Harry Mulisch Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration
Night Shade Message Boards » Ford, Jeffrey » Harry Mulisch « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 06:41 am:   

Hey Jeff,

Got a hold of the Discovery of Heaven yet? Just curious what you think of it so far.

Cheers,

Cornelis
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 07:00 am:   

Cornelis: Not yet. I went looking for it in the local stores. I remember having seen tons of copies of it a while back but now there are none. I will have to order it online. No sweat, I'll get to it. Right now ass deep in writing stuff, though. I'll post in this thread when I get it and start reading.
Thanks for asking.

Best,


Jeff
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2003 - 07:24 am:   

Okidokie Jeff,

Not trying to pressurize you or anything like that. Just curious. Good luck on the writing!

Peace,

Cornelis
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 08:28 am:   

Cornelis: I'm about to crack The Discovery of Heaven. I'll let you know how it goes. Happy New Year! I know it took a while. I work slow, like the San Andreas Fault.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Monday, January 05, 2004 - 05:32 am:   

Hehehheh! Great your giving it a go! It's kind of hard to get into, but once you're there... wow! One tip! Don't see the movie!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2004 - 02:57 am:   

How's the Mulisch comin' along Jeff?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 07:15 am:   

Cornelis: If you'll notice, I've been avoiding giving you my Mulisch report. The fact is I've been somewhat mulish about the Mulisch. I started reading it, and it was very good, but then one night I fell asleep on the couch reading, and it dropped out of my hands onto the floor. When my dog came over to wake me up, which he has a habit of doing by putting his nose up to my mouth to see if I am breathing, he knocked it under the couch. I'm not sure what this says, but it is still there. I know it is there and it weighs on my conscience, but I have not made the effort to retrieve it. I will eventually, I'm sure. Until then The Discovery of Heaven will have to wait.

Guiltily Yours

Jeff
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Luís
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 08:44 am:   

If you find it, Jeff, will it be The Rediscovery of Heaven?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 09:01 am:   

Luis: If it takes long enough, it will be The Unearthing of Heaven.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 10:00 am:   

I'm kinda disturbed by this sort of barbarism! ;)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bob Urell
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 12:11 pm:   

I'm kind of disturbed by the dog needing to know how to give Jeff CPR. That and whatever else might be under that couch....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, February 13, 2004 - 12:43 pm:   

Barbarism, ha, you don't know the half of it. As for the dog, he better know CPR. I'm the only one who can reach the mini-burger dog treats in the kitchen cabinet and he knows it. Sometimes I even give him one.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2004 - 12:29 pm:   

:-)

All those freaking awards are probably under the couch to!! Right next to Nooteboom, Van het Reve en Simon Vestdijk! Dutch party under Jeff's couch in the Izzooooooooo!!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, February 14, 2004 - 03:11 pm:   

Cornelis: I've actually read the Nooteboom. In the Dutch Mountains first and then a couple afterward. He was an easy read. Very enjoyable.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Sunday, February 15, 2004 - 01:30 am:   

Nice Jeff! Maybe there's some good in the world after all. ;)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Luís
Posted on Sunday, February 15, 2004 - 01:55 am:   

Things under Jeff's couch:

$6184.51 in lost change
6 half-chewed mini-burger dog snacks
3 corks
2 Incan masks (1 cursed)
1 copy of THE DISCOVERY/REDISCOVERY/UNEARTHING OF HEAVEN
1 copy of THE LAMBSHEAD DISEASE GUIDE (52nd edition, signed by Dr Lambshead)
1 Holy Grail
1 rabbit-shaped squeaky toy
4 oz. of good
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Sunday, February 15, 2004 - 02:04 am:   

You forgot to mention the hidden entrance to the subterranean world of Emit, where everything moves backwards due to a glitch in the space time continuum. But the rest sounds quite right!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Luís
Posted on Sunday, February 15, 2004 - 11:45 am:   

Sounds like my country you're talking about, Cornelis.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2004 - 04:36 am:   

Let's hope they play soccer the same way Luís! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 10:55 pm:   

Jeff, I hear that Mulisch book calling from under the couch! Listen....

D'ya hear it?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, April 01, 2004 - 05:49 am:   

Cornelis: That's not Mulisch. It's the IRS.
I'm going traveling soon, maybe I'll take him along if only for some ballast. The day will come, though, my friend when I will Discover it all. The day will come...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, April 01, 2004 - 06:15 am:   

Don't worry! I'll make sure you will! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2004 - 09:13 pm:   

Cornelis: Just tonight read a wonderful essay by the South African writer, J.M. Coetzee, about Mulisch and
Discovery of Heaven. His description of the book has moved it from under the couch back onto the to read pile. You see, I should have listened to you all along. If you want to hunt down the essay by Coetzee it's in a collection of essays called Stranger Shores. Also good pieces in there about Kafka, Borges, Mafouz, Byatt, Nooteboom, etc.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 07:36 am:   

I know Coetzee... he won a major Dutch award last year for one of his books. He also spends a lot of time in the Netherlands.

Thanks for the tip Jeff, just hope you can bite the damn bullet this time.. 'n read the book! ;)

Cheerio!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 01:36 pm:   

I've never warmed to Coetzee as a novelist, mostly because I find him just too darn bleak, but there's no question he's a superb critical essayist.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 03:06 pm:   

Gabe: I feel the same way about him. Too stiff as a fiction writer, though I did like Foe (not as much as Friday by Tournier, but still pretty good). But these essays are kind of light and fun, which surprised me.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 07:03 pm:   

Haven't read either, but I recognize the titles as worthy Crusoe spinoffs. Funny you mention Tournier, as I just recently picked up a used copy of his short story collection THE FETISHIST. Twisted adult fairy tales, rather Carteresque.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 07:22 pm:   

Gabe: There's a couple of great pieces in that collection. There's a very short Crusoe story in there and a great one about Tom Thumb. His novels, The Ogre, Friday, The Four Wise Men, Gemini, are among some of the best novels I've read ever, especially The Four Wise Men. Hey, scored myself a 20 copy of Flicker by Roszack. Have you read that yet? Jason and Lucius and a few other people were touting it, and I finally got my hands on a copy and it's really really good so far. Thought you would like it. Hope you're doing well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 07:36 pm:   

I've only read Tournier's stories plus his novella about Joan of Arc and Gilles de Rais, but from what you say I'll keep an eye out for his novels.

Yeah, I have a paperback of FLICKER from when it came out in the early nineties. Very cool, erudite "secret-history" stuff applied to the cinema. Plus there's Cathars, from what I can recall. (You can't go wrong with Cathars!)

When I list my favorite loopy conspiracy tomes, up there with Alan Moore's FROM HELL and Tim Powers' DECLARE, I should remember FLICKER. It's a bit of a sleeper, a real cult book, so it tends to slip the mind.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 08:05 pm:   

Gabe: Of course there's Foucault's Pendulum (probably the conspiracy novel to end all conspiracy novels), but can you think of any others beside the ones you listed? What about films?

Right off the bat I was reminded of Crying of Lot 49,
The Name of the Rose -- as a matter of fact, that's the big theme for both Ecco and Pynchon, conspiracies. Another favorite of mine that I read two summers ago was The Moth Man Prophecies (kind of a different kind of conspiracy).

There's a lot of films with that theme.
The President's Analyst
Manchurian Candidate
Parallax View
Jacob's Ladder
etc.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 11:45 pm:   

Speakin of books... What are you havin' your schoolkids read Jeff?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

montmorency
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 04:44 am:   

Sorry for the interruption. I'm not sure if it's appropriate to call them conspiracy novels, but Lempriere's Dictionary by Lawrence Norfolk and An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears are quite good.

Also, if you don't mind paranoia slapstick and Japanese monster movies, Jim Knipfel's Buzzing is hilarious.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 05:19 am:   

Cornelis: I teach Early american Literature, so the selection is somewhat limited. I teach with a guy who was a Science fiction writer, William Jon Watkins. He teaches the first half of the class and I teach the second, so I'm covering from the Puritans on to how ever far I can get. We cover a lot of writers, it's a survey course. Emerson, Melville, Hawthorne, Dickinson, Poe, Douglass, etc. In the creative writing class, I usually just use a couple of stories --
The Return of Imray by Kipling
Wakefield by Hawthorne
The Cafeteria by Singer
Good Man is Hard to Find by O'Connor
The Pedersen Kid by Gass
and there's others I just mix and match.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jeff ford
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 07:30 am:   

Montmorency: I know the Norfolk book, but the other ones are new to me. Thanks. My mind has gone into one of those maddening taxonomical phases where I am making lists.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Cornelis Alderlieste
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 09:00 am:   

Ok Jeff! I wish I could have followed a creative writing class in high school/middle school. I had to cram in 12 German, 12 French, 12 English and 21 Dutch books and I'm not mentioning all the poetry and literature history... And this is two years I'm talkin about! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 09:16 am:   

LEMPRIERE'S DICTIONARY is very good. At a book fair a couple of months ago I actually saw a copy of the original dictionary and was tempted to buy it so I could display it side by side with Norfolk's book, but passed. It was a little pricy and I don't have much use for a mythological dictionary.

As for conspiracy-minded books there's all those "smoke operas", the term coined by Moorcock to describe those "secret urban history" books authored by himself and his pals Iain Sinclair and Peter Ackroyd. HAWKSMOOR, WHITE CHAPPELL/SCARLET TRACINGS, MOTHER LONDON and so on. FROM HELL is in a similar vein.

There also seems to quite a trend toward this sort of thing in popular fiction right now. THE DA VINCI CODE, THE RULE OF FOUR, CODEX, probably some others.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

montmorency
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 05:54 pm:   

Mmm, I've got The Rule of Four and Codex a few days ago. Not a fan of the writing of Da Vinci Code (mere sequence of word puzzles with the linear plot) but I love this type of stories if they are well written.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Friday, May 28, 2004 - 06:52 pm:   

Unfortunately they don't tend to be very well written. I haven't read THE DA VINCI CODE but I did read another by Brown featuring the same character and I thought it was execrable. I have a copy of CODEX and am also curious about THE RULE OF FOUR, mostly because I'm fascinated by the HYPNEROTOMACHIA POLIPHILI (the book on which the plot turns). I bought a copy of the HP last year and still read bits and pieces of it from time to time. It's a wonderfully bizarre old book.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

montmorency
Posted on Sunday, May 30, 2004 - 09:10 am:   

Gabe, your predition was right as always. The Rule of Four was a lukewarm potboiler. The deciphering part was mechanical fix-up, and the campus scenes were something like a student's blog: full of cliches and pointless quips. The only thing I appreciate is the history behind the book. The treatment of "why it was written" is a bit attractive.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

GabrielM
Posted on Sunday, May 30, 2004 - 06:16 pm:   

Bummer. That's unfortunate, not least because I bought the damn book today. I was amused to find that Barnes & Noble was stocking copies of the HYPNEROTOMACHIA as well.... Thames & Hudson must be happy.

And as far as puzzle books are concerned I realized we neglected to mention the books of Arturo Perez Reverte, which are quite fun. His books don't have anything like the gravitas of Norfolk's novel or of Eco, but they're very good, solid popular entertainments. You know, I can see these young Princeton grads, like the author of CODEX or the guys behind RULE OF FOUR, reading Dan Brown and thinking, "This is such shit! We can do sooo much better..." and then turning around and putting out some middling thriller that's not such great shakes either. On the other hand, if they'd started out by reading Perez-Reverte they might have saved themselves (and us) the trouble.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration