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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 05:40 am:   

I read somewhere -- Amazon.com, maybe? -- that something like 70 pages(!) of WAKING THE MOON were cut for the US edition. Is this true? If so, which version do you prefer? And are any of your other books thus chopped?

Thanks!
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liz
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 11:51 am:   

Hey, good to hear from you! Can Amazon possibly have that info?

Yes, it's true. More like 100 pages, I think, at my US editor's request. She was right, too; as I recall, it was nothing but a lot of stoned wandering around DC. So my own preference is for the US edition. I guess the UK version could become collectable as the alt take. My English editor basically didn't want to be bothered with any changes and rushed it into print. But they're both there, for anyone who wants to compare and save.

I don't think any of my other books were cut like that. WINTERLONG was radically cut before publciation -- I think there might have 200 pages slashed from that one. And MORTAL LOVE went through numerous drafts, with hundreds of pages left on the cutting room floor. But this was all pre-pub, of course, so I am saved mucho embarrassment (maybe).


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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, June 07, 2004 - 12:28 pm:   

Good to know. I haven't read anything of yours yet, other than a couple of the Star Wars books which I think are probably not indicative of your normal writing, and am planning on trying a couple of your books, and the only ones I can find currently in print are WINTERLONG and WAKING THE MOON. So I just wanted to know what the deal was with MOON before I picked it up. Looking forward to MORTAL LOVE too.
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liz
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 07:15 am:   

WTM or Mortal Love would be good places to start. WTM you can probably find used pretty easily -- there's cheap paperbacks all over amazon, or at the Strand. ML will be out in a few weeks but that's relatively cheaap via Amazon as well.

And no, the Bobna Fett books aren't very indicative of my writing! Fun, though.
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, June 08, 2004 - 07:26 am:   

100 pages of walking around Washington stoned? Sounds like the American Ulysees to me! :-)
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liz
Posted on Wednesday, June 09, 2004 - 06:21 am:   

Ha! Very funny! And if only!

But hey, you never know. I'm rereading the Beats as research for my new book and remembering how much fun all that stuff was, uh, thirty years ago. I've never reread that part of WTM (I've never reread any of it) so (thankfully) can't comment on it. I do however rememeber the experiences that generated the pages! but now that my kids are getting older should start posting a Parental Advisory on my books ....
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Tom
Posted on Thursday, June 17, 2004 - 02:05 pm:   

Hi Liz,

Since you were nice enough to answer my query about 'Aestival Tide' on this bulletin board long ago, I will repay you by inflicting some totally unsolicited advice (perhaps 'punish' might be more appropriate than repay). Anyway, there's a three CD collection of the Beat Generation which does a reasonably good job of capturing it and places the Beats in a larger aesthetic and social context too. The collection is assembled from recordings of everythiing from interviews, readings, and music to Carl Sandburg denouncing Beatniks. If you haven't already checked it out, you might want to take a look at 'The Beat Generation'(Rhino Records) on Amazon under the popular music heading.

I listened to it while walking my great beast and found the marerial very informative and suggestive.
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liz
Posted on Friday, June 18, 2004 - 10:21 am:   

Tom -- thanks, that's a fabulous suggestion. I'll order it from Amazon ASAP.

Rhino is amazing. Just ebout everyone/everything I've ever liked comes from them. Incluidng MST3K on DVD!

Thanks again! I'll let you know when I get it.
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Tom
Posted on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 09:52 am:   

Rhino's great, and this collection's very distinctive. It's like a scrapbook/collage. There's a candid or unguarded quality that comes through some of the collected material that would be very hard to get any other way. I'd be interested to hear what think after you've had a chance to listen to it.
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Bill Reynolds
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 05:01 am:   

Despite the fact that I feel claustrophobic in mass market paperbacks and try to always read HC or Trade pb, I bought the British edition of WTM, pb only, because I did not want to miss those hundred pages - SO much did I love Winterlong, Aestival, and even Icarus. Besides, from my film love I tend always to look at the longer version as canonical. I.e. I still haven't really seen RTK. I'm sure it will have the capture of the corsair ships, Denethor's ill-advised use of the palantir, and will bring together Faramir and Eowyn.
Just before starting ML, I read a great beat pastiche, Nick Mamatas' Move Under Ground where Kerouac and Bill Burroughs fight Cthul'hu. Neal is there but its questionable what side he is on.
Many reactions to ML but not till I'm finished in a couple of hours. (All positive, BTW.)
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Mastadge
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 05:13 am:   

Heh. I went with the US edition. My mom read the first 5 pages or so of Mortal Love and decided it was too weird for her. This from a woman who reads Ken Follett and Marge Piercy!
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liz
Posted on Thursday, July 15, 2004 - 08:05 am:   

Ha! Very funny! that's the reaction my kids would have to my books!

Was she put off by the spontaneous combustion in the madhouse?
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Tom
Posted on Sunday, October 31, 2004 - 07:37 pm:   

Liz--I was recently trying to sell a very skeptical audience on some similarities that I found between 'Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom' and 'On the Road'. This reminded me that I had recommended that you listen to the Rhino collection on 'The Beats'.

Did you have a chance to do it? Was it useful or interesting? Did anything just jump out at you?

It's been a long time since I listened to the tapes, but a couple things really struck me and stuck with me. I'm curious about your reaction since I haven't recommended it before.
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liz
Posted on Monday, November 01, 2004 - 02:31 am:   

Hi Tom,

I regret to say I haven't listened to it, for the simple reason that I forgot to buy it! an occupational haazard, forgetting things. But maybe not that you've reminded me I'll go onto Amazon and order it. I know there was a flurry of interest recently over Kerouac's letters or journals being published, so this would be a good time to give them another kiik-see. Thanks for jogging my memory -- I'll let you know when I get the collection.

Liz
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justin
Posted on Wednesday, November 03, 2004 - 04:36 pm:   

hey while i'm thinking of it...the Shoggoth on the Roof also has some Christmas tunes done HP Lovecraft style if you'd like me the make a copy for your listening...

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Barbara
Posted on Sunday, November 14, 2004 - 01:25 pm:   

Hello Liz. I was glad to find this link from your website, and happier still to find that when I googled you to look something up on a reread of Waking the Moon. I so love that book, and am happier than I can say for your success. When I first read it, I wanted very much to send you a copy of the Brave Little Toaster Goes To Mars, from one who's done diapers now to another. Old Smuggler was a long time ago, and some of the pages of the book made me remember the past in great detail. From your photos you haven't changed a bit. Congratulations!
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liz hand
Posted on Friday, November 19, 2004 - 08:04 am:   

Hi Barbara -- thanks for the note! Old Smuggler was a long time ago for me, too. My stepson started college in DC this fall and I gave him a copy of WTM and told him DON'T DO THIS.

For the record, I've changed changed enough -- PhotoShop was invented for author photos. I am however listening to Ian Hunter live even as I write this.

Justin, the Shoggoth on the Roof sounds like fun. Sure, send it on! And thanks ...
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Tonya
Posted on Thursday, June 23, 2005 - 05:57 pm:   

Dear Ms. Hand,

It looks like this thread hasn't been used in quite awhile and I just found Night Shade as a place to leave you a message. Well, I'll give it a try; perhaps you'll check back here at some point. Before the question I have for you, I wanted to say how much your writing evokes wonderful images for me, not unlike those in a motion picture. That's what a great writer does I think with prose like yours. Like many before me, my first exposure to your work was Waking the Moon, and those characters are written indelibly on my psyche. In fact, some of us at a temporary forum on World Crossing before we move to our own domain were just talking about you briefly. Which lit a fire under my lazy butt to finally visit your website again to find a forum to ask (and I'm sure you've heard this question ad nauseum) if you will write, or even have any interest in writing a sequel to WTM. Or, do you feel satisfied with that journey as it stood? It seemed, and of course very selfishly from my point of view, that Sweeney and Dylan's journey together could be further explored; how they make the relationship work, the birth of their child, and certainly possibly experiencing further intrusions from the Benandanti in their lives.

At any rate, I continue to read your novels with relish, Mortal Love being the latest, and wish you continuing success.

Thanks! Tonya
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liz hand
Posted on Friday, June 24, 2005 - 03:47 am:   

Dear Tonya,

Thanks so much for your note! Over the years I've brooded a lot about the characters in WTM and, like you, wondered about what happened to them. I've never actually gone so far as to outline anything like a sequel, but I have had ideas as to what they might have done with their lives. The problem with sequels of course is that you're touching sacred texts -- everyone has a notion of who and what the original characters should be, and sometimes not even an author can or should intrude on that. There's an additional problem, too, in that chronologically WTM, BLACK LIGHT, and MORTAL LOVE all have crossover characters, and for me to write about any of them might involve writing about all of them. Which wuld be complicated though not impossible to do.

So I dunno. I've always wanted to do more with Balthazar Warnick, and I've always wanted to do more with Sweeney. I always thought it would be a hoot to get Sweeney & Lit Moylan from BL together. The novel I'm finishing now, GENERATION LOSS, has no fantastic element, but the central character is in many ways a lot like Sweeney Cassidy, more so than any character I've written: Sweeney if her life had gone completely off the rails. It's a pretty dark novel, though it's funny, too, which I hope keeps it from seeming *too* dark. Like many of my books and sories, it's backgrounded in Kamensic Village, which certainly seems to have a high proportion of residents who go on to have interesting lives (more interesting than mine, at any rate).

Anyway, thanks again for your interest in my work. And I'll continue to brood about this -- it'll be time soon to start another book!

ALl best,

Liz
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AustinTom
Posted on Thursday, July 14, 2005 - 11:54 am:   

Ms. Hand,

It is probably an asynchronous truism for (successful) artists that succeeding legions of admirers are still discovering the older work long after the artist has moved on to new projects.

I am halfway through Waking The Moon and I am absolutely knocked out by this book, enthralled, intrigued. It has all the elements in which I am currently interested.

What nonfiction would you recommend for guys who are interested in the goddess traditions referenced in WTM? Is there a "Daughters of the Setting Sun" or something close to it in real life?

I'm a writer/musician in Austin, Texas. Do you ever speak or visit in this area?
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Liz Hand
Posted on Friday, July 15, 2005 - 05:48 am:   

Hi Tom,

I love Austin! My mother is from Texas, and her (only) sister lives in Austin, also many friends and relations. Sadly, I haven't been there in too long a time -- which means I'm way overdue. One of my favorite cities, I spent a lot of time there growing up. One of my best friends from Maine is also an Austin girl & lives there now -- Cheryl Smith. I mention her name as she's active as a fan and sometime costumer on the local music scene, so you may run into her at some point.

Non-fiction, hmmm. There's a bunch of books, all at my cottage (office), where I'll be going to work in a few hours. So I'll compile a list and post it then. I'm glad you like the book -- and if you're a musician, you should read MORTAL LOVE. One of the central characters is inspired by Richard Thompson.

More soon -- thanks for your nice words!

Liz
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Martha Federle
Posted on Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 06:48 am:   

I've just finished WTM and can't get it off my mind. I worked in DC for quite a few years, a block away from Union Station; spent plenty of time in Kelly's Irish Times Bar; took countless visiting (Catholic) relatives to see the Shrine, and I'd love to get my hands on those 100 pages. I brought the book with me on a visit to my son's place in Dutchess Co. NY, and yesterday passed Storm King on a drive over to West Point. Not believing in coincidence, I'm sort of wondering about the meaning of it all. Can't wait to find another of your books.
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liz Hand
Posted on Sunday, January 08, 2006 - 04:56 am:   

Thanks, Martha. Been out of town for holidays and just getting back to Real Life. I try to pick up copies of the UK edition (those extra 100 pages) whenever I can, to give to people like yourself, but I don't think I have an extra one now. But I'll check. They sometimes show up (cheap) on ABE Books online.

Wasn't Kelly's a trip? A friend of mine was a bartender there and I spent many happy, mindless hours in it, long long ago. Is it still around?

Your name is familiar to me -- did you go to CU? Or live in Brookland/Capitol Hill NE? I'm on the fence about coincidence; my book Mortal Love is about (other things) there being no coincidences. So maybe our paths crossed back in the day in DC? You might also get a kick out of my first novel, Winterlong, also set in (a far future) DC. It's out of print but should be available on ABE or through Amazon's used bookstore. It may also be brought back into print, with the rest of my backlist, sometime in the nearish future. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
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Iceblink
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 01:16 pm:   

Hi--I was able to buy a copy of the UK edition (for a US paperback price, too) last year from an Amazon Marketplace seller in the U.S.; this might be something to try if any of you are still looking for a copy. Just make sure the seller specifies which edition it is! I for one thought the extra pages added a lot to the story and made a great book even better. Time for a reread!
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liz
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 02:33 pm:   

I'm delighted the extra pages didn't seem like dead weight! I haven't looked at it in so long -- especially that excised portion -- I don't know if I'd even recognize it.

I wondered if the city itself would seem all that changed to me. But when I last visited, I spent a great deal of time walking the streets, and it all seemed, miraculously, much the same. I still dream often of walking there.
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Iceblink
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 03:02 pm:   

Dead weight--no way! In fact while I was reading the UK edition I kept thinking "That wasn't there before...or was it??", because the parts that were new to me blended in so organically that it seemed like they'd always been there. It's hard to imagine reading it any other way now. There are some special books that you hate to finish and wish were longer and it was quite fab to have that wish actually come true for once (and not in a The Stand, let's-add-400-pages-AND-rewrite-everything-else sort of way, if that makes any sense).

I will say the cover of the US paperback beats the pants off the UK one, though! So it's a good excuse to keep both editions around.
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Liz
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 04:19 am:   

Yeah, the US cover is definitely better -- the UK one always puzzled me, especially those inesct-like monks. Very Cthulhu-like!

Thanks for the vote of confidence in the added text -- I'll really have to give it another look to see what's in there. The rights to WAKING THE MOON have reverted to me, and there has been some interest from publishers in a new edition. Maybe I'll see if the text of the UK version could be used as the basis for a reprint. What think you folks ...?
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paulw
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 12:04 pm:   

Definitely! And get 'em to pay by the word!
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Iceblink
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 12:35 pm:   

Stick in a bibliography and I'll happily add another edition to my collection. I'd love to check out some of the source material.
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liz
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 04:42 pm:   

A bibliography! Another great idea. I'll do that, too. Assuming I can do anything!

Yeah, Cuz -- as Larry McMurtrey used to say, "They pay me by the word. The word. The word. The word. The word..."
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Iceblink
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 06:51 pm:   

And speaking of Cthulhu, have you ever written anything related to the mythos or considered it?
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liz
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 04:29 am:   

No. I only ever read one or two things by Lovecraft -- he never appealed to me. I was always more of an Algernon Blackwood/Arthur Machen/M.R. James fan.

I have however taken the Lovecraft Tour with Paul DiFillipo and Deb Newton, in Providence, and visited HPL's grave -- twice! I left my SFFWA card on it as an offering.
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Kyle Sennett
Posted on Thursday, May 11, 2006 - 02:22 am:   

Liz,

I think I read the UK copy first. I read it when I was in Sweden, but I have the book at home and when I got back I re-read it and was like, "Is this missing some pages??" I actually checked the pagination. LOL.

At any rate, I have to agree with you. The US printing is a lot more.... what's the word? Some chaff was cut out. I hesitate to say that just because I love your writing so much, but yeah, in fairness, the cuts were good.

Total aside: what are the chances you were at Sherman's Book Store in the first week of August last year? I live in Portland, Oregon now, but I am from BH and I was there visitting my family last summer and I SWEAR I saw you there.

:-)
Kyle
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Elizabeth Hand
Posted on Friday, May 12, 2006 - 04:02 am:   

Hi Kyle,

Sherman's in Camden? Very likely! I live in the next town (Lincolnville) and go into Sherman's periodically -- I confess that I do most of my book-buying online and second hand, but I love Sherman's and pop in there when I need a fix of something new or to buy gifts or books for my kids.

So yeah, it was probably me! Very likely looking for something for my teenage children to read in the dog days.

I'm glad to hear you thought the cuts were "chaff." That's what I felt at the time, but as I said, I haven't gone back to reread it. I have a real tendency to over-write. I've worked on it over the years, but it makes it hard to reread stuff because I always think "Agh, I should have cut that -- and that, and THAT ..."
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Kyle Sennett
Posted on Saturday, May 13, 2006 - 03:17 pm:   

Liz,

Nice. It probably was you. My family is actually for the most part in Bar Harbor, but I was in Camden seeing my (last living) great grandmother, Abby Sennett. Not very likely you know her, but just in case.

I'll tell you something kind of funny / kind of embarassing: I have been reading this forum for.... a couple years at least, and I have never posted anything because I have always been nervous about what to say. You are one of my favorite authors -- I'm not sure I could identify an exact favorite -- but 'Waking the Moon' and 'Last Summer at Mars Hill' are always on my recommended reading list to any person.

The Mars Hill short story collection is really wonderful. I actually could not read 'Winterlong' until after I had read 'The Boy In The Tree'-- that short story opened up the larger novel for me in a way that nothing else seemed to. After I read the short story all of a sudden 'Winterlong' made sense to me. It's a very dark and introspective novel and I was struggling with it until then. the irony here is that people told me 'the Glimmering' was the "dark & twisted" one, but I found that book really engaging from the start. Probably because I'm a gay man, but still...

Question for you: how would you classify 'Waking the Moon'? I write quite a bit in a similar vein and when people ask me what genre it belongs to I start stumbling over a description. It's not quite fantasy, definitely not straight fiction, not quite horror.... I call it "reality with a twist." I've noticed some of your writing (ex: Blacklight) is sold like horror, but I would never call it that. ??

:-)
Kyle
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Elizabeth Hand
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 04:23 am:   

Hi Kyle,

No, I don't know Abby Sennett. Wish I did! It's a small enough community here that there's always a chance, so it's worth asking.

I'm glad you like Mars Hill. I wish it was still in print -- all my early books are getting scarce, even second-hand, also kind of exspensive. I only have one copy of MH myself, so I'm always looking for (cheap) ones. I have a story collection coming out in the fall, 3 of the 4 stories from Bibliomancy (which was only published in the UK in a small and expensive collector's edition)and then a batch of recent stories. Someday it would be nice to have them all in one volume. Maybe when I'm your great-grandmother's age ...

I'm really glad too that you liked GLIMMERING. I've always felt that was an undeservedly (well, okay, maybe deservedly) overlooked book, but it seems to have acquired a kind of half-life. I never thought it was particularly dark and twisted, either -- I actually thought it was pretty much the way the world was going to be as global warming consumed it. And now that we're living in it, I think I was more right than wrong.

Ah, the dreaded categorization question! I've been cursed by that throughout my career. If I'd stuck to writing or rewriting Winterlong, or Waking the Moon, or any one book, it might be easier to answer. I'm not really sure myself. "Dark fantasy" is a good term in that it describes the tenor of that kind of writing, but I don't know that it sends readers running to the shelves (maybe running for the door).

I think the best thing to do is just say you write fiction. In some ways, this sort of classification is less important than it used to be -- more and more folks buy books online, so they don't need to look in a special section of a store to find you. Of course, your cover art probably determines where the bookstore clerks place you as much as anything else does. The mass market pb of Black Light looks like a shlocky horror novel, so that's where they put it. The hardcover looked a bit classier so it got filed elsewhere -- this is how it worked with me and that one title, anyway.

If you're sending stuff to editors, you might cite the writers you feel you belong with. I.e., SF in the Cory Doctorow mode, or Kelly Link-style magical realism. Or whatever.

If pressed, I guess I'd say that WTM is contemporary fantassy or dark fantasy. John Clute classes it as an "instauration fantasy" in his Fantasy Encyclopedia, but I don't think bookstores are going to start a section for that.
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Kyle Sennett
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 05:29 pm:   

Liz,

Actually, I usually cite you, Guy Gavriel Kay (for the traditional fantasy stuff which I don't write much of any more) and Joan D. Vinge. (haha- big names to live up to.) I've been writing a lot of what I would call space-opera (sci-fi that is more intrigue than action) lately, and taking little breaks to polish some short stories that fall more in the category of "dark fantasy." I'm glad you call it the "dreaded" categorization question. It makes me feel a little better that I have the same quandry.

I absolutely loved 'The Glimmering'. I think people might have considered it dark 10 years ago because a) so many people die and b) the situation for the world is so dire in the story. But now, I'd have to agree with you that we are starting to see some of it come true and people are more intrigued by the book as a warning. If I remember correctly, one of the reviews on the back cover (I have the big trade paperback) called it something like "a dark, post-apocolyptic vision of the future." Sadly, it's not really the future any more.

Something I have always liked in your books, and which has really inspired me, is what I perceive at least to be the quasi-autobiographical content. I've had quite a few stories really liven up when I've thrown in a character or experience based on my own life. I also got that same advice from Natalie Goldberg (who if you have not met her or read her work, I would highly recommend) and you were specifically mentioned as someone who does it exceedingly well. I operate on the theory that nothing is as strange as my own life. haha. It's been a little weird a few times letting my family read my writing when it contains characters that are so blatantly "real" to them, but I have to remind myself that they are the only ones other than me that know that. But then, I am always a little nervous letting my family or friends see my work.

At any rate, I'm just rambling now. :-)

Kyle
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Iceblink
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 07:27 pm:   

OK, that's it...Glimmering is going to be my next reread, now that I've finished up with Waking The Moon and Mortal Love. I've only read it once and remember quite liking it, but that's almost all I remember! It's been a while.
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Isabel Smythe
Posted on Thursday, August 03, 2006 - 04:51 pm:   

Hello! This is my first post. These boards look wonderful.

I've read most of your books and I love the atmosphere of decadent decay that runs through all of them. One scene that's always stuck in my mind is from Aestival Tide, with Reive and her "pet". I thought it was very touching in the midst of all that paranoia and impending doom.

I read upthread that you had a list of reference books you used for Waking the Moon. Could you post their titles? I've wanted to read more ever since I first read Waking the Moon. And a final question about that one: I read the ending as a balance of sorts between the Benandanti and the Goddess, a peace between two extremes. Is that what you intended, or something else?
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Elizabeth Hand
Posted on Sunday, August 06, 2006 - 03:42 pm:   

Hi Isabel,

Thanks so much for your note -- and forgive me for taking so long to reply. I've been in Vermont for a big family celebration of my parents' 50th (!) wedding anniversary. Just arrived back in Maine so I'll answer this at length in the next day or so -- just didn't want you to think I'd gone completely walkabout ...
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Tom Ohs
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 07:01 pm:   

Hi Liz!
I have been recommending your books for years. I only now stumbled across your website/discussion board, etc. I live in the DC metro area - and loved to follow the characters around "our" city while reading the books that were set here.

Reading up-thread, I realize I should try to get my hb Glimmering and pb Mars Hill signed! :-) Unfortunately, my copy of WTM and first copy of Winterlong were stolen. I hope you appreciate being 'stolen' as the compliment I think it is...

I hate to confess, I was not aware of your recent works - even in the WashingtonPost reviews sitting on my coffee table?! The last news I heard was that you were working on X-files episodes (or was that just a rumor?). I'm more than pleased to see that I have some shopping to do!

I know you probably hear this a lot, but I would love to be a novelist one day, and it's books like yours that really inspire me to want to write... unfortunately life happens, and the writing not so much. LOL

Tom
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Elizabeth Hand
Posted on Friday, August 11, 2006 - 05:32 am:   

Hi Tom,

Many thanks for the note. Yep, the X-Files thing was a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.

I heard some years ago from a reader who went on a Winterlong/WTM walking tour of DC with some friends. I thought that was neat. I'm finally doing a new novel set there (around the C&O Canal in georgetown). My first fictional foray to DC in a while. I still miss the city of trees ...
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Teresa Kennedy
Posted on Friday, August 11, 2006 - 01:55 pm:   

Hey Liz,

I hope you remember me. It's funny I found this site; Maureen Shea and I were just talking about you and Wayne Nic and the gang. If you get a chance send me an e-mail; I would love to invite you to speak at the university where I teach.

Best,

Terry Kennedy
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Teresa Kennedy
Posted on Friday, August 11, 2006 - 01:56 pm:   

Hey Liz,

I hope you remember me. It's funny I found this site; Maureen Shea and I were just talking about you and Wayne Nic and the gang. If you get a chance send me an e-mail; I would love to invite you to speak at the university where I teach. How's Pat?

Best,

Terry Kennedy

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