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Ellen
Posted on Monday, March 03, 2003 - 04:56 pm:   

I was asked on another BB for the TOC of my new, scary ghost story coming out from Tor in October so I thought I'd post it here too:

The Dark
The Trentino Kid Jeffrey Ford
The Ghost of the Clock Tanith Lee
One Thing About the Night Terry Dowling
The Silence of the Falling Stars Mike O'Driscoll
The Dead Ghost Gahan Wilson
Seven Sisters Jack Cady
Subway Joyce Carol Oates
Doctor Hood Stephen Gallagher
An Amicable Divorce Daniel Abraham
Feeling Remains Ramsey Campbell
The Gallows Necklace Sharyn McCrumb
Brownie and Me Charles L. Grant
Velocity Kathe Koja
Limbo Lucius Shepard
The Hortlak Kelly Link
Dancing Men Glen Hirshberg

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Ellen
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 07:16 am:   

We're trying to get the perfect subtitle. My original:

The Dark
New Tales of Ghosts and Hauntings

was rejected as being too literary I suspect.

For now, it's going to be called

The Dark
New Ghost Stories All the Colors of Fear

I think that a bit unwieldy though so if anyone has a better suggestion, throw it in the pot!
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Bob
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 09:43 am:   

The Dark
Stories That Aren't Quite Light, But More of a Kind of Evening Hue of...I Don't Know, Fucia?
Sorry, Ellen. Haven't had any coffee yet....
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Stephen Gallagher
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 09:51 am:   

I wanted to call my collection STORIES TO MAKE YOU SHIT AND CRY FOR MOTHER.

You know, the kind of Hitchcock angle.
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Mike Simanoff
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 11:05 am:   

The Dark
Pulpy Ghost Stories That Are Not Literary in Any Way, Oh No

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Ellen
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 11:59 am:   

None of you are being very helpful <g>

My editor originally wanted to put "scary stories" in the subtitle but I screamed and yelled saying "that sounds like a children's book" and one that's saying "this isn't really scary so don't worry." Luckily, he backed down.
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John Klima
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 12:13 pm:   

THE DARK
Stories that light won't even come near...
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John Klima
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 12:15 pm:   

THE DARK
Stories that light won't even come near...
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John Klima
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 12:18 pm:   

Now why did that show up twice? I was TRYING to be helpful...
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Bob
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 12:36 pm:   

On that whole "too literary" thing? I have a friend who's trying to publish her third book, a collection of short stories. She's receiving the same thing, too literary. I thought literary was a good thing....
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Ellen
Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2003 - 08:46 pm:   

Well, my editor didn't say that but I know that's what he's thinking.
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Stephen Gallagher
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 05:59 am:   

Unfortunately, the term 'literary' has become corrupted... it ought to mean the best kind of writing, but what it conjures is "style for its own sake and a disdain for story".
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 06:02 am:   

Stephen: Can you give an example?

Best,

Jeff
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Ellen
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 07:38 am:   

Steve, I agree.

Jeff, when people who work in the fields of sf/f/h call a story or novel "literary" they usually mean exactly what Steve says. Don't see see that all the time?
Ellen
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Jeff Topham
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 08:36 am:   

I think this is the result of a misplaced populism that's based on the implicit equation that "literary" = "pretentious bullshit." And this is not just something that's coming from the sf/f/h community, although I think it's particularly strong there. The assumption among many readers is that anything other than transparent prose used in the interest of story is both boring and pretentious.

Jeff: one recent example is the dismissal in some quarters (I'll try to track down the specific site I came across, much of which attacks contemporary fiction on the basis of pretension) of Jonathan Safran Foer's outstanding novel "Everything is Illuminated," which is an ambitious, structurally and stylistically complex book. Another example is the popularity of the recent book "A Reader's Manifesto," whose subtitle is "An Attack on the Pretentiousness in American Literary Prose" (or something like that). Delillo gets the axe, as does Cormac McCarthy, Annie Proulx (an author I dont' care for), Paul Auster, and several more.

Of course, there are books that are pretentious and awful, but I'm disheartened by the automatic assumption that "literary" prose is pretentious, that style is a bad thing, that anything that takes a bit of effort to unpack is simply boring.

Best,

JT
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lucius
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 08:59 am:   

I totally agree with Jeff T and Stephen...

I can't recall how many conversations I've had in which I've heard writers like Gene Wolfe referred to as "stylists" and writers whose porse is far more imprecise and unweildy described as "storytellers," suggesting that what Gene does is in some sort of opposition to the idea of telling a story. It seems that what a "literary" writer generally does is, by the specificity of his language, to tell a depthier, more character-driven story than, say, Tom Clancy or Robert Ludlum. This hardly disqualifies them as storytellers.

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Stephen Gallagher
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 10:13 am:   

Well, I'm no collector or pursuer of the bad stuff that has tended to corrupt the word "literary" into a pejorative term, so it would be hard for me to point a finger... but I *can* say what constitutes the literary for me... a maturity of ambition, a clarity of style, and a touch of the underlying eternal. I don't consider TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD to be a highbrow or an "arty" book, but I *do* consider it to be literature.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 01:12 pm:   

Stephen: I see I actually agree with you. I was thinking that you were saying that the definition you put in quotes was your own and not what you are saying the consensus now is. My apologies. Like Lucius and Jeff T, I hear a lot about how stories using literary techniques and characterization in the genre are lacking in plot, but I don't see it -- hence my challange to you to give me an example. Whenever someone makes the claim they never give an example of it, but it has, I agree, become a trueism among those that fear the growth of the genre and its hybridization. Have to read more carefully next time.

Best,


Jeff
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Ellen
Posted on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 - 03:21 pm:   

For me, style enhances all the rest of the _story_. While there are certainly stories and novels I enjoy that aren't stylistically sophisticated to me "style" gives it that extra oomph.
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Stephen Gallagher
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 02:12 am:   

I always think that the highest aim and the hardest thing in all of art is to state the obvious simply.

Took me a while to learn that. At twenty I thought Mozart was a lightweight!
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Jeff Topham
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 09:09 am:   

The oft-repeated criticism of genre fiction, as China Miˇville recently summarized it, is that we're too wrapped up in plot--too concerned with shit happening. From the other side, the current issue of McSweeney's and pieces like "A Reader's Manifesto" point to the fact that there's much dissatisfaction among readers that in "literary" fiction, style often trumps story--there isn't *enough* concern with shit happening.

In my opinion, Conjunctions 39 and McSweeney's 10 make the same observation from different sides of the genre chasm--the best fiction out there mixes style, depth, and complexity with a commitment to story, and it's coming from both sides of the genre divide. Genre simply doesn't matter any more, and there are a lot of people out there writing stories that take this for granted. Ask writers like Kelly Link, or Karen Joy Fowler, or Lucius Shepard or Michael Chabon or Elizabeth Hand or Edward Carey or Jeff VanderMeer or Jeff Ford. Ask them if they sit down and wonder if they're writing "genre fiction" or "mainstream fiction." My suspicion is they'll tell you that they don't give a rat's ass.

This is where I give Ellen enormous credit, both for her work at SCIFICTION and for YBFH, both of which give great coverage to the best of the genre mainstream, but also provide exposure for less generic, more adventurous work. This is why the negative reaction to "What I Didn't See" was nearly imcomprehensible to me. It reflects a preoccupation with a set of expectations that are both restrictive and stultifying.

My apologies for rambling on like this.
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Ellen
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 10:11 am:   

Jeff,
Thanks for your kind words. But just fyi, most of the "mainstream" selections in YBFH are on Terri's side of the volume (fantasy)--while I read all kinds of mags/collections/anthos for the horror half there are fewer dark stories published in mainstream venues than fantasy.

There was really only a loud handful of readers who reacted negatively to Fowler's "What I Didn't See." In fact, the story will almost certainly make the preliminary ballot of the Nebs this year and it was shortlisted for the Tiptree (unable to win even if the committee felt it worthy as Fowler is a founding member). I think it's going to become a classic in its own right.
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Stephen Gallagher
Posted on Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - 11:58 am:   

Regarding story, there's a lovely scene in Sheridan's comedy THE CRITIC that I've always remembered being played wonderfully by Alan Badel... the author's so-called friends are solicitously relaying all his bad notices to him and he's pretending that he finds the whole thing too hilarious for words while you can see in his eyes that he's inching nearer and nearer to going postal...

They save the best till last, saying that it's just a minor carp, hardly worth mentioning at all, just a nitpick on one aspect of the drama, really... the play, they report, "lacks incident".

The longer I have to think about that, the more of-the-essence I find it.
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E Thomas
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2003 - 01:17 pm:   

Darn. I liked the New Tales of Ghosts and Hauntings the best as a subtitle.

Is the "New" required? Would every suggestion need "New" in the title?
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Ellen
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2003 - 02:41 pm:   

Well, it needs to be clear that the stories are all original--hence the "new"

It's going to be:

The Dark
New Ghost stories

and the blurb on the jacket will also have "all the colors of fear" somewhere. I still don't know what the jacket art will be--my editor was hopefully going to talk to the art director today.

The bound mss have gone out to a few people for blurbs and advance peeks.
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E Thomas
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2003 - 07:23 am:   

It looks good. I'll have to keep an eye out for it next fall. :-)
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Jeremy Lassen
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2003 - 11:38 am:   

The Dark,
New Visons of old, dead things...

The Dark,
New Stories from the other side

New Visions of Darkness

Seeing the Invisible:
New stories of dakness

The Dark:
New Stories of things invisible

Seeing In The Dark:
New Visions of Ghosts and Revenants


I like my last suggestion best, and will leave it at that. Whaterver the title is, I can't wait to read it.

-jl
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Ellen
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2003 - 12:16 pm:   

Jeremy,
I like my original best, although it's not to be:

The Dark
New tales of ghosts and hauntings

which is exactly what the book's about. (sigh)
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Stephen Gallagher
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2003 - 02:55 am:   

I know this thread's been quiet for a while, but I thought I'd just chuck in the news that I've got a TV deal to script a pilot based on the characters from Doctor Hood.

And while I'm in plugging mode, can I just mention that I've posted the lineup for my story collection over on my own messageboard?
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Ellen
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2003 - 07:21 am:   

That's wonderful, Steve! Congratulations--I hope it all happens.

And I"ll check your line-up at your topic :-)
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Ellen
Posted on Thursday, May 29, 2003 - 04:49 pm:   

I've just gotten hold of the cover comp for The Dark and I like it very very much. The text is done with an elegant script for the first letter of "Dark" and "edited by" --black type for the title and subtitle. White type for "edited by" and my name. The colors are from white (a full, but hazy moon where "dark" overlays it) to light blue clouds to black. There are a couple of bats on the cover but they're eerie not cute.

Hopefully it'll be up on amazon or somewhere soon.
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Mark PL
Posted on Sunday, June 29, 2003 - 08:04 am:   

It's up on Steve Gallagher's website! In the news section. And it is quite a striking cover. I hope it does well for you, Ellen.
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Ellen
Posted on Sunday, June 29, 2003 - 08:09 am:   

Thanks Mark. I'll go check what it looks like online.

From you mouth to book buyers' ears :-)
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E Thomas
Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2003 - 11:21 am:   

I put it on my Christmas list (my grandma always wants a list during the summer so she can shop early). Hopefully someone will get it for me either for Christmas or for my birthday. :-)
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Ellen
Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2003 - 11:51 am:   

My fingers (and toes) are crossed for you :-)
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ellen
Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 - 09:42 pm:   

I got my first copy today and it looks beautiful. Very elegant. I notice that the error on the inside flap under by bio was only partially corrected. However, it could have been worse. A Wolf at the Door is incorrectly listed as The Wolf at the Door but that's better than what they had The Wind at the Door (sigh)

Contributor copies are being sent directly by Jim Frenkel so contributors should let me know if they don't get a copy soonish.

An excellent review in Chronicle by Don D'Ammassa. Yayyy.
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LeslieWhat
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 08:04 am:   

Look forward to reading this. It's been a while since I read anything that actually scared me. Fiction, I mean.
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ellen
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 08:13 am:   

Leslie,
Just started unpacking and discovered you gave me two copies of your sexy book. I'll bring the unsigned one with me to WFC so you can sell it there <g>
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Michael Kelly
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 02:05 pm:   

And a nice mention of The Dark in the latest ish of Cemetery Dance, as well. Way to go, Ellen. Can't wait to get a copy.

-Mike
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ellen
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 03:51 pm:   

Thanks Mike. I knew about that review since Paula sent it to me awhile ago.
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LeslieWhat
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 04:31 pm:   

Maybe you want a loaner copy? I like to think of it as a novel _and_ a manual :-)

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ellen
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 07:48 pm:   

If you want I could pass it on to a needy person --male or female?
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LeslieWhat
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 09:05 pm:   

I do have lots more--no need to keep track of it for a month.

(I'll get your plate sent out maybe tomorrow when I send Slayer his next check)

L.
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ellen
Posted on Thursday, September 25, 2003 - 09:36 pm:   

OK. I'll pass it on.

And looking forward to it.
Thanks
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GabrielM
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 09:36 pm:   

Hi Ellen. Picked up The Dark today at B&N. Looks nice! While I was there I noticed Stewart O'Nan had a new novel out and it turns out to be a ghost story. Must be the season. I like his work so I picked it up as well.
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ellen
Posted on Sunday, October 05, 2003 - 10:35 pm:   

Hi Gabe. Oooh, it's officially out then. How nice!
Enjoy. And bring it to KGB if you want it signed by me ;-)

Yes, that's why it was a perfect month to have O'Nan reading at KGB. I have the galleys and I heard the book is very good. Luckily, it looks short, too so I'm very much looking forward to reading it.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 05:42 am:   

Gabe & Ellen: What's the title of the O'Nan novel?

Best,

Jeff
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 07:27 am:   

Will do, Ellen.

It's called THE NIGHT COUNTRY, Jeff. Ever read A PRAYER FOR THE DYING by him? Boy, talk about dark...it's like a fictional companion to WISCONSIN DEATH TRIP. Harrowing but a great read.
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ellen
Posted on Monday, October 06, 2003 - 08:42 am:   

Gabe,
Jeff, if you haven't yet read O'Nan's A Prayer for the Dying you should. It's very good. I also read his nonfiction book about the Circus Fire in Stamford, CT I think it was. Also, good.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 06:08 am:   

Gabe & Ellen: I don't think I've ever read anything by O'Nan, but I remember a lot of good reviews for A Prayer For the Dying. I'll put it on the list. I think I'll go for the ghost story first.

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ellen
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 06:27 pm:   

I'll be appearing on Jim Freund's long-running radio show Hour of the Wolf Saturday 5-7 am October 18th. She will be discussing her new ghost story anthology The Dark

The program is broadcast live over WBAI (99.5 FM) in New York City. It CAN be recorded via your VCR....if you just can't get up that early.
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ellen
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 06:28 pm:   

Nuts. You know I mean "I" will be discussing "my" new ...etc. That's what I get for cutting and pasting.
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JeremyT
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 07:41 am:   

What's a VCR? Is that anything like a Tivo? Or a DVD-R? ;)
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ellen
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 08:13 pm:   

You laugh but I don't know what a Tivo is--I've heard them mentioned but haven't a clue!
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JeremyT
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 09:25 am:   

A Tivo is basically what we call a PVR: a personal video recorder. It's like a VCR, except "smart" and it stores the video on a hard drive rather than tape. Tivo downloads the TV line up through your phone or network connection. You tell it what shows from the lineup you want to record, and it records them. On top of that, Tivo learns your preferences (sci-fi or whatnot) and starts automatically recording shows it thinks you will like.

I don't have a Tivo. I just built my own computer to do the same thing, minus the smart recording-- but I hear that feature works pretty good for most people.

Also I'm not sure if it still does, but Tivo used to include a 30 second skip button for flying past commercials. Tivo also allows you to pause live television. You can record one show with Tivo while watching another, etc etc.

I guess there are other PVRs on the market like the Tivo, but I don't know what they are. And no, I don't work for Tivo. I don't even watch that much TV, but what I do watch, I record with my computer PVR.

Anyway, it's all moot to you if you don't watch TV :-)

Anymore, I don't own DVD players and individual components like that. I just have a PC hooked up to my television, through which I watch TV and movies and play games.
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JeremyT
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 09:26 am:   

Er, sorry to be cluttering the topic with technobabble! I forgot which thread I was on.
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 09:49 am:   

Ellen: Last night I read Hirshberg's "Dancing Men." That's a beauty.

Best,

Jeff
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GabrielM
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 11:38 am:   

Hirshberg's turning out to be one of the best of the current crop of ghost story writers. He's certainly giving Terry Lamsley a run for his money. And Lamsley doesn't seem to publish very often.
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ellen
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 05:53 pm:   

Jeff and Gabe,
Yes, I don't think there's a story of Hirshberg's I haven't been impressed by. I love "Dancing Men." The implications of it are chilling.

Btw, I spoke at the Garden State Horror Writers today and Shikhar Dixit, who picked me up had read The Dark and although he said he enjoyed it he said he was disappointed because he didn't feel many of the stories are scary. I've been thinking that perhaps I've erred in describing the book--I wanted all the stories to be disquieting and disturbing--"scary" in a way is too mundane a description of what I was aiming for.

To scare possibly implies a "boo!" and the short sharp shock which is absolutely not what I was aiming for. More the unease that lingers and really creeps you out. For anyone who has read the entire anthology, any opinions?

Oh, and one other thing. The Mike O'Driscoll story is a toughie that I suspect most readers will not completely comprehend but despite that I think it will creep them out. Shikhar said it was one of his favorites and when I explained what was going on he hadn't twigged to it at all. So sometimes dread can be effectively produced even when comprehension is incomplete...interesting, eh?

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ellen
Posted on Saturday, October 11, 2003 - 05:55 pm:   

Btw, I don't know what's happened to Terry Lamsley. He wrote two excellent collections and had a handful of stories that were not in his collections. I published one in Lethal Kisses and I think there was one in Dark Terrors a few years ago that I picked up for YBFH.
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GabrielM
Posted on Sunday, October 12, 2003 - 08:44 am:   

I believe Lamsley has three collections, DARK MATTERS, UNDER THE CRUST and CONFERENCE WITH THE DEAD. I own the first two. The third has become prohibitively expensive (copies in the used market run to a few hundred dollars, Otto Filip had one at WFC last year for $400). There are rumors the Rodens will reprint it, which would be nice.
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Mark Shiney
Posted on Sunday, October 12, 2003 - 09:01 am:   

Ellen, if you didn't already know, Shikhar Dixit wrote stories that appeared in Issues 1 & 3 of Scared Naked Magazine.
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ellen
Posted on Sunday, October 12, 2003 - 04:06 pm:   

Gabe, right. I forgot about the third. I've got all three. You might let the Rodens know that you'd be interested in a reprint of Conference With the Dead.

Thanks for the heads-up Mark.
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Mark
Posted on Sunday, October 12, 2003 - 05:24 pm:   

Ellen, correction: Shikhar Dixit only appears in Issue #3.
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ellen
Posted on Wednesday, October 15, 2003 - 10:07 am:   

My radio appearance on Jim Freund's Hour of the Wolf has been changed to the Saturday 5am the 25th. Which is closer to Halloween and perhaps closer to the starred Publishers Weekly review I hear we're getting.
Wahoo!
Ellen
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ellen
Posted on Monday, October 20, 2003 - 11:45 am:   

Yayyyyy! The starred review in Publishers Weekly is in this week's issue and is glowing.

Jeff Ford's, Lucius Shepard's, Tanith Lee's, Glen Hirshberg's, and Ramsey Campbell's stories are mentioned but the reviewer appears to have enjoyed all of them.

Some prime quotes:

"Datlow has cast her net beyond the horror genre's usual names and pulled in contributors whose stories are the equal of their best work, as well as mystery, fantasy, and SF writers whose tales seem to be the ghost story they've always wanted to tell."

"...this book is sure to be the yardstick by which future ghost fiction will be measured."

Wow!

Sorry for going on about it. But know...it's nice ;-)
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Jonathan Strahan
Posted on Monday, October 20, 2003 - 03:18 pm:   

It's better than nice. Yayyyy for you! It's a terrific book, and deserves the terrific review.

J
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ellen
Posted on Monday, October 20, 2003 - 03:57 pm:   

Thank you Jonathan. By the time I've finished editing an anthology, it's kind of hard to know.
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LeslieWhat
Posted on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 - 09:36 am:   

Congrats, Ellen! (and contributors!)
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ellen
Posted on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 - 10:38 am:   

Thank you Leslie.
Btw, I gave the extra copy of your erotic novel to an interested party--Anna Genoese was over picking up some slush from me last night and she took it gladly <g>.

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LeslieWhat
Posted on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 - 04:14 pm:   

Thank you, Ellen. I wanted to meet Anna at a conference this summer but she was swamped each time I saw her and I barely got to say Hello.
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ellen
Posted on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 - 07:42 pm:   

She's very nice so if you run into her again, grab her and say "hi"!

I just heard from Sharyn November and John Douglas that not only did The Dark get its starred review but it's it's a PW monthly pick for November (as was YBFH #16) for its month.
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ellen
Posted on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 - 09:05 pm:   

For those not sure they want to buy the anthology, you can try out five days of excerpts for free by signing up at:
http://www.dearreader.com/

The excerpts of The Dark begin October 27th.
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ellen
Posted on Thursday, October 23, 2003 - 08:20 pm:   

Here's another review someone passed on to me today. I don't know if you'll be able to access it from this url indefinitely:


http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/reviews.nsf/0/01DDCCDFD5D1F004862 56DC600626CEF?OpenDocument&Headline=There
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ellen
Posted on Sunday, October 26, 2003 - 02:58 pm:   

Unfortunately, reports of typos and at least one more horrendous error are coming to light. There are some minor errors in Tanith Lee's story (wrong italics at the beginning of the story and a couple of typos). But far far worse is that Sharyn McCrumb discovered that a whole ms page of her story was omitted. This latter happened between transmittal of ms (which was correct) to production. I'm extremely upset by this. Weirdly, no reviewer has pointed out the gap this omission leaves in the story. Arghhhhh.
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, October 27, 2003 - 12:29 pm:   

Is it in p 228, where Seeley begins to maneuever toward the other boats but then in the next paragraph shows up with a rescue party?

Actually, I think if you're not paying close attention you can miss it or else chalk it up to a continuity mistake. The omission doesn't seem material to the later developments, or is it?
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ellen
Posted on Monday, October 27, 2003 - 05:06 pm:   

Yup--that's it. It just has him agonizing over not jumping in himself and deciding to run for help. It doesn't have that much impact on the rest of the story except for the guilt--but I suspect the reader can fill in the blanks---you did, right?
Oy!
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GabrielM
Posted on Monday, October 27, 2003 - 07:15 pm:   

I see, that's interesting. I guess it's more significant than I thought, but certainly not essential -- maybe it gives a bit more of a jolt to the ending? I was just thinking how some of the more oblique ghost story writers might have chosen to go that route on purpose -- never making the guilt explicit as a way of forcing the reader to draw the inference on their own. I think that's how I read the story anyway, and perhaps most readers would as well.

I assume you'll correct the paperback edition, but perhaps you can consider posting an errata sheet on the Tor website or on your own that those of us who bought the HC can print out.

See you at WFC, Ellen.
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ellen
Posted on Monday, October 27, 2003 - 07:47 pm:   

Gabe,
It will definitely be corrected in the trade paperback edition.

Hmm. I wonder if there would be a way to somehow create a downloadable or print out-able errata sheet. I'll ask my editor if that's even something we should think of doing.

See you in DC.
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Ellen
Posted on Sunday, December 07, 2003 - 05:00 pm:   

The book has been getting very good reviews and I'm delighted about it. Just in from the San Francisco Chronicle (passed on by Jonathan Carroll):

In The Dark (Tor; 382 pages; $25.95), editor Ellen Datlow delivers 16 ghost stories, each designed to
frighten and unsettle the reader. The contributors include old hands at the horror game, like Ramsey
Campbell and Tanith Lee, as well as such relative newcomers as Kelly Link and Daniel Abraham. No
feel-good fantasies here.

Jack Cady transplants the spirit of Poe's "Fall of the House of Usher" to a small town in the Pacific
Northwest in "Seven Sisters." Kathe Koja explores an otherworldly obsession that propels a performance artist into increasingly self-destructive acts in "Velocity." Kelly Link's "The Hortlak," set on the rim of the Ausible Chasm and involving zombies, a convenience store clerk with a suspicious supply of novelty pajamas and the ghosts of abandoned dogs, surely takes the prize as the volume's most bizarre and funny entry.

The strongest piece in the book may be Lucius Shepard's "Limbo," in which a man running from the mob finds a chance at redemption with a rock singer's abused wife. The story twists and loops through a number of disturbing revelations before arriving at a truly shattering conclusion.

Datlow, former fiction editor of Omni magazine and longtime co-editor of "The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror," remains one of the surest anthologists in the business, with catholic tastes, impeccable discernment and access to the top talent. "The Dark" offers a wide range of specters and approaches to them, from Jamesian subtlety to outright, no-bones-about-it horror shows. It's a good selection to dip into on long, winter nights.


--by Michael Berry


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Mark Gerrits
Posted on Sunday, December 07, 2003 - 05:07 pm:   

Catholic tastes, yowza!

Is there an ETA for the paperback?
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Ellen
Posted on Sunday, December 07, 2003 - 05:22 pm:   

Mark, I'm not really sure, but I assume in about a year.
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Ellen
Posted on Sunday, December 07, 2003 - 06:43 pm:   

Mark, by the way, I'm not sure you realize that "catholic" means varied when lower cased. It's not a religious term (although we can go back to Jeff Ford's topic and talk about his "Catholic Fiction." :-) (don't kill me, Jeff. Just kidding)
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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, December 07, 2003 - 07:19 pm:   

Ellen: So, I am the brunt of your tom-foolery, eh?
Grumble, mumble... And the Catholic fiction thing, no less. The unkindest cut of all.
Hey, we should open up that topic just to talk about the doings in that film about the Irish school for girls movie you saw the other day. Man, the Catholic church is just batting a thousand these days isn't it?

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Thomas R
Posted on Sunday, December 07, 2003 - 08:23 pm:   

I think it was capitalized because it was at the beginning of a sentence.

And yeah the Irish were pretty bad to girls deemed "fallen." There were similar places for Protestant girls, but Catholics there certainly deserve much blame. I've noticed in communities that are 90%+ of one sect they either get blase or overly rigid. Ireland was like 90%+ Catholic and many of the nuns themselves were likely in convents because the family expected it of them.

Now why that stuff would continue into the 90s I'm not sure. Except that Ireland was more backward and Church people there had political influence to a degree that's generally corrupting.
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Thomas R
Posted on Sunday, December 07, 2003 - 08:29 pm:   

D'oh, that was kind of off topic. I think I'd pledged not to discuss the Catholic thing around here anyway. Sorry everyone.
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Mark Gerrits
Posted on Monday, December 08, 2003 - 03:21 am:   

Ah, I did not know that. Thanks for enlightening me, Ellen. That's what happens when one learned most of one's English skills from computer games and subtitled television at a tender age.
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Ellen
Posted on Monday, December 08, 2003 - 08:33 am:   

Jeff, we can certainly bring it up--as Thomas did.
Have seen the movie?

It may be slightly off-topic but if we move it to movies, it'll probably die.
I think what most shocked me is how long the system lasted. Didn't anyone who got away try to do something about it? (eg the one girl in the movie who was rescued).

Mark, I hadn't known when I started to come upon the lc usage. It's not an expression that's all that commonly used these days.
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Ellen
Posted on Saturday, March 27, 2004 - 02:29 pm:   

I forgot to mention that two stories from The Dark--Jeff Ford's "The Trentino Kid" and Glen Hirshberg's "Dancing Men" plus the anthology itself,
have been nominated for the International Horror Guild Award, which will be given out at the World Horror Convention in Phoenix in a few weeks.
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EDatlow
Posted on Friday, August 06, 2004 - 09:02 am:   

I'm cross-posting from the WFC topic.

I'm delighted to announce that The Dark has been nominated for the World Fantasy Award and two stories from it: "The Hortlak" by Kelly Link and "Dancing Men" by Glen Hirshberg have been nominated in the novella category.
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Luke
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 05:17 am:   

Ellen,

Congratulations on your World Fantasy nomination.
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EDatlow
Posted on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 10:33 am:   

THanks Luke. I'm very happy.
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EDatlow
Posted on Monday, August 23, 2004 - 02:02 pm:   

Just got my first two copies of the trade paperback and it looks as fine as the hardcover. I just hope the errors are corrected, although taking a quick look at the McCrumb, I see that one is now correct. (sigh of relief)
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EDatlow
Posted on Thursday, September 09, 2004 - 12:46 pm:   

It's out it's out. Go for it.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Tuesday, October 26, 2004 - 09:02 am:   

I've just been told that the trade paperback is going back for a second printing. Hooray!
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Justin
Posted on Saturday, July 09, 2005 - 01:42 pm:   

hey, just found this spot and the reference to an amazing collection. received a copy from my 2 year old as a gift in April and finally found some time...

had to comment on what a terrific collection it is. i always keep my eyes open for your collections.

i'm wondering if Kathe Koja will ever go back and write another full length geared towards adults. her recent teen fiction has been very good, but i miss the teeth that always bit when reading Kink or Strange Angels.

well thanks again!
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Sunday, July 10, 2005 - 09:35 pm:   

Hi Justin,
Thanks.Glad you've been enjoying the book.

I don't know if Kathe is planning on writing another adult novel soon. Her YA novels are doing well and I think she's happy about that.

I hope to see more stories from her though. Which reminds me, I need to encourage her to write some!
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, September 29, 2006 - 08:30 am:   

It's going into a second printing in trade paperback. Hip hip hooray.
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Kelly Christopher Shaw
Posted on Friday, September 29, 2006 - 08:31 am:   

Great news. I love this book!
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Friday, September 29, 2006 - 12:43 pm:   

I gather it's for Halloween. Hopefully, they'll reprint more every Halloween...keeping fingers crossed.

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