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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 09:45 am:   

Because the last thread was way too long.

Marc, I'm rereading The Playboy Book of Horror and the Supernatural for the same assignment --I started it on the plane home from Sydney and it's just as good as I remember it from over 35 year's ago.
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Mastadge
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 09:48 am:   

What I've read so far in 2005:

"A Problem From Hell": America and the Age of Genocide, by Samantha Power
The Labyrinth, by Catherynne M. Valente
The Player of Games, by Iain M. Banks
Wild Cards, edited by George R. R. Martin
The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Constantine, by John Shirley
Terminator Hunt, by Aaron Allston
Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood, by Marjane Satrapi
Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return, by Marjane Satrapi

What I'm currently reading:

Ravelstein, by Saul Bellow
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chance
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 10:21 am:   

Let's see, just finished:

Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell - found it uneven, but the two sci fi sections were boffo.

Neuromancer by William Gibson - as a friend told me yesterday "I'm sure you would have liked it more if you were a 15 year old boy" But I am glad I have finally read it

Midnight Blue by Pauline Fisk - loved the premise, but the ending did not work for me.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 04:35 pm:   

Chance,
I enjoyed Neuromancer when I read it back in 1984 or whenever it as published--and I was far from a 15 year old boy :-) I love all of Bill's work and think he continues to mature with each new novel.
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chance
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 05:50 pm:   

I enjoyed Neuromancer when I read it back in 1984 or whenever it as published--and I was far from a 15 year old boy :-) I love all of Bill's work and think he continues to mature with each new novel.

I'm planning on picking up Pattern Recognition and a collection of shorts my friend recommended - so if you any other suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

(and welcome back.)
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chance
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 06:07 pm:   

(oh and that wasn't meant to be a criticism of Gibson, but more his way of saying that I had missed my window to like Neuromancer, which I generally agree with - I can definitely think of times in my life when I would have liked it much more, though who knows if it will come round again *g*)

I read The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenger today. Pretty enjoyable - liked it quite a bit more than The Confessions of Max Tivoli, the other "person with time issues" book I read this year.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 08:00 pm:   

Who wrote The Confessions of Max Tivoli?
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chance
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 08:13 pm:   

Sean Greer - it was published in Feb of '04

It has one of my all time favorite story elements - after the big SF earthquake in 1906 (?) he recieves a piece of mail on a paper shirt collar, because the US post was sending everything so people would know their loved ones were ok

not sure why I love that bit so, but I do.

(There is much to like about the book, though I have a rather large beef with the ending, and some of the coicindences in it.)
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Tribeless
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 02:24 am:   

Chance, I suspect you should go with Pattern Recognition: it's quite different, in some respects (pertaining to stronger characterisation), to Gibson's other work.

Also, if you're checking out other cyber punkers, my favourite author of all (although I don't believe his work actually fits all that well in the cyber punk genre per se) is Lewis Shiner. Character driven beautiful story telling. Start with any of his short stories (not the novels, all of which are out of print I think and damned hard to get hold of).

Ellen; are you still wandering about these lonely Isles, or are you back in the bad ol'US of A?
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Christopher Barzak
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 05:18 am:   

I like The Confessions of Max Tivoli better than The Time Traveler's Wife, Chance. But only because I liked the language and structure of Tivoli better than TTWife. Also I felt the author of Tivoli made his paradoxes very smoothly understood and acceptable for the reader, whereas Niffenger made me want to put the book down a lot because her cat's cradle of paradoxes was very visible to me. But I think it was a decent book. I know your beef with Greer's Confessions of Max Tivoli, and understand it, but I just felt that I had a more pleasurable reading experience with him.
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Matthew
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 07:40 am:   

Currently I'm reading The thing at the Door by H.P. Lovecraft.

On the graphic novel front I'm reading Starman: Times Past and Astro City: Local Heroes.
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chance
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 07:42 am:   

Tribeless - thanks for the recommendation.

Chris - I agree with you about the language being much better in Tivoli, and it is probably a better book overall, but then again, I never wanted to shout "Oh get over it already" when I was reading The Timetraveler's Wife. So.

(Plus you know how I am about books I hate the ending of. :-) )
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MarcL
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 10:35 am:   

Matthew, "The Thing on the Doorstep" features my favorite line in all of HPL's writing: "Glub...glub-glub...glub..." And the best use of a pencil. It's pretty much the best tongue-in-cheek horror story ever written.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 11:26 am:   

Tribeless,
Yes, I got back Monday night. Glad to be home in the relative cold (although NYC is having a heatwave for Feb)..

I've never considered Lew Shiner a cyberpunk at all. I think maybe one story of his has any relation whatsoever to the subgenre. He just happened to be in the right (or wrong) place at the right time.
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Tim Akers
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 11:35 am:   

Gibson's tricky. It's easy to read it and see what a 15 year old would like, but there's more to it than that. There are hordes of fans who only like neuromancer for the Molly bits, and that's what you're referring to. There are just as many fans who ignore the trappings and enjoy the substance of the novel.

For me, I read Count Zero before Neuromancer. First time through I was young, and the book was all about Turner. Going back and reading it again, the most interesting stuff to me was Marly and Virek, and the nature of art. There are layers to this stuff. It's easy to look at the ninjas and the godmachines and discount it as adolescent flippery, but there are serious issues at hand in the sprawl series.
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Christopher Rowe
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 01:27 pm:   

There's an interesting discussion about NEUROMANCER going on at the "Instant Fanzine" LiveJournal community right now. I disagree with most of the initial points, but it's interesting. I remember being absolutely blown away by the novel after I'd read an article about it in, I think, SPIN Magazine. Must have been in my mid teens. I did a lot of stalking around night time streets, looking at the reflections of neon signs in rain puddles for awhile after that.

Okay, what I'm reading. I think I've read more genre fiction already in 2005 than I did in all of 2004. Unusually, so far that's pretty much ALL I've read (other than bicycling magazines). In the order I see the pieces noted here in my planner, in January and February I've read:

THE SKY ROAD by Ken MacLeod
"Follow Me Light" by Elizabeth Bear (Sci Fiction)
PALADIN OF SOULS by Lois McMaster Bujold
"Tales of the Chinese Zodiac: Monkey" by Jenn Reese (Strange Horizons)
"The Five Cigars of Abu Ali" by Eric Schaller (Sci Fiction)
DOWN AND OUT IN THE MAGIC KINGDOM by Cory Doctorow
"The Lorelai" by Alex Irvine (F&SF)
"Born Bad" by Arthur Porges (F&SF)
"The Huntswoman" by Merrie Haskell (Strange Horizons)
"The Blemmye's Strategy" by Bruce Sterling (F&SF)
"Keyboard Practice..." by John G. McDaid (F&SF)
"A Man of Light" by Jeff Ford (Sci Fiction)
"The Specialist" by Alison Smith (McSweeney's Online)
"Last Man Standing" by Esther Freisner (F&SF)
"The 120 Hours of Sodom" by Jim Grimsley (Asimov's)
"Angel Kills" by William Sanders (Asimov's)
"The Two Old Women" by Kage Baker (Asimov's)
"Homestay" by Tim Jones (Strange Horizons)
"Parachute Kid" by Edd Vick (Asimov's)
"Dead Men on Vacation" by Leslie What (Asimov's)
"Oxygen Rising" by R. Garcia y Robertson (Asimov's)
"Returning My Sister's Face" by Eugie Foster (Realms of Fantasy)
"All Fish and Dracula" by Liz Williams (RoF)
"Fir Na Tine" by Sandra McDonald (RoF)
"Crab Apple" by Patrick Samphire (RoF)
"The Good Doctor" by Melissa Lee Shaw (RoF)
"Peas and Carrots" by Michael Canfield (RoF)

My favorite novel so far is the MacLeod--but that may just be because I was so relieved to finish reading his "Fall Revolution" sequence.

Five favorite stories of 2005 SO FAR, in the order I read 'em:

"Keyboard Practice..." by John G. McDaid (F&SF)
"A Man of Light" by Jeff Ford (Sci Fiction)
"The Specialist" by Alison Smith (McSweeney's Online) I know this isn't new, but it's new to ME
"Parachute Kid" by Edd Vick (Asimov's)
"Peas and Carrots" by Michael Canfield (RoF)

I've also been dipping in and out of that book length interview Michael Swanwick did with Gardner Dozois.
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chance
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 03:11 pm:   

Thanks for the point, Christopher.

Here's the link for anyone else who may be interested:

http://www.livejournal.com/community/instant_fanzine/95456.html
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Andrew
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 06:17 pm:   

Currently reading:

"Skinner" by Neal Asher
"Strange Cargo" by Jeffrey Barlough
"Son of Avonar" by Berg (had to set this book aside for a while. It's a depressing read.)

Short stories read:
"Clownette" by Terry Dowling 4/5
"Heritage of Stars" by Eric Brown (Constellations) 5/5
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 08:43 pm:   

I totally agree with Tim Akers and Christopher Rowe about Gibson. There are definitely layers to his writing. F'rinstance, Virtual Light's Texas evangelicals don't seem so far-fetched anymore. (And I also paid a lot more attention to neon-in-rain at night after the Sprawl series. lol.) I've read his novels in their publishing order ... though I've yet to read his last three, because I want to savor his work. Chance, hope you enjoy Burning Chrome ... it's some truly awesome work. Sorry to go on and on, but I'm a sucker for Gibson starfucking, what can I say?

As for book readin,' I'm enjoying Gulliver's Travels right now.
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Celia
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2005 - 11:03 pm:   

I loved Parachute Kid when I first read it, and i'm really glad Edd sold it.

I've also been reading a lot more genre fiction than I have in a while--I started the tawny man trilogy, am nearly finished with The Knight (and The Wizard is on my to-read floor biding its time), have the second Apropos book started, and maybe a handful of other notables--oh, the second book of Ivory was the first book I read this year, so maybe it's setting my mind back on the genre track.

Actually, I suspect it's a warning sign that my brain is starting to think about writing again, and wants to fill up on the right stuff.
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JV
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 05:26 am:   

I'm currently reading Murakami's Kafka on the Shore. Lovely and mysterious thus far. I'm also reading Clare Dudman's 98 Reasons for Being, which is slow to start but picking up.

I just read Troll: A Love Story by Johanna Sinisalo--quite disturbing, odd, and dark, and highly recommended (blogged about it at http://www.vanderworld.blogspot.com, too).

JeffV
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mastadge
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 07:48 am:   

Finished the Saul Bellow novel.

I read Hellblazer: Dangerous Habits and Hellblazer: Fear and Loathing TPBs by Garth Ennis, and am now reading King Leopold's Soliloquy by Mark Twain, after which I'll be reading King Leopold's Ghost by Adam Hochschild.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 08:12 am:   

Jeff V.
I quite liked Troll too.
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JV
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 11:14 am:   

Cool--I've come to it very late, I know.

Toni Jermann, who is hooked up to the Finnish genre scene, tells me that Sinisalo has edited a book of Finnish fantasy fiction, which is coming out from Dedalus Books later this year. It covers works from as far back as 1900, I believe, and newer works. Should be interesting.

Between Troll and Leena Krohn's Tainaron, I'm very eager to explore more Finnish fantasy.

JeffV
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SDR
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 11:36 am:   

So, would a story based on Finnish fantasy be Finn-fic? Finn-fan-fic?
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ET
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 03:26 pm:   

I'm mid-way through Asimov's Second Foundation. When I finish it I'll read Prelude to Foundation, which I've never read before. I read the trilogy 20 years ago. Must have impressed me enough since I remembered who the Mule was, and I think I remember where the Second Foundation is. But other than this I remembered very little (and I mis-remembered the little I thought I did), so it manages to surprise me.
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nstanife@tulane.edu
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 03:39 pm:   

Reading Maria Cummins's The Lamplighter. Can't recommend it.
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 07:25 pm:   

Still on Gulliver, but I've added the estimable Mr. Jeffrey Ford's The Fantasy Writer's Assistant and Other Stories to the mix.
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Vylar Kaftan
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 10:06 pm:   

I'm almost through with Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy. Absolutely love them, especially the first book. I have no idea why I waited so long to read these.

--Vy
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Vylar Kaftan
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 09:22 am:   

That would be great, thank you.

Has there been a problem with people self-deleting before? Posting flamebait and then deleting, perhaps? I'm just surprised that people can't delete their own posts when needed.

As for more about what I'm reading, I think the next thing I'll start is "Beggars in Spain" by Nancy Kress.

--Vy
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chance
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 09:26 am:   

Just finished After the Quake by Haruki Murakami and about halfway through The Faery Reel
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Mastadge
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 09:41 am:   

Still reading King Leopold's Ghost, also reading Iain M. Banks' Consider Phlebas
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Kelly Shaw
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 09:56 am:   

Has anyone read Holly Phillip's From the Palace of Repose? I bought the Prime book, which is quite pretty as a book object, because of Matthew Cheney's praise for it on his blog as "lit'ry fantasy" to share with those who don't read fantasy.

So far, after 3 stories in, I'm very disappointed with the collection, and am not responding emotionally to her characters at all, nor is the langauge grabbing me. It seems choppy, intentionally so. Not to mention, the stories feel underwritten, like templates for something grander. Anyone else experience her writing and what'd ya think?
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Mastadge
Posted on Wednesday, February 09, 2005 - 11:01 am:   

Haven't read it. I'm generally very pleased with Prime Books, which has me unusually willing to take chances on their $30 books by authors to whose works I'd not previously read, but I haven't picked up the FROM THE PALACE OF REPOSE.
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Kelly Shaw
Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2005 - 10:55 am:   

I shouldn't have impetuously commented on the Phillip's collection, IN THE PALACE OF REPOSE. Though the first 3 stories didn't awe me, the next three, particularly the haunting, beautiful, strange, enigmatic "Pen & Ink" and "One of the Hungry Ones," blew me away, and now have me reconsidering my opinions of the early stories.

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JV
Posted on Thursday, February 10, 2005 - 04:23 pm:   

It's a first collection by a very interesting author. It's gonna get overhyped. It's gonna have good stories and so-so stories. Such is the way of the world. I'm looking forward to it.

JeffV
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chance
Posted on Friday, February 18, 2005 - 03:19 pm:   

Just finished Troll, A Love Story by Johanna Sinisalo. Such a lonely book.

Currently reading Notes of an Anatomist by Frank Gonzalez Crussi (fascinating essays; I pretend it is research, maybe it really is) and Men and Cartoons: Stories by Jonathan Letham (Good God this book is good!)
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Ray Vukcevich
Posted on Saturday, February 19, 2005 - 01:06 pm:   

I just finished an interesting book for young people called GODLESS by Pete Hautman. It's about a kid who decides worshipping the town's water tower (the Ten-legged One) makes as much sense as anything else.

Ray
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, March 04, 2005 - 12:39 pm:   

I finished reading The Armies of the Night: History as A Novel, The Novel as History, by Norman Mailer. Norman Mailer is indeed an interesting man, and this is, of course, an interesting period of American history. It works as both a novel, as well as a historic account of the march on the pentagon to protest the Vietnam war in 1967. The novel features guys like Robert Lowell, Allan Ginsberg, Noam Chomsky, Jerry Rubin, David Dallinger, and Dwight MacDonald as characters. And of course, Norman Mailer, as the novel's hero and narrator. That's quite the cast already.

If someone wanted to learn about this period in history, I'd give them this book. It's both literature and journalism. It doesn't just give the reader the history behind the events, but also a look into the insights and mind of a legendary literary figure. It's entertaining and informative. This book won both the Pulizter Prize and the National Book Award. It really is a great novel. I think I now have a better sense of the anti-war movement of the time, which exposes all the brutality and blood on America's hands. It's obviously still relevant today, as the war machine continues on.
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MarcL
Posted on Friday, March 04, 2005 - 01:02 pm:   

Thanks for the recommendation. ANCIENT EVENINGS is the only Mailer I've read. It's a great novel, with a worldview (out of Ancient Egypt) that is tantamount to fantasy, so it provides quite a buzz if you like that sort of thing.
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StephenB
Posted on Friday, March 04, 2005 - 01:19 pm:   

Sounds interesting, and different compared to most of his novels. I've only read the one, but that sounds like it'd be a good one, if I pick up another Mailer novel.
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Greg Wachausen
Posted on Saturday, March 05, 2005 - 09:53 am:   

I've finally started reading Stephen King's Dark Tower Series.
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Mastadge
Posted on Saturday, March 05, 2005 - 01:15 pm:   

Since the last update I've read:

The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James
Superman: Unconventional Warfare, by Greg Rucka
Wonder Woman: Bitter Rivals, by Greg Rucka
Ex Machina, Book 1: The Fist Hundred Days, by Brian K. Vaughan
Under the Penitence, by Mary Gentle
The Secret Agent, by Joseph Conrad
Muhammad: A Biography of the Prophet, by Karen Armstrong
Runaways, by Brian K. Vaughan
Supergirl, by Peter David
An All-Consuming Century: Why Commercialism Won in Modern America, by Gary Cross

Currently reading:

The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion, by Ford Madox Ford
Endless Enemies: The Making of an Unfriendly World, by Jonathan Kwitny
The Limits of Enchantment, by Graham Joyce
Gunning for the Buddha, by Michael Jasper
Approaching the Qur'án: The Early Revelations, by Michael Sells
Islam: The Straight Path, by Paul Esposito
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Jonathan
Posted on Saturday, March 05, 2005 - 07:20 pm:   

Just finished reading Brad Denton's LAUGHIN' BOY, which I really enjoyed. Not sure what next. Dan Simmons' OLYMPOS, I think.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, March 07, 2005 - 09:42 am:   

Any relation to Salinger's "The Laughing Man"? (Old favorite...one of the few short stories that ever made me cry.)
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Alan Yee
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 04:57 pm:   

I'm about 3/4 the way through Anne Rice's THE TALE OF THE BODY THIEF. Although many people consider Anne Rice as mainstream, I consider supernatural horror to be a subgenre of SpecFic, or more specifically, a division of dark fantasy.

Does anyone have a similar or different opinion on what some people call "mainstream"?
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 05:09 pm:   

Anne Rice definitely writes dark fantasy and horror (I haven't read a novel by her, she's over rated I think), but she's mainstream in the sense that she's really popular and well known in mainstream society.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 06:35 pm:   

Marc: That's my favorite story in Salingers 9Stories too. Did you know there was a, I think it's victor Hugo, novel of the same name. And I believe that's where Salinger got the idea for the story that the young guy tells the kids.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 08:47 pm:   

I consider Anne Rice a horror writer. (although she has written mainstream novels, like Cry to Heaven)
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, March 08, 2005 - 10:35 pm:   

Jeff, I didn't know that. I need to reread that collection. I love the idea of a pool of stories all inspired by some vaguely misunderstood and half-remembered protostory. Then there's Dan Clowes' unforgettable THE LAFFIN' SPITTIN' MAN from Eightball #1.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 02:59 pm:   

Marc: Wasn't there some famous old movie,maybe Lon Chaney, called The Man Who Laughs, or He Who Laughs? Have to ask Sam.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 03:54 pm:   

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000B1A1J/104-9244002-4905558?v=g lance
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2005 - 11:17 pm:   

That novel by Victor Hugo is _The Man Who Laughs_. It's only available in the US in hardcover from The Paper Tiger (www.papertig.com). It costs about forty bucks. It has a small introductory note by Ayn Rand.

(There's a reference to it in _The Black Dahlia_, James Ellroy's novel about the famous 1940s Los Angeles murder case.)

(Question: _why_ isn't _The Man Who Laughs_ as widely available as Hugo's other novels? What's different about it?)

Jason

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jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 04:54 am:   

Thanks, Ellen.

Jason, good question. I have a copy around here somewhere. I'll see if I can find it and find out.
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StephenB
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 07:44 pm:   

Just finished Toni Morrison's Beloved... Wow, what a powerful novel. It's a ghost story set in slave era America, which is haunting, disturbing, and also beautiful at times. Highly recommended. I've heard the movie starring Oprah sucks; I'm not going to bother seeing it.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 08:07 pm:   

Stephen,
I've always meant to read Beloved, but haven't gotten around to it.

Finishing up YBFH#18 summary so skimming what I haven't yet read.I'm getting there.

Things I read recently that I enjoyed:
Lisa Tuttle's novella My Death--impending menace and strange things happen. Subtle horrific touch.

Gary Greenwood’s Jigsaw Men which starts off as a missing persons PI story and moves into explorations of an alternative reality wherein Dr. Frankenstein succeeded.

The Ice Maiden, a suspenseful novella by Steve Lockley and Paul Lewis about a woman who dreams about the future.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 11:04 pm:   

Recently finished Stephen R. Donaldson's _The Runes of the Earth_. I know Donaldson is an acquired taste, but I enjoyed this book enough to look forward to his next, _Fatal Revenant_.

Also finished _Freedom's Gate_, by Naomi Kritzer. Well done, I thought.

Just started China Mieville's _Perdido Street Station_. Lots of weird stuff in it.
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 09:44 am:   

Just got my copy of William T. Vollmann's EUROPE CENTRAL. It apparently features a shapeshifting Nazi, who bears some resemblance to the villain in YOU BRIGHT AND RISEN ANGELS. I read the first section this morning...I can hardly tell what he's talking about, but I love it.
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 01:27 pm:   

Hello again. I've recently read M. John Harrison's Light and Robert B. Parker's first Spenser book, The Godwulf Manuscript. I am currently on Idoru by some guy named Gibson.

Jason, what do you think of Perdido Street Station so far?
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Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 02:04 pm:   

My latest:

The Eyes of the Overworld - Jack Vance
Talk of Mandrakes - Gene Wolfe
Kafka on the Shore - Haruki Murakami
Luminous - Greg Egan

Currently halway through 'Jonathan Strange and Mr Norell' - Susannah Clarke

Must buy real-soon-now list:

Heart of Whitenesse - Howard Waldrop
Magic For Beginners - Kelly Link
Starwater Strains - Gene Wolfe
Cosmology of the Wider World - Jeffrey Ford
The Girl in the Glass - Jeffrey Ford

...and the next Lucius Shepard, Elizabeth Hand, Michael Bishop, etc! Great time to be reading new F/SF/H!!
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 03:44 pm:   

Just finishing up Some Danger Involved, first novel by Will Thomas. Murder mystery taking place in Victorian London. Fun but turns out not as dark as I expected/hoped.

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Jonathan
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 04:03 pm:   

I've just started Jeffrey Ford's The Girl in the Glass which arrived yesterday, and so far is terrific. I know someone who's read it already, and they'd told me it was funny, but I wasn't ready for just how funny. I'm about half way through and loving it. After all, how could you not love a book that starts with the breaking of wind?
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chance
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 05:13 pm:   

Reading The Princess of Mars by Burroughs - makes me want to write some old school SF. very fun.
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Matthew
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 02:56 pm:   

So is The Girl in the Glass out already?

I've just finished Heroes & Horrors a collection of Fritz Leiber's stories. I had forgotten just how good a writer Leiber was.

Now, I'm reading Camp Concentration which I'm coming to the opinion that it's highly over-rated.

Oh, yeah I'm reading Brothers Karamazov for a second time, at one chapter per day. This is very rewarding.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 07:48 pm:   

The Girl in the Glass isn't out yet. Just got the bound galleys. Jeff probably says in his topic.
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Jonathan
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 11:53 pm:   

I think the book is due in August. I was lucky enough to get Girl in the Glass galleys day before yesterday, and I'm about half way through. It gets better.
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joyce scrivner
Posted on Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - 10:16 am:   

More reading - late to the thread:

Book of Spies (Alan Furst) - I really wish I could write like Graham Greene at the moment.
All Things Bright and Beautiful (James Herriott) - I think I'll send it to my mother when I'm done
Lost in a Good Book (Jasper Fforde) - haven't started it yet
Enemies Enemy (Jan Guillou) - a Swedish style James Bond with politics mixed in
Perfectly Pure and Good (Francis Fyfield) - something quick and easy
Zenith Angel (Bruce Sterling) - some sf at least.

Does it count that I've just ordered three of the Hugo nominees?
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - 10:31 am:   

Laird Barron recommended a cool-ass hardboiled thriller called THE DOMINO PRINCIPLE by Adam Kennedy. It was a bestseller once upon a time, but it's currently out of print until some noir/crime publisher picks it up and reissues it, which ought to happen right away, if there's any justice. It's gritty and tense and wonderfully written. I was only able to find an audiotape version which I listen to during my commute...if I were reading the thing in print, I'd certainly have finished it by now. Feels like a one-sitting read.
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StephenB
Posted on Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - 12:34 pm:   

Is it a recent novel?
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MarcL
Posted on Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - 01:10 pm:   

1975. And it was made into a (by all accounts pretty bad) movie with Gene Hackman.
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JeremyT
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 12:21 pm:   

I'm currently reading a wonderful book called _Fate is the Hunter_ by Ernest K. Gann. It's about the early years of the commercial aviation and the author's life as a pilot. One aspect I really enjoy is that Gann has a remarkable ability to describe people. I recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of commercial aviation, but it's a great read even if you're not.
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 12:32 pm:   

Ernest K. Gann also wrote _Masada_, about the famous rock fortress that was occupied by Jews and besieged by Roman armies during the time of the Roman Empire (which was made into an ABC miniseries in the early 80s, starring Peter Strauss and Peter O'Toole).
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 12:47 pm:   

Didn't that miniseries inspire the hit song, "We Built This Fortress on Rock and Roll"?
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 04:32 pm:   

Wasn't Fate is the Hunter made into a movie with Glenn Ford?
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Jason D. Wittman
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 11:02 pm:   

"Wasn't Fat is the Hunter made into a movie with Glenn Ford?"

No, I think that was Orson Welles. Or maybe Raymond Burr. :-D
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, April 25, 2005 - 11:21 pm:   

Who is currently doing reissues of noir and vintage thrillers? Black Lizard?

Someone needs to be severely pressured to reprint THE DOMINO PRINCIPLE. This book kicks ass. It's not just the conspiracy plot. It's the insights, the characters, the bleak asides. I'm almost through the audiocassette version and it's a continual parade of wry observations, hopeless insights, punctuated with violence. It's a perfect gritty thriller. There are about a million copies available from abebooks for $1, so perhaps that doesn't bode well for a reprint.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 08:14 am:   

Jason,
I fixed it :-)
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John Klima
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 06:05 am:   

Currently--finally!--finishing Fred Pohl's ESCHATON sequence. I read THE OTHER END OF TIME about a decade ago, and then never read the other two books. About 2/3 of the way through THE SIEGE OF ETERNITY with THE FAR SHORE OF TIME on deck. I just finished THE AX by Westlake and was vastly disappointed with the book. Also finishing King's Dark Tower series, about halfway through SONG OF SUSANNAH, which I'm enjoying a lot more than WOLVES OF THE CALLA. Hmmm, what else? I have Neal Barrett's KELWIN set up to be read soon, but I may move onto Robert Sawyer's HOMINDS/HUMANS/etc. series (I read the first book which won the Hugo a few years ago and really enjoyed it).... Obviously I'm working on finishing series that the writer has finished, but I have not.

I'll have to check out Gann when I get the chance. I did start reading Dorchester Publishing's HARD CASE CRIME books, which are good and should be picked up by people who like noir and gritty.

JK
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Mastadge
Posted on Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 06:21 pm:   

I just finished Nabokov's PALE FIRE. Holy crap, what a trip. You laugh and cry your way through the thing, and then at the end -- Nabokov tears it all apart. Awesome book, and I'm sure I didn't pick up the half of it. Definitely have to read it again.
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Andrew Hook
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 03:24 pm:   

PALE FIRE is a stunning piece of work, and quite probably my favourite Nabokov book. I think you've just inspired me to re-read it again too!

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