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KJ Bishop
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 09:27 pm:   

"He pronounced the word 'lunch' as a kind of sybaritic benediction, rolling the sound of it around his tongue, releasing it from his clenched teeth in an attenuated hiss: lllunnncchhhhh....."

As a vegetarian who hates cooking, I naturally snapped up 'Orlando Crispe's Flesh-Eater's Cookbook', by David Madsen, as soon as I saw it.

I briefly mentioned this book in a thread on another board, but now that I've got my own space to bounce around in I'm going to yak about it a bit more, because... well, because it's a fun book to yak about.
Orlando Crispe is a connoisseur of human flesh, a sophisticated modern cannibal. The book is a mixture of anecdote, reverie and recipe, at once decadent and a piss-take on decadence. It's tongue-in-cheek and bawdy in a way that reminds me of Aubrey Beardsley's 'Under the Hill', though where Beardsley's prose is lilac, Madsen's is more the purple of raw chopped liver.

Within the segment titled The Soul of Pork, Crispe muses: 'Pork belongs to the world of secondary colours - of muted, autumnal shades and the darker blends of russets, ochres and olives; whereas beef is the offspring of the sun, pork is of the moon - a twilight domain of mystery, imagination, the subtleties of contemplative moods, of the reflection of an image in the mirror, rather than the original which casts it.'
He goes on to write of 'pork painters' (the Symbolists) and 'pork music' (the Adagietto from Mahler's fifth symphony).

Scenes where sex meets cannibalism abound - all done in the best possible taste. Some of these scenes are taken from Madsen's previous book, 'Confessions of a Flesh Eater', which I haven't read - so I'm doing this out of order. And while I don't know a filet mignon from a fillet of fish, the recipes look real. And in the cases where human flesh is used, I dare say some other kind of meat could be substituted. Or not, as you prefer.



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Mike Simanoff
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 09:35 pm:   

Well, you've certainly sold me. I'm on the lookout for Madsen's stuff now and hope to read it and be able to converse about it at some point in the not-too-distant future.
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Cara Hall
Posted on Friday, February 21, 2003 - 08:43 am:   

It's truly wonderful and profane material. I'm surprised to even see it mentioned on a message board, but glad.
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KJ Bishop
Posted on Saturday, February 22, 2003 - 09:47 am:   

Deliciously profane. Like de Sade with all the boring bits cut out (and cooked and eaten).
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Vera Nazarian
Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 - 09:29 am:   

Another vegetarian who hates cooking? All right! *hi-fives!*

:-)

Vera (vegetarian since 1985, technically ovo-lacto, but in practice mostly lacto, and tending toward vegan)
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KJ Bishop
Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 - 11:53 am:   

Right on sister! Cucumber sandwiches rock!

Gotta confess, I'm ovo-fisho. If I can personally relate to the food on my plate, I can't eat it; but I don't relate to, say, scallops - or not enough to stop me from enjoying them fried in batter. On the other hand, I don't relate to mangrove worms at all, but am not inclined to eat them :-)

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Vera Nazarian
Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - 06:09 am:   

I think I was ovo-fisho for 2 years when I first dropped meat, then I kinda dropped the fish and seafood and only left the eggs, and then, about 10 years ago I pretty much stopped buying eggs. I still eat them when as part of some foods such as breads, but in very minute quantities. I also occasionally order breakfast eggs when I am traveling to cons or such, but that is no more frequent that once or twice a year.

The whole vegetarian thing is such a gradual process. It's like weight training, the best way to do it is to build it up. My mantra has always been, one day at a time, meaning that I never say I'll never eat meat again. But -- so far I've managed not to eat any for 18 years, and I really highly doubt that I could eat it now because it would make me sick for a variety of reasons.

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KJ Bishop
Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - 09:36 am:   

For me it isn't a... what would you say... a philosophy of life, or something that I try to do. I'd like to say that it's a conscious moral choice, but for me it's just a 'feel' thing. I tend to see other mammals as people, so I usually feel that I can't eat them. There's no good reason why I shouldn't see fish as people too, but I don't make the emotional connection - so I eat fish.
(I also don't particularly like red meat, whereas I do like fish, so I'm sure that has something to do with it...)
But as for eggs, I like 'em (as long as they're free range - that's a moral choice). Can't eat much dairy - gives me asthma. Milk's right out, it's the worst. Cheese is ok. But I don't know what I'd do without So Good Lite.
I go through stages. I'll have months when I'm almost vegan, and other months when, as Withnail would say, 'I want something's flesh!'

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Vera Nazarian
Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - 11:38 am:   

Sounds like yours is a very fluid and organic way of looking at it. I like it!

Listening to your inner "feel" needs for the kind of nourishment to take in probably requires a very subtle "ear," something all of us might strive for.

Personally I've always hated milk, but I do love cheese products like cheesecake, and I don't have the money to get the pricey vegan versions.

Heck, being vegetarian can be expensive!

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