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YBFH #19

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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 06:19 pm:   

March 2005

I co-edit the World Fantasy Award winning anthology series The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror (St. Martin's Press) with Kelly Link & Gavin Grant. The 18th annual collection will be out in August 2005. We are now reading for the 19th volume, which will include all material published in the year 2005.
I am looking for stories from all branches of horror: from the traditional-supernatural to the borderline, including high-tech science fiction horror, psychological horror, or anything else that might qualify. If in doubt, send it. This is a reprint anthology so I am only reading material published in or about to be published during the year 2005. Submission deadline for stories is December 15th 2004. Anything sent after this deadline will reach me too late. If a magazine, anthology, or collection you’re in or you edit is coming out by December 31st 2005 you can send me galleys or manuscripts so that I can judge the stories in time. No email submissions. I strongly suggest that authors check with their publishers that they are sending review copies out to me as I don’t have time or energy to nag publishers to get me material. I request it once (maybe twice) and that’s it.

There are summations of "the year in horror," and "the year in fantasy" in the front of each volume. These include magazine and publishing news concerning the horror and fantasy fields, novels we've read and liked, and in my section, "odds and ends"-- material that doesn't fit anywhere else but that I feel might interest the horror reader (like strange nonfiction titles, art books, etc). But I have to be aware of this material in order to mention it. The deadline for this section is January 30th, 2006.
When sending me material please put YEAR'S BEST HORROR on the envelope.
Ellen Datlow
PMB 391
511 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10011-8436

Kelly Link & Gavin Grant
176 Prospect Avenue
Northampton, MA 01060

Kelly & Gavin cover fantasy and I cover horror. If you consider something both, send a copy to each of us. We do not confer on our choices.
****I do not want to receive manuscripts from authors of stories from venues that it’s likely I already receive regularly (like Interzone, The Third Alternative, Cemetery Dance, Weird Tales, F&SF, etc) or from anthologies and collections, unless I don't have or can’t get that anthology or collection. And please do not send a SASE. If I choose a story you will be informed. If you want to confirm that I‘ve received something, enclose a self-addressed-stamped postcard and I will let you know the date it arrived. For stories that appear on the web, please send me (or have the publisher send me) print-outs of your story.
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chance
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 06:42 pm:   

ah everything is new again!
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 08:22 pm:   

If only I was really finished with the last, but I'm not :-(
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 11:21 pm:   

Ellen, quick question: do you consider humorous horror? I have a little story, "The Tale of Roderick Rabbit, by Beatrix Stoker", coming out in _Tales of the Unanticipated_ in 2006.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 06:56 am:   

Hi Jason. I do,and I regularly receive copies of TOFU for review.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 08:29 am:   

Uh, that's TOTU, not TOFU. :-D
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Patrick Samphire
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 09:07 am:   

Tofu with stories on it. An untapped market, I think. Damn, where do you get it?
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 09:25 am:   

ROTFL. Yes, TOTU. I hate TOFU! Don't send me any please.
Patrick: Any supermarket :-)
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Vylar Kaftan
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 09:30 am:   

TOFU. Now printed with 100% soy-based inks. :-)
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 02:25 pm:   

First there was Alphabet Soup.
Next, Conversation Hearts.
Coming Soon: Literary Tofu!
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anon
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2005 - 07:42 am:   

Just when you thought it was safe to take off your socks . . . Toe-FOO.

Look out! Or the FOO will get YOU.
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Melissa
Posted on Sunday, March 13, 2005 - 09:08 pm:   

Ellen, I love your Anthologies!

A few Q’s re: YBFH:

1: Are the writers chosen for YBFH compensated, other than the prestige and increased popularity?

2: Has a writer ever refused to take part in the book?

3: I’ve seen guidelines where the publisher has a long period of exclusive rights to the story (Such as a quarterly). If you’ve ever selected a story, which will still be under the exclusivity, do you have to pay publishers to allow you to print the story, or are they so happy to have the prestige of being mentioned that they allow you to print it?

4: This is my really real question. How do you define the date of publication? The day it was printed, the day it became available to the public, or the issue date on the cover? It seems mags are coming out earlier and earlier…no doubt April or even May issues are out right now. My point is as follows. Let’s say Anne Author has a story to be in the upcoming January ’06 issue of Hypothetical Example Magazine. The magazine will actually hit the stands in December ‘05, if not earlier.
If you like the story enough to include it in YBFH, would it be the ’05 book, or the ’06 book?
I’m thinking it would be ’06, because “Originally published in Hypo. Ex. Mag. Jan ’06” would look odd on a TOC with ’05 stories. However that brings up some issues in my nit-picky mind.
If issue date is the determining factor, then it seems that an unethical writer could market a work as unpublished to editors, while still having it self-published with an issue date far into the future, and still technically be within his/her rights. Does that make sense to anyone but myself? An extreme example: Anne Author posts her story on the web, and prints up a bunch of flyers. Everything has an issue date of May 2010. She hands them out everywhere, glutting the market with them. Meanwhile, she sells it to Hypo. Ex. Mag. as an unpublished work.
Maybe the exclusivity clause takes care of that? Maybe I just answered my own question? Maybe I’m just a fruitcake?

5: “A URL” or “An URL”? “An” seems grammatically correct, but it doesn’t roll off my tongue properly and it irks me.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 12:50 pm:   

1. Yes every anthology I edit pays the authors. The YBFH pays very little, but that's because we're paying for over 250,000 words of fiction.

2. Yes, writers occasionally don't want to be in a horror anthology--and they aren't always mainstream writers. I won't name names but at least once a genre writer didn't want the particular story I wanted to use reprinted in a horror antho. Sometimes the rights are held by the publisher (especially mainstream writers) and the sub rights dept wants an unreasonable amount of money (which the author doesn't even get directly, if at all).

3. It depends on who controls the rights. But I've never heard of a magazine owning the rights so even if there's an exclusivity period the author would get paid, not the publisher. Sometimes an anthology contract will stipulate that a story can be reprinted within the exclusivity period if it's for a best of the year anthology or in the author's collection. Sometimes we can't get the story because the original venue won't stretch the rules and let us reprint the story.

4. A professional magazine is considered by the date on the magazine. Occasionally, a small press mag will say that the issue that says one year was actually published a few months later and I'll consider it for the later year.

If publication is on the cusp of the year, it depends on the piece of work. eg. I really love the Acquainted with the Night antho from Ash-Tree. It was supposed to be out in 04 but actually didn't reach anyone including bookstores till January 05. I'm considering the book for 05 because there are stories I'd like to reconsider for 05 even though I read the pdf file of all the stories pre-publication.

I'm not sure I understand the other part of your question. If an editor buys a story that originally appeared on a personal website then they should provide correct first publication credit. If I was such a story reprinted in a magazine, loved it and wanted to take it for YBFH, I'd be pretty annoyed if I hadn't known it was on a personal website for 5 years.

5. A "url" because the first letter begins with a "y" in pronunciation.
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Melissa
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 02:45 pm:   

Ellen,
Thanks for answering my silly questions!

The "a/n URL" question resulted from the SFWA website. I've seen "an" there. If I had enough paper to make a list of people smarter than myself, those folks would surely be in the first ream. Perhaps they think of "URL" as an acronym (pronounced like "Earl").
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2005 - 03:19 pm:   

Well, sure--it does depend on whether you're spelling out U R L --then it would be "a" but if you're pronouncing it URL as "earl" then it would be "an".
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Monday, August 01, 2005 - 11:18 pm:   

Hi Ellen,

Do you subscribe to Talebones? I have a story in their Summer 2005 issue. It might not be YBFH-caliber material, but I thought I'd give you a heads up. :-)

Hope all is well.

Jason
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, August 02, 2005 - 09:30 am:   

Hi Jason,
I get a comp from them, so I will see it.
Thanks
Yes, now that my replacement computer's set up I feel much better :-)
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Roger
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 03:58 pm:   

I just read Ted Chiang's one page "What's Expected of Us" in the July 7, 2005 issue of Nature. A nasty little story, I think you might like it.
Roger
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 06:37 pm:   

Thanks for the suggestion, Roger. I don't suppose it's online somewhere? Or I guess I can ask Ted to email a copy to me.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - 01:06 pm:   

I've finished choosing my wordage for my half of the Year's best. Unfortunately, I can't publically announce my TOC until we confirm one story... so be patient boys and girls :-).
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 05:38 pm:   

I'm finally at liberty to announce the horror half of YBFH 2006: Nineteenth Annual Collection:


Ding-Dong-Bell Jay Russell Don’t Turn Out the Light
Boatman’s Holiday Jeffrey Ford Book of Voices/ F&SF October
Northwest Passage Barbara Roden Acquainted With the Night
Shallaballah Mark Samuels Don’t Turn Out the Light
The Ball Room China Miéville, Emma Bircham, and Max Schaefer Looking for Jake
My Father’s Mask Joe Hill Twentieth Century Ghosts
Hot Potting Chuck Palahniuk Haunted
Vacation Daniel Wallace Off the Map
Twilight States Albert E. Cowdrey F&SF July
The Souls of Drowning Mountain Jack Cady Taverns of the Dead
Follow me Light Elizabeth Bear SCIFICTION January
Proboscis Laird Barron F&SF February
Going the Jerusalem Mile Chaz Brenchley The Third Alternative spring
The Machine of a Religious Man Ralph Robert Moore Midnight Street spring
American Morons Glen Hirshberg Darkness Rising chapbook
Jolly Bonnet Andrew Bonia (poem) Jabberwocky
Nymphs Finding the Head of Orpheus Theodora Goss (poem) Jabberwocky
The Pavement Artist Dave Hutchinson As the Crow Flies
Where Angels Come In Adam L.G. Nevill Poe’s Progeny
Scarecrow Tom Brennan Crimewave 8: Cold Harbours
Among the Tombs Reggie Oliver The Complete Symphonies of Adolf Hitler

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Nathan
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 07:39 pm:   

I see some writers who are new to me, amongst the old reliables. I'm looking forward to it.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 09:43 pm:   

Me too :-) Which is always nice. I like fresh blood....
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Marie Brennan
Posted on Saturday, March 25, 2006 - 11:33 am:   

Inquiring minds would also love to see the list of HMs, if it's at all convenient to post. (I often find it just as interesting to peruse as the actual reprints.)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, March 25, 2006 - 07:53 pm:   

Hi Marie,
Sorry, but it's way too long to post.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, March 31, 2006 - 04:18 pm:   

Finally, the complete TOC (fantasy and horror) in alphabetical order:


The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror 2006: Nineteenth Annual Collection
Edited by Ellen Datlow and Kelly Link & Gavin J. Grant

Isabel Allende “The Guggenheim Lovers”
Laird Barron “Proboscis”
Elizabeth Bear “Follow Me Light”
Andrew Bonia “Jolly Bonnet”
Chaz Brenchley “Going the Jerusalem Mile”
Tom Brennan “Scarecrow”
Jack Cady “The Souls of Drowning Mountain”
Jennifer Chang “Obedience, or The Lying Tale” (poem)
Robert Coover “The Last One”
Albert E. Cowdrey “Twilight States”
Kelly Everding “Omens” (poem)
Jeffrey Ford “Boatman's Holiday”
Jeffrey Ford “Scribble Mind”
Theodora Goss “Nymphs Finding the Head of Orpheus” (poem)
Theodora Goss “A Statement in the Case”
Elizabeth Hand “Kronia”
Joe Hill “My Father's Mask”
Glen Hirshberg “American Morons”
Pentti Holappa “Boman”
Dave Hutchinson “The Pavement Artist”
China Mieville, Emma Bircham, and Max Schaefer “The Ball Room”
Sarah Monette “Night Train: Heading West” (poem)
Ralph Robert Moore “The Machine of a Religious Man”
Adam L.G. Nevill “Where Angels Come In”
Kim Newman “The Gypsies in the Woods”
Reggie Oliver “Among the Tombs”
Chuck Palahniuk “Hot Potting”
Stacey Richter “A Case Study of Emergency Room Procedure and Risk Management by Hospital Staff Members in the Urban Facility”
Barbara Roden “Northwest Passage”
Deborah Roggie “The Mushroom Duchess”
Jay Russell “Ding-Dong-Bell”
Geoff Ryman “The Last Ten Years in the Life of Hero Kai”
Mark Samuels “Shallaballah”
Willa Schneberg “Grief” (poem)
Nisi Shawl “Cruel Sistah”
Delia Sherman “Walpurgis Afternoon”
Bruce Sterling “The Denial”
Howard Waldrop “The Horse of a Different Color (that You Rode in On)”
Daniel Wallace “Vacation”
Marley Youmans “Incident at Agate Beach”
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Yasmine
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 06:32 am:   

Ellen, I've just seen the cover for YBFH 2006 and am a bit puzzled...it doesn't look like a 'typical' Canty cover at all. In fact I think it's been done by someone else or have i got it wrong?
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 09:17 am:   

Yasmine,
The new design is by Tom Canty but is completely different from the past eighteen volumes in the series. We all felt the book needed a redesign after all this time. I don't know how accurate the colors are or anything but I do believe that's what it will look like, overall.
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Yasmine
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 02:56 am:   

Oh i see. Thanks Ellen. Of course it's too soon to comment on the redesign, but i have to say i shall miss the old design.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, April 05, 2006 - 06:41 am:   

I understand your feelings completely. I love that style of Canty's work. But keeping the same design for 20 years makes for a type of complacency in the viewer. Every few years a magazine or a series needs a bid of change in look to pep it up.

I hope the new design works for the YBFH.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:05 pm:   

I've emailed in my summary of the year in horror and am really relieved. There are a few minor additions I made need to make but I don't care!!!!
I'm freeeeee.

And when I get back from Kiev I'll start reading for 06.
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Armand Constantine
Posted on Sunday, April 30, 2006 - 04:20 pm:   

Hey, Ellen. I always look forward to your Year's Best anthos. I'm really happy to see "Hot Potting" in there! It's one of my all-time favorites. The image of skimming the hotsprings for bits of the kid who went in after his dog is one of those things I'll remember for a very long time. :-)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, April 30, 2006 - 04:37 pm:   

Hi Armand,
Glad to hear that you enjoy them! That's what makes it worth doing (really! It sure ain't the $$).
Yeah. I liked "Hot Potting" a lot. Lovely disgusting stuff. :-)
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, May 01, 2006 - 05:09 pm:   

I liked Diary and Lullabye. I have others, including Fight Club, which I really want to read but don't know when I'll get to it.
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Armand Constantine
Posted on Monday, May 01, 2006 - 08:29 pm:   

I also loved Guts (despite the over-the-top publicity stuff about people passing out/throwing up/going into cardiac arrest, etc.) Chuck did a great reading of it at the Stokers last year. Sadly, no one puked. :-)

I agree that the whole of the book didn't add up to too much more than the stories themselves. Although, introducing characters that were responsible for telling these stories did something to add a "yarn spinning" quality that was, I thought, interesting.

I hear Choke is good, though I haven't read it.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 11:30 am:   

This was posted on Tim Lucas's blog (Video Watchdog). I guess I should go out and shoot myself but somehow it just makes me laugh. I'm guessing that if I'd read his Renfield novel and praised it, his post wouldn't exist, but of course, I could be wrong.

I tried writing up a few "notable" novels that I hadn't read and not doing a "completist" list for a couple of years, but it took too much time and still didn't satisfy everyone (how could it?) -writers were insulted that their novels weren't mentioned in a line or two. And at least one person was unhappy when I stopped doing the list(Ed Bryant, who felt it was a print record for the year).

So I went back to merely listing the titles of mainstream/borderline horror and in-genre horror. So I can't win. Only if I cloned myself.

http://www.videowatchdog.blogspot.com/
From Sept 2nd, scroll down to:

"I've also been feeling some discouragement from the arrival of the new edition of THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY & HORROR, edited by Ellen Datlow and Kelly Link & Gavin J. Grant. Back in 1995, when my first novel THROAT SPROCKETS was published, Ellen very kindly singled it out in a paragraph as the year's best first novel; it's been more than a decade since then, and I had hoped that THE BOOK OF RENFIELD would be acknowledged in some way, for good or ill -- especially as there were so few reviews. Certainly an incentive in undertaking a novel is to see what knowledgeable people will say about it, especially when they've shown signs of being discerning about your past work. Unfortunately, Ellen's section on "Notable Novels of 2005" in the new edition begins with her lamenting, "I rarely have time to read novels..." and then proceeding to list the best of those she had, including the latest Harry Potter. (As a fellow novelist commiserated, "I think it's time people stopped congratulating themselves on reading YA" -- besides which, Harry Potter is fantasy, a genre subject to an annual overview of its own by Link & Grant, who give every book they mention its due.)

THE BOOK OF RENFIELD is mentioned in Ellen's overview, but only as a facet of a lengthy, many paged list of novels "Also Noted." Here, the titles of novels and the names of their authors are presented on an unbroken list so multitudinous as to appear unselective, so monolithic in their accumulation as to resemble the Viet Nam War Memorial. Readers of the book are unlikely to read through such a list. Such uncomprehensive handling of the category made me feel sad -- not only for myself, but for every other novelist who took the time and care this past year to contribute something more substantial than a short story to the genre. If Ellen's not reading many novels these days, she needs to hire someone who is; better still, perhaps an altogether new horror anthology is needed, one that would select and excerpt from the best horror novels of each given year."
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 11:36 am:   

And to be accurate, he praised my continuing coverage of Video Watchdog in his next para, but that didn't seem relevant to the above.
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PM
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 12:05 pm:   

What are your thoughts of simply dropping the discussion of novels altogether?

Or just a URL that points to it?

It's not a lack of interest in your novel comments though.

Oh and I support Datlow cloning.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 01:34 pm:   

I don't feel I can drop it completely. The book has always been seen as a kind of "completist" reference book, in addition to the stories. That's the problem. It has grown in size and intent over the past 20 years. It's hard to draw back once you've gone ahead.

Of course, those not interested in certain areas can just skip them so no harm no foul.

An url to where? I'm a little confused...


Thanks for the feedback :-)
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 01:43 pm:   

As someone who loves and savors Link/Grant's (and Windling's before them) Top 20 Books of the Year, I'd actually like to see someone cover horror novels more in depth. Good horror novels, more than those in the fantasy genre, seem to creep between publishing borders and are often difficult to find. I'd like someone who's a voracious reader of the horror novel to point me to something a little more obscure. Kind of like you, Ellen, do with your selections of short horror fiction. The reason I buy your antho year after year, and not the plethora of others, is because you offer selections that many genre pubs usually ignore.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 02:13 pm:   

Kelly,
Kelly and Gavin's half of the book is modeled after the structure Terri Windling used for her half of the intro...my half is modeled after Gardner Dozois's Year's Best intros. And year's ago, when the book was smaller and I wasn't expected to cover _everything_ I actually had more time to read novels. But venues for short horror fiction have expanded exponentially (which I don't believe it has for fantasy) and I simply don't have the time--or energy. I know this doesn't provide a solution but I don't know what can be done. I'd be loathe to have Jim Frenkel hire yet another contributing editor as it would take away from the little money Kelly, Gavin and I already make from the anthology and would just add another dozen pages to a book that's already huge.

that said,there are magazine reviewers who do cover horror books that are published in the mainstream regularly: Paula Guran and Doug Winter (not so regularly). Also, Ed Bryant is reviewing in Locus again after a several month absence.
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PM
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 02:24 pm:   

RE: the URL idea. (Just an idea. One among several.) As it's impossible to put all the material in the book why not put a pointer in the book to this material and let it continue to develop online. ("Material" --- that which doesn't concern short works)

I acknowledge your tradition and there's no intention intended that I'm suggesting that this material should be skipped or not printed. I'm suggesting that it could spawn online or even in another volume.

I'm requesting more Datlow please...
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 03:14 pm:   

I'm reading and editing as fast as I can :-)

PM--where would the url point to? I'm still confused. Do you mean to random reviews all over the web? I'm so behind on my novel reading from years ago. I only read about 6 or 7 a year. Reading the Tiptree bio is a big break for me--I read nonfiction even less often than I read novels. I've read two novels so far this year that I'm covering, although I know I'll be getting to several more by the time the intro is due.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 05:11 pm:   

"I'd be loathe to have Jim Frenkel hire yet another contributing editor..."

Solution (which will not make everyone happy): Focus on the written word. Cut the movie, anime, and music overviews. That would free up space for another contributor to highlight horror novels.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 05:51 pm:   

I think the movie overview is important (and a selling point). Not sure about the others, but it really isn't my decision. However, I don't think I'd feel comfortable farming out novel reviews.
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PM
Posted on Thursday, September 07, 2006 - 06:31 pm:   

Ideally the publisher would host a web page dedicated to the book. It would promote the book.

If I understand it correctly there is more material available than is feasible to put in the single volume. The website would offer the opportunity for more stuff. There are a number of approaches. For example, the movie, anime, and music overviews could be entirely on this website. The actual book would have a pointer that says, "Go to this website for the movie, anime, music overviews." Or put some of it in the book and the rest on the website.

One of the advantages of the website is that it provides an opportunity for errata and anything else (perhaps even stories) that for whatever reason(s) weren't put in the book.
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Mary Robinette Kowal
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 07:19 am:   

Right, but websites aren't free either. So rather than hiring another editor, there would also have to be a webmaster.

I don't think this is a problem that needs to be fixed, personally. I buy the book for the short stories in it, and this was before I started writing. I skim the other sections, but I never sought out any of the books, videos or movies mentioned. I do now, but not before I started writing.

The problem with cloning Ellen is that then she would need two salaries. Now, an AI of Ellen that could do a review from just uploading stories, that would be useful and probably have less overhead.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 07:42 am:   

Hi Mary,
Unfortunately, this one Ellen doesn't even get one salary right now. And the pittance I get from editing YBFH pays about two months NYC rent. ;-)
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Mary Robinette Kowal
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 07:55 am:   

See! That's why I'm saying an AI is the way to go. That or move to Tennessee where the price of two months NYC rent can buy a six bedroom house.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 08:45 am:   

I'm salivating about the six bedroom house--but....(sniff) I love NYC. Can't I bring the house back here?
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Chris Dodson
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 08:45 am:   

"That or move to Tennessee where the price of two months NYC rent can buy a six bedroom house."

But on the other hand . . . it's Tennessee. Trust me, you don't want to move here. :-)
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Mary Robinette Kowal
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 08:49 am:   

Hey! That's where my family is from. You just have to be picky about where you chose to live. Chattanooga, now, it's small but very artsy. They've got a great grant for artists who want to relocate and buy a home there.

Don't listen to him, Ellen, I'll talk to my friends in temporal displacement and see if they can make a loophole for you, then your apartment building and the house can time-share the same space.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 09:58 am:   

I've been to Gate City, Tennessee-- about 25 years ago--in the Appalachians. Kind of in the country--my friend's father had me shooting his rifle in their front yard. They grew amazing yellow and orange tomatoes (the first I'd heard of such a thing) and I had the best sausage I've ever tasted --from their own hogs. Luckily my friend did not tell me that there were rattlesnakes behind the house (they were at the foot of a mountain) or I wouldn't have set foot near the place.

I like your idea of the time share, Mary :-)
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Chris Dodson
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 10:33 am:   

I live in Kingsport, which is about 10 miles away from Gate City. My town isn't quite as rural as Gate City, but it's still a little too backwoodsy for me. Wouldn't trade the peace and quiet for anything, though.

I haven't really thought about it much, but yeah, we do have some good food around these parts. I guess I tend to take stuff like that for granted since I'm around it all the time.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 02:06 pm:   

Right. My friend had at one time worked in Kingsport --I think at a printer--before she moved to NYC.
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Melissa Mead
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 02:18 pm:   

My brother-in-law's parents moved to Tennessee from Long Island. They love it.
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Jason Sizemore
Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 09:58 pm:   

Don't let Mary Kowal trick you, Ellen.

Her parents' house is up a holler straight from the pits of a frightening Brian Keene zombie novel.

They pull out the band-saw, the jug, and fiddle and play the Best of the Charlie Daniels Band.

Some of the nicest folks I've met in Tennessee, the Kowals... :-)
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Jason Sizemore
Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 09:59 pm:   

Oh, and on topic, I just finished reading Marc Samuel's story...wow, that was bone-chilling. Excellent choice, Ellen!
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Mary Robinette Kowal
Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 02:25 am:   

Jason, Jason... My father plays a handsaw, not a band saw. That would be silly.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 06:54 am:   

Hi Jason,
thanks for telling me the truth about where Mary's parents' live (even if the facts were slightly off ;-) ).

Glad you liked Mark Samuels' story...I've got an original chiller from him for my INFERNO anthology.
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Steve Tem
Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 02:57 pm:   

When I was growing up we thought of Kingsport as our New York--and we had to drive an hour and a half to get there. But it had the closest book store and big newstand
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 04:31 pm:   

Steve, now THAT'S shocking ;-)
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Chris Dodson
Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 10:41 pm:   

For those of us who live in Kingsport, Knoxville is our New York (although New York traffic surely, surely isn't as bad as Knoxville's.) :-)

So where did you grow up, Steve?
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PM
Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:29 pm:   

Gary K. Wolfe reviews in the Sept. Locus. It provided an informative "walkthrough" the book.
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Steve Tem
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 10:31 am:   

I grew up in Jonesville, Va., in Lee County, Va.--my mother and brother are still there. The population was slightly less than 700 when I left--it's slightly less than 1000 now, but a large portion of the businesses have moved out--we do still have the county court house though. A little before I was born (in 1950), it was considered one of the poorest counties in the US (several counties in Mississippi beat us). We didn't get a county library until I was in high school.

A new highway makes the trip to Kingsport a little less than an hour now. I hear a Wal-Mart is going up a few miles outside of town--my mother's pretty excited.

-- Steve
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 01:23 pm:   

PM, I saw that.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, October 21, 2006 - 06:50 pm:   

Quotes from the review on Strange Horizons:



Pick of the crop—and, astonishingly, not printed anywhere else—is Geoff Ryman's exuberant "monkpunk" tale, "The Last Ten Years in the Life of Hero Kai..."

Datlow, Link, and Grant give the best value for money—and a number of excellent entries found nowhere else...

More here:
http://www.strangehorizons.com/reviews/2006/10/horton_hartwell.shtml
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, October 31, 2006 - 07:56 pm:   

Publishers Weekly finally came out with a brief, starred review of the book (they never got the galleys and the review is only on the website --and at amazon) but I'm just relieved they reviewed it:
The excellent 19th volume in this distinguished anthology series offers 40 stories and poems sure to please fantasy and horror connoisseurs. The rest is here:
http://reviews.publishersweekly.com/bd.aspx?isbn=0312356145&pub=pw

Also, Ernest Lilley gave us a rave at:
http://sfrevu.com/php/Review-id.php?id=4597

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