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jeff ford
Posted on Friday, March 04, 2005 - 07:56 pm:   

Just picked up a copy of The Nebula Showcase 2005
My story, "The Empire of Ice Cream" appears in it. Jack Dann did a great job on editing this anthology of Nebula nominees and winners. There's fiction by
Eleanor Arnason, Richard Bowes, Cory Doctorow, Harlan Ellison, Carole Emshwiller, Karen Joy Fowler, Neil Gaiman, Charles Harness, Elizabeth Moon, Robert Silverberg, Adam Troy-Castro, and James Van Pelt and non-fiction by Lucius Shepard, Jeff VanderMeer, China Mieville, and more. A really great volume of stuff.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 07:58 pm:   

Article by Sandy Auden at Alien Online about some of my upcoming work.
http://www.thealienonline.net/ao_030.asp?tid=1&scid=2&iid=2796
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, March 28, 2005 - 04:01 pm:   

Land Sakes! Will Wonders Never Cease!!!!
I went to the mailbox today and what was inside? The Journal of Pulse Pounding Narratives #2. Amazing. At least four years in the making, but it looks so good it should have taken four years. Great black and white art work by Thom Davidson. And a wonderful line-up of writers. I'm glad to be part of it. It looks like a million, but you can get it for a five spot. See Young Irvine's MB for details.
Here's the TOC:
"This is Where the Title Goes" by Scott Edelman
"The Exquisite Hairpiece" by Lori Selke
"Informatic Exchange: Null" by Gavin J. Grant
"Apocrypha" by James L. Cambias
"Dubious In Dublin" by Peter Hagelslag
'The Left Hand of Avarice" by Davin Ireland
"The Philistine Detectives" by Jetse de Vries
"Twilight of the Odd" by Jay Lake
"Sunk" by Paul Finch
"Lachrymose and the Golden Egg" by Tim Pratt
"Giant Land" by Jeffrey Ford
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Jetse
Posted on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 - 11:30 am:   

It dropped down my mail box--in The Netherlands--today, as well.

I'm honoured to be sharing a ToC with you (and the others, of course), Jeff.

At the WorldCon in Glasgow we--the JPPN authors and readers--should corner Alex and extort, in full pulp style, him to do another JPPN...

Otherwise we'll buy him a drink .
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Pat Lundrigan
Posted on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 - 01:00 pm:   

Hey Jeff,
I heard that you will be leading a workshop at Brookdale in April. What sort of stuff will you be doing? Can I expect to be a hugo-wining author after a few hours of instruction from you???
If not, I'd settle for shameless hack if that's that's all you can do.
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Thom D.
Posted on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 - 06:04 pm:   

Thanks for the kind words about the JPPN, Jeff, but it only felt like it was four years in the making. Actually, we managed to squeeze it in under the two year mark.

Thanks, also, for the great story.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 - 09:20 pm:   

Jetse: Yeah, glad to be in the book along with you and the others. I haven't had a chance to read more than one story so far. I read Scott Edelman's story, the first in the magazine, and I thought it was freakin ingenious -- flawlessly executed as well. If the rest are as good, JPPN#2 will really be something.

Pat: We start with how to become a Hugo winning author and increasing in difficulty move on to how to become a shameless hack. Hope to see you there.

Thom: Ok, so I exagerated a bit. I'm hoping along with Jetse that you guys will do another. If not that, that you at least will continue finding showcases like this for your art work.
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Saturday, April 02, 2005 - 04:04 pm:   

Hey Jeff ... just wanted to let you know I finished "The Fantasy Writer's Assistant" collection today, and loved it. I rarely like every single story in short story collections (you always expect at least one "filler" story), but your collection is the exception. Every single one was fantastic. I think my favorite is "Exo-Skeleton Town" followed very closely by "The Honeyed Knot" or "At Reparata." But really, I dug them all. You've got a gift for fucking with a reader's expectations, and I commend you for it. :-) Greatly looking forward to your second collection.
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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 06:46 am:   

Mahesh: Thanks for reading the book. I'm glad you enjoyed it. "Exo-Skeleton Town" is also one of my own favorites. The next collection, Empire of Ice Cream, is coming along and should be out in March 06. Hope things are going well for you.
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 09:04 pm:   

Yeah, things are good on this end, thanks. Gabe Mesa mentioned that your novel GIRL IN THE GLASS will be coming out soon; also looking forward to that one.

Another thing I liked about your collection were the end notes, where you managed to let the stories speak for themselves, but still added interesting tidbits. Did you use the same approach for the EMPIRE OF ICE CREAM?
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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, April 03, 2005 - 09:42 pm:   

Mahesh: Yes, we decided to go with the afterwords for the stories again in Empire. They're not there to explain the story but just an attempt to describe some of the events surrounding the creation of the story, or things or people that might have influnced its writing, and also to talk some about the editors and publishers a little. In one instance I get a little carried away, but what the fuck... girl in the Glass will be out August 1st. I already have the proof copies. I'm warning you that it's not a fantasy, though. Thanks for asking.
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Mahesh Raj Mohan
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 09:34 am:   

"I'm warning you that it's not a fantasy, though."

Hey, man, I look forward to your works, regardless of genre. I'm a fan of great writing, period. It must have felt pretty good to work on something long-form that wasn't a fantasy.
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 09:52 am:   

I'm looking forward to that novel too. I haven't read one of your novels yet, but this one sounds like one I'd like to start with and it doesn't have to be fantasy. Depression era, with con men and circus freaks, a murder mystery with a possible ghost involved (but I guess that would make it fantasy in a way), sounds pretty damn good to me. I'm wondering what this historical orginization is?
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StephenB
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 09:55 am:   

Oh, and I'm not even asking you to answer that last question because the mystery will be part of the fun of the read.
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Bruce
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 10:26 am:   

Hi Jeff,

Looking forward to the new novel! I did notice that all copies of your first novel 'Vanitas' have disappeared from abebooks.com and it is difficult to obtain. Would you entertain the possibility of a reprint?

...and I see Locus was having a wee bit of fun with yourself and Lucius Shepard a few days ago. Christopher Paolini editing your stuff? Please.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 12:48 pm:   

StephenB: The Girl in the Glass is quite a bit different than my other books. The writing is much more pared down, less florid, more dialogue. It reads fast like a bat out of hell. I was somewhat influenced in the style by Dashiell Hammett, not by his dark thrillers like Maltese Falcon and Red Harvest, but the lighter, more comic, The Thin Man, and the movies that were made of that book. Here's a hint as to the organization. Its initials are ERO.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 12:53 pm:   

Bruce: Vanitas is hard to come by, I guess. although you might want to contact Space & Time publishers and Gordon Linzner. He might still have a few copies kicking around. Yeah, I'd do a reprint of it, but I'd want to edit it first. The editing left a little to be desired. not their fault, there were just so many fucking mistakes in the manuscript. I remember writing that book on legal pads and typing it on an electric typewriter. Thank Christ for progress.
Hey, that Paolini kid is doing all right for himself. He's only, what? 16? God bless him. He's turned out two door stopper books and kids love them. I just checked out his amazon ranking for the second book -- it's at 60. Maybe he could teach me how to make some fucking money.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 12:56 pm:   

As for VanderMeer's April Fool's essay. Shepard and I are going to take care of him next time we see him. Why I oughta...
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 01:18 pm:   

On Saturday, May 21st, Lucius Shepard, Liz Hand and I will appear on a panel at The Hugo House in Seattle, Washington. It's a day of SF/F discussions, starting at 10:00 AM. Hugo House is putting this on in conjunction with the SF Museum.
I'll try to list below some of the other participants in the day's events but for now here's something about the panel we'll be on.

10:00 - 12:00 NEAR FUTURE NIGHTMARES AND DREAMS
with Lucius Shepard, Elizabeth Hand, and Jeffrey Ford. Leslie Howle moderates.

Let's talk about the near future, our dreams and our fears. In this panel, three prominent science-fiction writers will take the hotseat and explore some of their own visions of what might happen as a result of political and social events of the past half decade. They'll consider the global hallucination that may be gestating or already born. They'll ask whether the American dream is resolving into a sleep-disturbing story on the global stage. Can the new American empire actually the full fruit of Orwell's and Huxley's predictions? What should we be paying attention to now? Corporate mind control, in which "revolution" may have become another marketing concept? Will robots be used as law enforcement and military personnel? Is fear the new religion? Are we at the beginning of a dark age or a golden one? Is history being rewritten or are we at the bottom ebb of one of its massive new cycles?
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 01:20 pm:   

Here's the rest of the Hugo House program:

12:30 - 2:30 TRASHED FUTURE

with James R. Karr, Mary Rosenblum

Science fiction writers have imagined a bewildering variety of eco-catastrophes, including droughts, floods, heat waves and ice ages. How likely is it that Earth is arcing toward deep trouble? How can we tell which human activities are too dangerous to continue? Will we recognize the warning signs before it's too late? Here a scientist and a science fiction author take stock, holding their separate glasses up to our possible environmental futures. Professor James R. Karr, the University of Washington, specializes in environmental indicators -- those small signs we use to make global policy decisions. Karr will walk us through why we use some indicators and not others, why it's a challenge to get people interested in ecological indicators, and why our global life support systems are moving into a new order of things. Author and writing instructor Mary Rosenblum's Drylands stories imagine a future wrecked by global warming. How do her characters deal with a scarcity of fresh water? Do they have a chance to prevent the grim future in which they now must live? What signs do they see that things are getting better. Or worse?



3:00 - 5:00 BEATING BORGS INTO BLOGS

with Eileen Gunn, Blunt Jackson, ZAPP, and Slide Rule

Zines -- magazines and fanzines, the heart of science fiction culture for 75 years -- spawned the now-larger zine culture of music and comix zines. Many of the best-known SF writers -- Ray Bradbury, Harlan Ellison, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and more -- started in fanzines. Today, the SF magazines, successors to the wild-eyed pulps that ruled the earth in the 1920s and '30s, are dying, and their steaming entrails are dragged off by sharp-toothed webzines with no visible means of support. Fanzines have been supplanted by blogs, and many fannish editors and writers have sprouted beaks, wings, and feathers and moved into the new ecological niche. Writer/editor Eileen Gunn of the fiction website Infinite Matrix and blogger/critic/writer Blunt Jackson will battle for primacy with Hugo House's own zine library, ZAPP. The finale will be an exuberant comix-cabaret from the celebrated Slide Rule.



Note: The Slide Rule portion of the session three slide show performances with live sound. One from Simplicissimus (that's Davey Oil on pictures and Tyler Gillies on sound, you saw us at the last auction) called "the Reader: Drops From Outer-Space". Also, Mark Campos will present a peice of his own speculative fiction called "June 1946". In

addition, Stefan Gruber brings "Phil Dick's Mutant Service" a parody-homage to Philip K. Dick set in Seattle, WA 3000. The comic was written by Mark and draw by Stefan for an anthology called "Moxie, My Sweet."

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StephenB
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 01:34 pm:   

Jeff, I'm somewhat familiar with Hammett's writing. Although, I've only read his hard-boiled stuff: Maltese Falcon and The Continental Op stories.

ERO... hmmm
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rick bowes
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 01:43 pm:   

Jeff

The Girl In The Glass may not be fantasy but it flirts with magic throughout. The inexplicable, the halucinatory are always there at the corner of the reader's eye. Maybe that's magic realism. Maybe that's part of pay-off for your playing against type. I do know that the manuscript glided along like one of the custom built cars on a Long Island roadway circa 1932. I didn't want it to end.
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MarcL
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 01:56 pm:   

I did a panel at Hugo House a couple years ago, about writing and games (the usual). It's a cool place. Maybe I'll swing by. We are moving that week, so it might be rough, but if we don't get together I'll be really sad!
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Robert Devereux
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 02:58 pm:   

Shocklines.com still has some copies of Vanitas.
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Bruce Chrumka
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2005 - 03:32 pm:   

M. Devereux,

Thanks! I've got dibs on a copy.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 06:08 am:   

Rick: Interesting that you should mention the Long Island roadways, cause that was one of the things I had a hard time figuring in the book. There are whole highways that no longer exist out there. One being Motor Parkway, which, if I remember correctly from my notes was built at the behest of Vanderbilt so he could drive his many amazing cars to and from his estate. Other road names I had to rely on my old man for as maps were hard to come by for some reason. A road that figures prominently in the story, Bungtown Road, I couldn't tell whether it was an old road or a newer one, but I figured no one in their right mind would call a road Bungtown these days, so I just decided it was an old one.
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jeff ford
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 06:09 am:   

Robert: Thanks for the info on Vanitas. Shocklines generally has interesting stuff in their inventory.
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rick bowes
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 08:25 am:   

Yeah, you set the story in the pre(Robert)Moses era of Long Island. He reorganized and remade the road and rail system. I believe Motor Parkway was still there in the early '60's - a lot of the connecting roads between the big West-East highways were still being built. No Bungtown Road, though. I'd have remembered. No Bungtown either. Maybe it had changed its name to something like Hicksville.
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Scott Edelman
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 06:54 pm:   

Thanks for the kind words about "This Is Where the Title Goes," Jeff.

Now that I think about it, though, I guess I should have published it without a byline. Just a blurb stating, "by Author."
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Lucius
Posted on Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 08:51 pm:   

You know, Jeff, they asked me to write that paragraph describing our panel -- and then they edited it into semi-incoherence...

Fucking editors....

I think I'm gonna talk about my wooden parrot collection. How's about you?
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 04:43 am:   

Scott: My students got a kick out of the story. It was one of those, "I didn't know you could do that" moments.
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jeff ford
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 04:45 am:   

Lucius: I think as it is presented it allows maximum gas release in a myriad of directions; my specialty both literaly and figuratively.
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Scott Edelman
Posted on Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 06:12 pm:   

I'm glad to hear that they liked it. Did you read it aloud, or pass it out for them to discuss after they read it?

From your comment on their response, I gather than this was their first exposure to metafiction?
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jeff ford
Posted on Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 06:27 am:   

Scott: I ended up just reading it. It very well might have been a meta-fictional first. It's a startling example to start with. I was thinking about that story by Borges where this giant map of a country is made with exquisite detail but it is so large that it covers the enitre country.

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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 07:10 am:   

For those interested, John Klima will be publishing the short-short Mr. Stories I posted on the board in his magazine Electric Velocipede. There are a couple others I haven't posted yet, and so I'll hold off on those and also give them to John if he's interested. Readers responses to them had a lot to do with me ultimately placing them in EV, a magazine I've wanted to have something in for a long time, so thanks for your help.
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AliceB
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 08:17 am:   

Jeff, that's great.

It took me a while, but I realized that the stories reminded me of the feel I get from reading Harvey Pikar's American Splendor anthologies: a cummulative sense (though not necessarily understanding) for a time and a place--a world you want to keep learning more about.

Best,
Alice
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 01:30 pm:   

Nice.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 01:54 pm:   

AliceB: I know Pekar's comics and like them, mostly when Crumb does the drawing. As for the affect you say it has, that sounds good to me. Thanks.

Ellen: Thanks.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, April 18, 2005 - 08:56 pm:   

And I've just bought Jeff's newest story for SCIFICTION, "The Scribble Mind."
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MarcL
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 09:55 am:   

Oresome!
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John Klima
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 10:02 am:   

I'm very proud and excited to finally have something from Mr. Ford to publish in Electric Velocipede. Lord knows that I've been after him for years!

JK
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 09:44 am:   

A quick note on a few things upcoming and already out for those who might be interested:

"The Scribble Mind" a new novelette, will soon be appearing at SciFiction, on, I believe the week of May 25th.

"Boatman's Holiday" a story that originally appeared in the anthology, The Book of Voices, is being reprinted in F&SF some time this fall. Either in the September or October issue.

I mentioned this one before, but my vignette, "Holt" will appear in the new issue of Flytrap, which I believe will appear at Wiscon, coming up soon.

An older story, "Exo-Skeleton Town," which origianlly appeared in Black Gate, has been reprinted in the French magazine, Galaxies. This latest issue also has stories by Lucius Shepard and Paul DiFillipo -- in fact they have done an entire section, what they call a dossier on Paul's work.

Just recently turned in an introduction for Rick Bowes' Streetcar Dreams and other Midnight Fancies, a really great story collection due any time now from PS Publishers. And don't forget Rick's From the Files of the Time Rangers, which will be out from Golden Gryphon in the next couple months.

This coming Saturday, the 21st of May, I'll be doing a panel at The Hugo House in Seattle along with Lucius Shepard and Liz Hand. I think the thing starts at 10:00 AM. I've posted this before in more detail back a ways on this thread.
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 10:48 am:   

One other thing I forgot to mention -- I just this morning received a copy of the new FICTION magazine, a French publication. This is a beautifully produced trade paperback sized book with high quality paper and black and white illustrations. This first issue has stories by Ursula Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, Terry Bisson, etc. and also the work of authors from France and other countries. My story, "Creation" is in it. This magazine/anthology is being published, I believe, in collaboration with The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. I think it will be publishing primarily French and US writers, but also intends to publish writers from all points on the globe.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 06:22 pm:   

Jeff, I'm assuming FICTION is in French, yes?
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 08:11 pm:   

Ellen: You know, I didn't notice it, but the title FICTION is actually in English. I have to ask Gordon why that is. It's really a great looking book, though.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 08:41 pm:   

No no. I mean the book itself.
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 09:38 pm:   

Ellen: I get it. Yeah, it's all translated into French.
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Laurent Queyssi
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 08:51 am:   

Well, Fiction means fiction in french, so the title is actually in french...
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andre-francois ruaud
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 09:14 am:   

Fiction is the new French "foreign edition" of F&SF, actually. And thus, all in French.
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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 09:28 am:   

Laurent & Andre-Francois: Sorry for being such an ignoramus. I didn't know Fiction was the same in both languages. Thanks for dropping by to post.
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andre-francois ruaud
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 09:58 am:   

We're very proud to be able to publish you a bit, really! Doing this foreign edition of F&SF is simply great, a real feast of talents. "Fiction" was the title of the first French edition of F&SF (from 1953 to 1989!), which explains why we choose to re-use this particular term for our relaunch. Another of your stories, "The Honeyed Knot", is already in translation for us.
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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 03:00 pm:   

Andre-Francois:
Glad you picked up "The Honeyed Knot." It'll be great to be part of another issue. Best of luck with the magazine.

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andre-francois ruaud
Posted on Monday, May 16, 2005 - 02:20 am:   

I hope to publish it in our volume two, in September. We'll publish Fiction twice a year, in March and september.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, May 23, 2005 - 05:34 pm:   

Two new things in the offing --

I'm just putting the finishing touches on an interview I conducted with Paul Witcover for Fantastic Metropolis. Paul talks about his first novel, Waking Beauty, his childhood, his influences, his book on Zora Neal Hurston, his comic book work, and, of course, his new novel, Tumbling After. Look for it soon at FM.

Also, just got word yesterday that The Portrait of Mrs. Charbuque will be published in Japanese translation by Random House Kodansha in Tokyo.
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Mastadge
Posted on Monday, May 23, 2005 - 07:40 pm:   

Great news about the translation, but I'm more excited about the interview!
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jeff ford
Posted on Saturday, June 11, 2005 - 06:16 pm:   

Found out from a friend in Japan today that the translation of The Physiognomy has been nominated for the 2005 Seiun Award. Over there the book is called The White Fruit. Here are the other writers nominated in the novel translation category. Sorry I don't know what works they are up for or what's up in other categories. Greg Egan, Connie Willis,
Christopher Priest, Gene Wolfe, Ian Watson, and Robert Reed.
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Saturday, June 11, 2005 - 08:40 pm:   

Congratulations, Jeff.
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ben peek
Posted on Saturday, June 11, 2005 - 10:43 pm:   

the white fruit is a neat title.
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jeff ford
Posted on Sunday, June 12, 2005 - 07:47 am:   

Thanks, Ellen.

Ben: It's interesting that of all the things in the book, The White Fruit was chosen as the title. It works ok, though. My favorite aspect of the translation is that one of the translators names, translated into English, is Mountain Tail Child. Now that's a cool name. From what I understand, I think this person is a woman and also one of Japan's leading Fantasy writers.
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ben peek
Posted on Sunday, June 12, 2005 - 08:30 pm:   

with a name like mountain tail child, could she be anything but a fantasy writer? :-)
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Minz
Posted on Monday, June 13, 2005 - 07:50 am:   

Shouldn't that be Mountain Tale Child? Or maybe Childe Tail to the Dark Mountain Came?

Regardless, or irregardless even, Congrats on the well deserved Seiun nomination. Hope you make it up on the stage in Glasgow, though that's a heckuva lineup you're up against, irregardless of which particular novels from each individual author. Good luck!
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, June 13, 2005 - 01:12 pm:   

Minz: Thanks. I know, the other nominees are impossibly awesome and I don't stand a chance of winning, but I'm still happy to know a lot of readers in Japan liked the book.
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, June 13, 2005 - 06:10 pm:   

A recent interview I did with Jason East at Fantasybookspot
http://www.fantasybookspot.com/?q=node/view/180
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jeff ford
Posted on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 05:13 am:   

The interview I conducted with Paul Witcover is now up on Fantastic Metropolis. Paul talks about everything from his childhood, to his first novel, Waking Beauty, to his comic book work, to his book on Zora Neal Hurston, to his terrific new novel, Tumbling After. Check it out when you get a chance.
http://www.fantasticmetropolis.com/i/witcover/
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Ellen Datlow
Posted on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 05:13 pm:   

Good stuff, Jeff. (and Paul :-) )

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