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Lou Anders
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 11:23 am:   

A nice place for the original press release, also available at www.pyrsf.com:

Poised to Set the Science Fiction World
on Fire

Prometheus Books is proud to announce the launch of Pyr,™ a new science fiction and fantasy imprint, with titles anticipated in Spring 2005. Prometheus Books is entering its thirty-fifth year of successful independent publishing; since 1969, Prometheus has been a leader in publishing books for the scientific, professional, library, educational, popular and consumer markets.

For founder Paul Kurtz, the progression from popular science nonfiction to science fiction and fantasy is a natural one.

“Science and science fiction have a long history of mutual inspiration and admiration that stretches back at least as far as the 19th Century,” says Kurtz, “Science fiction is vital for the human person. It feeds the mind, the heart, and the creative imagination… At its best, it can inspire positive images of the future.”

Prometheus Books took its name from the courageous Greek god who gave fire to humans, lighting the way to reason, intelligence, and independence. Pyr ™, the Greek word for fire, continues this connection to fire and the liveliness of imagination.

Prometheus Books has tested the waters of science fiction before, most notably with the well-reviewed Nothing Sacred (2004) and its prequel, Galactic Rapture (2000), by Tom Flynn, and the rediscovered Jules Verne classic Journey through the Impossible. Launching a dedicated imprint proves the commitment Prometheus Books is making to the genre.

Lou Anders has been named Editorial Director of Pyr™. Anders joins Prometheus with over nine years of experience in science fiction and fantasy entertainment and media. He is the editor of four anthologies, including Live Without a Net (Roc, July 2003) and Outside the Box (Wildside Press, 2001). He has also published over 500 magazine articles. Previously, Anders was the Senior Editor of Argosy Magazine, Executive Editor of online publishing site Bookface.com, and the Los Angeles Liaison for Titan Publishing Group.

“The challenge of developing a new imprint from the ground up — with its own identity yet one that complements Prometheus — is an exciting prospect,” notes Anders. “Since the start of the new millennium, we’ve been seeing a renaissance of speculative fiction. With Pyr™, we’ll be looking to create science fiction for the Next Age.”
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Lou Anders
Posted on Sunday, August 08, 2004 - 11:33 am:   

Pyr™ Announces Spring/Summer 2005 Line

Prometheus Books is proud to announce the inaugural titles for its new science fiction and fantasy imprint, Pyr™. Pyr™’s upcoming Spring/Summer 2005 line will consist of four original novels, one classic reprint, two North American debuts, and a brand-new anthology from a master editor.

The Pyr™ debut titles are:

· The North American debut of John Meaney’s Paradox. Meaney was called “the first important new SF writer of the 21st Century” by the Times, and this novel, the first book of his three-book “Nulapeiron Sequence,” was short listed for the prestigious British Science Fiction Association award for Best Novel in 2001. (March 2005)

· Science Fiction Writers of America Grand Master and multiple Hugo and Nebula winner Robert Silverberg’s 1986 Locus Recommended Novel, Star of Gypsies, a rollicking tale of the King of the Rom and his lifelong quest to return his people to their ancestral home of Romany Star. (March 2005)

· Sidewise Award nominated author Chris Roberson’s time-and-dimensional travel novel, Here, There & Everywhere. Roberson’s short fiction has appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, as well as the anthologies Live Without a Net, and The Many Faces of Van Helsing. Famous fantasist Michael Moorcock says of his work, “A talented storyteller, he has a unique ear, a clever eye, an eloquence all too rare in modern fiction,” while Charles De Lint calls him an “author to watch.” (April 2005)

· New York Times Best Selling Author Sean Williams 1999 Ditmar Award Winning novel The Resurrected Man, a near-future tale of a private police force which investigates teleporter-related crimes, never before published in the United States. (April 2005)

· Babylon 5: Crusade scriptwriter and Spider-Girl and Tomb Raider comic book author Fiona Avery’s The Crown Rose, a historical fantasy set in the early 13th century during the reign of King Louis IX of France and containing hints of bloodline conspiracies in the vein of such books as The Da Vinci Code and Holy Blood, Holy Grail. (May 2005)

· Hugo, Nebula, Sidewise, and John W. Campbell Best New Author finalist Charles Coleman Finlay’s debut fantasy novel, The Prodigal Troll, a tale of a human child raised by a band of the mythological creatures that is both hysterical and moving. (June 2005)

· World Fantasy and Bram Stoker Award finalist Michael Blumlein’s The Healer, a very literate speculative fiction tale of an offshoot of humanity with the ability to effect miraculous healings that examines the way they are commoditized and mistreated by the larger human population. (July 2005)

· Former Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine editor and 14 time Hugo Award winner Gardner Dozois’ anthology, Galileo's Children: Stories of Science vs. Superstition, a collection of stories focusing on the progress of science despite the opposition of religious and political authority. (August 2005)

“We are very pleased with these eight initial titles,” says Pyr™’s Editorial Director Lou Anders. “Together, they represent a strong mix of famous names and emerging talents, indicative of both the genre’s rich history and its promising future. With the support of such a powerful collection of authors and works, we are confident that Pyr™ will be a positive force for defining the science fiction and fantasy of the 21st Century.”
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Sunday, August 08, 2004 - 02:48 pm:   

Sounds like a great lineup, Lou. I'm looking forward to seeing the finished products.
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Jonathan
Posted on Sunday, August 08, 2004 - 04:14 pm:   

Hey Lou, the line-up looks great. Can't wait to see the books as they come out, and I'm really glad to see Sean Williams' novel get a larger audience. Hope they all sell a million!
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Lou Anders
Posted on Sunday, August 08, 2004 - 07:15 pm:   

Thanks guys. Regarding the finished products, I'm proud to say that John Picacio will be providing three covers (Williams, Silverberg, & Roberson), while Caniglia provides two (Avery & Blumlein) and Brian W. Dow one (Finlay).
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Jonathan
Posted on Sunday, August 08, 2004 - 11:20 pm:   

Can't wait to see what John will do. The Australian edition of The Resurrected Man had a reasonably ordinary cover and I'm sure John will do something that'll really sing.
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John Klima
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 05:44 am:   

Great stuff Lou! Very excited to see the final products!

JK
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Lou Anders
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 08:42 am:   

Thank to you both! I'm looking forward to seeing what John will do as well.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 02:51 pm:   

I'll be attending the 62nd World Science Fiction Convention in Boston, MA from September 2 - 7. While there, we will be hosting a "special interest group" discussion about the new Pyr SF&F line. Along with myself, authors Chris Roberson, John Meaney, and Mike Resnick will appear, as well as editor Gardner Dozois and artists John Picacio and Brian W. Dow. The discussion will be held on Friday, September 3rd, at 4 pm in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 107.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Wednesday, December 15, 2004 - 07:20 pm:   

For convenience sake, an Amazon list of the first 8 Pyr titles, neatly gathered:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/listmania/list-browse/-/8Z89ZVLGDECR/ref=cm _aya_av.lm_more/002-7565738-7000002
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montmorency
Posted on Thursday, December 16, 2004 - 06:22 am:   

Wow, quite an attractive lineup. I'll be buying most of them. I do appreciate the impressive covers as well.

Actually, I read Paradox in UK hardcover and I'm truly glad of its US debut. Is there a possibility for To Hold Infinity in hardcover in the future?
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Lou Anders
Posted on Sunday, December 19, 2004 - 11:38 am:   

Thank you very much for the compliments. I hope you'll let me know what you think about the various books when you have read them. Meanwhile, re: To Hold Infinty - nothing official, but there are always possibilities. It is no secret that I am a big fan of John's writing.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 10:07 am:   

I hope that in the spirit of Prometheus Books (remember, they do science) that Pyr will make an effort to try to encourage what we used to call "hard" SF - where the Science/Speculative part has at least equal standing with the Fiction part. I've been told by agents that: "people who read SF don't want to learn anything," that in order to get published today you need some kind of gimmick - like it has to be violent, gothic, or have the look and feel of a "fairy tale." Most things that are published in SF today are more or less Fantasy - that's okay but there should be some place where people who loved classic SF can go other than techno thrillers - which is where they're going. By classic SF I mean the kind of stuff Arthur Clarke, (the great) Greg Bear, Greg Benford, and of course Michael Crichton used to put out. I recently wrote something positive about Crichton on the Analog forum and was pleased to find that when one person had disparaging remarks, many more said they liked him very much.
The trend that I've noticed is that even if people like Michael Crichton out sell everyone else, for some bizarre reason, SF editors and agents seem to minimize him - many lovers of speculative fiction disagree with their pocket books. I hope Pyr will try to do things a little differently, I know saying this is probably just pissing in the wind.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Tuesday, December 28, 2004 - 08:40 pm:   

The short answer to your question is "Yes, absolutely."

The long answer is that science is the bedrock of science fiction, and our parent company, Prometheus Books, has a three decades plus commitment to a scientific, rationalist worldview. We are absolutely committed to showcasing the case of science and to publishing quality hard science fiction. In our first season, we are featuring the U.S. debut of John Meaney's PARADOX, first book in his Nulapeiron Sequence, with its brilliant extrapolations on both cutting edge cosmology and quantum physics; as well as Chris Roberson's HERE, THERE & EVERYWHERE, praised by Paul Di Filippo in Asimov's magazine with "Roberson threads his narratives with pop-culture brio....and does not neglect his speculative physics either.” Across the book, Roberson investigates a host of theoretical models of time-travel, from Tipler cylinders and Visser wormholes to naturally occurring wormholes in quantum foam. Sean Willams' THE RESURRECTED MAN does what the best hard SF has always done, which is to take the SF gizmo, in this case the matter transporter, and explore it in all its myriad ramifications, taking each implication to the Nth degree. And Gardner Dozois' anthology, GALILEO'S CHILDREN, is a collection of short stories exploring the vital role science plays despite opposition from political and religious authority.

Our second season will continue this trend, with such works as a hard SF novel from Justina Robson and a reprint of George Zebrowski's classic MACROLIFE - one of the hardest of hard SF works, called by the Library Journal one of the 100 best SF books of all time.

However, I should say that I consider the soft sciences as important to SF as the hard sciences, the other side of a coin that is as old as the dichotomy of Jules Verne vs. H.G. Wells. It is science fiction's ability to act as vehicle for social criticism and a catalyst for social change that brought me to the genre. If you know my anthology work, particularly LIVE WITHOUT A NET or PROJECTIONS: SCIENCE FICTION IN LITERATURE & FILM, you should know that I am not an enormous fan of "entertainment for entertainment's sake" and no friend of mere escapism that masquerades as SF. I very much believe in the importance of science fiction, above that of any other genre. That being said, Pyr aims to be a rich and diverse imprint, publishing both hard and soft SF, as well as the best in traditional and contemporary fantasy. We probably won't be publishing any Christian allegories, but neither will the genius of our individual writers be slaved to a single agenda, mine or anyone else's.

Nor will we publish science for science's sake. Any book, of any genre, needs strong plot, character and theme, and a work can be "important" without being any good. Or fun.

Regarding Crichton, I believe that what turns a lot of members of the SF community off is that, despite grounding his stories in science, he is actually a very anti-science writer, turning every new invention and cutting-edge idea into a continual retelling of the Frankenstein story, science run amok, a very tired regurgitation of "there are some things man was not meant to know."

I hope that I've answered your question (or was it to your challenge?).
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, December 29, 2004 - 08:37 am:   

Well Lou, I think your answer was very thoughtful. Sounds good, but I would ask you not to fall into a trap that I feel is pervasive these days and goes well beyond SF-i.e. form over substance. By that I mean writing and ideas whose purpose is to shock or "seem" far out, but on closer inspection is just so much smoke. I think the differentiation between mystery, crime, thrillers and SF is that in the former the writing and characters tend to be more measured, more consistent with real behavior while in much of SF (really Fantasy) the characters are more, well, characters-like out of a comic book. The science too. For example, I knew Matt Visser, and a lot of what passes for science in SF is so wrong that it's really fantasy in the true sense of the word. That's why, in these areas, writers like Benford, Bear, and yes Crichton excel. Their stuff is the real stuff and the less excessive but subtle detail of the dilemma they present is appealing to the more adult reader-those that have made Crichton so popular. Many times less is absolutely more, and subtlety more interesting and engaging than shock.
And yes, you do have a challenge, to present books that bring back a lot of the readers that I know SF has lost, not just appeal to a very limited group of fans with very stylistic tastes.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Wednesday, December 29, 2004 - 10:38 am:   

"Her father had so often told her that the world was fantastic and miraculous enough without having to resort to fairy tales and mythology. The behavior of a single electron in the laboratory was more wondrous and strange than any unicorn could ever be...."
— Chris Roberson, Here, There & Everywhere (coming from Pyr April, 2005)

Dear "Anonymous",
I'm somewhat confused in that I'm not sure where "shock" factors into any of what I've said in my previous post above. Though perhaps you are using it to indicate a sense of the strange, in which case I might proffer another quote:

"Science fiction, essentially the literature of altered circumstances, is the obvious place to seek a language for the unprecedented, especially since it offers as many anxious images as utopian ones."
—Colin Greenland, The Entropy Exhibition

I believe that all fiction depends upon three factors, plot, character and theme. Sometimes, the poorer examples of the mystery/suspense genre can get away with only two of these, and sometimes "literary" fiction gets away with only the latter two. However, the strongest works will resonate with all three.

Beyond these criteria, science fiction can offer any combination of these three additional factors, largely unique to its genre:

1. a presentation of the principals of hard science
2. a presentation of the principals of soft science, usually with its attendant social criticisms and examinations
3. a sense of the strange - the communication that the universe is about change, that change comes through technology, and that unimaginable social change is coupled to technological change.

In a society that largely resists change, and one in which an increasing number of Americans believe that certain myths are immutable laws, that, for instance, our founding fathers all shared their current religious beliefs, that evolution is a mere "theory" (without understanding what that term means), that "In God We Trust" and "One Nation Under God" were always on our money and in our pledge (and not additions cobbled on in the 30s and 50s), this latter factor can be just as important, if not more so, than factors 1 and 2.

The best science fiction will combine plot, character and theme with these three additional points, as I believe Neil Stephenson's The Diamond Age does admirably - a book that can teach you about Turning machines, examine whether certain societal mores are inherently "better" than others (based upon the quality of citizen they produce), and present you with a world utterly transformed from our own by the presence of a new technology, all in a story with great characters, a rich plot, and an important theme.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, December 29, 2004 - 12:13 pm:   

Lou, I couldn't agree with you more. My only point concerns what I see (for the most part) in bookstores (in the SF sections in particular), conversations I've had with agents, who are trying to make a living and take their queue from editors whose suggestions range from "why doesn't the main character have Seret's Syndrome to make him/her more interesting" to "it has to be dark/violent(i.e. punkish) or have the look and feel of a fairytale to sell. Well-these guys should look at their numbers, with the exception of Juvenile Fiction, it's not selling.
Aren't you tired of brain numbing versions of Mad Max meets Harry Potter? Do all SF have to incorporate silly, simplistic, cave-like/castle-like/Imperial Army-like scenarios. Thank goodness for Shelly (Frankenstein) and such works as Bear's Darwin's Radio and his awesome "Queen of Angels."
From what you wrote above, I think philosophically, we're in total agreement. The only reason I'm picking on you is because you represent a new branch, a new possibility to get some good stuff out under the banner of a serious, science, adult oriented, topical book publisher.
I'm not bemoaning that SF stories shouldn't have a human, topical, societal dimension. The only reason to read fiction and not popular science is exactly for that. I'm only saying that in reality (not theory) what I see and hear are SF publishers running away from anything that smacks of the serious because it may not be fun. But fun for whom? - a twelve year old with visions of wormholes swimming in their heads. It's odd to think that a serious incorporation of wormholes was first done by Sagan-Contact-great book(who is never talked about in SF circles). The quantum foam was, I believe, first explicitly presented by Crichton in Timeline. Also a darling of the SF set.
All I'm saying is that a little diversity in the genra would be nice. I grew up on this stuff. Many of my science colleagues used to love it. In my opinion the "state of the art" is too sylized-too much of a ghetto.
Don't take anything of what I've said as personal, you are obviously a talented professional - I am just a frustrated ex-fan of the majority of what is now called SF. Some (many?) of us would rather have more choice than what is offered by the Walmartization of SF. By- the-way, last good one I read over Christmas was Joe Haldeman's "The Coming" - nice book.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Wednesday, December 29, 2004 - 04:23 pm:   

Surely Greg Egan was surfing the quantum foam well in advance of Crichton's Timeline, was he not? And his spiritual successor, Charles Stross, is the current crest of the wave of hard SF. Have you read any of his work? I think there are plenty of good works out there right now, more at least than I can manage to read and still read for Pyr! But yes, we are beginning to argue at cross-purposes.

But as to Max/Potter hybrids, the sell-through numbers on the latest Forgotten Realms novels do often dwarf those of the "real stuff." Why that is is of interest to me. Are they doing something right? Have we weened readers in the wrong direction and do we now need to retrain them? What to be learned? What to be unlearned?
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, December 30, 2004 - 09:14 am:   

I agree Greg Egan is pretty good, I've read several of his books-and enjoyed them a lot. Although, I must say, there were many conceptual errors in his presentation of the CI of quantum mechanics, such as those found in Quarantine. But it sounded good and made the story work. Crichton's version of the science is better. But both these guys are great. No, my problem is with guys like China Mieville and the other guy, you know-"Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom." These kinds of things may be dark satire, or perhaps clever-amusing to some, tiresome to others, books that purport complexity in the form of noise and over-description and indirection in a emperor-has-no-cloths feast of MTV style glitter, but they are not recognizable to me as SF (and to many others who have simply, quietly, moved on).
As to your questions:
"Why (is) that (is is) of interest to me.(?) Are they doing something right? Have we weened readers in the wrong direction and do we now need to retrain them?"
The reason I am writing in this forum is because I saw you were here and know that Prometheus books (a serious publisher) has started a new imprint that you are managing. This gives you a measure of creative control. I was hoping that you could take this occasion to not just "follow the leader" into the brave new world of video-game pop culture or Juvenile Fiction and present a "balanced selection" of thought provoking SF which is hard to find in most other places today. The sales numbers don't reflect (other than Juvenile) what many SF editors are pushing, so it must be the cool factor-which is just so much smoke.
SF in the past has been truly thought provoking and filled with believable, mature, vulnerable characters, set in believable speculative worlds that are interesting to thoughtful people (those not being medicated for ADD). It inspired many of the people who are making it "real" today - scientists and thinkers, and at least the ones I know aren't reading this stuff any more. I believe your job is not to force people in any direction, just publish a diversity of material and let the chips fall where they may - just like in real life.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Thursday, December 30, 2004 - 02:39 pm:   

You misunderstand. I believe it is the Forgotten Realms books and their ilk that may have weaned readers in the wrong direction, so that they now respond to the type of entertainment you characterize, though I disagree strongly with you on your assessment of China Miéville and Cory Doctorow, two brilliant writers who are at the vanguard of their respective genres. (I think part of your mistake is that you characterize China as a science fiction writer, which he most definitely is not, and then apply your criteria for such to him falsely).

But as to today's readers & their capabilities, I tried recently to lead an old friend, a lawyer who reads Crichton, Clancy, Grisham and their ilk, to William Gibson's recent Pattern Recognition, supposing that since it was set in present day reality, it might be a good backdoor introduction to an SF writer. He read the first page, and then thrust the book away from his body in shock, proclaiming, "Good God! That's almost literature!"

Meanwhile, your advocating of a "balanced selection" was precisely what I proposed earlier as a counter to your initial post advocating only hard SF. But please bear in mind that entertainment should be part of any diverse mix as well. Still (and again), if you know my previous work, you'd know that my tastes run to thought-provoking fiction, to explorations of genre, and that beach reading and "Mtv style glitter" really don't come into play.
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Chris Roberson
Posted on Thursday, December 30, 2004 - 04:25 pm:   

"Anonymous", it occurs to me that when making comments that might well be construed as confrontational and perhaps even a bit acerbic (to say nothing of lobbing a few dubious barbs at China and Cory, either of whom arguably falls outside of the scope of what you’re discussing), your arguments might carry a bit more weight if not posted, well, anonymously.

As one of the writers whose Pyr work you’re apparently criticizing for failing to meet up to your standards of SF, I can only recommend that you wait until the books are actually in print before holding our feet to the coals for trying too hard to be “cool.”
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Anonymous
Posted on Friday, December 31, 2004 - 11:56 am:   

Sorry, I thought we were talking about Science fiction being published by a Science book publisher-my mistake. My comments weren't meant to be personal, my central point is that the genre, as we knew it, SF that is, the SF of Clarke and Verne and Wells, that of Benford and Bear, is being eclipsed by something else. If you want to talk about dark satire or fantasy or juvenile fiction please do. It's not really of interest to me.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Tuesday, March 01, 2005 - 05:39 pm:   

The Pyr website is finally up in full at: http://www.pyrsf.com/

Besides the usual requisite information, it features book pages for the entire first season, several chapter excerpts, Q&As with authors Chris Roberson and Fiona Avery, and Sean Williams' novella "A View Before Dying," a precursor to his novel The Resurrected Man.

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montmorency
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 04:01 am:   

Just got Paradox through Japanese Amazon. Yes, I couldn't resist buying it despite I had the trilogy in British hardcovers.

I'm so happy with the very careful production of the book inside out. The only caveat is the oversized PYR logo in disharmony. :-)

I'll be getting Chris Roberson and Sean Williams next month.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 07:46 am:   

Very glad you approve.
For some reason, the UK edition gave Jim Burns' wonderful artwork a limegreen tint. We've gone back to his original intent, which has more blue tones as the painting wraps around to the back cover. I'm very, very happy with how it turned out.

Please let me know what you think of the Roberson and Williams as well when you get them.
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2005 - 03:28 pm:   

The site looks great, Lou. I'm especially looking forward to the Finlay, Roberson, Avery, and Williams novels. Nice work.
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Lou Anders
Posted on Thursday, March 03, 2005 - 07:44 pm:   

Thanks Mahesh! Much appreciated. I'll really be interested in your opinion of same - not just the books, but also the layout! We got a little funky.
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KeithB
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 11:11 am:   

Nice to see the new site, Lou - we'll have links up from infinity plus next time I update in a few days.

I particularly like the 'forthcoming' section ;-)
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John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 12:12 pm:   

Lou,

Saw a review of John Meaney's new book in Entertainment Weekly, they gave it a B+. If you want, I can send the whole thing to you.

JK
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Lou Anders
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 02:06 pm:   

Hi Keith,
thanks for the link & the love. And yes, I thought you would. In a month or so, those "forthcoming" titles will get their own book pages in the catalog and a new list will be up. I'll be excited when we can display Genetopia's cover. Brian Dow did a tremendous job with it.

And hi John. I've got the review already. But the offer is very kind & much appreciated. I was happy with the review overall, but I wish they hadn't spoiled the ending. Not that I'm grousing - I'm very glad to be in EW. And I've heard through channels that the reviewer was actually more enthusiastic about Paradox than his edited review indicated and "can't wait" for Context, the next book in the Nulapeiron Sequence (out in our second season).
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Lou Anders
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 10:55 am:   

Meanwhile, a very nice review of John Meaney's Paradox from Scifi.com, calling it a "landmark work":
http://www.scifi.com/sfw/advance/07_books.html
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Friday, April 15, 2005 - 06:33 pm:   

Lou --

Entertainment Weekly reviewed Chris Roberson this week. Here's what they said:


Here, There & Everywhere
Chris Roberson
(Prometheus, $15)

Young Roxanne Bonaventure receives a powerful bracelet that opesn bridges to branching and often divergent time lines--her actions in the past don't change the future.

Story's Little Helper: She names the bracelet Sofia, Greek for wisdom, since "these early Christian gusy called the Gnostics worshipped Sofia almost like a goddess...."

Upshot: Roberson's irreverent alternate histories of the Beatles, Sherlock Holmes, and H G Wells are a welcome stitch in the age-old time-travel tradition.

Grade: B
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Chris Roberson
Posted on Sunday, April 17, 2005 - 06:37 am:   

Hey, another coup for the Pyr publicity department. Good on them!
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Lou Anders
Posted on Sunday, April 17, 2005 - 07:41 am:   

Hey John,
Thanks very much. I appreciate you posting this. I heard the review was out yesterday, but haven't seen an issue yet. And a very nice review it is indeed. I should point out there is both a paperback and a hardcover edition out, and it looks like they only mention the former, but I'm happy to see it nonetheless.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Sunday, April 17, 2005 - 08:47 am:   

No problem!

Besides neglecting to mention the hardcover edition, I also noticed that they called the publisher Prometheus instead of Pyr, but I suppose that's close enough. :-)
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Lou Anders
Posted on Sunday, April 17, 2005 - 09:36 am:   

Argh! Last time, they listed us as "Pyr (www.prometheusbooks.com)" which is better, if still not 100%. Speaking of, the 2nd season catalog is now up for download as a PDF at www.pyrsf.com on the "catalog" and "forthcoming" pages.

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