HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

What Everybody's Reading 8

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Datlow, Ellen » What Everybody's Reading 8 « Previous Next »

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
The Green ManMelissa Mead07-28-07  05:15 pm
  Start New Thread        

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Monday, January 22, 2007 - 09:28 am:   

I'm late coming to the party, but I devoured Barron's "Hallucigenia" in the wee hours of the morning. Av wicked delight.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 08:59 am:   

A couple great books to recommend. James Hynes' PUBLISH AND PERISH, which contains three pitch-perfect, creepy and comical horror novellas that skewer acedemia (Hynes also pays homage to Poe and M.R. James in the process). And Donald Harrington's indescribable masterpiece WITH, which is a big novel that begins with a 7-year-old girl being abducted by a pedophile and taken to the peak of a near-mythical Arkansas mountain. Though don't be turned off by that initial premise, as Harington's magic realist story offers many surprises. It could be described as a ghost story, a love story, a longing for things past, and much more. Be warned, though, it's anything but fast paced -- it's the kind of book you live in for a while. It's also inspired me to seek out the rest of Harington's canon (he's published, I believe, 13 novels).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 09:17 am:   

Finished Crowley's LORD BYRON'S NOVEL, THE EVENING LAND and Vonnegut's A MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 09:17 am:   

Steve, I loved "Hallucignenia."

Kelly, I read it back in 1997 when it came out and enjoyed the collection immensely.

I'm still reading THE OPEN CURTAIN by Brian Evenson and am finishing up some anthologies and other stuff for YBFH #20 reading.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 11:43 am:   

I'm a little over halfway through Ngugi wa Thiong'o's 'Wizard of the Crow'. So far it's a brilliant skewering of an African despot known as The Ruler - who's an amalgam of charmers like Mobutu, Bokassa and Idi Amin - and his despicable henchmen by an unlikely pair of revolutionaries. Jeff VanderMeer touted this one as one of the best overlooked novels of last year - thanks, Jeff!

Next: Guy Gavriel Kay's 'Ysabel' as soon as my wife finishes it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 09:19 am:   

Finished 'Wizard of the Crow' after taking a breather with two other novels. The only quibble I had was that I found the final section a bit rushed but overall it was terrific, one of my favorite two or three novels out of Africa.

Coincidentally, Dan Simmons's 'The Terror' also weighed in at 766 pages and made for a gritty, suspenseful secret history of the doomed Franklin expedition. Appropriately enough, I finished it during one of the blizzards that have creamed us the last few weeks. First-rate.

I'm puzzled by the glittering reviews of Guy Gavriel Kay's 'Ysabel'. Unlike 'Tigana', 'A Song for Arbonne' or 'The Lions of Al-Rassan', I found the story thin, the dialog unexceptional and the characterization flatter than a pancake. Frankly, I've been disengaged by his last three novels as well though they've been lavishly praised. I haven't been able to care about the characters and have found his chapter long asides-to-nowhere frustrating. Very disappointing.

I was going to begin Gene Wolfe's 'Soldier of Sidon' but decided I'll reread the first two prior to that; it's been quite a few years. Next, Glen Hirshberg's 'American Morons'!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Daniel Ausema
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 10:22 am:   

I'm definitely keeping my eye out for Wizard of the Crow (after also seeing it on Jeff's blog). I just finished Black Swan Green by Mitchell--very different from the other two books of his I've read, but I enjoyed it a lot. I'm reading Go Down Moses by Faulkner now and have a Flannery O'Connor collection going as well, giving me some good southern writing.

Also just picked up a couple Nightshade books with a gift certificate for a local bookstore--Mother Aegypt by Kage Baker and Iain Banks's The Algebraist. I've only read The Bridge by Banks, not any of his more identifiably SF stories, so I'm looking forward to that (The Bridge is certainly speculative in the way I use the term, and an excellent book, but it's classified as mainstream). I'm far less familiar with Kage Baker's stories than I ought to admit, so I'm excited about that one as well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 10:35 am:   

I enjoyed Sidon more than the first two.

I've noticed this trend with some of Wolfe's more recent works (Urth being a notable exception) that there's a marked improvement as the work progresses.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 11:35 am:   

I've heard terrific things about the Simmons.
Still hoping to finish more novels from 2006 before heading on to that one.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 11:43 am:   

There were some homophobic elements to the THE TERROR that bothered me. I don't think Simmons himself is homophobic but chose the period's viewpoint, still I was deeply bothered by some things written in the book.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:00 pm:   

I thought the Simmons' was great and historically accurate. To call it homophobic is tantamount to calling a book depicting slavery in the Deep South racist.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:01 pm:   

One more thing: You're supposed to be bothered by some a lot of things in THE TERROR.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:12 pm:   

Kelly, the fact that the good sodomites are the ones that never have sex at sea and are basically the least bit physical to me reeks of judgement.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:22 pm:   

Simmons is not passing judgment at all. How else would a gay seaman exist during a historical period of extreme intolerance and under a military system that hangs you for being gay? Historical facts are historical facts. The fact that Simmons depicts these historical facts accurately does not equate him with passing judgment.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:24 pm:   

No, you are missing my point. The evil sodomites have sex on board a ship. The good sodomites have no sex drive. They are shown as effete intellectuals. By presenting such characters a statement is made, whether or not Simmons intended one. I don't know what your sexuality it, but as a gay man I was offended.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 12:33 pm:   

I don't see the "good sodomites" as having no sex drive. I see them as suppressing their sex drive to survive in an ignorant, intolerant, stupid time period of human history! But, to each their own...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 01:11 pm:   

I thought that the relationship between the two gentlemen who'd had an affair and remained friends when they met again was portrayed sympathetically and compassionately. The so-called 'evil sodomites' aren't gay from this straight guy's p.o.v. The 'relationship' is more about rape and power than sex; the passive one has the I.Q. of a houseplant and the moral sense of a handball. The villain of the piece isn't even human except from a biological standpoint.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 02:03 pm:   

While I think the "good sodomites" (sorry for the terminology) were compassionate, I think it is still dangerous to write them as sexless. If I recall, their last meeting ending in a hug rather than a kiss. If that had happened between to heterosexuals who still cared for each other deeply and were saying goodbye, it would have struck me as odd.

While many homosexuals did resist temptation because of the naval laws, many still did not.

I think the perspective of the gay men was also sanitized. They did not remark about their fellows in ways that many homosexuals would. With Lady Silence, her features were often viewed from the lens of attraction, but rarely were the men viewed such (granted they were getting scurvy slowly).

I normally relish Simmons novels, but this one seemed to have too many elements that made me want to put the book down again and again (and I would have but I had to write a review for a gay magazine).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 03:47 pm:   

Steve, you might try dropping Dan Simmons a line and share your opinion with him. He may respond and perhaps shed some light on his treatment of those characters. It could prove relevant to your review or provide a coda to it if your assessment of his novel has already been turned in.

Just a thought.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 - 04:37 pm:   

I admire Mr. Simmons and some of his novels are my favorite horror titles. But I don't think its appropriate to contact an author regarding a review - I can only base my reaction what is in the text. If he needs to explain it, then either I missed something or it was not conveyed well. I can't imagine the NY Times contacts the authors before their reviews.

I won't make assumptions about Mr. Simmons' beliefs based on his writing. That would be an assumption I feel is very wrong. But I remain convinced that his characterization of homosexual behavior in this book, among other issues, was derogatory.

And, actually, the point is moot as the review released last month.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

des lewis
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 08:06 am:   

Against The Day by Thomas Pynchon. This is slowly sending me mad. :-)
Anyone else tried it?
Wish me luck! Wonderful stuff, though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Laird Barron
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 10:59 am:   

I recently finished "Divinations of the Deep" by Matt Cardin.

Excellent weird, Lovecraftian tales of cosmic horror...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christopher Barzak
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 12:17 pm:   

I recently read Ursual LeGuin's "Voices" which was really lovely. She writes about ordinary people caught up in the machinery of politics better than anyone else I've read (well, except maybe Pat Barker, but even there it's close to a tie for me).

I also read Kurt Vonnegut's "Man Without a Country". Very funny and sad, and ultimately a requiem for what he sees is the loss of a life-sustaining planet. Despite his judgments, though, he's also forgiving where forgiveness is applicable. I hope I can grow up to be like him someday. ;-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, February 18, 2007 - 02:56 pm:   

Some threads ago, Ellen asked a question regarding Sheila Williams and Tiptree. She has an editorial in the March Asimov's which addresses that question and others.

I would encourage those who haven't to pick up a copy (to support the magazine) but the editorial is available for free at:

http://www.asimovs.com/_issue_0703/editorial.shtml

I thoroughly enjoy reading this sort of stuff.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, February 20, 2007 - 04:24 am:   

I tried to post a few days ago but didn't have my password handy so gave up. Now I've got it...

I'm still in London, reading a lot of stuff (still YBFH~20), and started John Connolly's Book of Lost Things, which I like so far.

Thanks for pointing out the editorial by Sheila, PM.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, March 04, 2007 - 06:42 pm:   

Read Ben Peeks' twenty-six lies \ one truth.

It's disemboweling. Or not.

Read Lord Byron's Jackal, a bio of Trelawney, a notable liar.

Read PKD's A Scanner Darkly
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 09:30 am:   

I finished John Connolly's THE BOOK OF LOST THINGS and loved it. Nice use of fairy tales.

I also read "Bloodstained Oz," a novella by Christopher Golden and James A. Moore that's a finalist for the Stoker. I liked it quite a bit. Mutated evil creatures from OZ comes through to Kansas during a tornado.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 01:37 pm:   

Read THE ESQUISITE by Laird Hunt. A quirky noir in which a destitute lost soul joins a strange group whose business is arranging staged murders for post-9/11, anxiety-ridden clients. The ringleader's identity, Mr. Kindt, is traced back to the corpse depicted in Rembrant's The Anatomy Lesson. This weird tale unwinds like a giant anaconda let loose in New York, high on mushrooms. Superbly written.

Non-fiction pick of the week: BLACK DAHLIA AVENGER, by Steve Hodel. A retired LA cop makes a compelling case that his own father murdered Betty Short. Absolutely riveting from start to finish. Only letdown was how little Hodel reveals his own feelings throughout this extraordinary, horrific journey of paternal discovery.

Re-reading Ellen's LITTLE DEATHS, which is as darkly delicious as I recall from years past. Loved Lucius' to-die-for story of obsessional love every bit as much as before.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 03:28 pm:   

Bronwyn,
I've got that--it's lightweight (in poundage) so maybe I'll bring it to Florida with me to read.

Glad you're enjoying LD (again?).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 06:17 pm:   

Ellen,

I'm glad it arrived intact . . . there was a bar-room fight at the post office when I mailed it. I live in a rough neighborhood . . .

I found the poem I sent you hilarious, profanely sacred, infectious. A sort of Alice-through-the-looking-glass, Gregorian chant poet Christopher Smart wrote for his poor rat-torn cat, Jeoffrey. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

LD again, you bet. Blessings of this sort are too few and far between. I haven't read it since 1995 or 6, when I lived in Seattle. Just finished Taylor's Hungry Skin. Clever and resonant.

Have a great trip!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 07:53 pm:   

PM: Great article on alli/Tip. Alli's letter to Sheila Williams was particularly interesting. Her candid and tenative, "as I cower in my cabin in an endless rainstorm in the wild woods north of Anchorage, Alaska," would seem to echo an aspect of her solitude, reclusion. Also her psychic preoccupation with "life here", Nature, i.e., the red squirrel. Thanks for sharing.

I've not read much Tiptree. A long time ago. But any woman who has navigated slishy moose trails to the john with a flashlight at midnight is my kindred spirit: Been there, done that, in the Yukon. Used the torn T shirt for toilet paper, a blessing after wiping my bum with 5000 pages of pulp fiction. I kid you not.

I like the title, THE STARRY RIFT. Has anyone read it?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 08:04 pm:   

Bronwyn, if you haven't read it yet (hard to keep up with who has and hasn't) the Tiptree bio is recommended reading.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 08:16 pm:   

I second that. It's terrific.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 10:09 pm:   

The bio's reference to Alli's double life is also terrific hook -- I'll check it out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 07:32 am:   

Julie Phillips did a stunning job. Highly recommended.

'The Starry Rift' is a collection of three novellas set in a future history replete with first contacts, 'the Black Worlds' and instellar travel. Like most of her later writing, I found it less engaging than her earlier collections. I'd humbly suggest starting with 'Ten Thousand Light Years From Home', 'Warm Worlds and Otherwise' and 'Star Songs of an Old Primate'.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 08:26 am:   

Thanks, Bruce. Your suggestions are humbly appreciated. :-)

I love reading about writers and their processes. I think the last book I read was Mailer's THE SPOOKY ART. As I recall, some of his thoughts on art-making were pretty far out, verging on superstition. Hearing about other writer's crazy quirks makes me feel SO much better about myself.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 08:29 am:   

One suspects that her bio is selling better than her work. (Her work is out of print.)

Tachyon has a collection of 18 stories Her Smoke Rose Up Forever which is relatively inexpensive and is still in print.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 09:16 am:   

Too right, PM.

'Her Smoke Rose Up Forever' is very close to being the Essential Tiptree and if you could only read one of her books, Bronwyn, this would be it.

Humble, indeed :0)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 09:34 am:   

Her work is out of print?

I hate that! Good writers going out of print is so bloody depressing. Meanwhile Dean Koontz and his viral clones keep eating up bookshelves -- makes me sick. I got curious about King's take on electromagnetic madness (EM fields are an obsession of mine) and read CELL (from the library; I will not pay money to read trash) and felt polluted for days. I just don't get why this boring shit sells.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 10:03 am:   

Well, since Her Smoke Rose Up Forever has a lot of her best stories in it, that's not such a tragedy. My guess is that as a result of the attention brought by the biography, someone will pop up and do a new overview of her short work.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 10:21 am:   

Hope that someone will have success bringing more Tiptree back into print.

Bronwyn, it's been my experience that many folk are happy with what they're reading. If you compel them to read a good book they won't thank you for it. To them, we are skunk devourers.

So I say do what you can to buy books, to give books to libraries, to check books out from libraries, and to request libraries to purchase books. (Good books) This keeps (helps) books you want in print and creates/continues the market so that more of those books will be offered.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 10:41 am:   

Ellen, That's encouraging, at least.

PM, I don't have much experience with people who read those books . . . skunk devourers? Talk about projecting your own stink onto others. How can anyone with half a brain be entertained by shallow stupidity? I dunno. I just find books like CELL so boring, the opposite of entertainment.

You're dead on about putting your money where your mouth is. I do buy books, request libraries to buy them, etc. I'm living on a tiny income, however, so I can't buy as many as I'd like. Sad to say. I think my local library branch is a wee bit sick of me requesting books. Being gentle souls, however, they do tolerate my endless requests with humor and grace. Thank dog. I got friends to feed. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 12:16 pm:   

I agree CELL was lazily written and boring. On the other hand, I wouldn't lump King in the "trash" category. He's probably had more misfires than successes, but I'll always appreciate him for books like 'SALEM'S LOT, THE SHINING, THE DEAD ZONE, and even his nostalgic pieces like "The Body" and HEARTS IN ATLANTIS.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 01:57 pm:   

King is a terrific writer--but not always. My favorites among his novels are THE SHINING and THE GREEN MILE. And many of his stories and novellas are excellent.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bronwyn Elko
Posted on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 - 02:56 pm:   

I agree that some of King's stuff is enjoyable and well written. Ditto the works mentioned. Dean Knootz, on the other hand, writes irredeemable dross. imo.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vincent Singleton
Posted on Wednesday, March 07, 2007 - 06:31 pm:   

Hey, Ellen, et al.--
Reading Joe Hill's HEART-SHAPED BOX, which I just learned is the abridged version. I've ordered the Sub Press ed: anybody know if it's unabridged?
Recently finished Elizabeth Hand's SAFFRON AND BRIMSTONE, which is of course superb. I have never found -- or even seen -- a copy of ICARUS DESCENDING, which seems weird.
Next on my list is Dan Simmons's THE TERROR!
Waiting for copies of Gene O'Neill's TALES OF THE BAJA EXPRESS, Lucius Shepard's VALENTINE, Joe R. Lansdale's LOST ECHOES.
The 30th Anniversary-issue of ASIMOV'S is choc-a-bloc with fine stories, including a new Lucius Shepard novella set in same milieu as GREEN EYES! We likes our Lucius Shepard.

King is essential, but some of his novels are flawed, I think. My favorite, flaws and all, is 'SALEM'S LOT. THE SHINING is quintessential. THE GREEN MILE, too. But I consider BAG OF BONES his best book. (His worst, DREAMCATCHER). Some scenes in IT scared the bejezus out of me.

King is better at short lengths--"The Raft," "Survivor Type," "The Monkey," "Lunch at the Gotham Cafe," "The Body," "...Shawshank Redemption," a coupla dozen more, easily. You can't go wrong with any King collection!

Vince Singleton
aka grokLF
& CatZilla
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Wednesday, March 07, 2007 - 08:16 pm:   

Are you thinking of the unabridged CD for Heart Shaped Box?

Icarus Descending is out of print but is available via used book sellers such as those at Amazon, AbeBooks, etc.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, March 07, 2007 - 08:18 pm:   

Welcome, Vincent,

Echoing PM, what do you mean by "abridged"?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan frackelton
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 03:35 pm:   

Hi to one and all.

Just want to pick up on some of the chat re Tiptree:

I agree wholeheartedly with Bruce Chrumka's recommendation of Tiptree's collections, though the later ones are worth checking out too - ditto HSRUF. Secondhand copies shouldn't be too hard to get hold of via Amazon, etc.

Are there any actual plans for a 'Collected Tiptree', something like the North Atlantic Sturgeon series or the Darkside Press Simak?

As I'm pretty much a newbie on this message board, instead of a laborious introduction, I'll stick to the topic and let you know what I'm (about to start) reading:

Farah Mendlesohn's anthology Glorifying Terrorism (SF) and Phobic, edited by Andy Murray (horror). My copy of Heart-Shaped Box still hasn't arrived yet...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff VanderMeer
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 04:12 pm:   

I'm reading the galleys of the new Burdett Bangkok mystery novel. Just as freakin' good as the first two. These are mysteries with depth, ingenuity, and first-rate writing. They stand high above most crime fiction. From a writer's perspective, I stand in awe of the balancing act he performs with all the different elements, and how characters gain amazing depth and interest as he advances the plot. Page-turners that you'll want to read again.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 04:25 pm:   

Oooh. Jeff. I want. But I still have a bit more reading for my 06 summary before I can get into 07.
When's it coming out?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 04:31 pm:   

Sorry to butt in, but I noticed on Amazon that the hc of 'Bangkok Haunts' is out June 5; they have it bundled with the new Renko novel by Martin Cruz Smith. Quite the duo.

Burdett's 'The Last Six Million Seconds' is very similar thematically to the 'Bangkok' novels though set in Hong. Kong. Definitely recommended.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 07:06 pm:   

That was half a post; company rolled in.

The very last thing I'd read was J. VanderMeer's intro to 'Conrad William's, 'The Unblemished', a tout from this board. Looks like a terrific read. And thanks for the rec on 'Wizard of the Crow', Mr. VanderMeer.

Just finished 'Soldier of Sidon' and 'Memorare'. Splendid. Currently reading, Kim Stanley Robinson's finale to the 'Washington trilogy'.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 07:35 pm:   

Bruce,
Thanks.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff VanderMeer
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 11:56 am:   

Yeah, June, Ellen, re the Burdett. I thought the last one was a great commentary on the post 9-11 environment, in addition to everything else it was.

I also just got in a book called Soon I Will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman that looks really cool. It looks like a very clever superhero novel. I don't usually go for this kind of thing, but this one looks to have more depth.

JeffV
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Parks
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 11:09 am:   

Just finished reading THE PILLOW BOOK by Sei Shonagon (Ivan Morris tr.) Been meaning to read this since just about forever, and finally got it done.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 09:39 am:   

Was the Peter Greenaway movie based on it?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Parks
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 01:43 pm:   

I don't think so, or at least not directly. I haven't seen the movie, but what I've read about it suggests to me that Greenaway was using the title in its more generic sense (the term "pillow book" has had different meanings over the years). Yet he couldn't have been unaware of this, the most famous (and earliest surviving) example. The way the movie is broken into "chapters" based on the text does echo Shonagon.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 05:58 pm:   

I just read a bunch of Jim Butcher 'Dresden' novels, which were kind of fun. I'm now about a quarter way through Gene Wolfe's PIRATE FREEDOM. It's really interesting. I'm just at a turning point where I'm working out whether the emperor has no clothes on, or whether that's a really cool outfit. I'll know soon.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 06:39 pm:   

Surely you're not accusing Wolfe of authorial nudity...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Bowes
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 08:42 pm:   

I'm reading "Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio," a recent translation of a part of the massive 18th century collection by Pu Songling (to which I was tipped by Jeff Ford). I'd read another partial and much bowdlerized version many years ago. And either the cuts and censoring or the fact that I was, maybe, sixteen years old made me much less able to appreciate these elegant pieces. Lots of ghost, human-like animal, trickster and possession stories: some are full fledged tales, others short anecdotes. I'm dolling them out as bedtime stories. It's surprising to me that this isn't better known.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Parks
Posted on Friday, March 16, 2007 - 06:19 am:   

I just got that one too, likewise tipped off by Jeff Ford. I'm looking forward to it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan frackelton
Posted on Friday, March 16, 2007 - 06:35 am:   

Can I just ask, are you referring to the Penguin Classics edition that was issued (or reissued)last year?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Parks
Posted on Friday, March 16, 2007 - 08:24 am:   

That's the one I have.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Bowes
Posted on Friday, March 16, 2007 - 08:36 am:   

Yes, that's the one. Plentiful notes and illustrations along with the text.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan frackelton
Posted on Friday, March 16, 2007 - 11:43 am:   

Ok, thanks Richard...and Richard. It's been on my radar for a while but I haven't gotten around to buying it yet. It was recommended by a friend who also recommended Barry Hughart's novels, which I really enjoyed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Friday, March 16, 2007 - 04:51 pm:   

Wow, that sounds great. I'm going to track down a copy.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Bowes
Posted on Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 12:43 am:   

Why aren't you busy writing?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 07:29 pm:   

Rick: I am, I am! I'm doing some non-fiction work for hire and I'm working on a novel.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Bowes
Posted on Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 08:39 pm:   

Nathan: I'll believe it when I see it. You have a story coming out in INFERNO, right? Anything else?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Sunday, March 18, 2007 - 05:28 am:   

That's right, and I have another story in Ellen's hands right now, though its fate is yet to be determined.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, March 18, 2007 - 05:57 am:   

Nathan,
I haven't heard yet from my in-house editor about anything --I"ll get on it when I return home from Florida (arrive home today).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Sunday, March 18, 2007 - 07:50 am:   

Sounds good. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, March 18, 2007 - 07:42 pm:   

Just finished Sarah Langan's first novel The Keeper and think it's pretty good. I had my doubts about where it was going three quarters of the way through but then she pulled it together.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, March 25, 2007 - 07:18 pm:   

Read David Lynch's Catching the Big Fish...so get meditating :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, March 25, 2007 - 07:43 pm:   

Finished The Open Curtain by Brian Evenson. Got a bit confusing about a third of the way in but the last third was riveting. I probably had trouble because I didn't have enough time to read it straight through but had to keep picking it up and putting it down.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, March 26, 2007 - 07:57 am:   

I really enjoyed both The Keeper and The Open Curtain.

Currently I'm about 300 pages into Michael Bishop's Brittle Innings, a book I was first turned onto here a while back. While it doesn't have a strong narrative pull, it more than makes up for that with a perfectly captured WWII Southern setting and a cast of well-drawn characters. Oh yeah -- it also finds a way to make the Frankenstein story and minor-league baseball blend naturally. Really good stuff, and makes me wish Bishop would write more novels.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GSH
Posted on Monday, March 26, 2007 - 11:13 am:   

Probably I'm way behind the curve here, having only just finished the third of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. It's among the best fantasies I've ever read. I'd passed over The Golden Compass on the shelf more than once. For some reason I was thinking it was misplaced juvenile fiction.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Monday, March 26, 2007 - 02:52 pm:   

Yeah, Kelly, Brittle Innings is wonderful.

I'm currently reading Graham Greene's Brighton Rock. Greene's one of my favorite writers. I'd recommend The Heart of the Matter and The Quiet American, especially, to anyone.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GSH
Posted on Monday, March 26, 2007 - 06:18 pm:   

BTW, anyone who might be curious can read the first three chapters of Pullman's The Golden Compass (aka Northern Lights) online here: http://www.randomhouse.com/features/pullman/books/gc_excerpt1.html

It's the first volume of the His Dark Materials trilogy.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, April 08, 2007 - 02:20 pm:   

It's so quiet around here....

I've finished YBFH #20 although if I can quickly finish reading The Exquisite by Laird Hunt and The Pilo Family Circus by Will Elliott, I might still be able to fit them into my summary.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, April 08, 2007 - 03:59 pm:   

I could make some scratching sounds.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2007 - 10:55 am:   

Been reading stories from Logorrhea which reads better than it sounds. It's a mostly original antho . There's a story titled "Logorrhea" which is pretty good. Is it fantasy or horror?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ben Seeberger
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2007 - 02:43 pm:   

The Satanic Verses, by Salmon Rushdie. I read sporadically (as in, ten to twenty pages at at time), as it takes me awhile to get used to Rushdie's voice. If I don't read regularly, then it's even harder to get back into it. Still, though, it's fantastic.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2007 - 02:53 pm:   

I returned from the Saints & Sinners conference in New Orleans last night with a copy of Peter Dube's AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SKY (http://www.peterdube.com/Books/at-the-bottom-of-the-sky). He read a terrific excerpt from the book (inspired by the peep show scene from the Howling) and I'm looking forward to reading the entire book.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2007 - 06:18 pm:   

I'm almost finished with The Pilo Family Circus by Will Elliott, which obviously won't make it into the forthcoming YBFH #20 but will be in #21. I've recommended it to the International Horror Guild judges even though I haven't finished it. It's about very nasty clowns and an evil circus.

I've also started reading for YBFH #21--so far magazines. I highly recommend a poetry website I wasn't aware of til a few months ago: Goblin Fruit at
http://www.goblinfruit.net/winter/
It's got some excellent dark poetry.

I also read the Jack Dann/Gardner Dozois edited all original anthology Wizards and was impressed by it. I especially liked the stories by Jeff Ford, Peter Beagle, and Liz Hand.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2007 - 08:05 pm:   

That Jeff Ford steals all my best work.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ben Seeberger
Posted on Monday, May 14, 2007 - 10:57 pm:   

That reminds me (the link to the poetry site) that I haven't seen a lot of mythic poetry being composed in contemporary rhyme. Do you think there's a reason for this?

Somebody should bring back Pandemonium...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 06:47 am:   

Finished Sarah Langan's post-King, small-town horror novel, THE VIRUS. Great stuff! Langan more than fulfills her promise of THE KEEPER. The best horror novel I've read since Conrad Williams' THE UNBLEMISHED.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 08:41 am:   

Ben,
I'm not an expert in poetry so don't really think of what kind of rhyme poets use...but there was a whole magazine called Mythic edited by Mike Allen in 2006.This is what I wrote about it for YBFH #20

Mythic, a new magazine edited by Mike Allen dedicated to fiction and poetry using myth, legends, and fairy tales, published two good looking issues with notable dark work by Erzebet YellowBoy, Theodora Goss, Catherynne M. Valente, Charles Saplak, Sonya Taaffe, and JoSelle Vanderhooft.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

des lewis
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 11:51 am:   

Ben mentioned: The Satanic Verses, by Salmon Rushdie.

I read that book some years ago amid the height of its controversy and I thought it terrible. Completely impenetrable. And his life has suffered so much for this book unnecessarily.

However, it is remarkable with Rushdie how some of his other works are genuine masterpieces in my view: eg: 'Midnight's Children', 'The Ground Beneath Her Feet' and 'Shalimar The Clown'.
=======

I am currently reading 'The Book of Dave': a remarkable SF novel by Will Self.

des
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 12:10 pm:   

Recently finished Lucius Shepard's 'Softspoken': excellent! and Naomi Novik's 'His Majesty's Dragon': enjoyed it enough to look forward to the second book. Just started Charles Stross's 'The Jennifer Morgue' and then on to Haruki Murakami's 'After Dark'.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 01:37 pm:   

I've started reading 2007 issues of F&SF for YBFH #21.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ben Seeberger
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 02:42 pm:   

Wow, that's a fantastic perspective, Des... thanks.

I do plan on reading those others as well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mark Bukovec
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 03:39 pm:   

Hi Ellen. I enjoyed the Don Webb story in the May issue of F&SF. Good and creepy.

I'm reading Geoff Ryman's Air right now.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 04:48 pm:   

Hi Mark. Gordon mentioned that one to me, too. Thanks. Have only gotten through January and February so far.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 - 04:54 pm:   

Speaking of poetry, Disch has a new poetry collection out titled About the Size of It.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2007 - 02:23 pm:   

There all over ABE and cheap, too

http://tinyurl.com/ypsv6y
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, May 26, 2007 - 08:24 am:   

I'm ready to start a new novel and not sure which. I may wait to read Simmons' The Terror or Joe Hill's Heart-Shaped Box when I go on vacation with my family at the end of June as I hate carrying hardcovers around the city--too heavy.

I'm a little more than halfway through issue 42 of All Hallows and 3/4 of the way through Postscripts 10.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Saturday, May 26, 2007 - 09:17 am:   

Lately I've really enjoyed re-reading Stephen King's LISEY'S STORY, which I think will join the ranks of his ten or so essential books, and discovering the short horror fiction of Paul G. Tremblay in the collection COMPOSITIONS FOR THE YOUNG & OLD.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2007 - 07:17 am:   

Just finished 'The Dead Orchards' by Ian R. MacLeod - a moody, bleak piece which evoked a couple of Jeffrey Ford's darker stories - and 'Bangkok Haunts' by John Burdett. The third novel in the saga of Sonchai Jitpleecheep, an incorruptible, ganga-smoking Buddhist detective who runs a brothel with his mother, it involves a snuff film more twisted than usual, and a Jacobean revenge plot that is all teeth. Indispensable.

Next up: David Marusek's first collection, the new Arkady Renko novel and an old Richard Bachman novel that's been unearthed and re-edited by Stephen King.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2007 - 04:50 pm:   

I finally got into Joe Hill's The Heart-Shaped Box today while traveling to and from visiting my parents. I like it very much so far.

I've just received Bangkok Haunts from amazon the other day so that might be next up.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, July 01, 2007 - 03:12 pm:   

I finished Joe Hill's Heart-Shaped Box on a long bus ride thursday and found it a very satisfying first novel. Jaded over the hill rocker buys a ghost on ebay on a whim. The writing is really excellent and the protagonist, who starts off kind of loathsome, actually grows over the time of the book.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Sunday, July 01, 2007 - 06:02 pm:   

I did like 'Heart-Shaped Box' yet preferred 'Twentieth Century Ghosts'...'Best New Horror' and the KellyLinkesque 'My Father's Mask' definitely stayed with me. I recently read 'The Lies of Locke Lamora' by Scott Lynch which was my favorite first novel of the last year.

Just finished today: 'Stalin's Ghost' by Martin Cruz Smith, sixth of the Renko novels. Simply superb. It has a nice tout from John Burdett on the back which I found very fitting indeed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, July 01, 2007 - 06:32 pm:   

Bruce,
Oh I completely agree about Twentieth Century Ghosts.

Ooh. I'm hoping to get a review copy of the Martin Cruz Smith. And I think maybe the Burdett will be my next novel to read.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Monday, July 02, 2007 - 06:20 pm:   

Currently reading and loving a novel of demonic possession called A GOOD AND HAPPY CHILD. It's a well-written page-turner, filled with vivid characters and many scary moments. It's by newcomer Justin Evans, and, come end-of-the-year awards, I hope it finds some recognition amongst the genre set.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, July 02, 2007 - 07:16 pm:   

Kelly,
I received galleys of it--glad to hear it's a good one. I'll see if I can get to it this year.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, July 20, 2007 - 02:18 pm:   

I read a powerful psychological suspense debut: Tana French's In the Woods on the plane home from Finland. This is what I've written about it for YBFH#21:
In 1984, two children playing in a suburban British woods go missing, and the third child, found with blood in his sneakers and almost catatonic, has no memory of what happened to his two friends. Twenty years later that survivor has become a detective on the murder squad and is faced with a child murder in the same woods. The ensuing psychological suspense tale has a teeny hint of the supernatural that provides a thrill of extra creepiness.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

steveberman
Posted on Monday, July 23, 2007 - 09:19 am:   

Holly was telling me about French's book. She really enjoyed it.

Just finished Oates's SEXY, which I had found in a box in the back of my closet. Started out very strong but led to some melodrama and a muddled and unsatisfying ending.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, July 23, 2007 - 09:26 am:   

I've just started John Burdett's Bangkok Haunts which I'm enjoying.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul Jessup
Posted on Friday, July 27, 2007 - 09:00 am:   

I just finished reading Patricia McKillip's Beasts of Eld - thought it was really damn good, loved the prose, and the simple interaction between only a handful of characters. Also just finished reading the latest Weird tales and a handful of stories in PS #10. So far, nothing has made me jump up and down and holler for joy- yet.

Right now I'm in the mood for a good ghost novel. Know of any (recent) ghost novels that are any good? Is Heart Shaped Box as good as Hill's short stories? I want something atmospheric and creepy, heh. Figured here would be the best place to ask.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Friday, July 27, 2007 - 11:04 am:   

Sort-of-recent ghost-story novels that I liked better than HEART-SHAPED BOX are Dan Simmons' A WINTER HAUNTING and Peter Straub's LOST BOY LOST GIRL. Both are thoroughly atmospheric and creepy.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul Jessup
Posted on Friday, July 27, 2007 - 11:24 am:   

I haven't read a Winter Haunting yet, so I'll have to pick it up. I did read Lost Boy Lost Girl and it's sequel (In The Night Room). I really enjoyed LBLG- although I'm not a huge fan of serial killer stories. This one worked.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Friday, July 27, 2007 - 11:53 am:   

Ah, but it's a serial-killer "ghost story"!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, July 27, 2007 - 02:08 pm:   

I liked HEART-SHAPED BOX --no it's not as wonderful as Hill's short stories, but it sure is good.

I just finished Bangkok Haunts and enjoyed it a lot. It's a police procedural/ghost story. I recommend it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul Jessup
Posted on Saturday, July 28, 2007 - 12:19 pm:   

Ok, sounds good- I've got two new ones to read now- Bangkok Haunts and Winter Haunting. I also just bought Jack Cody's Ghosts of Yesterday, so I think I'm set. Thanks again!

Kelly-
Yes, it works because it's a serial killer ghost story, but in a way that's not like most sk/ghost hybrid movies (like the What Lies Beneath or The Messengers) it's far more messy and real and there is so much to like love about it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, July 30, 2007 - 02:43 pm:   

Read Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows and as I read, realized that the clunky writing and superficial characterizations bothered me. However, that didn't stop me from getting into the final volume and zipping through it. And I did find it satisfying.

And today William Gibson's Spook Country arrived in the mail. I'll probably read that next.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, August 07, 2007 - 02:19 pm:   

I'm almost 100 pages into Spook Country and loving it--I want/need to finish it before leaving for Japan next Wednesday.

In between I'm reading for YBFH #21--many magazines, some collections, and a few anthologies. I've got to give a few names to Jim Frenkel before I leave.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GSH
Posted on Tuesday, August 07, 2007 - 02:24 pm:   

The 2007 Night Shades edition of The State of the Art by Iain M. Banks. I'm reading through the stories in presented order. Just finished Descendant. I haven't read any of his novels. Apparently this is his only published short fiction, which strikes me as unfortunate.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, August 07, 2007 - 04:06 pm:   

I love his first two novels The Wasp Factory and Walking on Glass (both dark) and later, Canal Dreams.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GSH
Posted on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 - 05:25 pm:   

Hmm... I read Piece from the aforementioned Iain M. Banks ss collection last night. An oddly presented, quiet little tale, with a moment of shocking realization that springs on you at the end with lingering effect. I'm not sure I'm up to the likes of The Wasp Factory at the moment; I presently like my fictional encounters with darkness to be strong but brief. *S*
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mark Bukovec
Posted on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 - 10:40 pm:   

Hi Ellen. I just finished Logorrhea, which had some really good stories and some that just didn't do anything for me. It's a theme antho, but the theme is so broad that the stories don't start feeling the same.

Currently reading Train by Pete Dexter. The writing is superb, but I'm not engaging with the story yet at the 1/3 mark.

Next up is probably Spook Country.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, August 09, 2007 - 08:08 am:   

Hi Mark,
I read Logorrhea and agree with you. There were about six to whom I gave Honorable Mentions (for horror).
I believe I've read one Dexter--an early one, Paris Trout --and enjoyed it, but not enough to fun out and read others.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Thursday, August 30, 2007 - 07:38 am:   

D.A. by Connie Willis - pleasant YA 'off to space camp by mistake' screwball comedy

Getting to Know You by David Marusek - first landmark collection by one of SF's most vigorous near-futurists. I understand the delivery of his second novel is imminent.

Spook Country by William Gibson - loose followup to 'Pattern Recognition' [the Blue Ant trilogy?]
Gibson's trademark high-voltage prose; highly recommended.

coming up:

The Imago Sequence: Laird Barron
The Dog Said Bow-Wow: Michael Swanwick
Mortal Love: Elizabeth Hand
The Execution Channel: Ken MacLeod
Catacomb Years: Michael Bishop
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

anna tambour
Posted on Friday, August 31, 2007 - 06:10 am:   

Probably everyone here already read or read about this feature, but in case I'm wrong, New Scientist ran a "Science in Fiction special" in the 22 Aug issue.
http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn12525&feedId=opinion_rss20
"I hate science fiction"
The interview of Jeanette Winterson is probably the core piece. The distinction between "science" fiction and "science fiction" is the nub.
http://www.newscientist.com/channel/opinion/mg19526185.300-interview-in-search-o f-a-grand-unified-theory-of-me.html
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Friday, August 31, 2007 - 01:27 pm:   

I can't get too upset about these sorts of things. New Scientist seems to be a bit sensationalist on some of these topics.

Invariably I'll see something that falls into a familiar area of knowledge on tv or in a movie and it's just wrong. But that isn't going to stop writers from continuing to make bonehead errors --- and frankly they don't know and just as likely don't care. It's all about the story they'll say.

And I don't doubt that scientists shudder at some of the nonsense in science fiction. And that's fine with me.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 20, 2007 - 09:22 pm:   

I just started Martin Cruz Smith's latest Renko mystery: Stalin's Ghost and am enjoying it so far.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ahmed A. Khan
Posted on Tuesday, September 25, 2007 - 02:24 pm:   

Currently reading "Einstein's Bridge" by John Cramer. Good so far.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Craig L. Gidney
Posted on Saturday, September 29, 2007 - 09:47 pm:   

I really enjoyed Brian Francis Slattery's SPACEMAN BLUES. It's an alien invasion story/gay love story/ NYC travelogue as if written by Kurt Vonnegut.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Byron Bailey
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 07:10 pm:   

Just started reading Haunted: Tales of the Grotesque by Joyce Carol Oates and couldn't help but notice that it was dedicated to someone by the name of Ellen Datlow. Cool.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 10:10 pm:   

Yup. She asked me if it was ok first and I thought that very gracious of her.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

des lewis
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 11:44 pm:   

I'm reading 'Blonde' by Joyce Carol Oates at the moment. I've long been a fan of Oates and this is one of her best novels. Yes, a novel.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Byron Bailey
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 06:43 am:   

Yeah. Congratulations on the World Fantasy win even if it's still cooler to have Joyce Carol Oates dedicate a book to you.

I've never actually read an Oates novel although I have six collections of hers, a few of them still unread as of now. I'll need to read a novel or two or ten of hers sometime. The one I have my heart set on starting with is Zombie.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Byron Bailey
Posted on Thursday, November 22, 2007 - 10:08 am:   

I've been alternating between stories found in Fritz Leiber's The Black Gondolier and Joyce Carol Oates's Haunted: Tales of the Grotesque. The title story "The Black Gondolier" in the Leiber collection seems awfully relevant today. Oil. It's out to get us. In this day and age, would anyone be surpised? I've been a little stalled on the Oates collection because by pure coincidence, I've stumbled upon a story entitled "Thanksgiving" within it and felt compelled to save it for today.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, November 22, 2007 - 09:25 pm:   

Byron, I published "Thanksgiving" in OMNI.

I read a bit more of Dan Simmons' The Terror while on the bus crosstown to T-day dinner. Didn't get very far but I do like it quite a lot.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Byron Bailey
Posted on Friday, November 23, 2007 - 07:03 am:   

Cool. "Thanksgiving" was a very good story, another example of your impeccable taste. I have two interpretations for it, one of which has the events in the story being on the surreal side rather than real. However, I couldn't help but notice that the events of the story make a certain realistic sense if one considers that an apocalypse has occurred and the father and daughter lead such isolated lives that they didn't know about it.

The only thing I didn't like about "Thanksgiving" is that it ultimately seemed to have far more to say about today, Black Friday, than it does about about Thanksgiving. What some people will do in the name of shopping!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

des lewis
Posted on Friday, November 23, 2007 - 09:32 am:   

What's 'Black Friday'?
des
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Byron Bailey
Posted on Friday, November 23, 2007 - 09:50 am:   

The Black Friday I'm talking abour is the day after Thanksgiving in the US, generally considered the start of serious Christmas shopping with a lot of stores having big sales. Some take their Black Friday shopping extremely seriously. Last night at my family's Thanksgiving celebration, after all the food had been put away, the dishes washed and almost everyone had left, I was still there missing the Colt's Football game because the sister I hitched a ride with was planning shopping strategy with two other of my sisters for 4 hours. They started shopping at 6:00 AM this morning. And that's nothing compared to what some do in the name of shopping on this day.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

des lewis
Posted on Friday, November 23, 2007 - 10:24 am:   

Thanks, Byron. That's all new to me here in UK.
I learn a lot being here! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, November 23, 2007 - 12:51 pm:   

I just did my own "Black Friday" shopping--buying a new travel notebook on sale till Sunday --via telephone.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

PM
Posted on Sunday, December 16, 2007 - 01:37 pm:   

Now that it's out, I suppose I can discuss Shephard's postapocalpytic (though he may suggest pre rather than post) beach party romp from Inferno.

Who knew Tom Cruise would illuminate the human condition...:-)

The irony per square inch would shock the most jaded whore. Dare I say "classic"?

As errata go, Doria mysteriously becomes Dory on page two hundred forty nine. Twice. But then she shucks the "y" and regains her "ia".

And we are reminded in his introduction that one cannot predict Lucius' publishing future :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, December 16, 2007 - 02:47 pm:   

Damn! I don't know how everyone missed that...it damned annoying.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register

| Moderators | Administrators |