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Lou Anders
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 09:28 am:   

Hi all,
Welcome to the Argosy discussion board.
Many thanks to Jeff V. and the folks at Night Shade Books for setting this up!
Lou Anders
www.argosymag.com
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Chris Dodson
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 09:55 am:   

Argosy?!?

Wow, that's a name from the past. I just checked out the website, and it looks pretty good. Impressive author lineup, cool artwork -- I hope everything goes well!
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Jay Caselberg
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 10:34 am:   

Lou, welcome here. Good to see you. Noticed the empty space this morning and thought yeah, good thing.
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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 10:36 am:   

Here's to Argosy becoming bigger than God.
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Liz Williams
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 11:21 am:   

And a big hand to Argosy...
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Tim Akers
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 12:44 pm:   

Looking forward to the first issue, Lou.
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Thomas R
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 01:16 pm:   

I read about the old Argosy in The Encyclopedia of SF. As I think it ended in the 40s I imagine few from that one are still working. Still sounds like an interesting idea, good luck!
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Lou Anders
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 03:48 pm:   

Thanks all.
Yes, the original Argosy ceased publication in 1943 (it began in 1882 as a children's magazine called Golden Argosy, before going to Argosy in 1896). After that, it came back in a number of iterations - including a men's magazine. There was even a brief but well-intentioned Argosy around 1991/2. And now us.
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Bob
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 03:54 pm:   

Very nice. A blast from the past indeed.
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Luis Rodrigues
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 04:48 pm:   

Great to see Argosy moved into the Night Shade forum neighbourhood. Welcome!

Cheers,
Luís
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Laura Anne
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 05:22 pm:   

Welcome, Lou & Argosy!

(yeah, I lurk everywhere. But I'm a nice lurker. Really I am. Ignore anything that Datlow woman says...)

-- Laura Anne
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Lou Anders
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2003 - 02:18 pm:   

How do you have time to lurk?
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Laura Anne
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2003 - 04:15 pm:   

Lou,

Actually, my lurking self is a computer-generated spam program...

either that, or I'm procrastinating. Madly.
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Ellen
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2003 - 05:00 pm:   

Don't listen to Gilman--she's an utter bitch!


Anyway, hi and welcome to the nightshade boards Lou. Good seeing you in Austin.
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mike
Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2003 - 08:54 pm:   

Hey Lou, I know I'm getting ahead of myself, but do you what retail outlets are going to carry the mag? (Especially in New York!) Not that I can resist a subscription, but I'd love to see it on the shelves here too.

Mike
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 06:22 am:   

Well,
a) hello CG-Spam LAG
b) good seeing you too Ellen
c) Mike, all the retail stuff is still being worked out, but isn't my department. I'll see what I can learn and report back!
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Paul Barnett/John Grant
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 08:04 am:   

Hi Lou

Great to see Argosy up and running again! The UK Argosy ran, in its original form, well into the 1960s and I think into the 1970s. I well remember reading it as a kid. So there's a particular nostalgia for me in the notion that the name's once again going to be on the newsstands, even if it's in a different country.

All power to you and James!
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 08:09 am:   

Actually,
I think James has some international distribution deals in the works too...
Lou
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Mike Jasper
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 08:43 am:   

Looking forward to the first issue of Argosy! Welcome to the boards, and congrats on going bi-monthly.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 09:10 am:   

Thanks Mike,
we're getting so much good material, I hope we can jump to monthly before too long!
Lou
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Richard A. Lupoff
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 10:47 am:   

Wow! ARGOSY was one of the great, classic pulp magazines when I was a kid. I dreamed of writing for that magazine, BLACK MASK, ELLERY QUEEN, AMAZING STORIES, F&SF, GALAXY, OTHER WORLDS, WEIRD TALES. Of course, by the time I was writing and selling fiction, the classic pulps were all gone -- but I did manage to hit most of my childhood ideals, in revival series if not in their original personae.

Now I have a chance to write for ARGOSY. What a thrill!

Dick Lupoff
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 11:53 am:   

I grew up on Burroughs (Edgar Rice - William S came later), so I'm thrilled to be editing the latest iteration of the magazine that originally ran his Martian stories. They're still my favorite Martian stories to date, despite Bradbury, Robinson, etc... Give me Barsoom anyday!
Lou
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Laura Anne
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 12:38 pm:   

I should note that my first words to Lou on Argosy were "Are you INSANE?"

My second words to him were "I've got this story..."

*grin*

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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 01:57 pm:   

That questionable insanity
is seeming more and more likely
as our submission rate
which seems to be at about 400 a month right now
grows incrementally.
Mind you, I am caught up thru ArmadilloCon, but haven't opened any of the 71 manuscripts that have arrived in the week and a half I've been back!
Lou
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Tim Akers
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 02:06 pm:   

One of which would be mine. It's the clever one, just bear that in mind. :P
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Jim Minz
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 05:16 pm:   

Here's to wishing you all the best!
(Terrific start, based on the website)
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 18, 2003 - 08:48 pm:   

Thanks Jim,
I'm about to die to post the contents to Issue Two,
but I want to keep some surprises!
Lou
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Mark Finn
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 09:32 am:   

So, the message board will be here, and not hosted on Argosy's server?
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Lou Anders
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 04:15 pm:   

There's nice company here.
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Mark Finn
Posted on Thursday, August 21, 2003 - 09:09 am:   

Oh, I agree Lou. Glad to see it here. I was just making sure, is all.
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Mike Resnick
Posted on Thursday, August 21, 2003 - 01:03 pm:   

Good luck with Argosy. It's high time we had
something with the catholic tastes of the
old Argosy back with us. I'm proud to be a
part of it.

-- Mike Resnick
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Lou Anders
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 07:52 am:   

Thanks Mike,
We're very glad to have you.
But I'm also very curious how people are going to react to these "catholic tastes." The reaction of the SF reading public, as exemplified at this last ArmadilloCon, was overwhelmingly positive. And the reaction from the writers has been stupendous. And we're getting a lot of support from the community of editors and publishers. But I'm very curious to see if mystery readers, for instance, will enjoy a little SF&F getting into their "mystery mag" as readily as the SF&F community might embrace mystery. I've also been struck lately by how much of what McSweeney's runs could just as easily show up in SF&F if it carried a byline by someone like Terry Bisson or Jonathan Lethem. We're running about 4 of their regular contributors in our first year, and I'm curious to see whether their work ends up catching any SF eyeballs, getting any noms or anthology slots, and also how their readership reacts to them being here. It's all a grand experiment - one that I'm pretty convinced is very timely. I mean, the recent Harper Perenial trade of Jeffrey Ford's Portrait of Ms. Charbuque plays up his Boston Globe and Salon.com reviews, while making no mention of his genre connections. On the flip side, Michael Chabon just made an appearance at ComicCon, did a draft on Amazing Spiderman, and has dipped into fantasy with Summerland. The recent McSweeney's has a story by AG Pasquella called "Why not a Spider Monkey Jesus?" about a surgically altered chimp who becomes a televangelist that, apart from being one of the funniest things I've ever read, could easily have run in an SF publication. (Incidentally, expect the notorious AG to show up in Argosy afore too long). So, anyway - these "catholic tastes" seem to me to be a measure of the pulse of publishing right now. But I could be wrong. Thoughts everyone?
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Tim Akers
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 08:43 am:   

I'm of two minds on this one. I'm fairly omniverous when it comes to reading tastes. Very omniverous, actually. But my true calling, my deeply held love, is science fiction. Good old scifi is getting a bad rap in the publishing biz. Publishing houses are throwing around terms like "the ghettoization of science fiction" and making moves to distance fantasy and slipstream from the blighted shelves of scifi. This hurts me. I read all the major mags, and what scares me is the paucity of serious, good old fashioned science fiction.

Now, don't get me wrong. I'm not a "hard science" guy. I can't stand infodump, or any story where the characters are mere window dressing for the technology. Rather I see the tools of science fiction as being particularly evocative, and very suitable for "getting at" certain themes and ideas. But the market is absolutely flooded with slipstream and dark fantasy, and there simply aren't enough stories about, you know, spaceships. Anyway. Just me ranting.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 09:34 am:   

Tim,
I take your point, and I want to clarify that I'm not necessarily behind - for example - Harper's repackaging of Ford's novel. I just cite that as one example of (or reaction to) a broader trend, though I don't necessarily think their response to this trend is the correct one. (Though it may expose his work to a broader audience, so I'm neither decrying nor applauding it). A better response was possibly, say, McSweeney's No. 10, which - for all its faults - seemed to celebrate that which Harper is downplaying. As for infodump, I don't mind it at all when it occurs in something like Charlie Stross' Lobsters - not an easy tale to read if you've never picked up a Wired Magazine or spent some time surfing slashdot. However, recently I read a story by a noted author (won't say which one)in one of the major mags (won't say which one) where the story itself *required* no SFnal elements and the author had just thrown in the usual array of vidphones, holopics on the wall, bus stations redressed as spaceports, etc... And while I generally like the writing of the writer in question, I realized that had it been in the Argosy slush pile, I would have passed. (And I have passed on several stories like it since). I had a friend in the development department of Nickelodean animation during my time in LA, who said that she only bought animation projects that *had* to be animated, stories that couldn't be told any other way. If they could be told with live actors, she passed. I think this maybe applies to my opinions of hard SF. I want my hard SF to show me things, explore ideas, wow my brain with stories that simply couldn't be told in any other medium. If the story can be told in another genre, and the writer is just appropriating the tropes of SF as "setting", I'm not interested. This may not be exactly what I mean, but I'm starting to think that maybe SF as metaphor perhaps doesn't interest me as much as SF as trailbazing societal vanguard. This may mean that its going to be harder to write my definition of (or my preferred) hard SF than it used to be, as you practically have to be a computer programmer to read Charlie's Accelerando tales with full-on appreciation, let alone write them!
Now, on a related tangent, there's already been some misunderstanding that we're a slipstream venue (maybe I should recompose our guidelines?) and this isn't necessarily true. We may publish some slipstream, but no more nor less than any other venue. We're hoping to be "all-story", and run true, dyed-in-the-wool mysteries next to New Yorkish existential pieces next to Hard SF, which is different from running exclusively mixed-genre fiction. I think we *are* going to have a nice mix of classic-pulp pastiche and cutting-edge of the genre(s)though, I'm proud to say.
As to stories about spaceships - I thought the recent Locus did a good job of demonstrating that there's an explosion of them right now. Certainly, between Ian Banks, Ken McLeod, Allistair Reynolds, M John Harrison alone there's more than I could possibly keep up with out there.
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Tim Akers
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 10:09 am:   

Ah, haven't picked up the last Locus yet. And the spaceships line was just me pulling a word out of my head.

I didn't really mean scifi as metaphor so much as scifi as device. Hard to define the difference. I think that the tropes of science fiction need to be integral to the story to pass as real science fiction. Like 'Altered Carbon' by Richard Morgan. Without the device of the cortical stack, that story simply doesn't exist. That's what passes water with me.

If there's an explosion of good scifi, well then, I'm a happy man. Unless this explosion is somehow destructive, or results in actual property damage. That is, as long as the explosion is purely metaphorical and not an actual rapid expansion of burning gas, somehow emanating from a pile of spacey stories that have reached some sort of authorial critical mass.
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Nicholas Liu
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 11:20 am:   

Lou: "We're hoping to be "all-story", and run true, dyed-in-the-wool mysteries next to New Yorkish existential pieces next to Hard SF, which is different from running exclusively mixed-genre fiction. I think we *are* going to have a nice mix of classic-pulp pastiche and cutting-edge of the genre(s)though, I'm proud to say."

I salute you from the heart of my bottom. This is what we are trying to do, only with no money. =P
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Lou Anders
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 12:51 pm:   

So since he's spilled the beans in another forum,
I want to go on and announce that Jeff Ford's A Night in the Tropics will be in Argosy's first issue, along with the lineup as already listed here: http://www.argosymag.com/CurrentIssue.html

The Moorcock piece "Mystery of the Texas Twister" is the novella, with cover and b&w illustrations by Jon Foster (www.jonfoster.com)
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Christopher Barzak
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 01:03 pm:   

Lou,

If the success of McSweeney's No. 10 is any indication, I'd day Argosy should be a hit, as long as people find out about it and see it on the stands, etc. From the looks of the first cover, it seems like it'll be hard to not be attracted to its look.

Best Wishes,
Christopher Barzak
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Lou Anders
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 01:14 pm:   

Thank you Christopher,
Here's hoping you're right!
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Matt Cheney
Posted on Sunday, August 24, 2003 - 01:53 pm:   

Just wanted to add my name to the list of people anxiously awaiting the first issue. I've yearned for a magazine like this for a while -- I love my Asimov's and F&SFs, but it's nice to have a place open to genre-type pieces as well as other stuff, because it makes reading a fun and interesting surprise. I hope some writers who are identified with one type of writing will try to use the venue as a way to write other things, too.

I feel a bit guilty for having submitted a story, since I didn't expect you'd be slogging through such a slushpile this early. It bodes well for the magazine's success, though, as it's clearly gotten its name out there, even before an issue hits the market. Many congratulations!
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Lou Anders
Posted on Sunday, August 24, 2003 - 04:52 pm:   

Thanks very much Matt.
Yes, I think we're up to something like 400 submissions a month right now, though it's hard to tell and it seems to be increasing steadily. So far, I've bought two stories out of the slush pile, and the rest I've solicited from writers I've already worked with or have relationships with. So, 1 in 200 odds? Not too bad is it?
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Matt Cheney
Posted on Sunday, August 24, 2003 - 09:43 pm:   

1 in 200 is pretty good odds, I agree, since I expect with many markets it's closer to 1 in 1000 with the slush. I wasn't feeling bad for myself -- heck, I've literally got a bathroom wallpapered with rejection slips (some from good friends) -- I was feeling bad for you and for my part in adding to that pile! I'm an English teacher, so the vision of 400 papers all at once is one which gives me nightmares, though that's about the amount of student papers that I read in a month, so...

Maybe I'm just taking out my new-school-year anxieties on you. For all I know, you might LIKE wading through it all. And at least you can use form rejections (I assume you do).

In any case, thanks for the hard work. It made me interested in your other work, since I wanted to get a sense of your literary taste, and I bought the Life Without a Net anthology (or is it Living Without a Net ... not in front of me), and have liked what I read.

Enough gushing from here. It's really not my normal mode of writing...
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 25, 2003 - 06:46 am:   

Matt
first I'm flattered you picked up Live Without a Net. I'd love to hear what you think of it when you get a little further in. Oh, and it's Live, like the old circus barkers cry - "direct your attention to the center ring... performing live...without a net..." It's a pun on nets both real and virtual, of course, though for some reason half the folks I talk to think it's live, pronouncing like in living and Liv Tyler, and not live - long i - live. Anyhoo...
That is my, as one reviewer called it, "pure quill" SF anthology.And is so far proving very different from what Argosy's initial issues will be like. If anything, science fiction will be the *hardest* genre to sell me, as I'm getting an overabundance of it, (that's where most of my friends are), and will be struggling to make sure we don't let the side down in our other genres.
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Tim Akers
Posted on Monday, August 25, 2003 - 08:11 am:   

That's sorta depressing, actually. I submitted to you specifically because I liked Live so much, and felt that the material presented was similiar to the stuff I was writing. Oh well, maybe for a second anthology...
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 25, 2003 - 10:06 am:   

Alas, only two anthologies to my credit and I'm stereotyped already!
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Tim Akers
Posted on Monday, August 25, 2003 - 10:26 am:   

We prefer to think of it as editor targetted submission policy. It's a subset of rejectomancy, using past events to predict future rejections. Something like that.
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Matt Cheney
Posted on Monday, August 25, 2003 - 01:44 pm:   

Hi Lou,

I promise to post really thoughtful, engaged responses to Live w/out a Net once I get through it, but it's had to be put on hold because I realized this week I needed to do the summer reading our school assigned, both the books for students and the books for faculty, so I won't have anything substantive to say for about three weeks, but I won't forget. I thought the central idea for the anthology was creative and stimulating, and that attracted me to it right off. The Paul DiFilippo story was typically, wonderfully bizarre; "The Memory Palace" I found strangely beautiful; and Alex Irvine's story fascinated me simply because of his use of Sufism -- the only SF I know of other than Doris Lessing's series to do so -- I generally love anything which mines Eastern religions for speculative purposes. I need to reread them more carefully, though.

I like the idea of "rejectomancy" that Tim posits. I once started an article which I never finished, intended for Poets & Writers, about the hermeneutics of rejection slips, how an editor's quickly-scrawled "sorry -- not quite" at the bottom of a form slip can be interpreted by writers to mean all sorts of different things, probably none of which had anything to do with the original author's intent.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 25, 2003 - 02:21 pm:   

Do you know, I started off responding personally to all submissions, descended into form letters within my third week, and now find my penmanship - never great to begin with - degenerating into that must-be-obligatory scrawl that makes even me go "what the hell does that say?" It must be something that comes with the job description.
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LARRY ZAP
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 11:10 pm:   

WELCOME BACK ARGOSY. I REMEMBER THE MAG FROM THE MID TO LATE 60'S. DOES ANYONE OUT THERE REMEMBER THE CARTOON STRIP CALLED RATMAN AND BOBBIN? IT WAS PUBLISHED IN ARGOSY AND PERHAPS A FEW OTHER MEN MAGAZINES. I AM LOOKING FOR ANY INFO AS WELL AS COPIES OF THESE CARTOONS.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 02:46 pm:   

Larry
we are not affiliated with the original Argosy
However, a company called Argosy Communications, Inc. holds the copyrights to, and often reprints, that classic material. They can be reached at P.O. Box 513, Newark, NJ 07101
Best of luck,
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Paul Cornell
Posted on Friday, November 07, 2003 - 01:22 am:   

It's good to see Argosy back, and in safe hands. Lou may look like something Grant Morrison made up, but he's a great editor. It'll be interesting to see what a magazine that pitches itself right into the middle of the current genre-bending situation will come up with.
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Gorden Russell
Posted on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - 05:29 pm:   

It made me laugh out loud to read, "I started off responding personally to all submissions, descended into form letters within my third week, and now find my penmanship - never great to begin with - degenerating into that must-be-obligatory scrawl that makes even me go "what the hell does that say?" It must be something that comes with the job description...."

Years ago I got back a rejection that appeared to say, "Sorry kid, can't use this shit." Lord knows what that harried editor really meant to say.
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Minz
Posted on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 07:21 pm:   

This seemed like the right place for this comment: Great wedding photo in Locus, Lou. (The cake had the folks at the Tor offices drooling . . . me, I was a sucker for the whole package: clothes, cake, the whole shebang.)
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Chris Roberson
Posted on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 10:21 pm:   

Oh yes, that cake was pretty damned good. The wine wasn't so bad, either, as I recall. But with our host dressed up like some cross between Doctor No and Fu Manchu, I don't think many of us were paying too close attention to the food.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 06:55 am:   

Thanks!
The suit is actually a replica of a 1930s businessman's suit - the vest red for weddings - that Xin's family had custom made for me in China. I can't wear the red vest again apparently, but when we go to Changsha in the spring, I'm planning on getting a blue or gold vest made, and wearing this suit as my suit on future formal occassions.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Thursday, December 04, 2003 - 10:51 am:   

Revised/Updated Submission Guidelines are up at:
http://www.argosymag.com/ArgosySubmission.html
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Lou Anders
Posted on Friday, December 05, 2003 - 09:24 am:   

And we're now up on our distributor's site, Rider Circulation Services, at: http://www.gorcs.com/
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Joe Johnson
Posted on Thursday, December 11, 2003 - 05:38 pm:   

I'm trying to get a hold on an old Argosy article, "The Hells Ships" by Darnell Kadolph.
I believe that it was published in July 1963.
If anyone has or knows how to get a hold of this please email me at thejohnsonfamily35@yahoo.com

Thank you!
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Lou Anders
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 06:47 am:   

Joe,
we are not affiliated with the original Argosy.
There is a company called Argosy Communications, Inc. that holds the copyright on and reprints some of that material. They can be reached at P.O. Box 513, Newark, NJ 07101
Best,
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Jokester
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2004 - 06:54 am:   

Any relation to the new teashop I've been seeing around, Argos Tea?
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Fishsis
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 05:38 pm:   

Hello all...I am searching for an Argosy article titled, "I'll let that hole keep its gold".(circa 1950?) Where can I get a copy?
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Argosy
Posted on Sunday, June 13, 2004 - 09:34 am:   

we are not affiliated with the original Argosy.
There is a company called Argosy Communications, Inc. that holds the copyright on and reprints some of that material. They can be reached at P.O. Box 513, Newark, NJ 07101.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 12:28 pm:   

Dear all,

Effective July 8, 2004, I have stepped down as Senior Editor of Argosy Magazine in order to devote my full attention to my new role of Editorial Director of Pyr, an SF&F imprint coming from Prometheus Books in 2005. I'm very proud of all the work that went into Argosy 1 & 2 and gratified by the support it has garnered. If you have any Argosy related questions that need to be addressed, please direct them to either Publisher James Owen at coppervale@skyboot.com, or Production Manager Jeremy Owen at jeremybrundage@yahoo.com. They can also be reached at the Coppervale Studio offices at the following number: (928) 536-3596.
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John Klima
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 12:49 pm:   

Best of luck Lou! I really liked what you did with the first two issues of Argosy. Looking forward to see what you do with Pyr.

JK
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Lou Anders
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 02:29 pm:   

Thanks John!
They'll be some announcements to that effect shortly! Debut titles and such.
Best!
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 03:15 pm:   

Hey, best of luck to you, Lou. I agree with John, you did great work with issues one and two, and were always prompt with answering my questions. Looking forward to Pyr, as well.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 04:26 pm:   

Thank you very much Mahesh!
And I would love to here what you think about the contents of issue 2 now that you've received it! Personally, I think the nonfiction pieces are especially strong.
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EDatlow
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 05:53 pm:   

Lou,
Good luck and congratulations.

Will Argosy be continuing? If so, who will be editing it?
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Lou Anders
Posted on Thursday, July 08, 2004 - 08:08 pm:   

Good questions. But not for me to answer.
I did hand in a third issue, which I really hope they produce, as I think it showcases some outstanding work.
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Nuke
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 05:04 am:   

Will Pyr accept unsolicited material?
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Coppervale
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 09:33 am:   

Ellen -

Most definitely - Argosy will be continuing. We have the third issue ready to go, and the fourth on deck, and will be making some announcements about both the schedule and the masthead sometime this weekend or early next week.

We're sorry to lose Lou, but basically, it's not going to have a huge impact (short term) because we have a lot of the material Lou assembled still to publish! And just GETTING to the 'longer-term' question is a goal in and of itself!

With the chaos we've had to endure on the distribution end, the release schedule has been much slower than the acquisition schedule. Thus, we have the aforementioned completed #3 and most of #4 ready to go, but were off schedule enough that we didn't want people committing material for further issues (and in the case of interviews, time-sensitive material) so far in advance of possible publication.

When you add that to Lou's rapidly increasing duties at Pyr, it just seemed like a sensible move at the moment. While we both wish we'd not have had to go through the distribution trials and schedule slowdown, one thing Lou and I resolved was that we were NOT going to do ANYTHING which compromised the quality of either the material or the presentation of Argosy. And we haven't.

We're going to be making an announcement about the release of #3 within a week (along with another BIG announcement regarding the entire Coppervale operation), and we'll tackle any other questions then.

Best,

James
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EDatlow
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 08:43 pm:   

James,
Thanks for all the info.
I very much look forward to seeing Argosy continue to publish and thrive.

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