HOME | CATALOG | DOWNLOADS | LINKS | EDITORIALS | DISCUSSION | CONTACT

Best of the Best (horror)

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register
Night Shade Message Boards » Datlow, Ellen » Best of the Best (horror) « Previous Next »

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  Start New Thread        

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, July 26, 2006 - 01:44 pm:   

There's a very good chance that I'll be co-editing a Best of the Best of YBFH in honor of the antho's 20th anniversary edition. So...suggestions for my horror half (which would be about 140,000 words --since there won't be a long summary or HM at the back) are welcome. The stories have to be taken from the HORROR half of the 20 volumes (of course, neither you nor I know what will be in this year's volume yet :-) )
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Wednesday, July 26, 2006 - 03:07 pm:   

Yay!! That's wonderful news. Can't wait to see the final book. I'd recommend Glen Hirshberg's "Mr Dark's Carnival".
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, July 26, 2006 - 08:22 pm:   

I was thinking of that one, but I have a soft spot for "Dancing Men." We'll see. I'll have to reread a lot of them anyway. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Nathan Ballingrud
Posted on Wednesday, July 26, 2006 - 08:49 pm:   

I really like "With Acknowledgements to Sun Tzu" by Brian Hodge.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

FERNANDO JIMENEZ
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 01:57 am:   

I'd go for "Mr. Clubb and Mr. Cuff" but I think it might be too long for this kind of book.
It may look a commercial decision to include Stephen King but "Lunch at the Gotham Cafe" is one of the stories I still remember with a shudder.
Also:
"You Go Where It Takes You"
Ramsey Campbell (difficult to choose a story)
Ditto Michael Marshall Smith
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 06:14 am:   

If "The Specialist's Hat" and "Only Partly Here" are considered horror, I vote for them. And I second "Mr. Dark's Carnival." There was also a story that you chose in the mid-90s by Michael Marshall Smith that I remember really liking (of course, that doesn't narrow it down).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 08:06 am:   

"The Specialist's Hat" is indeed horror and was chosen for YBFH when it came out. "Only Partly Here" kind of is and was chosen by Kelly and Gavin--I didn't split the wordage with them but did put my initials on it :-) so I've always had mixed feelings about it.

I love "Mr Clubb and Mr. Cuff" but it was even too long for the original YBFH it appeared in (we had to squeeze it in).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 08:10 am:   

Kelly,
I've taken a lot of stories by MM Smith. I may be partial though to "More Tomorrow." "Not Waving" from my cat horror antho was from the mid-90s. Is that it?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 08:36 am:   

Ellen: I'd have to look through the anthos from the 90s. I don't remember much of the story, only that I liked it a lot. My vague recollection tells me it dealt with a man and a woman in a bar...err, I know, that's not much to go on.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 09:03 am:   

"Later" might be it in #7...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris Dodson
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 09:31 am:   

That sick, sick Christopher Fowler story about the dentist (shudder); I believe it was called "On Edge."

I also remember Gemma Files' "The Emperor's Old Bones" as being profoundly disturbing.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 11:44 am:   

Chris,
I know. I posted the title and author on Dm.net where the subject first came up. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 07:55 pm:   

i really dug the laird barron 'bulldozer' from last year. also, michael chabon's 'the black mill' was a favourite.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 08:26 pm:   

Of course, my problem is that I love most of the stories or I woudldn't have picked them. But everyone mentioning favorites is helpful because they tweak my memory.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

MarcL
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 10:26 pm:   

Old Virginia!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fernando Jimenez
Posted on Thursday, July 27, 2006 - 11:52 pm:   

After further consideration ...
George RR Martin: The Pear Shaped Man
Terry Dowling: Beckoning Nightframe or Scaring The Train
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Fernando Jimenez
Posted on Friday, July 28, 2006 - 03:25 am:   

Kelly's reference to a man and a woman in a bar reminded me of (if I'm not confused) "A Friend Indeed" by David Garnett, also a favourite.
More titles come to mind everytime I think about this: you have made a great work all these years.
By the way, will be Link/Grant or Terri Windling who edit the fantasy half?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ben peek
Posted on Friday, July 28, 2006 - 06:20 am:   

'scaring the train' is my favourite dowling story. if you're taking votes for a dowling reprint, that would be mine...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, July 28, 2006 - 12:29 pm:   

Terri would be choosing stories from the first 16 years (or whenever she stopped) and Kelly & Gavin from the years they edited the fantasy half. So there would be all four names on the cover :-)

These are all great suggestions, btw.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, July 28, 2006 - 09:40 pm:   

It's not definite yet....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Moomaw
Posted on Friday, November 24, 2006 - 05:04 pm:   

All right! Finally, my chance to help edit a horror anthology -- always a private dream of mine. Two stories that I by God DEMAND you include are "Old Virginia" (still Barron's best story) and "The Silence of the Falling Stars" (best ghost story I've ever read by anyone, ever). And one story that I demand you NOT include is "Guts"; the purpose is to chill the reader, not make him vomit.

Beyond those Three Unshakeable Commandments, I'll have to put in a little more thought and review; there are lots of promising candidates.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Byron Bailey
Posted on Friday, November 24, 2006 - 08:58 pm:   

"And one story that I demand you NOT include is "Guts"; the purpose is to chill the reader, not make him vomit."

Chilled vomit is a bit of an acquired taste. Still, I can see including "Guts." In relationship to it's wordage, it made a very strong impression on me. I'm not sure if I'd personally include it but I don't think it would be at all out of place, either.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, November 25, 2006 - 05:05 pm:   

Bruce and Byron, thanks for the feedback :-) Although I very much likef "Guts," I very much doubt I'd consider it one of the "Best of the best."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Eric Schaller
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2006 - 10:03 am:   

"Guts" made sense to me for inclusion in the Year's Best--it did for me what all good horror does, make me want to continue reading even though what I am reading proves disquieting. What weakened it for me was a certain scientific implausability to the central concept. You can get a "sprung-bung" as cats and dogs will sometimes get, but you can't pull your entire intestines out by the method in the story.

For the Best of the Best, I'd hope that some of the older stories get fresh play. For example, Ligotti's "Last Feast of Harlequin."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Moomaw
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 02:27 pm:   

Among Terry Dowling's stories, I'd definitely go with "Clownette". It's an exception to his annoying habit of writing horror stories that are more puzzling than scary -- for instance, I'm still trying to figure out what actually happened to the woman at the end of "Beckoning Nightframe". I just finished reading "Scaring the Train", and unfortunately it falls into the same category -- although I won't mention here the frustrating questions raised in my own mind by the story, lest I spoil it for someone who might like it more.

(As for the two original stories in his "Basic Black" collection, I'd definitely go with "Cheat Light" for the next YBFH anthology.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 02:45 pm:   

As I think I mentioned, I took "La Profonde."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2006 - 02:47 pm:   

I love most of Terry's horror stories. Even if some of his stories are puzzling, to me they always have that frisson of creepiness as well. But I rarely need to know exactly what happens to a character--I KNOW it's something bad, and that's good enough for me. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Moomaw
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 11:13 pm:   

Maybe, but I dislike scratching my head when I'm supposed to be shivering. A large majority of Dowling's stories remind me of Pres. Eisenhower's speeches: Uh-huh, uh-huh...what??

Anyway, aside from "Old Virginia" and "The Silence of the Falling Stars" I can't really find any other horror stories from the volumes of YBFH I've read (which is most of them) that positively DEMAND to be included in a "Best of the Best" -- which is not, of course, to say that there aren't lots of other very good stories. Everyone seems to have his own favorite Hirshberg story; mine is "Struwwelpeter", but I thought "Safety Clowns" was even better and regret that it didn't get into YBFH.

For whatever it's worth, my own other personal tip-top list from what I've seen would include:
Etchemendy, "Cat in Glass"
Carroll, "Mr. Fiddlehead"
Haldeman, "Graves"
Clegg, "I Am Infinite, I Contain Multitudes"
King, "That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French" (actually I think Terry Windling picked that one, but it's definitely horror)

Be interesting to see how many of these we agree on. (If I had to name the post-1987 horror story I've read that I most regret didn't get into YBFH at all, I'd say Karl Edward Wagner's "Cedar Lane" -- which I think is a flat-out classic.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Bowes
Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2006 - 11:19 pm:   

If the project is approved, you might try to get them to make it visually distinct from the YBF&H. The Best Of Best SF just looked like another volume of YBSF.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 10:25 am:   

Rick, That makes sense...will strongly suggest it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Michael Kelly
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2006 - 04:47 pm:   

Personal favorites:

"The Great God Pan" by M. John Harrison
"Some Other Me" by Brian Hodge
"The Machine of a Religious Man" by Ralph Robert Moore
"Blackbirds" by Norman Partridge
"Every Angel is Terrifying" by John Kessel
"Struwwelpeter" by Glen Hirshberg
"Endless Summer" by Stewart O'Nan
"Mr. Sly Stops for a Cup of Joe" by Scott Emerson Bull
"You Go Where it Takes You" by Nathan Ballingrud
"Down Here in the Garden" by Tia Travis
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bruce Moomaw
Posted on Monday, December 04, 2006 - 05:39 pm:   

I can't really say I thought the Kessel story was great, but I must say I admired his audacity (or gall) in actually writing a sequel to "A Good Man Is Hard To Find", just as he previously wrote one to "Moby Dick".

(Of course, a few years ago someone wrote an entire novel based on a fact casually mentioned by Melville and then dropped -- namely, that Ahab was MARRIED. Their domestic life must have been interesting in the extreme. "Have a nice trip, dear, and remember not to get too filled with obsessive rage at the meaningless malevolence of God. You know what it does to your digestion." "Arrrrr! Craven hussy!")

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Log Out | Edit Profile | Register

| Moderators | Administrators |