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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Friday, April 02, 2004 - 07:45 pm:   

Oh, yeah, I did write a book, didn't I?

Any discussion, questions, or whatever about Things That Never Were or the essays I write in general should probably go here. Praise is nice, but discussion of where the essays missed a chance is welcome, ideas for what should have gone in it, or what have you.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 06:46 am:   

I'm about half way through the book right now. It's definitely odd. It often seems like reading the rantings of a madman, but the sort of madman who has kernels of truth at the core of his lunacies. I did really wish I hadn't packed away my mythology books, since The Killer of Gods makes me want to re-read stories about Typhon.

With regards to The Mind War of the Great Khan, even though it only relates to a minor portion of the essay, I was thinking of some possible reasons why Kubilai Khan would be willing to grant power to a merchant who just arrives. Both relate to an interesting book, The Tartar Khan's Englishman, by Gabriel Ronay. The first is that Venetian merchants had been running a spy network for the Mongols under Genghis Khan. Perhaps the Polos had been involved with it.

The second is that Genghis had been quite willing to employ some Europeans in positions of power. The book examines the life of his chief diplomat, who happens to be an excommunicated English priest. I highly recommend the book (and I'd be interested to hear what theories it inspires in you).
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 05:38 am:   

I did know Genghis was interested in Europeans as spies and followers in part because of his mother, but I didn't get to touch upon it like I would have liked to (the dangers of only having a couple of thousand words at a go) but I am definitely interested in looking up the Ronay book. Thanks for mentioning it.

It's definitely the rantings of a madman. Hopefully the new collection is a bit smoother (if it gets published, knock on wood) although I'd hate to lose the mad sensibility of it all. Less ranty, just as crazy, that's the idea.
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Robert devereux
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 04:27 pm:   

I wonder if it would be possible to combine all the theories into one overarching theory. It would have to involve humans in other dimensions, dinosaur people, nanotech, God, Satan and a whole bunch of other stuff.

I did have one question (at least one right now) - you mention Roanoke twice, but I'm not sure what your theories on that are. I'm somewhat familiar with the general mystery of it, but my understanding doesn't link it to contagion/symilarity.

By the way, I seem to have a 2 page difference for both Roanoke entries in the index (it says 38 and 90, but it's really 40 and 92). I seem to get this on anything I check in the index.
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 06:30 pm:   

Hmm. I'll mention it to Chris, but to be honest, unless the book sells a crapton of a lot better than it is right now, there's little chance of a new edition to fix any of the errors, unfortunately.

If there's a Grand Unification Theory of Weirdness, the new collection has my closest statement to it in the essay 'The Cage of Fleshly Existence' which you can read online at the moment. The version I'm hoping to see publication has some minor differences.

Roanoke? Well, depends on if you want a plausible explanation or an apeshit one. Plausibly, they either all died or mostly died and the rest were taken captive. Less plausibly, magical inversion comes to mind (since they were in America to create Arcadia, maybe there was a substrate reaction and they all ended up *in* Arcadia/Gloriana/Avalon/Annwn/the Otherworld) as does the idea that the School of Night actually sacrificed them all deliberately. I also think it's possible that the whole colony time-shifted backwards or forwards, if you consider the Sanderson theory of time slip... maybe the temporal rubber band is still waiting to snap. I've heard Ergot poisoning bandied about, with the colonists tripping off of their gourds and wandering into the woods... could dovetail with native shamans awakening the fungus spirits in an attempt at magical warfare.

I'll think more about it. Roanoke deserves a full-fledged whack-out.
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Chris Roberson
Posted on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 - 10:08 pm:   

Thanks for the tip about the index numbering, Robert. I know exactly why that happened, but hadn't noticed it before you mentioned it. Despite what Matt says, I'm hoping the book goes into *multiple* printings, so we'll be sure to fix it next time out (well, I'm *hoping* that it goes into subsequent printings, anyway).

Matt, I'm interested in your take on Roanake, too. Any theories on what "CROATOAN" meant (and I'd MUCH prefer the apeshit explanation, if you've got one)?
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Robert
Posted on Wednesday, April 14, 2004 - 07:37 am:   

I was thinking of an apeshit theory for Roanoke. The plausible theories aren't as fun.
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Thursday, April 15, 2004 - 12:13 am:   

Okay, give me a little time... I'll probably be doing something with William Marshal on OIN in a few days, and I'll see about Roanoke once that's out of the way.
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Neddal
Posted on Thursday, April 15, 2004 - 07:35 am:   

http://www.libraryreference.org/roanoke.html

I wonder if they could do mtDNA tests?

Matthew - Any thoughts on Oak Island?
http://unmuseum.mus.pa.us/oakisl.htm
http://www.oakislandtreasure.co.uk/
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Thursday, April 15, 2004 - 04:37 pm:   

Okay, so now you bastards have me looking at the Brass Plate that washed up in California in 1936 that purported to be from Drake, claiming California for England in 1579. Also, you have me looking at Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler. How does all this tie into Roanoke? I have no idea, but I think Raliegh and Drake were up to something... possibly a Gentleman's wager of some kind, especially since Raliegh got beheaded during the reign of James I after failing to find El Dorado.

I need to work on the novel first, but when I get a free moment, I'm sure the Knights Templar and Prince Henry Sinclair could have something to say about that money pit, Neddal.
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 01:58 am:   

Okay, you wanted Roanoke, you got Roanoke.

Here it is.

Expect more Templars soon.
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Neddal
Posted on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 04:36 am:   

Nice. Sir Humprhey Gilbert, before his death, claimed St. John's for England. It should also be noted that the next settlement after Jamestown, the Colony of Avalon - now known as Ferryland (about. 80 km. from St. John's) had as one of its backers Sir Francis Bacon.
http://www.heritage.nf.ca/avalon/
http://www.lib.unb.ca/Texts/SCL/bin/get.cgi?directory=vol4_2/&filename=djwa.htm
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 05:48 am:   

You have no idea how hard it was to bring this one in at around 5000 words. Heck, just the Revenge would have taken another few hundred, and man, I wanted to work it in, too. The Sea-Dogs book alone is packed with juicy tidbits.
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 07:59 am:   

Nice...you quote yourself in the essay. That's not something I see very often.

I wonder what it says about me that it makes sense to me, and doesn't seem as far-fetched as some of the stuff in Things That Never Were.
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Matthew Rossi
Posted on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 11:14 am:   

I was wondering if anyone was going to notice that. Good eye.

I honestly don't know what to tell you about the plausibility or lack thereof of that entry, however. To me, it's about as crazy as anything else I've written, it's just spread out over more words.
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Luís
Posted on Sunday, April 10, 2005 - 12:24 pm:   

Very positive review here:

http://www.fantasybookspot.com/?q=node/view/143

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