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Theodora Goss
Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 10:22 am:   

Once again updated my journal page:

http://people.bu.edu/tgoss/journal.html

So now I'm up to the end of last year. Ugh. (More to come, I hope in a week or so. I hope.)

Stories coming out:

"Letters from Budapest" in Alchemy
"A Statement in the Case" in Realms of Fantasy
"The Belt" in Flytrap
"Pip and the Fairies" on Strange Horizons

And one poem:

"How Raven Made His Bride" in Coyote Road, the new Datlow/Windling anthology (hurray! I loved the last one)

And a short story collection from Prime Books, probably this fall or next spring. More on that as the details become clearer (but you'll love the cover art!) . . .
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johnpotten
Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 01:10 pm:   

New stories - yippeee!

And a tease about cover art - who can it possibly be?

Cheers

John
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 11:16 pm:   

Congratulations, Dora. I look forward to reading them, :-)

Jason
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 10:31 pm:   

John: I don't mean to make a mystery of the cover art, though I won't post anything until we have a cover to show! :-) But it's something I found and fell in love with, so I'm very happy about it.

Not so happy about the fact that we still haven't come up with a title. This has been a really tough month (at this point everyone's been sick in turn), so my brain's just not working well. Sigh.

Thanks, Jason! Now I just have to write one more story . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 08:25 pm:   

Title for the short story collection (from one of the stories): In the Forest of Forgetting

Reprints coming out:

"The Wings of Meister Wilhelm" in The Year's Best SF and Fantasy for Teens

"Miss Emily Gray" in Year's Best Fantasy 5

"The Changeling" and "What Her Mother Said" (poems) in The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighteenth Annual Collection

And a very cool poetry symposium in which I participated with Alan DeNiro and Mike Allen, moderated by Matt Cheney, coming out on Strange Horizons.
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Greg Wachausen
Posted on Saturday, April 23, 2005 - 12:16 pm:   

Any idea when the strange horizons poetry symposium will be available?
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 10:45 pm:   

Just very, very quickly:

Greg, I thought it would be another week or so, and was surprised to hear from Matt that it had gone up this morning:

http://www.strangehorizons.com/2005/20050502/poetry-symposium1-a.shtml

This is part 1 of 2. Just remember that it was originally much longer, I think about 15,000 words, and had to be cut and rearranged. Matt did a wonderful job editing, but I hope he eventually finds a way to publish an expanded version (he's mentioned that he might put parts of the conversation that didn't make it in on his blog). I mention this just because every once in a while something appears that seems like a non sequitur, but is really a response to something that had to be cut.

Anyway, hope it's interesting . . .
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Stephanie Burgis
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2005 - 01:25 am:   

Thanks for posting the Mary Coleridge poems! I'd never heard of her before, and it's a wonderful discovery. I particularly loved "The Witch" and "The Other Side of a Mirror".
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 11:05 pm:   

Hi Stephanie!

I'm so glad you like Mary Coleridge! I don't know if you'd be interested, but there's a wonderful anthology that came out a few years ago called Victorian Women Poets, edited by Angela Leighton and Margaret Reynolds. It includes all sorts of forgotten Victorian women poets, some OK, some wonderful, but all interesting in different ways. And there's another small anthology, that was actually produced as a sort of coffee-table book, with gorgeous illustrations, called Sound the Deep Waters: Women's Romantic Poetry in the Victorian Age. It's one of my favorites, and as a bonus, many of the illustrations are by forgotten Victorian women artists. I wanted to give an example of what was in it, so here's a poem by Dora Sigerson Shorter, whom I'd never heard of before I read the anthology:

Deep in the wood's recesses cool
I see the fairy dancers glide,
In cloth of gold, in gown of green,
My lord and lady side by side.

But who has flung from leaf to leaf,
From flower to flower, a silken twine--
A cloud of gray that holds the dew
In globes of clear enchanted wine?

Or stretches far from branch to branch,
From thorn to thorn, in diamond rain,
Who caught the cup of crystal pure
And hung so fair the shining chain?

'Tis death, the spider, in his net,
Who lures the dancers as they glide,
In cloth of gold, in gown of green,
My lord and lady side by side.

Both anthologies mix no-longer-known Victorian women poets with the more famous, like Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti.

And the second section of the symposium is now available on Strange Horizons:

http://www.strangehorizons.com/2005/20050509/poetry-symposium2-a.shtml
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Stephanie Burgis
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 02:06 am:   

Ooh, I'll definitely look up that anthology next time I go to the library! I like that Dora Sigerson poem a lot. (I've been studying 18th-century literature for so long now, I'd forgotten how much I used to love the Victorians!) Thanks for the recommendation!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 10:31 pm:   

Stephanie--

I hope you find it! If your library doesn't carry it, Amazon seems to have some used copies:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0821218956/qid=1115904412/sr=8-1/r ef=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/104-2954622-6395109?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

(Um, I hope that link actually works, but if not, just put the anthology title into the Amazon search box and you'll get there.)

Unfortunately, it's out of print, which is really too bad. It's a beautiful book.

Hmmm. Maybe I should start a thread for poems (no longer under copyright, of course) that people particularly like . . .

(And by the way, where are you studying 18th-century literature? And for what purpose, other than pleasure? Are you a graduate student? I'm asking in part because it's always interesting to talk to someone else on that particular interminable track . . . :-))
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 10:33 pm:   

Hurray, the link actually works!

And, just to add something announcement-y, I finally updated my journal page again . . .
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Stephanie Burgis
Posted on Friday, May 13, 2005 - 03:59 am:   

Hi Theodora,
I'm a grad student at the University of Leeds (England), nearing the end of the third (and final????????) year of my PhD in opera studies, studying eighteenth-century opera as literature/political statement/music/etc. Officially, I may even finish it by August or September. But oh how interminable it feels right now...

(And I'm a spec fic writer too. So I'm always particularly interested in spec fic being written by other grad students!)
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 08:57 pm:   

Hi all!

Eric Marin sent me an email a while back, part of which went,

"Speaking of poetry, I decided to start a little webzine of speculative poetry reviews, MultiVerse (http://multiverse.erictmarin.com) that you might enjoy perusing someday when you actually have a moment to breathe."

I did enjoy perusing it, and Eric gave me permisson to link to it, so here's the link. Glad to have one more site talking about spec poetry!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 09:08 pm:   

Hi Stephanie!

I wish my PhD were three years long . . . Although if it were, I think they would have tossed me out long ago. Your field sounds fascinating. I hope you incorporate some of it into stories? I would love fantasy (if that's what you write) that involved operas, or opera singers . . . That would feel fresh and inventive. I can't quite imagine science fiction involving operas or opera singers, but it would be interesting to try. And come to think of it, there is The Ship Who Sang, although I don't know if she sang opera.

Yes, I love hearing about what other grad students are doing. It's like comparing notes with someone who's been on the same, I dunno, SF prison planet. We can all talk about the same barbarian warlords, and trecks over mountain ranges, and that sort of thing. Let me know if you have any stories out there . . .
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 11:27 pm:   

Have you read _Maskerade_, by Terry Pratchett? It's a Discworld novel that parodies Phantom of the Opera, and lists opera's Three Flaws:

1) The plots don't make sense.

2) We only think the words are so beautiful because we don't know what they mean.

3) Everybody takes half an hour to die.

IIRC, it's pretty much a stand-alone book.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Tuesday, May 17, 2005 - 11:34 pm:   

Speaking of Phantom of the Opera, has anyone seen the movie version that came out recently? The Phantom there was not what I would call hidesouly disfigured--more like he had a burn rash on the right side of his face. He certainly didn't hold a candle to the Lon Chaney version (good ol' Lon Chaney!)--nor, indeed, to King Baldwin IV in "Kingdom of Heaven."
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Stephanie Burgis
Posted on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 - 01:53 am:   

I loved _Maskerade_! It was hilarious. But yeah, the new Phantom was really disappointing--especially because the actor who played the Phantom had the weakest singing voice of just about anyone in the movie. (No scary face, no great voice...sigh...)

The short stories I've gotten published so far haven't had music in them, sadly, but I do have an opera-history novel (Haydn, alchemy, romance, more magic, murder) waiting for a decision right now. (Tapping fingers, much nervousness...)

And I just got email notification from my library that a copy of _Victorian Women Poets_ has come in for me! Yay! (Motivation to get this thesis chapter *finished* so that I can leave the computer and go into campus to pick it up!)

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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 24, 2005 - 01:43 pm:   

My Wiscon schedule:

37 The Illusion of Independent Agency: Do Writers Experience Their Characters as Having Minds of Their Own?
Writing SF&F: The Craft•Conference Room 4• Saturday, 10:00–11:15 a.m.
An article by this title recently appeared in the journal Imagination, Cognition and Personality summarizing the results of a study on adult fiction writers and their perceptions about whether their characters have "independent agency"—characters are not just a fiction under the complete control of the writer. One third of writers in the study said their characters had independent agency, reporting that: they just watch the characters and write what they see/hear, characters do things writers don't want them to do (like change the plot), and characters step out of role to talk (or argue) with the writers. The other two thirds of writers said their characters are definitely not real or independent: characters are created by listing attributes, basing them on real–life models, or role playing to flesh them out. Participants discuss their personal experiences with character agency.
M: Maureen F. McHugh, Theodora Goss, Gavin J. Grant, Jennifer D.B. Lackey, Jan L. Schubert

67 Creation and Procreation
Writing SF&F: The Craft•Conference Room 5• Saturday, 2:30–3:45 p.m.
Do babies eat your brain? How does the transition into parenthood affect your ability to do creative work that requires personal space? An honest discussion of the practical aspects of parenting and writing, with some wider implications thrown in. For writers who are thinking about becoming parents (or vice versa): You are not alone. We'll tell you what it's like for us.
M: Karen Meisner, Barth Anderson, Haddayr Copley–Woods, Theodora Goss, Naomi Kritzer

87 Women on the Edge
Readings•Conference Room 2• Saturday, 9:00–10:15 p.m.
Edgy, inventive stories from four writers on the edge: Of fantasy and science fiction! Of fame, and possibly fortune! (Well, we hope.) And sometimes, of falling apart . . . About characters on the edge of understanding, of love and madness, of disintegration.
Haddayr Copley–Woods, Theodora Goss, Maureen F. McHugh, Karen Meisner

102 Back to Basics: Character
Writing SF&F: The Craft•Wisconsin• Sunday, 8:30–9:45 a.m.
Let's talk about character. How are convincing characters constructed? Is convincing the same thing as realistic? What makes people love or hate a character?
M: Theodora Goss, Virginia G. McMorrow, Debbie Notkin, Caroline Stevermer

If you're there, come say hello!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 24, 2005 - 01:44 pm:   

p.s. There should be chocolate at the reading! So come for the chocolate, if not the fabulous literature . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, July 05, 2005 - 09:14 pm:   

Will be at Readercon this weekend. I'll post my schedule as soon as I have some time . . .
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Alan Yee
Posted on Thursday, July 07, 2005 - 10:02 am:   

Since Dora will apparently be absent this weekend, I thought Dora's Dedicated Fan Base might like to know that she is listed at Locus Online as an author in the August 2005 issue of _Realms of Fantasy_. The story is titled "A Statement in the Case." Dora, does this story include your own lawyer experiences?

Buy a copy (my local Barnes & Noble carries _Realms_), or better yet, subscribe (as I plan on doing soon)!

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Alan Yee
Posted on Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 05:12 pm:   

Forget about the lawyer question. I just finally read the new Realms, and your story wasn't what I had expected from the title. Now I understand what the title was referring to. Stupid me.

P.S. One of the Tangent Online reviewers really liked it!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Monday, July 18, 2005 - 10:32 pm:   

Can't believe it--I actually managed to update parts of my website today, including the journal page. Of course most of it is still terribly behind . . .

I never did manage to post my Readercon schedule, for which many apologies, but it was a wonderful convention, as always.

Alan, maybe someday I will use the legal stuff I still have floating around somewhere in my brain in a story. ("Stuff," of course, being a term of art . . .) But you're right, "Statement" isn't so much about anything legal.

I have a Dedicated Fan Base? If so, I should send them all chocolate! Wry smiley face: :-)

And a final announcement, which I'm very happy about: the first printing of The Rose in Twelve Petals & Other Stories is almost sold out. It will be reprinted, but if you want a first edition (just in case I become famous some day, you never know . . .), this is the time to get it. There are, I believe, less than twenty left.
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Tuesday, July 19, 2005 - 06:37 pm:   

*grins* I'm all for chocolate, especially dark chocolate. -Em
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Alan Yee
Posted on Saturday, July 23, 2005 - 03:11 pm:   

"(just in case I become famous some day, you never know . . .)"

Ah, come on, *you* may not be really famous yet, but lots of famous people like you (famous in SF World at least)... Ellen Datlow who says you are one of three writers she is sad to never receive stories from... Terri Windling... James Patrick Kelly... *Those* people are in your Dedicated Fan Base! Plus a bunch of other writers... give all the reviewers chocolate!

"There are, I believe, less than twenty left."

Really? You have almost 400 fans? That's a good start, for a chapbook. I told you people like you!

"*grins* I'm all for chocolate, especially dark chocolate. -Em"

I'm not getting chocolate on my First Edition Chapbook! (You see the fascination of using CAPS that I see a lot online?)
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philipfoster
Posted on Wednesday, August 10, 2005 - 12:25 am:   

Hey remember me? So sorry for not posting in so long, my life`s been kind of hectic (in a nutshell - moved to Northern Japan to teach English in the city of Sapporo, so only just got reconnected to the internet - this is a nutshell that like the house in `Little, Big` is much bigger on the inside!) However, any mention of chocolate always catches my attention (milk chocolate especially). Sadly, I think Japan might be a little too far to send chocolate...
PS Congragulations on the WF Award nomination.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Sunday, August 28, 2005 - 09:21 pm:   

Philip: Mine too! I mean, life being hectic. But congratulations on the move to Japan, which sounds fabulous.

I was thinking about houses that are bigger on the inside than on the outside, and wondering which literary houses are that way--because I'm thinking about writing a story in which there's a house like that. Are there any other houses like that? I know the inside is often bigger than the outside in Madeleine L'Engle stories . . . And it sounds like the sort of thing that could happen in Lewis Carroll or George MacDonald.

In other news, in case anyone's interested, I'm trying to update my long-neglected website once a week now. So far, so good (but it's only been two weeks).
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Eric Marin
Posted on Sunday, August 28, 2005 - 09:58 pm:   

Dora, you might enjoy reading _The High House_ by James Stoddard for an example of a house far larger than its exterior would indicate.
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philipfoster
Posted on Sunday, August 28, 2005 - 10:51 pm:   

Some books and stories deal with space in a similar way to that of Crowley@- the `Little, Big ` idea. `Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell` plays with notions of space a lot with all its mirrors (also very Jean Cocteau) and Robert Holdstocks Mythago books feature a forest which is (much) bigger on the inside than the outside and also extends its boundaries through time as well as space. Earlier this year I read a marvelous book called `The Fox Woman` by Kij Johnson, which is set@in ancient Japan and based on a traditional Japanese fairy tale about the `Kitsune` (the Fox woman of the title). The kitsune constructs a house and garden which are in fact in reality just a small burrow in the ground but seems to@include a luxurious house complete with ornamental gardens. Here a noble japanese man, her lover lives under an enchantment. The paintings of Max Escher and Peter Milton also play with space in ways which remind of these stories (probably why Milton has been chosen to illustrate the new edition of `Little, Big`).

And what about Kelly link`s `Faery Handbag`?
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 05:46 am:   

Mmm, I love The Fox Woman. Rereading it now, actually. The magic in that isn't just bigger on the inside than on the outside, though; it's also the sort of thing you can't think about too much, because otherwise it would probably give you a headache. (Makes me glad I am not a fox in love with a man.)

Have you read Fudoki? It was good as well, though The Fox Woman is my favorite (for reasons that have more to do with me and less to do with the books themselves). And the story with the bees.... -Em
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philipfoster
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 02:30 am:   

I haven't read 'Fudoki' yet but I do have it. I'm living in Japan at the moment so it's definetly one I'm going to read during my time here.

So have you read any other books like these? The works of Patricia A. McKillip have a similar feel I think :-)
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 11:20 pm:   

The magic in The Fox Woman reminds me a lot of other things I've read about Faery, particularly the idea of fancy dinners and ballgowns that are really rotting leaves, etc. I seem to recall at least some of that sort of fairy stuff in Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, but it's been a while since I read it and I may be misremembering.

I don't believe I've ever read anything by Patricia A McKillip. Anything you would particularly recommend? -Em
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philipfoster
Posted on Monday, September 05, 2005 - 10:17 pm:   

I`m sure Theodora could recommend a few? by Patricia A. McKillip as well. I`d opt for `The Book of Atrix Wolf` and `Winter Rose` (which updates the Tam Lin story and has a similar romantic feel to that of`The Fox Woman`). She`s written many fine novels and short stories and seems to release a new book every year (and a collection of her short stories is long overdue). Another nice thing about her books is the attractive packaging, with gorgeous art by Kinuko Y. Craft (especially try and get the hardcovers if you can). I love `Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell` so much, really a book I didn`t want to end (even at 800 pages).
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jilli
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 04:16 pm:   

I remember Theodora talking about "The Shadow of Ombria" positivly on this board. I have to concer, it's beautiful. The only problem I have with McKillip is that she's an awfully subtle writer, and I've found that I need to re-read her novels again to fully appreciate what actually happened. That being, McKillip is one of my favorite authors, and I hope that you enjoy her.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 09:33 pm:   

So sorry, the past week had included bronchitis, a trip to Colorado for a wedding, and preparing to teach . . .

I loved Ombria in Shadow. I haven't read Alphabet of Thorn, but Steve Pasechnick recommended it to me, and he has awfully good taste. :-) I love Patricia McKillip's writing, but sometimes it's too beautiful for me--I feel as though I lose the meaning in the words (I felt that way while reading Winter Rose). But I agree that a collection of her short stories is long overdue. Anyone know of one?

I also really liked Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norell. And thanks for all the suggestions!
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 10:02 pm:   

The collection, Harrowing the Dragon, will be published by Ace in hardcover this November. I know galleys have gone out and, with a little luck, copies should be available in time for World Fantasy. She should also have a new novel out early in next year.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 09:22 am:   

Great, yet another thing I'll be spending money on in Madison! :-)

Meanwhile, "Pip and the Fairies" is now up on Strange Horizons:

http://www.strangehorizons.com/2005/20051003/goss-f.shtml
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Jason Erik Lundberg
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 12:42 pm:   

This was a wonderful story, Dora. I'm really looking forward to your upcoming collection.
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Eric Marin
Posted on Wednesday, October 05, 2005 - 06:46 pm:   

I really enjoyed "Pip and the Fairies," Dora. It reminded me of my own childhood wish to find a door to another world in the back of a dark closet or among jumbled rocks.
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Thursday, October 06, 2005 - 02:33 pm:   

I loved it!
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Beth Adele Long
Posted on Saturday, October 08, 2005 - 12:01 pm:   

I too loved "Pip and the Fairies," especially having read and loved Pip stories from your journal.

My apologies if this has been addressed elsewhere, but I must know: is there a novel in the works, perhaps?
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Christopher Barzak
Posted on Saturday, October 08, 2005 - 06:18 pm:   

"Pip and the Fairies" was great. And if there isn't a novel in the works, it would be great material to work into the form of a novel. Just saying... ;-)
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Wednesday, October 12, 2005 - 11:30 am:   

Hi there. I just wanted to pop in and say I really enjoyed "Pip and the Fairies." Perfect ending. I've been a big fan of your short stories for awhile now, especially "The Wings of Meister Wilhelm," "Lily, With Clouds," and "The Rapid Advance of Sorrow."

Looking forward to your new collection, and congrats on your WFC nomination. :-)
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2005 - 05:36 pm:   

Just read "Pip and the Fairies." Excellent, Dora. The ambiguous ending in particular was very well done.

Jason
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Luís
Posted on Monday, October 17, 2005 - 02:10 am:   

Hey, look for me at the World Fantasy Convention:

In the Forest of Forgetting
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Jason Erik Lundberg
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 11:18 am:   

Yay! Who did the cover art?
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Luís
Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 08:08 pm:   

Virginia Lee: http://www.virginialee.net/
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Friday, October 21, 2005 - 10:26 pm:   

Thanks so much to everyone for all the kind words on "Pip"! :-)

And thanks, Luis, for posting the cover of the advance copy! I think the cover of the collection itself will be the illustration that you see in the cartouche, with title etc. But that's in the hands of those brilliant men, Luis and Sean. Here's the Virginia Lee illustration in its full glory:

http://www.virginialee.net/landscapes/nature%27s%20cycle.html

I fell in love with it the first time I saw it!

There's no Pip novel so far, though Vandana Singh once suggested that I should write the actual stories that are mentioned. That might be fun. But I have been working like mad on finishing the novella that will conclude the collection, called "Lessons With Miss Gray." It's sort of YA, sort of dark YA, and I've been told THAT should be a novel. So I guess I really need to write a novel of some sort . . .

And my apologies to everyone I haven't been getting back to!!! And everyone I haven't responded to here. It's been a really tough semester--well, actually it's been a really tough two years, but at the moment I'm teaching, writing (sort of), working on a variety of different projects, each with deadlines, and taking care of a currently (1:22 a.m.) howling child (a charming howl, but a howl) who doesn't particularly want to be in bed. It's been exhausting. I try to catch up, but I can never seem to get the emails in my inbox under fifty, no matter how many I answer. So, if I haven't gotten back to you about something, please know that I'm heaping ashes on my head. I feel really, really guilty (something I'm especially good at anyway).

And now I think the howling child will have to be taken out of her crib so we can watch yet another two hours of Spirited Away . . .

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