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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 08:15 pm:   

The website I created with Rob Killheffer, Pamela Weintraub, and Kathleen Stein, my former OMNI colleagues is gone but not forgotten. It can be retrieved with everything on it via the wayback site:

http://web.archive.org/web/20030622124949/www.eventhorizon.com/sfzine/index.html

I know it works with Firefox. Apparently Safari doesn't work.

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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 06:01 am:   

Oh, cool! Event Horizon was gone before I'd ever heard of it, so I'm glad to have to chance to finally read some of it. Thanks for posting that link, Ellen.
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Claudia OKeefe
Posted on Sunday, April 17, 2005 - 08:55 pm:   

Hi, Ellen,

Thanks for the link. I just read a number of the essays on the site and found Doug Winter's take on the state of horror publishing in 1999 particularly interesting. Lately, I've noticed a couple of horror writers being marketed as the new big names of the "post-Stephen King era." I was wondering, where do you think horror has/hasn't gone since Winter's essay(s)? Who do you think has or will emerge on top next?
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 07:35 am:   

Claudia,
I think horror continues to trudge on, get published (but not necessarily as horror) and that the interesting writers will rise to the top of the heap. I wouldn't try to predict who could become the "next" Stephen King. However, there are some excellent horror writers whose work has impressed me over the past few years. The thing is, many of them don't ONLY write horror. And since I only read a few novels of any kind a year, I can only judge from the short fiction I read:

Glen Hirshberg
Jeffrey Ford
Lucius Shepard
Kelly Link


have all produced excellent horror stories over the past five years.

If you go over my TOC of the past five years of YBFH you'll see those writers and others whose horror work I think is terrific. The most recent TOC is in the YBFH #18 topic.
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Claudia OKeefe
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 08:08 am:   

Thank you, Ellen. I forgot to think about crossover writers. Personally, I usually find their work more interesting. They often times have a broader definition of horror. I've read Shepard, but not the other three (been out of the loop for some years and have a lot of catching up to do on reading). I'll check out the other three.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 08:46 am:   

Just thought of another:
ELizabeth Hand. A lot of her short stories and novels are very dark.
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Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 09:28 am:   

Hi Claudia,

Ellen listed a slew of my favorite writers. Try:

Glen Hirshberg - The Two Sams
Lucius Shepard - Trujillo and Other Stories
Elizabeth Hand - Mortal Love
Kelly Link - Stranger Things Happen
Jeffrey Ford - The Fantasy Writer's Assistant

Laird Barron is getting some good buzz but I've yet to catch up with him.

Cheers, Bruce
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 10:51 am:   

Yes, Laird's work is quite good and very horrific. His story "Old Virginia" was in F&SF in 2003 and was picked by me for YBFH #17. And his story on SCIFICTION "Bulldozer," was picked by me for YBFH #18, forthcoming this August.

And Marc Laidlaw has been writing short, horrific fiction again. His "Cell Call" from Steve Jones' By Moonlight Only is excellent.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 01:31 pm:   

I'd add, more for novel length, Graham Joyce. Like Lucius and Jeffrey, you wouldn't want to try and catagorize their writing as anything specific. But he does a lot of really well written, dark fantasy stuff, which blurs the lines of fantasticism (don't even know if that's a formal word) and realism; genre and mainstream.

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scott benenati
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 03:27 pm:   

Ellen: I also thought "Cell Call" was excellent and was glad you included it in YBFH; I wouldn't have come across it otherwise. It had such a simple premise, but was executed masterfully.

And I wonder if Thomas Ligotti should be included on the above horror list.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 03:47 pm:   

Oh yes, definitely. I'd add him and Graham Joyce (I adored Tooth Fairy).
I'd also add
Conrad Williams
M. John Harrison when he's feeling really dark
Nicholas Royle
Joel Lane
Gemma Files
Tia V. Travis (although neither of the latter two publish enough)
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 05:23 pm:   

It's John Langan. He's the "next" Stephen King. I have that on good authority.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 08:55 pm:   

Oh yeah ;-)

John Langan is another excellent horror writer. Hopefully, he'll finish his horror novel.
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Claudia OKeefe
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 10:17 pm:   

Thanks everyone, that list ought to keep me busy for some time. E. Hand's Mortal Love sounds especially interesting. Just read "Bulldozer." Not to put too fine a point on it, but wow. It's like the literary equivalent of watching a movie at an Imax theater. Everything is right there in your face. No wonder it made it into YBFH #18.

John Langan?

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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 07:27 am:   

Claudia,

"Mr Gaunt" was a novella Langan wrote for F&SF a few years ago. Great story. I would have taken it for YBFH but it was too long.
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John Joseph Adams
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 10:34 am:   

He also wrote "On Skua Island" (Aug. 2001)and "Tutorial," (Aug. 2003) both also in F&SF. And if you're interested, "Mr. Gaunt" was in the Sep. 2002 issue. The Aug. 2003 back issue is sold out, but the other two are available; or all three should still be available electronically from Fictionwise and Palm Digital Media.
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Claudia OKeefe
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 04:51 pm:   

Thanks, Ellen and JJA. Will look these up. The tower of reading material next to my bed is rapidly taking on ominous proportions.

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