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Melissa Mead
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 06:07 pm:   

I just saw the TOC. Congratulations!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 08:19 pm:   

Thanks, Melissa! I love Polyphony, and I'm very glad that Deborah and Jay accepted my story. It's yet another slipstreamy one . . . One of these days, I'm going to write one with a rocket ship and rayguns. (OK, maybe not . . .)
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Friday, April 22, 2005 - 05:02 am:   

I suspect I'll like this better than rocket ships and ray guns anyway.
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Josh Rountree
Posted on Friday, April 22, 2005 - 06:24 am:   

Looking forward to it!
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Robert Burke Richardson
Posted on Friday, April 22, 2005 - 05:57 pm:   

Theodora Goss and Polyphony -- always a great combination! :-)
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Alan Yee
Posted on Sunday, April 24, 2005 - 09:59 am:   

Congratulations, Dora! I also read the Polyphony 5 TOC on the Wheatland board. Three's the charm for considering yourself a regular contributor to slipstreamy Polyphony. Hope it's still around when I finally write something slipstreamy!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 10:36 pm:   

Thanks, all! Does anyone else get the impulse, in situations like this (when someone tells you, oh, I see that your story is coming out in X Magazine), to try to explain that, even though the person won't actually like your story, you've written other stories, or will probably write other stories, that the person may actually like? Including an explanation of why the person probably won't like the story in question? I mean, I get that impulse with editors, even. As in, "Dear Editor, here is a story that you probably won't like, but I'm hoping to send you other stories that you'll like, at some point in the future. I promise." I don't actually write that. But sometimes, when I've known the editor personally, I've come close.

Alan, I hope Polyphony is around too. It's a wonderful anthology.
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Scott William Carter
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 09:00 am:   

Yes, all the time. That's when I say, "Scott, take a deep breath and step away from the keyboard . . ." <g>

In my experience, writers are often the worst judges of their own work. I think it was Gardner Dozois who once said to me, "If a writer tells me in a cover letter that this is the best story he's written, then I can pretty much guarantee it's going to be crap."







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Jay Caselberg
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 01:28 pm:   

Yep, it was Gardner.
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Scott William Carter
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 04:57 pm:   

Yeah, I thought it was that short story workshop. And speaking of that, Kris and Gardner are teaching it again right now. Poor souls. They probably didn't know what hit them.
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Jay Caselberg
Posted on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - 07:06 pm:   

Heh. It were a goodly thing to do. Best workshop I've ever done.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 10:13 pm:   

In my experience, writers are often the worst judges of their own work. I think it was Gardner Dozois who once said to me, "If a writer tells me in a cover letter that this is the best story he's written, then I can pretty much guarantee it's going to be crap."

If only it worked the other way: that if your cover letter announced it was the worst story you'd ever written, it would turn out to be a definite sale. Alas.

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