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des
Posted on Wednesday, November 05, 2003 - 01:02 pm:   

Nemonymous is losing out and will always lose out because many writers assume the outlet is purely anonymous and most writers write to become less anonymous -- a fact which is perhaps paradoxical, because fiction often needs several layers (even fire-walls) between the Narrator and the Characters, between the Narrator and the Author, several selves selflessly and discretely/discreetly intervening a la Proust.

And, with the fiction small press in general, mostly writers buy the outlets.

Nemonymous cannnot list writer's names in advance - to sell the product.

Nemonymous suffers from many things (and one of those things is me), all conspiring against it. Nemonymous wants to change its name and utilise the investment available to make itself into a good standard product that people can accept as a publication obeying certain traditional ground-rules.

I've said these things before in different words. But I need to say them again and again until they're not true. Nemo doubts, therefore it is.

Chasing the Noumenon.

(Thanks for allowing this board sometimes to be a silent sounding-board or safety-valve.)


Des
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des
Posted on Saturday, November 08, 2003 - 01:02 pm:   

Logically, one should not first consider story submissions (as an editor) or first read stories (as a reader of already published stories) - unless the stories' by-lines are initially missing.
Logically, one should not initially read any fiction story (as an editor or as a reader) other than in the most neutral context possible, i.e without artwork or by-line.
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des
Posted on Saturday, November 08, 2003 - 01:40 pm:   

Just noticed those two posts above inadvertently had exactly the same time of day, but three days apart!
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des
Posted on Friday, December 12, 2003 - 07:56 am:   

Significance alert.

In connection with Gustave Flaubert's 'Madame Bovary', there is some fascinating and startling information about anonymity (and authorial/narrative implications) etc here:

http://tinyurl.com/yxrn

Including this:
"the French authorities illegalized anonymity. In August 1789 it was prohibited to publish material that did not carry the name of either the author, the printer, or the bookseller."

This article as a whole seems very significant (and extremely interesting) to one steeped in nemonymity, as I am. Probably the only one!
;-)

As it happens Gustave Flaubert was born on 12 December 1821.

Happy Christmas from the Nemonymous threads.
Des
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des
Posted on Friday, December 19, 2003 - 07:56 am:   

Edith Piaf was born on 19 December and whose famous song has words, often quoted in apt isolation, that are inscrutable and deceptively meaningful: No, I regret Nothing.
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No Me
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 08:20 am:   


I'm nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there's a pair of us don't tell!
They'd banish us, you know.

How dreary to be somebody!
How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!

A poem by Emily Dickinson.

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des
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 09:37 am:   

JRR Tolkien was born on 3 January 1892.

From the web:
"Classic works of literature also comment, both implicitly and explicitly, on the social impact of anonymity. JRR Tolkien's The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy, for example, explore the way in which anonymity can affect people when applied to them. In Tolkien's books, the Ring is a mystical item which, when worn, turns the wearer completely invisible. While it occasionally allows the wearer to escape calamity, it also conjures extreme jealousy and greed, and its power is easily used for committing evil deeds invisibly. As in anonymous systems, a Ring-wearer's anonymity leads to non-accountability and therefore the temptation to take advantage of the powers. Tolkien sends a strong message that the Ring carries evil powers and that it must be destroyed, because the good it could do would not outweigh its potential for evil."


!!
Des

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des
Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 12:34 pm:   

Sir Francis Bacon and Anonymity:
http://www.sirbacon.org/anonymity.htm

He was born on 22 January 1561.
des
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des
Posted on Sunday, February 22, 2004 - 05:37 am:   

Thanks to Luis for this quote:-

This from Neil Gaiman's CORALINE:

"Cats don't have names," [the cat] said.
"No?" said Coraline.
"No," said the cat. "Now, *you* people have names. That's because you don't know who you are. We know who we are, so we don't need names."


Incidentally, I have it on good authority that NG owns at least one copy of Nemonymous.
des
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des
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 07:21 am:   

New interview with Nemonymous editor which covers its inception etc:
http://lostpages.net/dflinterview2004.html
Thanks to Claude and Neddal.
des
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Asunder Damask Aulis
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 09:16 am:   

I'm wondering if NEMONYMOUS is OK out there. Not much feedback recently.

See '5 claims' in third posting and 'ominous imagination' here:
http://www.nemonymous.com

It's like mending walls. (or fences?)

I've recently not finished this sente...
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Carole C
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 01:32 pm:   

Asunder - there used to be a fantastic statue of Francis Bacon in the National Gallery. It was in an upstairs room along with all the Elizabethan paintings, and was so realistic that when I first entered the room and saw it, I thought he (or someone) was really sitting there!
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Asunder
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 02:17 pm:   

Indeed, Carole, Francis Bacon purchased a chicken to investigate the properties of freezing meat, but, during the endeavour of stuffing it with snow, he himself contracted a fatal case of <i>statue<i/> disease. I love his painting of the 'Three Screaming Popes', so his life was far from wasted.
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Carole C
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 02:24 pm:   

Especially the Pope wearing the tutu ...
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Asunder
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 02:28 pm:   

<ice>statutue</ice>
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Asunder
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 02:43 pm:   

From thread above....

*************

By des on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 12:34 pm:

Sir Francis Bacon and Anonymity:
http://www.sirbacon.org/anonymity.htm

He was born on 22 January 1561.
des
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Carole C
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 02:53 pm:   

There used to be a fantastic statue of Sir Francis Bacon in the National Gallery ....
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Carole C
Posted on Saturday, September 25, 2004 - 03:04 pm:   

Sorry, Des, I actually meant SIR Francis Bacon (from that post) - but Francis Bacon the painter was a fun person too! Or maybe 'fun' isn't exactly the right word ...
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des
Posted on Sunday, September 26, 2004 - 12:30 am:   

Sir Francis Bacon - that's right, Carole - he did his version of the 'Three Screaming Popes' anonymously.
Incidentally, on the Sir Francis Bacon link above, there is another link at the bottom of the page to the five reasons why he and nemonymity went hand in glove.

Five is a nameless number,
All it does is cumber.
des
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des
Posted on Sunday, January 09, 2005 - 01:57 am:   

"...But artists to some extent have to reflect the temper of the times. Paintings and sculpture were full of torture and dark brooding: movies seemed static and plotless; music was dominated by nostalgic revivals of earlier forms: architecture was mainly concerned with finding some place to put everybody; literature was damn near incomprehensible...."
Joe Haldeman (`The Forever War' 1974)
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des
Posted on Friday, April 08, 2005 - 10:08 am:   

Why do I get this site high up on the hits:

http://realityministries.com/realityministries/

every time I google the word 'nemonymous'? There is no possible link or connection with Nemonymous as far as I can see.

des
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des
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 01:47 pm:   

If you do a 'find' for nemonymity on this amazing page, you'll find it!

http://www.tumultus.ukgo.com/justlikethat.htm
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des
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 02:49 am:   

Indeed, if you do a 'find' for nemonymity on this amazing page:

http://www.tumultus.ukgo.com/justlikethat.htm

and then follow the word with your eye it becomes a sort of insect chasing the noumenon -- and it'll send you mad!

And someone has pointed out this thread to me:

http://www.ligotti.net/viewtopic.php?p=2446#2446
des
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des
Posted on Friday, February 10, 2006 - 09:15 am:   

Interesting thread (2 pages so far) on fiction as 'religion':
http://tinyurl.com/bropx

des (ever tenacious as a feather!)

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