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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 - 08:49 pm:   

I've been so erratic lately at responding on this board (and even more so by email) that I thought I should keep a sort of log of why my life is a mess at any give time. It's been a mess for a while now . . .

Today:

One year visit with the pediatrician. Two shots. One test. Did you know that, if a baby cries hard enough, she can turn magenta? Sleep last night: four hours, because there was work I needed to get done. So I came home this afternoon and fell deeply asleep (while Kendrick took care of Pip), woke up and realized it was late again and there was more work I needed to get done. Instead, I sat down and wrote this.

Pip report: teething. Seriously teething.

So if I haven't written back, here or elsewhere, you now know why . . . :-)
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Alan Yee
Posted on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 - 09:31 am:   

First-Time-Mother Syndrome... Oh my... We do wish you luck (you'll need a lot, but based on what's happened already, you'll make it). Sorry, I'd better practice writing before I lose my creative juices (I'm halfway through a 9-day vacation from school)!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Sunday, February 27, 2005 - 07:36 pm:   

Birthday party involving three one-year-olds. What, I ask, is the point of presents, when the best thing to play with is wrapping paper? Cake, cake everywhere.

Dissertation deadline. Oh my.

So sorry, all.

Alan, hope you're having a great vacation!
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Sunday, February 27, 2005 - 10:11 pm:   

Happy Birthday to your little tyke, Dora. May it be the first of many, and may they all be happy. :-)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, February 28, 2005 - 05:00 pm:   

Oh my indeed. Sounds everyone but you had a great time :-)
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Monday, February 28, 2005 - 05:24 pm:   

Sounds like the best present is a box full of wrapping paper.
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Deborah Roggie
Posted on Monday, February 28, 2005 - 07:17 pm:   

Mine turned, not magenta, but brick red, right out of the Crayola box. And he had a peculiarly piercing scream that made me sweat and my heart start beating extra fast. I was prepared to do *anything* to get him to stop. I could pick his scream out of a crowd. Evolution knew what it was doing.

At one, the best toy was a cloth diaper. You could play peek-a-boo, tickle, tug, and forty other games. It became my son's security blanket, and since we kept a dozen on hand, a missing cloth was easily replaced.

At two, the best present is a big, sturdy, cardboard box. You can put the toddler inside and slide it along the carpet, giving him a ride. It can be a house or a boat or a cave.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Monday, March 07, 2005 - 10:12 pm:   

Thanks, all!

Actually, it was fun, though exhausting. My first children's birthday party (I mean, on the parental end of things). By the end, the floor was knee-deep in stuffed animals (not presents, she just has a lot of stuffed animals).

Yes! A box of wrapping paper is an excellent present indeed. As are cloth diapers and cardboard boxes. Also good are old magazines (for eating), spoons of various sorts, and shoes. You can drop things into shoes.

Life's still messy, but I'm trying to catch up . . .

(Yes, every once in a while I click past a nanny show on my way to something intellectual and pretentious, like Mystery!, and the nanny is always telling the mother to let her child cry. Now, if you've ever heard a child cry, you'll know that it's a particularly piercing phenomenon, which ordinary people can stand for about two minutes. Which just goes to show that reality TV is nothing like real life . . . :-))
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 10:09 am:   

Computer meltdown. I think Skynet is becoming aware. :-(
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Robert Burke Richa
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 04:07 pm:   

^Skynet will become aware in 2012 -- the Mayans totally called it!

^^I hate the super-nanny! Can't wait until one of those traumatized children grows up and takes vengence.
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Robert Burke Richardson
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 04:11 pm:   

^Hmmm.

That should say "Richardson." Maybe I should just use RBR?
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 08:08 pm:   

Hard drive being replaced. Since I'm not technically literate, Kendrick explained: "It's like, the holodeck took over your ship. We have to shut down the warp engines until the holodeck can be repaired." Or something like that.

It should be fixed tomorrow. If it really is the holodeck, that is . . . (Meanwhile, here I am on impulse power, on an old, slooooow computer.)

I should clarify: it's not really Mystery! that's pretentious, but my "well, it's TV, but it's, y'know, PBS." We all cling to some illusions . . . And I have a theory about those terrible nanny shows. Which is, I think all of those poor kids are bored to death. They all seem to be toddlers who don't go to preschool, and whose parents never take them anywhere. I would scream and kick too!
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 11:30 pm:   

PBS gave us Doctor Who and Red Green. Can we really call them pretentious?

(Of course, compared to Jerry Springer, anything's upper crust...)
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2005 - 09:06 pm:   

Dissertation deadline met. Computer working.

Pip sick with a stomach virus.

Any moment now, a meteor is going to hit, and then the chaos will be complete . . .

Yes, and Red Dwarf. But on the other hand, to be fair, here in Boston we have weeks of British Comedy, especially around pledge time, and any chanel that presents Keeping Up Appearances as high art is pretty darn pretentious. (But I admit to my own pretentiousness for looking down my nose at the dregs of network television, since on nights of complete exhaustion I'm capable of watching almost anything but professional wrestling. Though, since we don't have cable, my choices are pretty limited . . .)

A clarification on those bored kids: they never seem to have any of the things that, when I was a child, gave life meaning: books, pets, art supplies, trees in the backyard that you could pretend castles and spaceships in, a creek for Robinson Crusoeing, even dance and music lessons. And I remember being taken everywhere, I suspect because my mother had no desire to spend weekends in a house with two whining children. In my memories, if not in real life, every weekend during my childhood was spent either at a museum (usually boring, since I had no taste for modern art) or the zoo.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Thursday, March 17, 2005 - 11:47 pm:   

What amazes me is the money some people spend on their kids these days. Video games, cell phones (now *there's* a financial black hole; I'm too cheap to get one for myself, never mind any kids I'll ever have). The rule of thumb seems to be, if kids whine enough, they can get whatever they want. With my folks, "No" meant "No."

PBS in Minnesota broadcasts British Comedy too. For some reason, it lists Red Green, a Canadian show, among them (it's part of the Commonwealth, I suppose). Myself, I mostly watch 24, Lost, and the new Battlestar Galactica. (Edward James Olmos, who plays Commander Adama, is a brilliant actor. I think it's a testament to an actor's ability how much he can convey with dead silence.)
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jill krupnik
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 10:20 am:   

Jason,

You assume that the video games are for the children. The only reason my family even owned a nintendo system was that my dad wanted one. And cell phones aren't all that bad. I'm sure one of the reasons parents get them for their children is for the parent's peace of mind.

But really, aren't we just coming up with a new version of the "in my day, I had to walk barefoot fifteen miles in the snow and it was uphill both ways!"


-jill
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 04:10 pm:   

I got a cell phone when I went away to a writing workshop for the first time--it was my first time being away from home for anywhere near that long, let alone flying to another state to stay with a bunch of people I didn't know.

Plus, my parents wanted me to be able to call them from school, or if I was out with a friend. Or, y'know, when I learned to drive, except I still haven't gotten around to that last one....
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Friday, March 18, 2005 - 10:57 pm:   

Jill,

You speak as if I'm over the hill. My parents were of the Woodstock generation (though they were the only members of their generation who *didn't* go to Woodstock. Too busy working for a living and raising kids). :-)

I suppose I can see parents giving their kids cell phones for peace of mind. Still, it chafes against my native frugality. To each their own, I guess.

Jason
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 09:44 am:   

Jason, you haven't even begun exploring the possibilities! You can now buy toy cellphones for toddlers. Toy laptops. Laptops that aren't toys, but actually work.

That said, I would definitely buy a cellphone for my daughter. The world is too scary nowadays.

I can't blame parents for spending money on their children. It's one way of showing that you love and want the best for them, though not perhaps the most direct way. For me, it's really more a question of what you buy. We tend to splurge on books. (And if you think cellphones are expensive! I spend more on books each month than on my cellphone bill.)
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 06:05 pm:   

Well, yes, but today's kids are missing out on some neat toys, too. Lincoln Logs, for instance (the wooden kind, not the cheap plastic stuff they have now). And those big yellow metal Tonka dump trucks with the six-inch wheels. They make them out of plastic these days too, the Phillistines. >:-\

Of course, they do have Transformers (though, when they first came out in 1984, I built my own out of cardboard. They really transformed, too). And when I was little, my dad soldered a trailer hitch to my tricycle and built a wooden trailer to pull behind it. (It helped that he was well-versed in carpentry and metalworking. He was an auto mechanic by trade, though.)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 06:20 pm:   

Jason,
I'm of the Woodstock generation and missed it. I think I was in Europe during the event. I watched 2001 in a London movie theater when it opened.

(and I don't own a cel phone but my parents just got one and I had to help them program it)
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 06:22 pm:   

Lincoln Logs, for instance (the wooden kind, not the cheap plastic stuff they have now).

What? They make them out of plastic? Sacrilege! I definitely played with wooden Lincoln Logs, and so did my little brothers, and, and... plastic? When did that happen?
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 06:26 pm:   

The really upsetting thing for me is not so much the changes in toys, but the changes in playgrounds. Some of the coolest playgrounds in my town definitely became boring when they redid them. Yes, they're probably safer now, but there's no scope for the imagination. One can only go down a slide so many times, and there are no more good little corners where you can hide, or just get away from people. There's not really much to do with them, and they're too dull to be proper castles, or military outposts, or anything interesting.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 07:21 pm:   

Sorry, I meant that "hey, toy cell phones!" with a sarcastic emoticon. Not the sort of thing I would buy for my child.

We used to wander around in the woods, playing in the creek, with stones and bark and berries. Lots of pretend. I don't know, do parents let kids do that nowadays? We used to ride off on our bikes, and come back before dinner time. I don't think that happens anymore.

Good toys: we used to make paper dolls, which was a lot of fun--anything we could make ourselves. I had a whole house of clothespin dolls I made once, which I was quite proud of, since I did all the decorating and clothes etc. (The house was an old dresser, but if you took the drawers out it looked exactly like a townhouse with rooms.) I had a whole Addams family: the mother was a witch, the father was a vampire, the grandmother was a mummy, etc. But mostly our toys were things like the sofa cushions, which we used to make a fort, or sticks for swords--we had legos, but the make-believe games were the best.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 07:39 pm:   

"I'm of the Woodstock generation and missed it. I think I was in Europe during the event."

Well, yeah. I meant my statement in the "if all the pieces of the True Cross were put together, we'd have a heck of a huge cross" sort of way. With every year that passes by, more and more people claim to have been at Woodstock. %-)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 09:20 pm:   

Remember when Mr Potato Head was actually made of a potato. Is there really a good reason that they now make him out of plastic? It was fun sticking the plastic ears, nose and mouth into a real potato and hearing it squish!
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Saturday, March 19, 2005 - 09:24 pm:   

I don't know, do parents let kids do that nowadays? We used to ride off on our bikes, and come back before dinner time. I don't think that happens anymore.

I think it depends on where you live. I live in a pretty quiet town and there are neighborhoods where all the kids know each other because there were lots of families all together, so the kids could play with each other. In kindergarten, in my old town, I had a couple of friends I would go to play with because they lived right nearby.

Now, though, my brothers and I might decide to bike someplace, but we usually tell our parents where we're going and how long it'll take. My parents also worry less as we get older, and they worry less about me than they do about my brothers, and they worry less if we're with friends than if we're alone....
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 06:44 am:   

Do kids still keep costume trunks for dress-up?

Last weekend my sisters and I introduced a family friend to "bubble tents." You drape one end of a sheet over a box fan, weight the edges with books (leaving one space for a door), turn on the fan and-instant tent!

We used to do that at my grandma Mead's. Grandma also taught us how to make our own play-dough.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Sunday, March 20, 2005 - 10:48 pm:   

Speaking of Mr. Potato Head, now they have Darth Tater. No kidding.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 07:49 am:   

That's pretty funny.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 10:32 pm:   

Hunh? I just wrote a message, and then it suddenly disappeared. I think it went something like this:

"Remember when Mr Potato Head was actually made of a potato."

I only remember the plastic version, but I was seven when we moved to the US, so I missed a lot of toys and TV shows. A real potato would be so much better. You could put the nose anywhere, not just in the nose slot. Alien potato heads!

"Do kids still keep costume trunks for dress-up?"

Dress-up was the best! Ophelia already likes dressing up, sort of. She'll take a scarf and wrap it around herself in different ways. It's very haute couture . . .

Speaking of childhood, I have very fond memories of Andre Norton's books. I was so sorry to hear that she passed away. But I have to add that if I die in my nineties, I want to die with a new book in press, just like her . . . That's gallant.

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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 07:17 am:   

Can the plastic Mr Potato Head parts still be used with real potatoes? What kind of bits do they have that attach them to the plastic one?

Andre Norton got to hold that new book before she died.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 07:37 am:   

I understand Andre Norton was cremated along with copies of her first and last books.
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 02:25 pm:   

You probably could use the plastic parts on real potatoes. They're on plastic stalks. Depends how sturdy the plastic is, I suppose. I'll bet you could at least make a "Mr. Apple Head."

Speaking of plastic, they don't make wooden Tinkertoys any more, either. ;(
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 05:01 pm:   

Melissa,
Wood is probably too expensive ...
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 06:17 pm:   

Maybe that's it. The only reason I could think of is that the wooden ones get sharp pointy edges when you break them.

(I used to make bows and arrows out of mine. Using a too-tight rubber band was a good way to produce lots of sharp splintery points.)
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 09:17 pm:   

"(I used to make bows and arrows out of mine. Using a too-tight rubber band was a good way to produce lots of sharp splintery points.)"

All the good childhood toys are dangerous . . . :-) OK, that's not literally true, but we made a lot of swords and bows n' arrows.

I'm trying to dig my desk out from under a mountain of paper, so I can actually get some productive work done, and I found the following list of children's stories that were recommended on a website. I think it was the website of a writer named Franny Billingsley (www.frannybillinglsley.com)? Sorry, it's been at least six months since I've looked at this particular piece of paper . . .

Here are the stories. Anyone familiar with these?

The Land of Green Ginger--Noel Langley
Once on a Time--A.A. Milne
Carbonel--Barbara Sleigh
The Magic Pudding--Norman Lindsay
The Twilight of Magic--Hugh Lofting
The Dolls' House--Rumer Godden

I think I read Carbonel, long ago. I think Carbonel was a magical black cat. But I'm not sure. If it's the book I'm thinking about, I remember it fondly . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 - 09:18 pm:   

Swift, Dora.

www.frannybillingsley.com
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Sarah Miller
Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 07:04 pm:   

"We used to wander around in the woods, playing in the creek, with stones and bark and berries. Lots of pretend. I don't know, do parents let kids do that nowadays? We used to ride off on our bikes, and come back before dinner time. I don't think that happens anymore."

My sister and I grew up in the middle of the woods, pretty much, and that sounds like a pretty good description of our childhood when the weather was nice enough to spend lots of time outdoors. Except for the bikes, because I didn't learn how to stop on a bike until I was eleven or so. Before that, I just fell off whenever I wanted to stop.

When we did actually play with toys, we tended to be recreating things we'd read. The only game I remember ever playing with Barbie dolls involved the Phantom of the Opera, and all of my sister's stuffed animals are named after characters from Robin Hood. (Most of mine are, too, except for Bagheera the panther and Nazareth the panda.)

My sister is a craftsy person, and she makes dolls, so we've been playing with those for a long time too.
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 07:51 pm:   

Barbie does Phantom-I love that!

I used to write plays for my sisters' Barbie dolls-and coax/cajole/bully them into acting them out on tape with me.

The first one was about Hitler. Pretty scary, now that I think of it. (Both the subject matter and my ignorance of history at the time.)The rest had wizards and magic spells in them.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 11:12 pm:   

And now, in the "No, I'm not kidding" department, I saw Lord of the Rings Barbie (dressed like Galadriel) in a video store.

Tolkien must be rolling in his grave. Lord of the Rings RISK, LOTR Stratego, those are great ideas, but this...
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Em Tersoff
Posted on Friday, March 25, 2005 - 08:27 am:   

The only game I remember ever playing with Barbie dolls involved the Phantom of the Opera

Heh, I acted stuff out with Barbies sometimes. I only had three, though, and two of them were (Disney's) Aladdin and Jasmine, and I got rather bored with that. Felicity had more clothes, and Playmobil were infinitely better when it came to acting out large stories with lots of people and places.

Actually, some of the few games my brother and I really played together when we were young involved playmobil; we would each use our respective collections and have people meet, talk to each other, go on adventures together... until we got tired of each other, and then it stopped being so friendly. :P
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, March 31, 2005 - 10:26 pm:   

All I remember doing with my Ballerina Barbie is cutting her hair off. Punk Ballerina Barbie (it stuck up in blond tufts).

Lord of the Rings Barbie. I don't know if that's actually worthwhile (imagine all the little girls who would otherwise have gotten California Surfer Barbie or Hairdresser's Dream Barbie or whatever), or just awful. My favorite Barbie reference is in the second Addams family movie. Anyone else remember it?
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 10:57 pm:   

Just a thought: Life would be SO much easier if I could get to sleep, just once, before two in the morning! But the deadlines never seem to stop coming . . .

Every once in a while, I come across someone saying, in a blog or somewhere, that REAL writers don't complain about not having time to write. REAL writers rearrange their priorities, and make the time.

Which I think is a lovely, though sentimental, way to think about writers (all determined, up in their attics, eating moldy cheese for their art). The REAL writers I've met complain about lots of things, including plumbing, and advances, and not having time to write. Thank goodness, or I'd have to stop thinking of myself as a REAL writer.

And that, in lieu of responding to anyone's posts, is my thought for the night . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Friday, April 15, 2005 - 11:31 pm:   

So sorry, it's been a frantic sort of month. But I'm going to try to respond to at least one message every day, until I'm caught up . . .

In the meantime, I thought this was an interesting article on Lovecraft in the (of all places) Wall Street Journal:

http://www.opinionjournal.com/la/?id=110006424

Interesting, I mean, as an example of someone trying to write with sympathy and understanding about a writer whose underlying philosophy he thinks is fundamentally wrong. (At least that's what I read between the lines . . .)

And I think this is a great (and true) sentence:

"But there's nothing creepier or more terrifying than the possibility that our lives are exercises in meaninglessness."

I think that hits the Lovecraft nail exactly on the head.
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Richard Parks
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 06:44 am:   

True as it goes, but there's another way to look at it, an aspect of the underlying philosophy of Lovecraft that hit me as a revelation growing up, and why I still have a sentimental fondness for HPL despite his flaws. I came from a background which taught that everything we did was weighed in the balance against us and, try as we might, we'd never measure up to what the Divine Enforcers thought we should be. Then along comes HPL, and every one of his stories sang a different tune: "The Universe doesn't give a fig about us and we don't matter. We're on our own." I didn't find this creepy OR terrifying. I found it a tremendous relief.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 09:03 pm:   

Richard--

Good point. My husband's grandfather was a Baptist minister, and as a child Kendrick was given the message that God Was Watching, whatever he did and wherever he went. And not just Watching but Judging. I think he resented the intrusiveness of it, the feeling of living in 1984. He responded rather as you did, not to Lovecraft but to science. I think he found it tremendously freeing, being able to rely on observed phenomena rather than faith (his grandfather, when Kendrick mentioned that he was studying DNA, would explain how genetic defects made our generation live shorter lives than Noah, and that sort of thing). He also found the idea that the universe doesn't give a fig about us a source of relief.

What I respond to in Lovecraft is the idea that the universe is stranger than I can imagine. I mean, I just read in a National Geographic column that gender, in platypi, is determined by five genes! What I love about Lovecraft is that he says exactly that: the universe is stranger than anyone on this relatively small planet, living in this relatively short moment in time, can imagine--even our planet is stranger than that. So say the platypi.

Also, for me, there's a message hidden in his writing, which isn't always easy to tease out. You see it in a story called "The Outsider" and in "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" (if I spelled that right)--also in the Randolph Carter stories. It's something like this. So, you look in the mirror and discover, like the Outsider or the protagonist in "The Shadow Over Innsmouth," that you're a monster. You're related to Shuggoths or ancient sea monsters or something. Or you're a ghoul. Whatever. But there's a whole world of monsters out there for you to join, and the world of monsters is actually cooler, more interesting, more real, than the world of illusory safety that ordinary people live in.

This is something I found particularly reassuring as a teenager, when I started reading Lovecraft. I suspect that the experience of looking into a mirror and deciding that you're a monster (hideous, outcast, etc.) is fairly common when you're a teenager. Or at least, the sense of feeling that you're different, that you don't quite fit into, not only the culture around you (school, your family), but the larger world out there. Lovecraft says, there's an alternate world of the imagination where you fit in quite well. In fact, it's where you belong. That's part of what I got from him.

Sorry, I didn't mean to make this message so long. I actually meant most of it to be an apology for not posting long messages just now, because I have a teething baby. (Teething = not sleeping, at least not through the night.) And then I wrote a long one . . .

But I do want to add one thought. You mentioned Lovecraft's flaws, but I find that the writers I love, I love because of their flaws. I wouldn't trade Poe's style for clean, clear Hemingwayesque prose any day of the week. Or Lovecraft's style. I love Austen because she doesn't tackle the big political or social issues of her day, because she focuses on the everyday, on ordinary life. I wouldn't want her to be Eliot. (I admire Eliot, but I don't love her.) I add this just because everyone mentions Lovecraft's flaws, but I wouldn't want him to write any differently.
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Richard Parks
Posted on Friday, April 22, 2005 - 08:09 am:   

True that if he didn't write like Lovecraft he wouldn't BE Lovecraft. Though it makes things more difficult when you're trying to explain to a young writer why trying to emulate HPL is a bad idea. "He wrote that way because he HAD to write that way. You don't. What's more, you CAN'T."

"The Outsider" as a metaphor for adolescent self-image makes a lot of sense.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Monday, May 02, 2005 - 10:48 pm:   

Baby's grandparents visiting. Baby still not sleeping. So sorry, I'll be back soon.

"The Outsider" as a metaphor for adolescent self-image makes a lot of sense.

Or adult self-image, some days! :-)
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2005 - 08:52 pm:   

Just got back from administering some final exams at a college in Vermont. So I should be able to answer messages tomorrow--finally!

Sorry for the long absence . . . :-)
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 10, 2005 - 11:08 pm:   

So sorry, trying to catch up with messages, but it may be a few days before I can answer all . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Saturday, May 21, 2005 - 06:59 am:   

Computer virus. :-(
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Sunday, May 22, 2005 - 08:45 pm:   

STILL having computer problems. Switching to Firefox, which may help. Hopefully this will be cleared up soon, and I can post messages without fear that the computer will shut off in the middle . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Friday, May 27, 2005 - 09:20 pm:   

Not a mess, but--at Wiscon. I'll post again as soon as I get back to Boston. Having a great time! :-)
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Alan Yee
Posted on Sunday, May 29, 2005 - 10:21 am:   

Aren't Tim and Heather supposed to be premiering Flytrap 4 at Wiscon (which includes your story, "The Belt", if I recall correctly)? I love keeping track of all the sales and publications you guys have; they keep me motivated.
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Forrest Aguirre
Posted on Sunday, May 29, 2005 - 06:03 pm:   

Deborah Layne and I are selling Flytrap 4 at the Wheatland Press/Raw Dog Screaming Press table. It looks beautiful!
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 - 10:07 pm:   

Hi Alan! Yes, Flytrap 4 came out, and I had a chance to start reading it on the plane back. It's really, really good. My favorite story is Jeff VanderMeer's "The Secret Life of Librarian Bob Scheffel," which is brilliant. Second favorite is Jeff Ford's "Holt." Actually, my other second favorite is Karen Meisner's "In the Woods," which is a retelling of Snow White. I didn't think of it right away because she read it at our reading (with Haddayr Copley-Woods and Maureen McHugh), and I almost forgot that it's a Flytrap story. Altogether, it looks like a great issue.

I'll start answering messages again in the next few days. Wiscon was great. Though I'm still recoverning!
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Jason Erik Lundberg
Posted on Wednesday, June 01, 2005 - 12:25 pm:   

I'm still recovering too, Dora. And it was wonderful to see you there.
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 09:58 pm:   

Hi Jason! I hope we get to meet again soon. One of the strange things about being a writer is trying to keep up with people from all over the country (or world), whom you never get to see except at conventions. I wish I could move you all to Boston . . . (And it was great meeting Janet for the first time!)

Switching to Firefox didn't fix my computer problems, so I'm back to Netscape, but I think Kendrick has finally solved the worst of them. At least, I haven't had a "Party Poker" icon appear on my screen for no discernable reason all day. So I'm finally going to try to answer all the messages I've been (so sorry!) neglecting, although slowly, because I'm also in the middle of a story which I should actually be working on right now . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 05:56 am:   

Arg! I meant to answer all messages before I left for a week-long writing workshop, but I didn't get a chance! The workshop is in the mountains and I won't have internet access, but I'll be back in a week.

So, so sorry! :-(
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Tuesday, July 05, 2005 - 09:07 pm:   

Back from the workshop, preparing for Readercon. Why is this summer such a mad rush from one event to another?

At least I wrote two stories . . .
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Theodora Goss
Posted on Wednesday, September 14, 2005 - 10:15 pm:   

Finally over about two weeks of bronchitis complictated by a trip to Colorado. It's been a crazy, crazy summer.

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