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matthew rossi
Posted on Sunday, August 15, 2004 - 11:11 am:   

It seems like a place to leave news about myself and what I'm doing, which is cool, but to be honest I don't know what else to do with it. I already post essays all over the freaking place, so it seems odd to post them here, too. I enjoyed the Nexus Folk thread and the discussions of Sword and Sorcery fic a lot, I'd like to see more of that, so I think I'll ask anyone reading this: what do you want to talk about? Feel free to make use of this space for discussions of same, it interests me.
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Ron Dingman
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 01:09 am:   

I'd be happy to see another essay on the Kindred of the Kibbo Kift; "The Dragon and Marduk" is one of my favorite essays (thus far) in your book. It reminded me, in a way, of The Quatermass Conclusion, in that a popular youth movement was really a ruse to glut the maw of some aliens who viewed Earth as a farm and human beings as livestock. Brrr.

I'd also be interested in your looking at possible magickal overtones behind some of the more grisly murders of royal personages throughout history: England's Edward II comes to mind, of course, as does Wales' Davydd ap Gruffydd (David, son of Griffin), who was the first person executed in England for treason, as well as the last Welshman to hold the title "Prince of Wales." Prior to Edward I's (Edward Longshanks) ritualistic slaying and dismemberment of Davydd, it wasn't treasonous to take up arms against the English king. Wild. No matter what you think of Davydd -- and, make no mistake, he was a man who made many questionable choices and was far from easy to like, apparently perversely committed to enacting the part of Bricru Bitter-Tongue -- you'd have to be as big of a rotter as Longshanks himself to think that he deserved to die in the manner that he did. I have at least a nodding acquaintance with the horrors meted out during the various Inquisitions, and the account of his death is still incredibly gruesome. Horribly enough, it's no hyperbole to say that William Wallace got off easy next to Davydd.

On another note, I can't believe that no one's hit upon the idea of writing a Batman story (even an Elseworlds story) portraying the Caped Crusader as a Sufi; I'm thinking in particular of Robert Graves' introduction to Idris Shah's The Sufis, and his explication of the seal of Majorca. I'm sure you'll be able to tell me that this has been done, or at least proposed somewhere, and that the only reason I don't know about is because I was a Marvel Zombie far longer than a DCU Ghast (??).
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 02:21 am:   

Edward II may come up at some point. I'm currently working on the interminable Cathar essay that works in the Plantagenets as bred by the Knights Templar to counter Stephen of Blois, who was an ally to Raymond of Toulouse, whose descendants were the targets of the Albigensian Crusade, and there's a good deal about sexual identity, gender and magic in there, so maybe Eddie B might pop up. I had considered doing Wales from the time of Giraldus Cambrensis, so maybe Davydd will make an appearance.

I don't like Batman enough to do more with the idea than I did in the Springheel Jack essay, unfortunately. I am planning on exploring the Ismali in more detail, though.
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Ron Dingman
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 06:10 am:   

The fact that the Simon de Montfort (IV?) who is so revered in English history because he's credited with "introducing" the idea of representational government thanks to his rebellion against Henry III that was supported by the common people of London was the son of the Simon de Montfort (III?) who was such an infamous and sanguine commander against the Albigensians is pretty interesting too -- as is the fact that he too was undone by a young Longshanks, who apparently ordered the mutilation of his corpse and the display of the pieces on various "city" gates.

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