btw...if you look long & hard almost all books can be found, you just can't be picky about the condition of said title...
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MJH
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 07:10 am:   

Liz, hi. Last year you wrote--

>>As for "The Bacchae" (Euripides', not mine), I'm reading Robert Stone's new novel, BAY OF SOULS, and there is a great amount of material in it that relates to the bacchae. Without giving it away (and I haven't finished it yet, so this may just be one minor strand in Stone's book), I think M. Kakutani and some of the other reviewers may have completely mised that subtext. The Washington Post reviewer did refer to the Mysteries (as in ancient Greek mysteries) but didn't flag Euripides; maybe because he didn't want to give anything away? I'm not sure.

Sorry to take so long to catch up with this post. I read the Stone in p/b recently (on the Black Train from Madrid to the Semana Negra). I thought it was underrated both sides of the Atlantic, partly because reviewers had missed that amazing undertow. I could feel it there but barely identify it. (My train notes go: "Greek spirits in landscape ???" which isn't very good, is it ? Even for short-hand.) Now I've caught up with your analysis, and had my memory jogged, I'll have to read it again!

John says we'll be meeting on the 16th ?
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aitapata
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 03:27 pm:   

Hello! Is this the place to say "hello"? I've only just discovered this board, the existance of Mortal Love and the existance of the woefully-out-of-my-budget Bibliomancy about fifteen minutes ago.

I have absolutely nothing productive to add here other than a huge and heartfelt THANK YOU to Ms. Hand for enriching our lives with your work. I stumbled upon Waking the Moon purely by chance sometime in 95 and have been utterly enamored ever since.

I am ECSTATIC to see some new stuff! I always get that happy-heartbeat-thrill when I find out there's been a new book out (though usually followed by the "Oh. It's a novelization." shoulder-slump) ;) But this time it's the real thing! TWICE! Thank you!

Though, I am wondering, will Bibliomancy ever be published in a more affordable form? It's way out of my price range right now, and only one library in the US has a copy, and they're not inter-library-loaning it, and I'm absolutely desperate to read it.


Again, thank you ever so much for sharing your imagination and your stories with us.


amy
aitapata

ps-- the new Fiery Furnace cd really is good! What a lovely group of posters here!
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liz hand
Posted on Wednesday, September 01, 2004 - 04:18 pm:   

Hey Mike -- great, as always, to hear from you! I was singing your praises just a few days ago (as ever).

Coincidentally, I was just reading Stone's collection BEAR AND HIS DAUGHTER the other night. It was great, but unrelentingly grim, and creepy, and I finally had to stop -- I've been having nightmares lately and this seemed like it was just going to prime the pump, as it were. But brilliant stories.

Yeah, the 16th, I think -- whenever I get there. Can't wait! send me your email again, I think I've lost. I'm still tbird@midcoast.com


"A Shoggoth on the Roof" -- very funny, Justin. I'll have to keep my eyes (ears) open for that one!

Aitapata, thanks so much for your lovely note. I'm glad , too, to have some new, 'real' stuff out there. The novelizations have to pay the bills, in part because I write so slowly, but I've just started something new that I hope won't take five years, which is how long MORTAL LOVE took. Ugh.

I wish I had more encouraging news about Bibliomancy, but I haven't been able to get a bigger US publisher yet, which is a real heartbreak. If I can get a smaller publisher interested who will do a paperback edition, that would be great, but I haven't really started pursuing that yet. I guess the only thing I can suggest is to look for it used online on Amazon or through ABE (Advanced Book Exchange).

But the four stories might be found cheaper & more easily separately, if you just want to read them (I know this is a pain compared to having them in one book). "Chip Crockett's Christmas Carol" can be read online free on the SciFiction site at SicFi.com (or link through my website, www.elizabethhand.com). The other stories I think appear in various Year's Best Fantasy & Horror anthologies edited by Ellen Datlow & Teri Windling, so you could always look for them there. That way at least you wouldn't have to shell out the money, and I think a lot of libraries carry the YBFH series. I never buy anything new, so I sympathize. If I find a cheap copy somewhere I'll let you know!

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aitapata
Posted on Monday, September 13, 2004 - 04:06 pm:   

...funny how things work. I've had an absolutely horrible past week and a half (Hurricane Frances), and I came home today to find the slipcased edition of Bibliomancy waiting for me.

Am currently in the process of tracking down the likely suspects and making them 'fess up.

So, inadvertantly, you made me really happy today, Liz!


amy
aitapata
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liz hand
Posted on Tuesday, September 14, 2004 - 07:37 am:   

Glad to have inadvertently increased the world's store of happiness! I'm off to Berlin to trace W.H. Auden's footsteps -- more when I return!
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Loren
Posted on Saturday, February 12, 2005 - 05:40 pm:   

Hello,

I just finished reading Chip Crockett's Christmas Carol and was finally spurred to write.

I've been reading your novels for years, starting with Waking the Moon and on thru pretty much everything you've written. I loved your colorful alternate DC of Winterlong and the rich Victorian world of Mortal Love. I've always had a bit of a thing for the pre-Raphaelites - made my own absinthe long ago and still play dress up with the Victorian Society on occasion...

But Chip Crockett just struck such a chord with me. Partially because, like Brendan and Tony, I'm feeling my age and I live in the greater DC area, but mostly because I've got a 4 year old son with Asperger's Syndrome. I don't know if you have a child "on the spectrum" or know one or if you have simply done your homework very well but this story literally made me weep. More than once I might add. Brendan's feelings of heartache and hopelessness are just so familiar, so too the feelings of great joy at your child's smallest triumphs. Wow.

Cheers,

Loren
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liz
Posted on Sunday, February 13, 2005 - 05:37 am:   

Dear Loren,

Your letter touched me deeply -- thank you so much. Yes, I do have someone very close to me with a child "on the spectrum," and several friends with autistic children; I also have someone very close whose child died in infancy. I'm a parent as well, and the love and grief and heartbreak and joy I've known these friends and relatives to experience are the most powerful things I've ever seen. And, like Brendan, I fight my own battles with depression, and know how hard it is sometimes to get through the day.

I suppose on the most basic level it's a matter of thinking, How do we all go on? Because, of course, most of us do. I try (often with difficulty) to hang onto moments of happiness or joy, knowing they may not last but are still precious, even if they only last three minutes. As Tony observes, "What did you expect?"

I'm hoping that late this year I might have a small illustrated edition of "Chip Crockett" printed up. This would kind of be a self-publishing venture, but I've always been sad the story never got published on its own as a little Christmas book, which is what I wanted. So stay in touch, and if and when that happens I'll send you one -- it's not going to be a money-making venture.

Give my regards to the City of Trees -- I still miss DC!

ALl best,

Liz
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liz
Posted on Sunday, February 13, 2005 - 05:49 am:   

I should also say that "Chip Crockett" is my favorite of everything I've written, and the closest to my heart. The characters in it are like real people to me, and in my head are still going about their lives, with happy endings for all of them (mostly happy, anyway -- as Tony says, "what did you expect?").
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paulw
Posted on Sunday, February 13, 2005 - 02:24 pm:   

Liz, tell us more about the illustrated version!
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, February 13, 2005 - 07:29 pm:   

Liz,
You know it's one of my favorites of yours--but for me, it's because of the Sandy Becker connection.

Yes, who is illustrating it?
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liz
Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 04:45 am:   

Judith Clute -- Paul, she did the painting in the front room at our house, if you remember that. Her paintings use elements of collage -- she takes images from photographs, other paintings, etc., then works them into new form on her canvases. Really cool stuff. Her style is a great match for this book as she can incorporate various photos etc., especially of Sandy's puppets, which I think would be really cool. This will be published by Beccon Books, which also did John's SCORES last year. The intent is to have a nice, illustrated HC that will be affordable for the general reader, rather than a pricey limited edition -- although in effect it WILL be a limited edition. So a good deal for everyone.
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Loren
Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 07:42 am:   

Your compassion for and understanding of those you know with autism really shows. Yes, depression is something I increasingly have to wrestle with as well.

"I suppose on the most basic level it's a matter of thinking, How do we all go on?"

I'm not really religious but I try (and emphasize TRY) to look at adversity the way the buddhists do - as an opportunity for me to learn. I am certainly learning a lot. But too I can get comfort from feeling gratitude - my child is verbal, there are so many so much worse off. There can be an odd bittersweet quality to difficulties in life, yes this is hard but how lucky I am!

It would be wonderful to see a Christmas edition of Chip Crockett. Any idea of the type of illustrations you'd like? I love the Victorian tradition of Christmas Stories, often ghost stories like A Christmas Carol. Brings to mind cozy thoughts of reading by the fire with a glass of port.

I don't get into DC much these days myself since I moved to a tiny town in the countryside of the Shenandoah Valley. Between the distance and the kids it's a miracle if I make it as far as Tysons Corner...

Happy Valentine's Day!

Cheers,

Loren
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liz
Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 02:18 pm:   

Happy Valentine's to you as well! I live in a small town in Maine, and while I miss the city, it's a better place to raise kids, i think. I used to love visiting the Shenandoah Valley, years ago -- a beautiful place.

Thanks for your good thoughts -- I send them back to you. And yes, a buddhist way of looking at the world helps; also remembering that this is what we have, now, and every moment counts (especially with children). I'll post somewhere here or on my website when the Christmas book is ready ...

Best,

Liz
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, February 14, 2005 - 04:12 pm:   

Paulw, I have a few pieces by Judith in my apt, too. Both color and one older B&W illo from Interzone.

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